35 Burst results for "Town hall"

Cuomo will allow New York schools to reopen

Reveal

00:53 sec | 4 d ago

Cuomo will allow New York schools to reopen

"Cuomo says the Koven 19 infection rate is currently low enough to open schools across the state. This fall. Jessica Gould of member Station W. N. Y. C reports he's leaving how to re open toe. Local district Governor Andrew Cuomo likes to say New York went from worst to first in fighting the Corona virus. But he says every plan still need sign off from the state's health and Education Department's local officials need to post their reopening proposals and whole town halls for parents and teachers. He wants them to detail ways to make remote learning better for students of all economic backgrounds. New York City has announced a hybrid plan that would bring students into school a couple days a week with remote learning the other days. Mayor Bill de Blasio says he's keeping a close eye on local infections and may wait until right before the start of the school year in September to decide whether in person learning is safe for NPR

Governor Andrew Cuomo New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio Jessica Gould Education Department NPR W. N. Y. C
Cuomo will allow New York schools to reopen

All Things Considered

00:52 sec | 5 d ago

Cuomo will allow New York schools to reopen

"Governor Andrew Cuomo says the cove in 19 infection rate is currently low enough to open schools in that state. This fall. Fiscal Gould of member station WNYC See reports he's leaving how to reopen them Toe local district's Governor Andrew Cuomo likes to say New York went from worst to first in fighting the Corona virus. But he says every plan still need sign off from the state's health and education departments. Local officials need to post their reopening proposals and hold town halls for parents and teachers. He wants them to detail ways to make remote learning better for students of all economic backgrounds. New York City has announced a hybrid plan that would bring students into school a couple days a week with remote learning the other days. Mayor Bill de Blasio says he's keeping a close eye on local infections and may wait until right before the start of the school year in September to decide whether in person learning is safe for

Governor Andrew Cuomo New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio Wnyc TOE
Washington DC - Fairfax County school superintendent says school system has not focused enough on equity

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 6 d ago

Washington DC - Fairfax County school superintendent says school system has not focused enough on equity

"Superintendent of Fairfax County schools, is pledging major changes to address equity issues in this coming school year. At Bray Band. Another school leaders were grill that a Fairfax County n double a C P Facebook Live Town hall and see the education chair. Sujatha Hampton says Not enough progress has been shown in hiring teachers of color part of the organization system Heart Is clearly against hiring teachers. Ray then responded. We're not goingto have schools that continue not to hire teachers of color as many as 26 Fairfax County schools do not have any teachers of color. Kyle Cooper. W T. O P. News of

Fairfax County Bray Band Kyle Cooper Superintendent Sujatha Hampton RAY W T. O
Dallas County Reports 641 New Cases, 31 Deaths

Clark Howard

01:43 min | Last week

Dallas County Reports 641 New Cases, 31 Deaths

"One Congressman, Heldon online online town town hall, hall, so so parents parents could could ask ask questions questions about about that. that. Charlie's Charlie's Allen's Allen's Kaya Kaya joins joins us us live live with with some some of of those those answers, answers, Alan Alan Has Has Scott Scott CONGRESSMAN CONGRESSMAN COLUMN COLUMN All All Red says schools or having to change plans quickly, and he knows parents want to be here from their district's community. Get our community spread down and under control to protect our teachers, protect our kid, check the staff members to make all of our schools. Dallas sized has postponed the start of their school year till after Labor Day. Also in already is district or Highland Park, Garland wildly and Richardson. They're all going to start online later this month. Parents and Richardson eyes do you need to make a decision by the end of this week on whether they will stay online or send their kids back after Labor Day? Deputy Superintendent Tabatha Brandon says Richardson has taken action to limit contact among students who do come back in person. Whether an elementary kid tear our music. The playground were just at all time limiting how are interacting and that goes in the secondary level. We completely changed our belt schedules to ensure their left transitions and our secondary campus. Dallas County reported 641 new cases of Govan 19 yesterday. That's their highest total since the last day of July back last week. Tarrant County confirmed 805 new cases. That's an increase from their 70 average of 550. But Tarrant County says that increase may be the result of a lag in reporting by the state Reporting live, Alan Skyla News, Radio two Navy k Your old Thanks, Alan, 605 now, and Your News continues for Crane and Willie Estate planning.

Alan Alan Richardson Tarrant County Scott Scott Congressman Congressman Kaya Kaya Deputy Superintendent Tabatha Charlie Dallas County Alan Skyla Allen Highland Park Heldon Dallas Willie Estate Crane
Hingham Firefighters Union Refusing To Take Down ‘Thin Blue Line’ Flags near Boston

Nightside with Dan Rea

06:55 min | 2 weeks ago

Hingham Firefighters Union Refusing To Take Down ‘Thin Blue Line’ Flags near Boston

"We're going to go to Hingham, Massachusetts. If you live on the South shore if you live on the South Shore. Um You have much to talk about tonight. Basically The South Shore, the town of Hingham. Is probably one of the nicest towns on the South Shore. It is certainly I think, one of the wealthiest towns of the South Shore Apparently a single complaint. By one citizen if I am to believe the Patriot Ledger newspaper, which I do believe Complained about what's called a thin blue line flag won't atop fire trucks in him. Now, for those of you who do not know what the thin blue line flag is. It's a flag that takes the American flag. Aah! And basically Um The red white blue are hushed or eliminated so flag of a black and white with a thin blue line, which obviously is intended to pay Tribute, Tio our first responders. And Was specifically purchased. By the Hingham Fire Department. Ah, too. Show support for the police department in Weymouth that lost Sergeant Michael Chestnut back a couple of years ago in again one of those Police shootings that you would not expect to have occurred in a community like Wayne that there was an early Sunday morning shooting in which The officer. What was approach someone who was acting pretty badly and in an effort to calm the guy down as I understand it, the The individual picked up Iraq, fired it at the head of officer Chestnut, standing him and then took out. The officer's gun himself and killed officer South Sergeant Michael Chestnut. There was also a woman in a nearby porch was simply sitting there, reading her Sunday morning newspaper who was also killed and I don't know if She was killed in a random shot or if she was killed intentionally that will all come out and quit anyway in nearby Hingham, neighboring Hingham. Um, the authorities there. I guess the select people. As well as the fire chief and the police chief told the Fire Department that they had to remove the thin blue line. The flags from the fire trucks now. The these, um flags, um are black and white versions of the American flag with a single blue line at the center. Ah, I have no idea where that is standing tonight in Hingham, But it seems to me that it was a mistake. Now, apparently. The individual who called with a complaint with one single citizen felt that the blue the back the blue themes and the Again and hear the thin blue line flag somehow. Um Offended the Black lives matter movement. Now it seems to me that it is entirely possible that someone could be sympathetic to the peaceful aspirations of black lives matter. Which which would be to have everyone treated. Equally and equally fairly by police officers and never again have what happened either to George Floyd in Minneapolis or Briana Taylor in in Kentucky. Happened again again in a big country like this. Will there be another incident? I'm sure sadly, there will be But The two year anniversary is, according the Patriot Ledger of Sergeant Chestnuts. July 15th 2018 Death an anonymous person Placed about 500 small, thin blue line flags on brain tree's town common near town hall. The flag spelled out the words spelled out the words. Thank you. But after talking with the mayor, I didn't even know that thief hanging ahead of me. And I thought, um, I thought him was a town. But that's what's reported in the In the ledger of the flags were removed from town hall to the Braintree Police Department property where there is a memorial for fallen officers. This is upsetting to me. Ah, I hope it is upsetting to you and I hope that you will Call and and express yourself. Um, this this is wrong because you now Not you cannot. You can express support for black lives matter. But if you would you express support for something other, some other cause. Again a back the blue cause somehow your Expression of supporting the police. Can be eradicated again. This is the cancel culture that we're dealing with in this country right now. Can't according to the ledger, one person, one person made a phone call. And the the officials in Hingham rolled over Now, If that story is changing, we did reach out to him to Hingham officials today. And of course, we had no one who would have the courage to come on and explained the rationale, but From the Um, from what we have Red Ah, the town statement was the town of Hingham has a long standing practice of Onley displaying official flags of the nation state town in military. As result when we were made aware of a banner being displayed on a town asset, I eat a fire truck that was inconsistent with this practice. We ask to be removed. Pingan firefighters Local 23 98 took to Facebook to make clear that displaying the flag of the on the anniversary of Justin's death was to support the law enforcement officers who put their lives on the line every day. And wasn't no time meant to be a political statement, while the members of local 23 98 or not pleased with the decision to remove the flags will continue our unwavering support for all the men and women of law enforcement. Who bravely protect their communities Day in and day out, So

Hingham Hingham Fire Department Officer South Sergeant Michael Chestnu South Shore Patriot Ledger Braintree Police Department Massachusetts Sergeant Chestnuts Facebook Weymouth George Floyd Iraq Minneapolis Onley
Israeli drone crashes in Lebanon amid tensions with Syria

Purity Products

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

Israeli drone crashes in Lebanon amid tensions with Syria

"Are rising between Israel and some of her neighbors. The media lines Lawrence Rifkin has more Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has warned both Syria and Lebanon that Israel will hold each accountable for any attack on the country emanating from their territory. He was referring to a spike in tensions along both borders. On Friday, shrapnel hit a car and a building in the Israeli held Golan Heights. Apparently a Syrian air defenses attempted to down and Israeli drone in the Lebanon The Shiite Hezbollah militia has been hinting it will seek revenge after one of its fighters died last week in an air strike against the target in Syria, Hezbollah and others have blamed the attack on Israel. The Israeli military moved an infantry battalion to the Lebanese border in anticipation of trouble. I'm Lawrence Rifkin Town Hall News Jerusalem

Israel Lawrence Rifkin Town Hall News Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Lawrence Rifkin Hezbollah Syria Lebanon Golan Heights
Trump campaign backs off in-person events as coronavirus cases pick up

WBZ Morning News

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

Trump campaign backs off in-person events as coronavirus cases pick up

"It is normal presidential campaign politics are more or less at a standstill. President Trump scrapped the scheduled rally a week ago and now goes virtual until the covet is gone. It's a little bit tough, and frankly, some of the Democrat governors make it impossible to do a rally anyway. They're saying you can't do political rallies, and that's nice, but frankly, it's it's fine. So we're doing the tele town halls or Tele rallies. He did two of them on Saturday streamed on Facebook. Tom Foti. CBS NEWS

Tom Foti Donald Trump Facebook President Trump CBS
Washington DC holds ‘Re-imagining Policing’ town hall aimed at bridging gap between officers and residents

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 3 weeks ago

Washington DC holds ‘Re-imagining Policing’ town hall aimed at bridging gap between officers and residents

"Neighborhood commissions commissions in in the the district district held held a a town town hall hall discussion. discussion. Today Today to to reimagine reimagine policing policing in in the the city city and and possible possible solutions solutions to to bridge bridge the the gaps. gaps. We We have have never never seen seen a moment quite like this Douglas Sloan with and he was among the Panelists at today's Town hall discussion as local leader stressed the need for reform within the district's police department. So we have to take the opportunity now to implement riel. Fundamental concrete change when it comes to specific ALS within the district Councilman Charles Allen says a major need a civilian led entity to deal with complaints involving police from the community. The systems that get built have to be founded on credibility and trust, and that's part of the challenge we're trying to meet is how do we find these different elements to create a trusted credible system? Melissa how w. T o

Town Hall Bridge Bridge Douglas Sloan Councilman Charles Allen Melissa
New Pentagon policy effectively bans Confederate symbols

Politics and Public Policy Today

03:54 min | 3 weeks ago

New Pentagon policy effectively bans Confederate symbols

"A new Pentagon policy that, as CNN describes it, will act as a de facto ban on the display of the Confederate flag. It deals with the display and depiction of flags on military installations. Well, the policy does not specifically mentioned the Confederate battle emblem. That emblem is not among the flags allowed to be displayed. The Pentagon held a virtual town hall today. Defense Secretary Mark Esper was there. This was the final question. You're going to hear the answer from the chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Mark Milley. Today's last video submission comes from operations specialist First Class Pierre, who is stationed in Italy. Let's roll it with all the recent events that's been going on back in the states at tax myself. A simple question. What does my chain of command seeing me when I take off this uniform? Unfortunately, I don't have the answer to that. But what I am is unapologetically black with that. Comes a great responsibility to face challenges and adversities of preconceived notions and prejudices of how I'm supposed to act or what I'm supposed to do that to say racism is alive and well around the world and not just back in the states with my experience in the Navy, Although I've been a great one, I ran into some people. The only judgment by the color of my skin and not about the quality of my work As a navy. I thought that we should continue to treat people fairly based off their character. Into some of their actions. That's how will continue to be the world's greatest navy. I'll turn this one over to the chairman of Joint Chiefs to comment on the West One Piers message. For special spirit. Thanks. Those are powerful words. You asked What you changed, man would think when you take that uniform off. I can't speak for every officer and there, But you and I, You're a sailor 24 7 when they were in that uniform or not. I'm a soldier 24 7 all the time every time no matter what on DH and that you are unapologetically black. That's a good thing You should never deny. I who you are no matter who you are, No matter how you identify on, you should be proud of that. Be proud of being a sailor would be proud of being an African American on all that's good and remember, And this is for everyone. Not just here but again, going back to the oath going back to the idea the idea that is America the idea that every one of us is free and equal. Remember the words of Lincoln that this is a nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men And I would add, all women are created equal period full stop on. That's what we're about. That's what that constitutes. That's what that idea is about, and we are all free and equal. It doesn't matter where we're from. It doesn't matter the color of skin. We're going to be judged by the content of our character, not the color of his skin, like Martin Luther King said. That is what this country's about. That's the essence of America, and that is what we in uniform are dedicated to protect and defend. That's what the Constitution is all about. And we are willing to. Die for those principles, those values and again if we're willing to die for those principles, we ought to be willing to live for him every single day. So thanks Special spear for what you do and what you do every single day with you wearing that uniform or not, thanks for what you're doing. You are General Mark Milley, chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, a virtual town hall held by the Pentagon Defense Secretary Mark Esper also taking part and Esper is memo today that effectively banned the Confederate flag on military bases. Did not address the issue of bases named after Confederate generals, a couple of other headlines today. The Pentagon

Pentagon Mark Esper Joint Chiefs Mark Milley Joint Chiefs Of Staff Navy America Martin Luther King CNN Pentagon Defense Operations Specialist Chairman Italy Pierre Secretary Officer Lincoln
New Pentagon policy effectively bans Confederate symbols at military sites

PBS NewsHour

00:54 sec | 3 weeks ago

New Pentagon policy effectively bans Confederate symbols at military sites

"Effectively bans the Confederate flag from military installations. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said in a memo that on Ly, the American flag will be displayed along with state territorial and military banners. At a virtual town hall, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Mark Millie, said the oath that everyone makes in the military is paramount. Going back to the oath going back to the idea the idea that is America the idea that every one of us is free and equal. Remember the words of Lincoln that this is a nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men and I would add. All women are created equal period. Full stop on. That's what we're about. The president has defended the right to display the Confederate flag. In view of that the Pentagon policy never directly mentions the flag or uses the word ban, though it does have the same effect. The federal government has carried out

Mark Esper General Mark Millie Chairman Of The Joint Chiefs O LY Federal Government Pentagon Lincoln America President Trump
Freedom for Black Lives rally held in Goodale Park

Town Hall Ohio

00:15 sec | Last month

Freedom for Black Lives rally held in Goodale Park

"On the Fourth of July. A freedom for Black Lives rally was held at Goodell Park, organizers told ABC six They wanted to create a space for people to learn more about their message, which is achieving racial justice and equality for all and to support the black lives matter movement. Cleveland

Goodell Park ABC Cleveland
Los Angeles - Dean Of USC’s School Of Dramatic Arts Resigns, Admits To Relationship With Student

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:27 sec | Last month

Los Angeles - Dean Of USC’s School Of Dramatic Arts Resigns, Admits To Relationship With Student

"The dean of USC school of dramatic arts has resigned following an admission he engaged in a relationship with a student over a decade ago the relationship came up during a town hall faculty meeting for students and alumni in the M. F. A. acting program David bridal who served as the dean since twenty sixteen wrote a letter to the faculty admitting that he briefly dated the woman he says the relationship had ended amicably but described the characterization of the relationship is grossly

M. F. A. David Usc School Of Dramatic Arts
Biden campaign commits to three debates, rejects Trump team's call for more as 'distraction'

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | Last month

Biden campaign commits to three debates, rejects Trump team's call for more as 'distraction'

"Campaign twenty twenty on WTOP Joe Biden's campaign says tonight the former vice president will debate president trump on September twenty ninth October fifteenth and October twenty second the campaign then criticized the president's campaign for asking for more debates the trump campaign once four of them he wants to hold them sooner than later in September the biking campaign says it once one of the debates to be in a town hall format that's left some voters ask questions directly of the cabinets the vice presidential debate will be held on October

Joe Biden Vice President President Trump
Somali soldiers end protest over unpaid salaries

Champions of Justice

00:39 sec | Last month

Somali soldiers end protest over unpaid salaries

"Controls suede's of the country BBC correspondent will Ross reporting president trump was not raised by Joe Biden made taking in seventy four million dollars for his reelection but Mr trump maintains a sizeable advantage in cash on hand over the presumptive democratic nominee more on these stories at town hall dot com balance of nature changing the world one life at a time when I first started balance of nature I was hesitant but two months into the product I begin to see the difference and I have to really admit I was totally surprised I went

Joe Biden Mr Trump BBC Ross President Trump Town Hall
Biden eyes sustainable development in climate push

Jim Bohannon

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

Biden eyes sustainable development in climate push

"In a virtual town hall style meeting with environmentalists Democrat Joe Biden was telling his plan to get the U. S. one hundred percent on sustainable energy by twenty fifty creating lots of new jobs in the process I'll make people know the Democrats are the ones fighting for workers fighting great good sustainable jobs good paying jobs in the future not a party just lets industry right off right does the

Democrat Joe Biden
Why Police Could Still Be Using Facial Recognition, Despite Big Exits

WSJ Tech News Briefing

09:15 min | 2 months ago

Why Police Could Still Be Using Facial Recognition, Despite Big Exits

"We've seen. The biggest company is making changes in response to protest over the killing of George Floyd. They've announced massive donations to racial justice. Initiatives held town halls in their own companies and introduce new diversity and inclusion policies among those commitments Microsoft Amazon. IBM and others have said they're no longer selling facial recognition technology to law enforcement, and they've called on Congress to institute national regulations to govern its use. But I reporter. Jerry Council says that might not spell. The end of police use official recognition tech, and he joins us now to explain jared thanks so much for being with us. Forever Man. All right, let's from the beginning. How does law enforcement use facial recognition technology right now? Why is it so controversial so I'll start with the second part I this. This technology has been around for years, and it's not just us by law enforcement. It's used in airports and retail establishments stadiums on and so forth, but the reason it's so controversial is there's really two reasons one has to do with the accuracy of these systems you know these systems for the most part have a tougher time identifying darker skinned people and women than they do. white males. Males essentially the other reason has to do with privacy. Even if these systems are ninety nine point nine percent accurate, some people were concerned that they're being used to survey them and to uncover information about them. That otherwise may not have been known so those are those are the two reasons why this technology is so controversial I'd say in recent years a lot of law enforcement agencies have turned to this technology to help with investigations, so if someone commits a robbery or crime in public somewhere in there are cameras that got footage of the perpetrator, then they. They would use the technology to essentially take an image of person and compared with the database of suspects that they have to essentially fight crime. Right and we've obviously had that going on for a long time. We have cameras that pick people up. And then they go through databases of potential suspects people that have committed crimes in the past, and they try to match those faces. How is this technology different from that kind of eyewitness matching in the lineup? Yeah, yeah, yeah, so technology allows it that process to happen a lot quicker so if you are. are able to get a again. An image of someone you can just run it through a database of of suspects and get results in minutes. The other aspect about the technology is that it's also being used to not just search databases, but the really the entire Internet there's a there's a company out there called clearview that sees itself as a as a search engine for faces, so if the police were using this technology upload of face of it could be a suspect, or it could even be a witness to a crime, they can essentially find. Find out who that person is based on social media, posed and other upload, so that's new and different about it, the the risk of the technology and again this is one of the main reasons. It's come under such criticism in recent years is that let's say a law. Enforcement agencies is using it, and they are trying to figure out the suspect Hula suspect is a in a robbery or some other crime. They use technology and IT pulls up potential matches for that suspect if it's not accurate if it's not if it doesn't do well at making those. Those matches for for faces that are that are darker, skinned or for women. There's a chance that police go after the wrong person, and it even goes beyond that it's not just the police agencies that use it, but there are stadiums I'd use it, you know. Retailers say we don't want this person who has been accused of shoplifting before to come back into our stores. You know if these technologies send an alert that says hey, you know, look out for this person. He or she is on our watch list and ends up being a wrong person you. You know that could that could cause a lot of headache in a lot of you know undue harm for whoever the whoever that person is. Each spoke about clear view and the work that they do. We've now seeing big companies that are are household names. Amazon Microsoft IBM come out and say that they are not going to allow police forces to Hughes facial recognition technology anymore at least for a moratorium at least for a time your reporting seems indicate that might make a big difference in terms of police use of facial recognition technology. Why is that? That yeah, yeah, the big players from Amazon. Microsoft of IBM they all announced that they're pulling back from the market. The only thing about it is is that they're big names in the facial recognition market, but they're not the biggest players per se and the market is made up of other companies including a whole range of startups that focus on this technology, so with the big tech players pulling back. There are still going to be other providers out there. That are selling this technology to police departments. They have no plans to pullback. They see this as. Their bread and butter. If you will you know despite some of the concerns around the technology, they feel that their technology. Does a lot of good. They say that it helps with investigations to find suspects quicker than otherwise might be possible. They also say that their technology is is used to help. Find Missing exploited children. A lot of them do want regulations, but they don't see any reason. Pull back right now because they feel that their services are are essential, and that there is still a market for it, so Microsoft an Amazon are calling on Congress to develop clear national laws about who can use facial recognition technology and how they're using it. Is there any kind of legislation already in the pipeline? So at the federal level, not so much. Last week the House of Representatives introduced a police reform bill that provides or at least touches on a lot of aspects of policing the country, but there was a mentioned in there about facial recognition, and essentially said federal law enforcement officers think you know FBI, and so on and so forth they had. They're not allowed to use facial recognition software on body camera footage without. Without a judge's warrant again that bill was not all about facial recognition. It was just a small part of it, but that's all. That's taking place at the federal level, and there are initiatives around the country and states and municipalities. Some them have sought to ban or put a moratorium on the technology by police agencies. At least for the time being, there have been other. Bills including one in Washington. That seek to regulate the use of the technology, so there's there's really kind of efforts happening across the country in various fashions, but at the at the federal level there hasn't been anything there and just add to that I think that actually was was part of the reason why a lot of these these large companies from Microsoft and Amazon why they why they took A. A step back. They saw the recent police reform bill and say hey, y'all congress. If you're looking at doing something, we're going to wait for you to address the whole issue. You know instead back until then as we wait for legislation on facial recognition software specifically, we're also hearing calls to defend the police. Is that something that could have an impact on this market? Oh Yeah for sure. Yeah, we we. We are seeing a lot of those calls which again just to be clear about not eliminating police departments. At least that's not what everyone wants. It's more so diverting resources and funds away from policing in changing how it operates as those calls and increase obviously in the wake of the George Floyd protests. A lot of police departments may be forced to look at what they're spending their money on, and some of the most controversial elements of what they're spending. Their money on could be the first to go, so you know. I spoke to a fellow at the Berkman Klein Center at Harvard, and she mentioned that these protests are really putting a lot of public pressure on police departments, and some of them, not all of them, but some of them may say this is just not worth it right now, you know. Know where we're going to wait and step back until there are rules of the road for how to use this technology so again. This is by no means to say that police are still going to be interested in it. They're there still are a lot of them are still using it a lot of facial recognition companies still have business in the US. But some believe that that that these calls the defunding police could change that calculation. Our reporter jared. Council thanks so much for joining us right, thank you.

Microsoft Amazon George Floyd IBM Reporter Congress Jared Robbery Jerry Council Berkman Klein Center At Harvar United States Official Washington Shoplifting FBI
Investigation continues into hanging death of Robert Fuller in Palmdale, Los Angeles County

KNX Evening News

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Investigation continues into hanging death of Robert Fuller in Palmdale, Los Angeles County

"Sheriff's sheriff's officials officials reveal reveal new new details details about about their their investigation investigation into into the the hanging hanging death death of of a a young young black black man man in in Palmdale Palmdale information information came came out out during during a a share share of of the the virtual virtual town town hall hall meeting meeting for for residents residents of of the the antelope antelope valley valley people people call call them them with with question question after after question about why deputies quickly ruled the death of Robert fuller an apparent suicide he was found hanging from a tree near Palmdale city hall last Wednesday we never indicated that we thought that there was a chair or anything in which the victim stood upon prior to the hanging we have we believe that quite frankly that the it was accessed from the branch above which is quite sturdy if you if you're looking at the the proper tree it's quite sturdy service captain Ken Wagner although there are no videos in the park itself we are looking at the exterior sides of the park to see if we can find the victim traversing the area either by himself or with someone else the Attorney General says his office will also be investigating fuller's death

Palmdale City Hall Ken Wagner Palmdale Palmdale Antelope Antelope Valley Valle Robert Fuller Attorney
Toward A Future Without Waste with Chief Sustainability Officer, David Rachelson

The Town Haul

06:24 min | 2 months ago

Toward A Future Without Waste with Chief Sustainability Officer, David Rachelson

"Hey, everyone, welcome back to the town hall today. I am sitting down with Rubicon chief sustainability. Officer David Rachel Sin to talk about our es. G stands for environmental, social and governance report that. That came out a few weeks ago. It was appropriately titled toward a future without waste. Dave, thank you so for coming back on the TACOS I. Don't think we've had you on the town hall since like two teen. That's right, and it is my pleasure to be back on and obviously great to see how much success the podcast in you as the host has really done generated over the over the years. Well, thank you. David did not pay to say that, but let's. First and foremost I mean for anyone who may not be familiar. What exactly is an ESPN report? And why is it so important that we published one after Louis in es g report as you noted environmental, social and governance. Is a compendium or analysis of the Best Practices, the company undertakes calendar year toward those objective ESPN objectives, and it's a really important way for all stakeholders to understand the real progress that company is making towards achieving objectives in those areas and it Rubicon. This is our inaugural ESPN report, and we really took the opportunity to outlay where we call the waste wakeup call and the masters problem up the linear economy and the rampant amount of waste that is generated everyday across the world, and how the circular economy and technology combined. Is the solution to solving this problem continuing to grow business and keep jobs in the economy, and also to solve the challenge around wait in a positive way for society. I mean the team your team, the sustainability team and the larger Rubicon team as a whole I mean a lot of different contributors executive leadership, obviously marketing had a hand in it our agencies. It's very long. It's very. Graphic heavy. I mean how long did it take? And how did you guys put this thing together? You've been working on this for a really long time, right? Yeah, absolutely, there is a lot of behind the scenes work that goes into it I have a lot of respect for the teams that produces reports for all companies out there for my colleagues in the sustainability world. Because you're absolutely right, there is

Rubicon Officer David Rachel Sin Espn Best Practices Dave Louis Executive
"town hall" Discussed on Take it or Leave it

Take it or Leave it

08:19 min | 2 months ago

"town hall" Discussed on Take it or Leave it

"I, forgot and I it's totally I five. Butts mine is. Years Tiffany. Oh. My God thank you even stop apologizing. Tiffany has the question, do you? Do you think that? It's easy to make fun of guys because like do. Do you know what I'm saying? You seem to be very involved and you seem to get it and I'm trying to say it without oh like he's woke. Yeah like he okay to and I. Get what you're going now. ruggles see where you are. I can see it okay. Alright halfway through I was like this might be offensive to men. I don't WanNa. Make it seem like all men stay on their phone and ignore their family and don't cater to their wife when they're losing their mind and their knee deep, who but truthfully a lot of times guys don't get it so I'm just wondering how how how are you so in tune? With it. I. Mean I wouldn't say I'm one hundred percent. There's still thinks that I do that frustration frustrating my wife a lot, but I don't know I. was my mom single mom in? So I grew up. With women so the just the basic struggles that women go through I was around that. All the time, so it was. It's not weird. I think that that's a commonality in a lot of these I. Swear to you. A lot of the dad of lagers Clinton. Edwards grew up with. A single mom I mean. I think there were a lot of them. And I think you're right. I think that makes that's A. Very insightful and I think that makes a whole lot of sense. Because you're watching your mom, your whole world, do everything yeah. Okay I kind of had this many mind blown thing when you said that because I was like I. Swear all the dad bloggers that I know that I that we are friends with have a very similar story, and it makes perfect sense. You can see the struggle you know that it is. That's that's yeah. Okay, good question, Tiffany! That was super insightful. Look at you. To get there. It's okay, but I. You know we rounded the horses. Got The carton a wagon and we brought it back over. You know it's all all good. So what's been the? What's been. So I had something happened today. That was not a big deal, but it just kind of it kind of encompass what quarantine has been like in my house, so I'll tell my little story, and then you guys can share a story. What kind of encompasses quarantine in your house? So I have a big lab mix. We don't know what she's mixed with something poodle lab, Wolf Hound who the hell knows, but she loves a swimming pool right, so she's been swimming all in the pool and. I noticed that she needed to go to the bathroom so I open the back gate, and I let her out. She comes back in and she proceeds to get back into the pool because she apparently wasn't done. And so she pisses all over the Sun Shelf in the pool and so it's like okay guys now. Everybody's getting out because the dog is pissed in it. Then that dog got out of the pool, the other dog, my geriatric dog who wears a diaper. Okay, because I'm that lady who diapers dog and she's sitting next to me as we speak, she walks over to where the other dog was. She squats down and starts to. To Shit in her diaper, and so then I see her actively going to poop in the diaper, and it's like no. No, no, no, don't poop! Don't poop so as I'm taking the diaper off, she kicks and the Shit just flings, and it's literally flinging onto the ground into the pool and I'm standing there holding a dog shit diaper. There's dog pebbles all over the place. I then have to go and get the scoop thing and fish poop out of the pool and throw it out, and then the pool is closed indefinitely. Until can figure out how you shocked dog shit out of a pool, but I kind of felt like after that happened. It totally encompassed. Quarantine. You know what I mean like. The dog kicked crap at me like it was like I shall shit in this diaper, and then I shall kick it in your face, and you will pick it up because you. It is your job like that's how I felt. Yeah, so there has to be a story of something during this quarantine that you've just been like Yep Yep sick a fork in me. That was it. You want to follow that Tiffany I. that's why I'm a cat person. Oh really. You don't have pets if I did it would be. My kids have recently gotten scared to go into other rooms without an adult. And I think maybe my anxieties rubbing off on them and maybe Mike constant fear of being murdered somebody writing out to me right right, and so when it comes to go to the bathroom, they will go unless somebody goes with them, and I'm like trying to teach them that they have to be brave, and there's nothing going to hurt them, and and chloe will literally just. On the floor if I don't get my lazy as up and go with her, and so it's like I'm in. This weird struggled daily poor times a day. I'm not joking. Do I get up and give into her fear, so she doesn't pee on my floor. Just let her be on the floor like it's. That's the only thing I can release the bathroom light off. Is it because it's dark in the room? I. It's I. Don't know I've asked her. She thinks there's bugs. She thinks that the painting is GonNa come to life. Oh, wow, that's really ghostbuster. That's what I. Did they watch that watch no. That was my first of all. I get it, but she's never seen it, and so it's just a constant struggle, and it's hard not to get upset with her. You know, but. So I. Don't know, so, I what do I, do sometimes I. Just give in. You know following through with. We've been talking about since that I'm trying to implement can be difficult sometimes, because I don't always want to get up and walk her to the bathroom. Sometimes I'm in the middle of an intense game of candy crush right I'm saying amount down on a Burrito and I'm trying to live my best life and right. So then there's pee on the floor and she's like I'm sorry. I'm sorry I'm sorry, and it's just so genuine, just unlikely to okay, but chloe chloe is. Very cute, so you know, but at some point she should stop pissing on the floor so I don't know man. I think that I think part of it could be the fact that literally you've spent every waking moment with the kids, so there could definitely be like this weird separation anxiety thing when you go into another room, especially with you and chloe cause you to have been like. Like he like it's like skin coat with her. Do you know what I mean your best friends? But literally you're together like she doesn't want to separate from you, so it could be a little bit of that because. Didn't you have a problem with dropping her at daycare? Initially. Yeah, so I'm wondering. If maybe with all the crappy covid stuff, it's like a separation thing. Is it gestures house, too? But yeah, and then somebody else said Khloe manipulates well, and that xactly so anyway, that's that's really the only reoccurring thing other than the usual asking for a snack seven hundred times a day, saying they're board asking me to play with them and then dictating the entire place session because I'm not doing it right. How Fun is that when they tell you that you're doing it wrong and it's like this imaginary. How can I do it wrong? There are no rules Brian. Can you relate to? Leuliette can relate to that as you're saying. I can just feel it. Going down my back. I guess. I didn't want to go back to back. Because I have shit story to well I broke it up. You great this one, and then I'll follow up looking to. Look Into Shit Sandwich. Sandwich. This happened just couple couple of days ago and fresh in the minds souls go that one. We both kids were in in the bath and..

Tiffany I. ruggles WanNa Sun Shelf Edwards Wolf Hound chloe Leuliette Brian Mike Khloe
"town hall" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

01:45 min | 6 months ago

"town hall" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

"To say that in this room because he does work for Fox News which is terrifying and Kelly and my dad are getting married and talking so sure and Ramona came to my dad's house. Fruit is like Annual Pool Party and my dad had no idea who they were and obviously I did hear and allied was freaking speaking out and I said dad you should talk to Cowley like she's cool like I say hi mom you after. She like comment on this posting. He was like what should I d m her so I gave him advice on how to get at her to like getting married. Well the details details the wedding I am not privy to anyone. Are you upset or you know who so let me just say Kelly has been nothing but amazing and what. My friends are really cool. One of them is here tonight and I love him and he's great and Mike Ramon is a bitch. The why does everyone and I would be happy to tell you all about it. Are you going to go to that soup. Kitchen with Kelly's workers list. Okay all all does your phone off. Her Breasts asked my dad. Get back. I'm going to your show.

Kelly Cowley Mike Ramon Ramona Fox News
"town hall" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"town hall" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

"Everything I mean. I think he's very dreamy and I'm wondering why are are we holding him back from the show. Well listen I think and I'm just throwing this out there. I think maybe right now in this point in his life going to Miami Ame with Jack's is probably not the healthiest place for him to be going to get something between a woman's tits. It's no I think maybe it's not the healthiest place for him in his journey. There is this show. But we're here. It's hard because the worst thing that happened to us on Vander pump his law laws covering and the hard the place to be as a viewer. You know because I want that for her of course but then I'm going to have to ask her to leave. You can't sit with US anymore. ORLA and I know people I love and I love her but it's just Arianna okay when Arianna took that lukewarm shot. Babies people are drinking and I know they were in Miami Ame but it is really crazy Belvedere at that age shrinking. Lukewarm Vodka. Arianna right now. If she's listening I I don't think she is. By the way we reached out to Thomson of all to ask if we could borrow the SIDECAR response pending another one which we ran into our assistance car with. Yeah we have to pay to fix it because they crash that after another. Ll moment was when he was having that argument outside of the Dan Exotic Dancers Club. Hope I said that correctly with that Mustache Sean. I mean that was L. A.. Well I'm sorry but we had more scenes like that Mary Me Casey. Oh.

Arianna Miami Ame ORLA Mary Me Casey US Dan Exotic Dancers Club Jack Vander
"town hall" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

01:56 min | 6 months ago

"town hall" Discussed on Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

"Like to ask the people around you. Did you know you were near Paul Wilson. When you all of them you know? I think my dad has gotten more fame than than you or I. I sure people stop him. One time. One woman stopped me and I was like she was like I love your purse. Okay sure shall we bring our guests please. So we have two guests tonight but I were. I is going to discuss the cities with us. He is incomparable. He's also on Broadway Rodway right now. I'm like we are Broadway adjacent where we belong Lord. Lift us up where we belong. Yes gentlemen running our show today the tact attacked and you guys sing and I took that as a compliment. We force people to watch. Gotcha please welcome he. I don't think there is a greater housewives fan then Mr Gorgeous sweet and lovable Enthusiastic Jerry Oh Wow allow ro. Wow Wow wow just explain to the people listening at home. I'm pretty sure I'm wearing a women's t-shirt it is a women's large. We also have of course them in blue. Why we're here? We have a red sweatshirt of Carroll's last summer that I think is very they also have boots on the ground. Mike's on either side someone could. Oh sorry and a blue. Giovanni.

Paul Wilson Mr Gorgeous Carroll Giovanni Mike Jerry
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:57 min | 9 months ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Welcome back to town hall Ohio we're talking about farmers and how they manage their operations to not only feed the world but also protect Ohio's water quality telling the story Doug beard or five USTA's NRCS Jordan Hey we're sure of the Ohio farm bureau and Erin filers who is managing the Blanchard river demonstration farms network Erin described force quickly a little bit about edge field monitoring basically capturing the water the leaves the surface or through underground tile measuring the nutrients ran it dug a part of this that's the that's really the research component or one of the key research components is the fact that you have what you call paired field sites what is that why do you do it okay appeared appeared is essentially to individual is set ups each with rage of field monitoring equipment set up on two different fields that have similar characteristics as far soils and terrain and slow and Donna it's great if we can have the same farmer operate those two different watersheds what we try to do is capture the base of condition so what is naturally coming off of that through the farmers normal method of practice and then what we can do is change of variable and that farmers operation whether be a cover crop installation whether it be a change a nutrient management whether to be a change in some other part of his production system and we can measure that impact by a comparing what we see coming off the field with that change as we can repair it back to the baseline so it's a it's a great opportunity to do great research so Jordan as you look at this edge of field monitoring what what sticks out in your mind is maybe the top one or two things that we we've learned to a half three years into this yeah I think the biggest thing we've learned with the edge of field not only fits my new or or commercial fertilizer is placing another ground so getting that many were covered up in the soil to some degree obviously of the balance between full Telligent full incorporation and then you know sometimes you'll put him there differ letterman or just on the surface so you the balance between those two and make sure that you get that those nutrients covered to some degree so I learned a lesson the first time I visited the Kellogg operation they apply commercial fertilizer and you know if if you don't know anything about agriculture say well let's just put all of our fertilizer under the soil surface or let's inject all of our maneuver into the into the ground so the Kellogg's are testing it with the commercial fertilizer of the US state learns of testing it with with liquid manure what's it cost the testing the did not just the testing the equipment I'll do that the equipment gather the Kellogg's they use strip tillage so they're putting their fertilizer out with that that type of tool bar I'm not granted there a large operation so they have just bigger equipment in general about their strip tillage barb was of gosh about a hundred ninety thousand dollars for that bar to put that fertilizer below the soil surface the the sailors with their minore operation probably in the fifty to sixty thousand dollar range and then the technology that goes on top of that to give it the ability to variable rate that new Trent he is also many thousands of dollars so that the equipment costs add up quickly and that doesn't even count the tractor that might be two hundred thousand dollars and that's gonna pull this equipment so it is a very costly endeavor to accomplish that goal so I go back to the math we mentioned at the top of the show there that basically in order to meet some some target forty percent reduction types of of goals we scene we're talking about a farmer that's losing roughly twenty five cents per acre and nutrients but fixing that problem can run twenty thirty forty dollars or more per acre to actually fix it so thus the math of how do we balance productive agriculture with water quality Doug there's a another practice that farmers are beginning to adopt and and we're learning more about planting cover crops what's a cover crop in what to do for the farmer and what to do for the water what I talk for farmers I tried to use the analogy that cover crops are like a crescent wrench they can do you they can be used to to do a lot of different things they can be adjusted to to accommodate that farmer specific objective whether it be organic matter depletion they would have billed organic matter where they want to sequester hold nutrients whether they are trying to to just stop build soil health and so are those objectives can be accomplished with a lot of different species and so what we try to do is is asset producer what do you want to do with cover crop and then we can make a specific recommendation to the farmer this far species and rates are concerned but there is a tremendous amount of interest and we have worked with literally hundreds of by the thousands of farmers who are interested in are applying cover crops in the western base someone asked the same question of you Jordan again so if this works why doesn't everybody do it yeah I mean I guess our our goal overall is that you know we're we're trying to be a conduit to all this information right you were bringing all this research information all these results and every farmers different every farmers in different situation there's there's a bunch of different soil types and capabilities in and willingness to do certain stuff and then and so what we try to do is provide a suite of things they can they can pull from so we talk about the few different buckets.

Ohio Doug beard hundred ninety thousand dollar two hundred thousand dollars twenty thirty forty dollars sixty thousand dollar forty percent three years
"town hall" Discussed on 13 Alibis

13 Alibis

10:21 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on 13 Alibis

"In two thousand one. He was found guilty of running. A massive drug ring was a hundred and fifty years. That's right one hundred fifty years. Our cameras weren't allowed inside the parole hearing room about an hour later. Sti Family walked out. I man I'm all former inmate. Johnny Dean released on Parole from Louisiana's Angola prison earlier this this year after a long battle to get out from under one hundred fifty year sentence for drug violations and that brings us back to Matthew Charles and we met earlier Matthew got out of prison in January after more than two decades behind bars on drug and gun charges a beneficiary of the newly-enacted first step act a first step toward prison reform but getting out itself is often just the first step of a long and difficult journey and here to talk about right now is Matthew Charles Matthew great to have you with us you. You and I spoke when you were locked up. I spoke right after you're elected that scene. We just showed look familiar to you yesterday with moment of freedom what what were you thinking that moment about your future from walking out. I was thinking about just being back reunited with my family and friends but the fact that I was able to walk out just was breath fresh air by all kinds ends. You were model prisoner. Your story got a lot of attention a yet. You've found yourself where a lot of guys found themselves. Things didn't always come easy. What was the biggest struggle struggle for. Let me was housing and employment all right. Well thank. You and we're glad things are working better for you all right. Let's bring our next excess. John Peacock served more than fifteen years on manslaughter turned his life around and is now the executive director of Hudson Link for higher education in prison providing education education and life skills to incarcerated men and women and helping them Reenter Society Lawrence Bartley spent twenty seven years in prison. He's now the director of the publication news inside aside from the Martial Project A nonprofit news organization focusing on the US criminal justice system Lawrence and Sean both did time here at sing sing and that brings this to Mike Capra Michael Capra who for the past seven years has been the superintendent of this facility after a long and impressive career in law enforcement great to see all of you superintendent. Thank you for for hosting is here. you job here as the Superintendent essentially that to keep the late on make sure everyone's safe to make sure your employees get home home safe at the end of the day but you realized that wasn't enough and then programs were necessary. What do you find the more programs more occupational things that you can do. How does that a change the environment well I think as a system we certainly have decline in the amount of inmates that we have you see the men that are here today. These guys who have known for many years this year have all been part of this movement called voices from within which is just a bunch of guys who really WanNa think about tomorrow think about their children's coming in they didn't want them to file the same same steps that they have filed number one and also to make an impact on the inmates who are here to give them hope and to give them a positive role model to look for so so that our system is a little bit safer. I was surprised when I was on my last visit here talking to the guys and they they WANNA be part of the change on the when they are on the outside part of the change. They all want to be part of their think tank group of people. If you ask these guys right now how many have a college education right now most of them are going to raise their hands and so when they to get involved in looking towards what can we do the change the culture inside and out and making this inside of the silliest safer place there so much involved and they have have some fantastic ideas and we're putting those those ideas to work so attention and showing you came here when you were sixteen yes. I was arrested on sixteen in left when I was thirty four and how did this place change for the better. I know it sounds crazy but I lived in nine maximum security prisons over sixteen years. I never met award until I got to sing. Sing and Brian Fisher was awarded time would walk the halls and talk to us. Hey are you in school why you're not in the in really push us and I remember like it was yesterday probably eight years ago you said it to me. Hey what if we did more and it's just not a normal question from Superintendent Imagine Charity Prison to think about doing more here like college and music and theater and an introspective work to make dig deeper into what causes the be here in the first place and Lawrence. You've been out what about a year fifteen months months. He's twenty seven years in the system nine of them here here. Yes what was it like stepping the outset. It was wonderful. You know I've been dreaming about my release. Since the first day I slept on a prison kyw went on finally got the opportunity to get out you know it was like the movies have watched when you go into the future and all this technology you see and I was i. I was marble byles. I wow this is super. Greek you know so in doing that and and when I finally got the opportunity for Masha project to get some gainful implement employment. I didn't think that I was special but I- intentionally went out to do exceptionally well because as I was doing it for the men behind me. It was talking about the men. Come up till you walker. Let's talk about the men behind you. You know these what are you. What are you tell them. What do you tell them about life on the outside outside has everything in you dreamed of everything we always dream it being as exactly what it's like but what we spend all that time in creating those programs rams that came out of our head and every step of the way we are not getting paid for it. We just toiled through it. We argued throughout all of it is worth it because those skills are transferable transferable one outside and if you do that you sit the ball high and not only doing it for yourself and your family you doing it for. Everyone went to prison uniform in the country that just wants to our as easy. It's very hard is difficult but I intentionally denied a difficulty because I can't afford to fail because of offense offense. They all fail my children fail. I can't do it and what about how society looks at you. We talked with John. About checking the box you get. You're a felon felony. I mean people ask you. Why were you here and that's going to be difficult compensation. It is a difficult conversation but I like. I think that my character speaks for itself. I am not who I was seventeen years old when I committed a crime if fact changed when I was still in my teens and I have have to suffer through a decade of incarceration when I wasn't that same individual anymore so when I'm on the outside if people look down on me because because I'm incarcerated I tell myself that's none of my business. That's their perception has nothing to do with the way I'm GonNa live my life all right it back with John Legend as well as personal reflections and final thoughts and what we've talked about here today when we return in a moment the we're back at sing sing sing with John Legend for some final thing I keep thinking of is the figure that ninety five percent of those locked up are going to get out some day. They're going to be on our streets and our neighborhoods with that in my what do you want to leave. Leave our viewers with. I think the key is that we see each other's humanity. I think this nation has a legacy of treating certain people like they were subhuman. I think slavery was part of the reason that that has been part of our national culture but we have to see everybody Black Brown whatever they are whatever community they come from as part of our national community think their humanity think of their families think of their emotions think of their possibilities for redemption and structure our system to account for that and every dollar we spend on prisons. Every dollar we spend on punishment is dollars. We can't spend on education on health care on on the things that makes our community stronger and let's continue to invest in things that make us stronger and stop investing so much in punishment John. You're obviously a huge important part of this conversation and so we thank you much of our conversation. Today was framed by the many questions I wrestle with during my brief time visiting behind bars and Angola prison including one that I wrote down I wrote could any of us under the right circumstances. Make a mistake that would take away our freedom and then what where do accountability and punishment and Rehabilitation and redemption begin and can they're truly be justice for all on both sides of these walls. It's a long long conversation certainly longer than one hour allows but it's one. I'm dedicated to further exploring. I want to thank John Legend Loretta Lynch and all of our panelists as well as might capper operate his team here at Sing Sing Correctional Facility for hosting this important event for all of us at NBC News. Thank you for watching and so on it. Hey it's Chris as from MSNBC every day. I come to the office and we make a television show an everyday. I think to myself there's so much more. I want to talk about and so this podcast it's called. Why is this happening and the whole idea behind it is to get to the root of the things that we see Lee out every day. They're driven by by big ideas each week. I sit down with a person uniquely suited to explain why this is happening new episodes of wise this happening every Tuesday. Listen for free wherever you get your podcasts..

superintendent Sing Sing Correctional Facilit Matthew Charles Angola John Legend Sti Family John Legend Loretta Lynch Johnny Dean Brian Fisher John Peacock Louisiana Mike Capra Michael Capra Lawrence Bartley MSNBC US Lawrence John I Lee director
"town hall" Discussed on Dateline NBC

Dateline NBC

10:21 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on Dateline NBC

"In two thousand one. He was found guilty of running. A massive drug ring was a hundred and fifty years. That's right one hundred fifty years. Our cameras weren't allowed inside the parole hearing room about an hour later. Sti Family walked out. I man I'm all former inmate. Johnny Dean released on Parole from Louisiana's Angola prison earlier this this year after a long battle to get out from under one hundred fifty year sentence for drug violations and that brings us back to Matthew Charles and we met earlier Matthew got out of prison in January after more than two decades behind bars on drug and gun charges a beneficiary of the newly-enacted first step act a first step toward prison reform but getting out itself is often just the first step of a long and difficult journey and here to talk about right now is Matthew Charles Matthew great to have you with us you. You and I spoke when you were locked up. I spoke right after you're elected that scene. We just showed look familiar to you yesterday with moment of freedom what what were you thinking that moment about your future from walking out. I was thinking about just being back reunited with my family and friends but the fact that I was able to walk out just was breath fresh air by all kinds ends. You were model prisoner. Your story got a lot of attention a yet. You've found yourself where a lot of guys found themselves. Things didn't always come easy. What was the biggest struggle struggle for. Let me was housing and employment all right. Well thank. You and we're glad things are working better for you all right. Let's bring our next excess. John Peacock served more than fifteen years on manslaughter turned his life around and is now the executive director of Hudson Link for higher education in prison providing education education and life skills to incarcerated men and women and helping them Reenter Society Lawrence Bartley spent twenty seven years in prison. He's now the director of the publication news inside aside from the Martial Project A nonprofit news organization focusing on the US criminal justice system Lawrence and Sean both did time here at sing sing and that brings this to Mike Capra Michael Capra who for the past seven years has been the superintendent of this facility after a long and impressive career in law enforcement great to see all of you superintendent. Thank you for for hosting is here. you job here as the Superintendent essentially that to keep the late on make sure everyone's safe to make sure your employees get home home safe at the end of the day but you realized that wasn't enough and then programs were necessary. What do you find the more programs more occupational things that you can do. How does that a change the environment well I think as a system we certainly have decline in the amount of inmates that we have you see the men that are here today. These two guys who have known for many years this year have all been part of this movement called voices from within which is just a bunch of guys who really WanNa think about tomorrow think about their children's coming in they didn't want them to file the same same steps that they have filed number one and also to make an impact on the inmates who are here to give them hope and to give them a positive role model to look for so so that our system is a little bit safer. I was surprised when I was on my last visit here talking to the guys and they they WANNA be part of the change on the when they are on the outside part of the change. They all want to be part of their think tank group of people. If you ask these guys right now how many have a college education right now most of them are going to raise their hands and so when they to get involved in looking towards what can we do the change the culture inside and out and making this inside of the silliest safer place there's so much involved and they have have some fantastic ideas and we're putting those those ideas to work so attention and showing you came here when you were sixteen yes. I was arrested on sixteen in left when I was thirty four and how did this place change for the better. I know it sounds crazy but I lived in nine maximum security prisons over sixteen years. I never met award until I got to sing and Brian. Fisher was awarded time would walk the halls and talk to us. Hey are you in school why you're not in the in really push us and I remember like it was yesterday probably eight years ago you said it to me. Hey what if we did more and it's just not a normal question from Superintendent Imagine Charity Prison to think about doing more here like college and music and theater and an introspective work to make dig deeper into what causes the be here in the first place and Lawrence. You've been out what about a year fifteen months months. He's twenty seven years in the system nine of them here here. Yes what was it like stepping the outset. It was wonderful. You know I've been dreaming about my release. Since the first day I slept on a prison kyw went on finally got the opportunity to get out you know it was like the movies have watched when you go into the future and all this technology you see and I was I I was marble by was like wow this is super. Greek you know so in doing that and and when I finally got the opportunity for Masha project to get some gainful implement employment. I didn't think that I was special but I- intentionally went out to do exceptionally well because as I was doing it for the men behind me. It was talking about the men. Come up till you walker. Let's talk about the men behind you. You know these what are you. What are you tell them. What do you tell them about life on the outside. I life outside has everything in you dreamed of everything we always dream it being as exactly what it's like but what we spend all that time in creating those programs rams that came out of our head and every step of the way we are not getting paid for it. We just toiled through it. We argued throughout all of it is worth it because those skills are transferable transferable one outside and if you do that you sit the ball high and not only doing it for yourself and your family you doing it for. Everyone went to prison uniform in the country that just wants to our as easy. It's very hard is difficult but I intentionally denied a difficulty because I can't afford to fail because of offense offense. They all fail my children fail. I can't do it and what about how society looks at you. We talked with John. About checking the box you get. You're a felon felony. I mean people ask you. Why were you here and that's going to be difficult compensation. It is a difficult conversation but I like. I think that my character speaks for itself. I am not who I was seventeen years old when I committed a crime if fact changed when I was still in my teens and I have have to suffer through a decade of incarceration when I wasn't that same individual anymore so when I'm on the outside if people look down on me because because I'm incarcerated I tell myself that's none of my business. That's their perception has nothing to do with the way I'm GonNa live my life all right it back with John Legend as well as personal reflections and final thoughts and what we've talked about here today when we return in a moment we're back at sing. Sing Sing with John Legend for some final thing I keep thinking of is the figure that ninety five percent of those locked up are going to get out some day. They're going to be on our streets and our neighborhoods with that in my what do you want to leave. Leave our viewers with. I think the key is that we see each other's humanity. I think this nation has a legacy of treating certain people like they were subhuman. I think slavery was part of the reason that that has been part of our national culture but we have to see everybody Black Brown whatever they are whatever community they come from as part of our national community think their humanity think of their families think of their emotions think of their possibilities for redemption and structure our system to account for that and every dollar we spend on prisons. Every dollar we spend on punishment is dollars. We can't spend on education on health care on on the things that makes our community stronger and let's continue to invest in things that make us stronger and stop investing so much in punishment John. You're obviously a huge important part of this conversation and so we thank you much of our conversation. Today was framed by the many questions I wrestle with during my brief time visiting behind bars and Angola prison including one that I wrote down I wrote could any of us under the right circumstances. Make a mistake that would take away our freedom and then what where do accountability and punishment and Rehabilitation and redemption begin and can they're truly be justice for all on both sides of these walls. It's a long long conversation certainly longer than one hour allows but it's one. I'm dedicated to further exploring. I want to thank John Legend Loretta Lynch and all of our panelists as well as might capper operate his team here at Sing Sing Correctional Facility for hosting this important event for all of us at NBC News. Thank you for watching and so on it. Hey it's Chris as from MSNBC every day. I come to the office and we make a television show an everyday. I think to myself there's so much more. I want to talk about and so this podcast it's called. Why is this happening and the whole idea behind it is to get to the root of the things that we see Lee out every day. They're driven by by big ideas each week. I sit down with a person uniquely suited to explain why this is happening new episodes of wise this happening every Tuesday. Listen for free wherever you get your podcasts..

superintendent Sing Sing Correctional Facilit Matthew Charles Angola John Legend Sti Family John Legend Loretta Lynch Johnny Dean John Peacock Louisiana Mike Capra Michael Capra Lawrence Bartley MSNBC US Lawrence John Fisher Brian Lee director
"town hall" Discussed on Dateline NBC

Dateline NBC

09:26 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on Dateline NBC

"Hello everyone and welcome to sing sing correctional facility or about thirty miles north of New York City for most of you watching this is as close as you'll ever come to being in prison for more than two million. Americans life behind bars is a daily reality in the last our you saw US reporting from inside Louisiana's Angola prison over the next hour dear at sing sing. We'll be talking to some of the key people making a difference on this. This issue experts officials victims of crime and men incarcerated here in this country locks people up at a rate greater than any country on earth especially people of Color. It's called mass incarceration and it comes at a terrible cost in dollars and in human lives. We've seen this problem album grow into an American crisis in our lifetimes. It's a story I returned to again and again today here. sing-sing will focus on how we got here. What we've learn how together we can make things better among our guests today award winning singer Songwriter John Legend who was made criminal justice reform a personal crusade aide. You'll be joining US shortly as will former Attorney General Loretta Lynch and others. Let's start by welcoming the founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative Ryan in statements and Brian Great to see it. I WANNA I wanNA start off with a chart. We're going to hear a lot of statistics six but I want to start over the chart and you know all too well nine thousand nine hundred seventy. Two fewer than three hundred thousand people were locked up in our prisons. You look at that chart. It's like Mount Everest going to ah two thousand sixteen one and a half million that doesn't count by the way those sitting in jails local jails. How did we get here well. It's first important acknowledged that throughout most of the twentieth century we were pretty stable that number remained under two hundred and fifty thousand and then in the nineteen seventies. I think we we were captured by what I call. The politics of fear and anger elected officials began using rhetoric of fear and anger and directing it toward people who were drug addicted drug-dependent and and instead of saying that people who are addicted independent need our healthcare system to respond to health issue we said that to criminal justice issue and we declared this misguided war on drugs and we put hundreds of thousands of people in jails in prisons for drug related offenses. It's as many of them non violent but here's but here's the rub you look at big cities across America. Crime rates have gone down people will look at that into the sea lock them all up and boom crime drops well I I actually it's not true that the incarceration boom correlates with crime going down actually where we began that after increasing racing the jails and prisons populations in one thousand nine hundred seventy s and early nineteen eighties the crime rate went up it actually peaked in the early nineties when we had already tripled the the number of people in jails and prisons what had an impact on crime is actually a other factors the economy social services. There's no question that we we live in a violent society but you can't actually say we're actually helping to control violence by putting so many people in jails and prisons people who are not even considered to a threat to others and in fact. I actually think mass incarceration has made us less safe. We've actually spent eighty billion dollars on jails in prisons when we could have spent some of that money on creating programs that actually help people avoid offending in the first every time I see you. I asked the same question because I wrestled with a necessarily wrestle wrestled with it in Angola. What is the purpose of prison punishment is retribution. Is it rehabilitation well. I think it's it's got to be all of those things but mostly it's about safety right and the problem is is that we've gone through an era where our politicians and elected officials and judges and prosecutors in too many people in law enforcement only think they're punishing crime. We can't send crimes to prison. We send people to prison. We can't punish crime. We have to punish a person and when you're only thinking about the crime it's easy to say death penalty life imprisonment without parole fifty years one hundred years three hundred years but crimes don't do time people do when you start thinking about the people you realize it's more complicated. I believe in accountability. I hate violence. I don't want to create. I WANNA create policies that protect Hecht us. I want to intervene when people are threat to other people. I want to intervene when people start to themselves but also believe in redemption. I believe in restoration I believe in reconciliation. I believe been rehabilitation. I believe in fairness and mercy and I believe in justice and we have a system that has no room for that and that's how we've gotten into this situation and then the question russian-built then turns to who belongs here. I know you've talked a lot about juvenile's being sent to maximum security prison. I'm going to hold off on the question because I wanna look at some of the incarcerator here. Any of you sentenced here as teenagers helping talk to a couple of the only grab a microphone here. What's your name John John John. Could you tell me tell me when you were sentenced here. I was sentenced twenty five years to life at the age of sixteen. Did you obviously for what what crime murder obviously. The state thought you were a man. Did you feel like a man at that time. No I didn't feel like anything. I just didn't know you know my mind. Just wasn't in the right set. You know I couldn't pass five minutes at that age and you were subtly in an adult prison just throwing right into it all right. Thank you for talking to let me turn back now with that. In Mind Bryan even violent criminals brought as teenagers they belong in a maximum security adult present. I actually she don't think we should put any children in adult jails and prisons. We recognize in this society that there's a difference between children and adults. We don't let seventeen year olds vote for reason. We don't let them drink. We don't let them smoke. We recognize is that your opportunity to develop isn't complete and so we say we're going to actually actually protect you from things that might hurt you but in this era of fear and anger we just threw that out the out the out the room and you make no exception for violent island crime murder. I actually think we have too many children. In this country who are born into violent families. They live in violent neighborhoods. Their lives are shaped in a crucible of violence and when you're surrounded by addiction and dependency and trauma and people are threatening you in menacing you and nobody's helping you are going to react violently but I don't think that's all about that child. That's about the rest of us so no. I don't think we should be putting children in adult jails in prisons and I also think we've got a lot of reform work to doing this space. We've got thirteen states in this country that have no minimum age for trying. A child has an adult so what I'm GonNa Prison. They meet a guy named Henry Montgomery. Seventeen years. Years old killed a cop life in prison possibility of parole. He was seventy two. When I I met him. We talked to the grandson of his victim and I wanNA play this because it's opened up a whole nother question about where we're going here here. It is there's no parole for Charles hurt. He's he's his life. Sentences insist permanent and my mom my mom. Our belief in the system is that equal justice but honestly I don't think anybody than sit there and say that he can never be thrown ago. He needs to finish doing whatever his obligations are to get the parole if he's ever granted parole and and congratulations tool but personally. I think he's he's wearing needs to be. I'm imagining a lot of people right now. Listening to that man and shaking their heads you feel the same way anthem. That was a family member of mine. We look at so much of criminal justice right now through statistics and charts like we showed a moment ago but how do you remove or do you remove that the personal that emotional connection. How do you take that out of the equation as you look at mass incarceration. Well I mean first of all. We have all these relationships. My grandfather was murdered murdered. When I was sixteen by Juveniles I've had family members sexually assaulted. I understand the pain of that. What I want to say to people is look. We can can do better than beat up on the people who commit these crimes. We can actually start working on how we create an environment where there's less murder less rate less violence. I do believe we have to hold people accountable but we can't be a society that wants every member to not be defined by the worst thing. We've done if you want that for yourself. If you want mercy for yourself then you have to be willing to give it to other people and I just think that we actually can't be evolved. We can't be decent. I do believe that we are all more than the worst thing we've ever done John. I think if somebody tells a lie they're not just a liar if they take something or not just that I think even if you kill somebody you're not just a killer and we've got to understand the other things you are before where we judge. You and I just think a world without mercy is not a world. That's going to allow us to progress and if a family member is too angry and two broken into hurt to not be able to see that that's okay. I don't think we should leave it to that. We have an organized society that has to step in. That's why it's the people vs Henry Emme Montgomery. It's the state. It's not that offender and I don't WanNA world with the people were victimized by crime are responsible for making sure that they get.

murder Angola John John John Henry Emme Montgomery John Legend New York City US Mount Everest Louisiana founder and executive director Loretta Lynch America Attorney Hecht Ryan Brian Great Charles
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Welcome back to town hall, Ohio, we're talking about no plant nineteen. That's the hashtag that many farmers of slapped on this year's cropping season. If you've been with us throughout the show, you've been hearing a lot about the economic consequences of nonstop rain. But there are emotional consequences as well. My co worker here at Ohio farm bureau, Jordan. Hey, wisher produces a podcast titled field day and ended up coming addition that he shared with talks with Highland county farmer and a member of the Ohio farm bureau board of trustees Nathan Brown chat about the impact of this year on farmers. Mental health. This has been something that's been really hit home to me being a first generation farmer, I didn't necessarily come from that culture background, but mental health and, and your mental wellness has been a part of my life from beginning, my brother and my mother, and my father have all had issues at one point in time. And you know something that I've struggled with in just, you know how do you how do you navigate life, you know, we're young parents. How do you know that your parenting your kids? Right. And then you know, once you throw in the agriculture and, and all the twists and turns that are thrown at you as a farmer. I see so many guys that are struggling, and they don't know where to go, and you know, we treat mental illness in this country as taboo, we don't talk about it. Yeah. It's, it's not something that may affect me, but that's not something I wanna show and in a mental wellness is the same as my physical wellness. I need somewhere to go if I need to go to have a checkup that can help me sort through my issues are usually once the tough through a lot of things. Right. They shoulder the burden of a lot of things, maybe their, their families income debt just just the day to day like physical work that's there. And then, by the way, like if they have a kind of a blip that comes up mentally are in their in their mental health shoulder that too, without actually expressing anybody, we bear so much ourselves. And, and we don't. At, like asking for help, we don't you know, I know more farmers, the farm by themselves have nobody else of that helps them on a daily basis than I know operations that are, you know, six seven eight ten people, you know, it's, it's that one person. And he's, he's the one that. If doesn't go right? He's the one to blame for if he goes bankrupt. He's one to blame for you know if his crops fail. It's all on him and that can be more than people can handle sometimes and. I've heard people say, well, if you can't can't handle the stress and get out. Well, you know, that that's not really a fair statement for anybody. Because if you had cancer, you know. You just need your job because you have. No. I mean you're going to go find help and it doesn't always have to be a professional help. I don't think you know you need to build a good support of, of peers. I mean, you know, me and my wife have one of the best relationships, the two guys for I mean, we are open and honest with each other, and it was just this weekend. We were joking around. Oh, we were in the card. Are we talking about this subject a little bit? And she said, you know, you're, you're getting pretty good with us. You mean a whole lot better hide, at the used to be what are you talking about? She's like what you're probably sitting there thinking about. Well, you know we just finished planting beans, but we got spray to do, do we've got this going on. We got cows litter just turned to blow out so we're in the process of Breedon. And then we're talking about three four five six inches of rain, come this week got, plus you got board meetings. All this other stuff, family kids, that are playing T-ball and baseball. And, you know, just trying to navigate life. And I think as a as a business owner and an ultra list, there's just more weight that is put on that person. You said it's kind of taboo, and it's tough to subject, because it's, you know, farmers generally haven't been the most expressive. But I think hopefully our generation can can help lead the way a little bit more on saying, okay hand up help go, go see somebody, you know, those guys, I say, reach out to your family reach out to your buddies. You know, put together of of group, you know that's one great thing about how you act professionals group. I mean you can meet so many guys and so many agriculture. Listen farmers from around the state and gather your network, and find people that you connect with and use those relationships. Those bonds to get through tough times, like you know mentally that you're having or whatever. And that's that's one thing I like about organization in organizations in our cultures. They bring people together, and you can.

Ohio farm bureau wisher Ohio town hall Highland county Jordan Nathan Brown baseball Breedon cancer business owner three four five six inches
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Welcome back to town hall Ohio opioid education is our topic today. Chad gesture of nationwide. Jennifer Martinez with the whole drug mental health board of Franklin county in the studio with us. And we were talking chat about some of the other parts of controlling opioids besides parental, and kid education. Besides law enforcement you made the point that the state of Ohio is taking this quite seriously as well. State of Ohio is a fantastic partner. And again, this is a public private partnership with everyone taking accountability. So few years ago, the state of Ohio took action to reduce the number of opioids prescribe to Ohio. And so at the peak in twenty twelve there, probably seventy pills for every man woman child in the state of Ohio that were prescribed, it is down nearly one third to about fifty pills, so it's still a lot of medicine in the marketplace. But the state's been a great partner and their leadership makes all the difference in terms of involvement in it. Both of you have made the point that this needs to be a high priority for the community. I'm thinking back three four years ago or at a higher farm bureau meeting, and the farmers are talking about the farm Bill and they're talking about clean water in Ohio, and they're talking about property taxes. And then this voice comes up and they start talking about drug abuse Cisco is farm bureau's vice president of public policy. I shouldn't be surprised, but it still set you back a little bit when farm bureau says we need to start paying attention to this. Yeah. Absolutely. And you know, part of our mission farm bureau's to strengthen our communities and a component of that. Our folks have recognized is the drug epidemic and what we're doing here in terms of this opioid crisis. So our members have made it a priority issue for the last three years and only seven or eight topics rise to being what we consider a priority issue at farm bureau, it's where we're going to put our resources where we're going to put our effort in ended has risen to that level. So much of what happens in farm bureau, the, the initial steps were taken a locally Michelle spec, who's one of our organization, directors and her counties over eastern, Ohio. They jumped on it with both feet and kind of brought everybody along. Absolutely. They were kind of the role model for how other counties. Could engage in this. The first thing we encourage everybody to do is take a look around at your community. Farm bureau is really good at that networking at using our grassroots model of actually having feet on the ground. But we encourage every folks, and we've put something out to every single county farm bureau. So they know look and see if you have prevention action alliance already organized. And if so, join their effort, there's no reason to duplicate those kind of the same thing that the board went through and saying, how do we collectively bring everybody who's working on this individually together? So we want to be part of solutions of community already has one to help strengthen that solution by using our grassroots network. And then our other major component, though, to this entire thing has been a youth where we know we have a strong point is our for H and R FFA students, we have an in with them. They're listening to the voices of the leaders of those organizations, who are who are helping them. And so we put together program called help for a hope, for Ohio, and then also came out of eastern Ohio and a local group that came together and said, we need to help educate the students about what they should be doing. How to have peer to peer conversations how to stay away from the drug themselves to begin with, but then how to have peer to peer conversations might as well, pull the adults in have conversations with them about what to look for. That might not be normally what you would look for in your household that's called hidden in plain sight. And so we have had hundreds and hundreds of students. Now, we did a statewide version of hope for Ohio. We've replicated it a road show all the way around Ohio to help those students who are active who are engaged to look at another peer and say, there's something off there. I have a conversation with them that might help in the long run. So a lot of different ways that we're using kind of that peer to peer conversation. Both in our communities and with our students in American Farm Bureau kinda saw what was happening here and it started a county. It's moved up to the state level and became a national priority as well. It absolutely has it's done the exacting. It's supposed to do communities. They were vocal and they, and they spread the word that we've got a dress this at moved up to the state, level, USDA an has let has met with our. Our county farm bureau's on several occasions. And she's now, actually moved over to the White House, so they, they recognize the work. She was doing in the rural communities and said, we need what she's doing to be replicated everywhere. And so our voices being heard at every single level in terms of we need help. We need the programming, we need the dollar think Chad for folks who may not know the relationship between farm bureau nationwide goes way back to win. We started a mutual automobile insurance company and it grew into nationwide. And we've had our hundredth anniversary. You're coming up on yours. But, but this whole community thing, and people working to help each other. It's kind of a shared value that we, we have with nationwide and foreign of your immunity is the shared value in. It's no surprise that the farm bureau is so engaged in this issue and so many others, and no surprise that. The Ohio farm bureau was actually one of the first members joined the Ohio opioid educational lines and said, what can we do so the work together on a complicated issue? Like this is all about complementing. Each other. It's not a competitive environment. It's leverage. Reaching more youth, and we highly valued, the Ohio farm bureau, and we highly value, the work that nationwide and the mental health board. Everybody's putting into this problem that we all have to tackle we've got a few minutes who wrap up to today's show, and perhaps sheer few more ideas on.

farm bureau Ohio Ohio farm bureau Chad gesture partner Jennifer Martinez Franklin county USDA Cisco White House Michelle spec vice president three four years three years
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Welcome back to town hall, Ohio. We're taping at the annual meeting of the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation Jenna, what two three four hundred farmers from across the state in town to do their lobbying with legislators at the state house and talk about some of the issues and hear from our keynote speaker Liliana Esposito, she is the chief communications officer for Wendy's. And and it's been fascinating learning about this piece of the of the food chain, and how it relates to our piece of the food chain. So we'll Yana hope you're doing it as much as we are you don't work in a bubble or you have other people, and you've talked about collaborating with farmers and far Morgan ization, but who are some of the other organizations that you find yourself working with on a regular basis that that you need to be able to communicate with and maybe sometimes negotiate with and and get along with we work with a lot of different organizations and individuals and. Some of that is by choice and some of that is not by choice. But you really as a where a publicly traded company, which means we have shareholders. It means that we have other stakeholders that are interested in our business. We're a major employer. So obviously, we have an impact on a lot of different communities and states around the country, and we have to work with elected officials and policymakers in those areas, we also are a restaurant company, we're bringing food to to to families. And so there are there are parents, there are bloggers there are all sorts of folks and organizations that are interested in what we do what we find at farm bureau is there's a lot of people interested in what we do too. And we work with them sometimes not only because we want to but we might have to and one of the challenges we run into quite often. And and it's not just farm bureau. It's not just Wendy's society. There's a lot of people who were single issue people strip if you're not on their side on animal welfare. It doesn't matter. If you do every. Something for the community and and pay every hamburger flipper twenty seven dollars an hour. They're still going to not be happy with you. How do you try to reach out to these single issue people? And and and maybe at least Ford some level of conversation. I I I think that you have to work with people that you don't necessarily agree with if if the only groups that you engage with are those that agree with what you already believe then it's going to be a pretty tight bubble there. And so you may not agree with everyone that has an interest in your business or in in what you're doing on a daily basis, but I do think you have to listen, and my general approach is if you are willing to have a reasonable polite, respectful conversation with me, I will have the same conversation with you. Now that cuts out a good number of groups that aren't willing to do that. And so I think single issue doesn't necessarily mean single-minded, I think there are some single issue organizations. That just have a very specific focus, but they're willing to work with you on how to get to the same end goal. Even if you do it in slightly different ways than what they might have originally proposed. So for instance, there might be an environmental organization that ultimately what they want to do is provide for the cleanliness and the safety of the water supply. If the only thing that they will talk to you about is a one specific way to make that happen, then you might have a hard time coming to some sort of a collaborative approach. But if they're willing to be open minded about a variety of ways that you could get to that same shared goal. I take that conversation. I take that conversation any day. And so there are organizations that are willing to have conversations with you. And again, their approach might not be what yours would be. They may not start from a place of a lot of understanding about what you do every day. But I think that's an opportunity to engage in. Sometimes we just have to put our own biases aside about those organizations or individuals and listen to them as well. What advice would you have for farmers who we we? Frankly, we have to evolve we know that for my lifetime and every generation before me, the key crucial food question was do we have enough to eat? Now. We are fortunate enough that yes, we have so much to eat. We can worry about how my raising beef cattle impacts the Guatemalan tomato grower. And we have the opportunity to look at social Justice and environmental issues. So how do we bring ourselves along? And agriculture to recognize that people want to have a say in what we do beyond just the food. We put on their play. You talked about the importance of advocate, advocacy, and obviously you're here on day. And so that advocacy is taking the form of having direct conversations with legislators, and that's incredibly incredibly important. Not the only way that you can be an advocate. And so for instance, there was a there's a pretty sir here in Ohio that we were visiting with just a couple of months ago, hog producer, and he was building a new housing facility a couple of years ago, and one of the things that he did all on his own certain. No government mandate or anybody telling him he had to do. It was he put plexiglas viewing pains in the barn. And what it allowed is that anybody from the community or a reporter or anybody else could come in see how he was raising hogs without obviously having to go through all of these safety challenges that you would have of having an outside person. Enter that facility. I think that's a great example of how you can look at your own operation and say, how can I.

Ohio Wendy Ohio Farm Bureau Federation town hall Morgan ization Liliana Esposito chief communications officer Jenna Ford reporter producer twenty seven dollars
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Welcome back to town hall ohio where our topic is research and helping us understand what's going on in that space dr carol whitaker retired recently as senior vice president for research at the ohio state university john cartlidge works in business development at mattel and glad to have both of them in the studio so i i joke with you carol before the break the ohio state did did you do anything that would top the development of the xerox machine like john told us happened patel i'm gonna try all right so the the whole field of computer animation came from ohio state maybe that sort of you know ken ken rival this machine although that's a tough act follow so the father of of of computer animation charles surrey really got his start at ohio state and developed all of the you know kind of the tenants and the and the principals around computer animation at at the university a second thing is the feline leukemia vaccine which is our that's been historically our greatest sort of tech transfer product and that has that has saved the lives i think of thousands maybe millions of of felines throughout throughout the world so i don't want to throw out a couple of terms here because i'm i'm as you said earlier john q citizen but i i often hear the term theoretical research in practical research carol may be help us understand the difference there i assume there's a difference of some sort there is i think it's a little esoteric in i think because theoretical research i think at some point becomes practical research i think if you again look at the iphone many of the patents that went into the iphone may have seemed really this is not going to go anywhere until somebody discovered that particular patent linked with another patent gives you an end product of of the iphone so i think i think theoretical research is is something that doesn't have immediate practical application whereas you know more applied research actually does it has a more short term and point and an application i am i correct and if i'm not please tell me but it it it seems to be that at a public university like ohio state a lot of the i don't know if you call theoretical but the basic research gets done and then it might move over to someplace like battelle were john works where it gets turned into a product is that the case or did it used to be in it's changing i mean it is states goal to to not just come up with the idea but eventually kick some kind of a product or lice since for a product out the out the door at the end yeah absolutely i mean i would have to say that that ohio state both kinds of research are done you know so there is the original research done and i would have to say over the last probably decade or two there has been a trend towards more applied research i like to think about it in terms of the fields that are pursued so let's say agriculture i think of agriculture as being in general practical and more applied sort of research as is engineering because that's done more in connection with with industry for example as his medicine particularly the clinical side of medicine is very practically oriented whereas more theoretical research may be done in physics for example or chemistry where you know it might be more basic science you know that ultimately will have practical applications but perhaps not right away john i would assume that there are some clients with some projects that you can't talk about but what are some of the things that are brewing patel that you you can share with us what are some of the areas that are are popular for people to come to you and say help us solve this problem i'll name one for now is off the top of my head is something called neon it's the national ecological observation network so this is a continental wide sort of network of observing how different ecosystems in our country are changing so said it'll be a thirty year program set up by the national science foundation and that's a large undertaking of development of sensors novel census for how data is collected in air water soil what have you.

town hall ohio thirty year
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Zach braff mobile loomed a consumer page timing the ludi lin a cold gray lulu account phillip welcome back to town hall hiault we are recording in front of millions of people attending the salvadore alkayed maybe not quite millions but up bonn she good folks from all over ohio in attendance at the seventy fifth anniversary meeting of the ohio federation of summa water conservation districts and we certainly appreciate being invited to be here and the opportunity to help share the story of saving soil and water cross the state of ohio three new guests with us here on on town hall ohio we're going to be talking a little bit about conservation today are our previous guest helpless look back at some of the first things big things of the first seventy five years with us at the podium today is the past president of the ohio federation of salt water conservation districts chris schwartz said the one of the past president chris welcome to the show chris is up in the would county air yup occur kinds joins us from the ohio department of agriculture he's the chief of the divisional sonal water conservation do they get that right how fans gay and a gentleman who i i probably know as well as any of our guest today terry cosby the state conservationist for the natural resources conservation service of the us department of agriculture so gentleman welcomed a town hall ohio chris i'm i'm going.

ohio president ohio federation chris Zach braff ohio federation of chris schwartz ohio department of agriculture terry cosby us department of agriculture seventy five years seventy fifth
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"The fact is that the developed world has been at peace for a length of time greater than at any point in history warren politics expert john mueller rebel highest state as a book titled retreat from doomsday in ended he writes about the rise of war aversion dr mueller's with us on town hall ohio i asked him does the rise of war version simply mean that as a society we aren't less inclined to accept war as a means to an end to degree of the main focus on the at reteach them doomsday was arguing about world war three centrally now that had been a turned against wars among developed states starting with the aftermath of world war one and then in reinforced by the aggressions it took it constituted the warden of the world or two and there's been a real change uh you can see it before world war one is very easy to find people saying orders wonderful and glory some progressive in pieces decadent an eminent and um does uh man boring and dull and horrible and stuff like that uh that you can't find out after world war two pretty much excuse me after world war one uh and there was reinforced after world war 2 so merkel basically is that there's been gradual turning away in the developed world from uh the idea of of wars among developed states uh some of that may have also affected elsewhere there isn't there have been very few international wars um since world war two brick since the end of the cold war um there there's been a colonial wars and there's been civil wars like crazy but it's been very few international wars anywhere in the world overall and of course no world war three ever took place has been no wars essentially between developed country since uh 94 defy the some of your other writings you make the case that uh if we can the process of building sound stable competent governments is going to help keep us off the path towards war the out at that particular case with civil war i think most civil wars are caused by bad governments uh either their just playing better they're incompetent and they can't stop a rebel groups from from growing um so.

dr mueller world war merkel civil war john mueller ohio cold war
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Weather patterns are changing today we're going to talk with three members of the state climate office civil hiault about the sign science of measuring it predicting climate and what we can do with the fact that the science delivers that science of climate policy and adapting to change is our subject this week on town hall ohio this is town hall ohio home to interesting people engaging issues at enlightening stories town hall ohio was the production of the ohio farm bureau federation working to forge a partnership between farmers and consumers and is supported by nationwide nationwide is on your side now here's town hall ohio host joe cornelie among the goals of the state climate office of ohio is to make ohio a more climate resilient state what's that mean and how do we do it's our guest today are going to have some answers jason server nick is education in outreach director for the byrd polar and climate research center at ohio state university aaron wilson is a senior research associate for the same and brian mark is our state climatologist gentleman welcome to town hall hiault makes growing us to be host joe we have half the faculty of ohio state of the room today this this could be fun a brian now let's start with you uh tell us about the state climate office of ohio and the job of the state climatologist we'll get morning joe and i would say right off the bat that you really outlined it well by calling us the state office the.

ohio ohio farm bureau federation joe cornelie director aaron wilson senior research associate brian mark jason ohio state university
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"This is town hall ohio home to interesting people engaging issues and enlightening schori's john hall ohio was you production of the ohio farm bureau federation working to forge a partnership between farmers and consumers and is supported by nationwide nationwide is on your side now here's town hall hiault host joe cornelie while the midwest is often called the world's breadbasket ukraine is often called the breadbasket of europe but as a relatively newly independent nation there is a desire to learn more about the important task of producing food and to that and a group of economists from ukraine are in the united states to do some learning they recently spent the better part of the day here at the ohio farm bureau in several of them graciously agreed to sit in with us four taping of town hall ohio our guest with us today are and ladies i'm going to apologize right now for messing up your names multiple times throughout the course of the show uh first with us is irina volvo which she and lay she is a burt zab ruin a daily giving close slowly shia yes a little bit close this would i could handle allen lines professor economist in agriculture at the at the ohio state university alan welcome in ladies welcome alan uh inc tell us a little bit about these two ladies are with us but we also have a a larger group of ukrainian economists wire the here what are they doing these people are here at you're in the united states to really do two things in general they come here first of all under the un pursues of our usda for an egg servers as part of the faculty exchange program operated by the foreign eggs service now there are ten of these people six of them are here at ohio state in ohio the four other four people are at the university of missouri uri in their here rudy to study modern approaches to teaching economics in agriculture at their own universities in to learn how the food system in the united states operates those are the two big objectives were going to explore those and other topics but arena will start with you just to get yourself introduced to our guest tell them a little bit about uh about you and your.

ohio university of missouri ohio state university professor allen europe john hall ohio food system rudy schori usda irina volvo ohio farm bureau united states ukraine joe cornelie ohio farm bureau federation
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"And that's really think we're more time it's going to come from the grassroots level so in order to participate in local matters to do i need to be of us of a specific economic class no we really go where people are so generally speaking in a you're gonna find us when you're when you're rolling for classes at the central ohio diabetes associate asia and if your kids at the wrecked center you're gonna find are classed as well just going to be there and then we also have a central kitchen across from children's hospital where we have a sliding scale so really is everyone from sixyearold's to mom and grandma cooking together and its students at its maybe donors and volunteers of our organization and that's ideally the best mix where we're all just cooking together richest people cooking together and enjoying a male i can thank you enough for taking a few minutes to uh to visit with is about two local matters best of luck down the road hope you all of you two future goals thank you it's my pleasure we'll talk food trinh's when town hall ohio continue shh it's only one somewhere and then another not quite national news just a local thing but they've been adding up and up year after year drivers killed by trains because the crossings had stopped signs instead of gates the state of ohio mike signs gates cost money what's another life worth report on data crossings learn more at angels on track dot org sponsored by angels on track aired by oab.

sixyearold trinh town hall ohio