35 Burst results for "Town Hall"

Townhall: New Data Wipes out Democrat Narratives on Crime

The Dan Bongino Show

01:30 min | Last month

Townhall: New Data Wipes out Democrat Narratives on Crime

"Here is the data Go to my newsletter if you want to read it yourself on Geno dot com slash newsletter Katie pavlich is a great piece of a town hall New data wipes out the Democrat narrative on crime So apparently they did a little study on what's going on with crime around the country And they found that murder rates that the review of these murder rates in these counties shows a very specific pattern That 30 of the cities with the highest murder rates 27 of them have democratic mayors Wow that sounds like a lot Sounds like it could be correlational evidence there The only exceptions being Lexington and Jacksonville that have Republican mayors and Las Vegas whose mayors and independent And within those 30 cities there are 14 Soros backed or Soros inspired rogue prosecutors That's what's called actual data And there's the data folks The cities that are showing the highest spikes in murder rates and crime spike are run by Democrats almost exclusively Detroit Chicago where we're on the air Dallas which sadly has been trending blue a little bit But going in that direction you want more of this or you want Law & Order You want to share who cares and respects about respect your civil rights and everyone else's but says you know what You protest all you want You're not protesting in the streets and blocking traffic What do you want Because you get to say today You get to go out and vote for that today and against the bad guys today

Katie Pavlich Soros Lexington Jacksonville Las Vegas Detroit Dallas Chicago
The Current Demise of Political Discourse

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:54 min | Last month

The Current Demise of Political Discourse

"Seen, however, in this campaign cycle, frustrates me even more than what I've just described. And that is that you've had candidates who have just intentionally not debated. And there's been Republicans there's been Democrats. Look, and I'm not talking about the races that are basically uncontested. I mean, you can have a contested race in which you know the Republicans are going to win by 40 points, and you know the Democrats are going to be in about 40 points. I mean, look, if you don't have a debate in those, is it good, probably not, but that's the way these districts are shaped. You have to depend on maybe more town halls or more interviews to get what the person actually believes or ask them, you know, if they have a campaign event, you get to ask a question that they'll answer. Those are the realities of life. But what we're seeing more and more, and we're seeing it in two governors races in particular. One is Josh Shapiro and Pennsylvania and then Katie Hobbs down in Arizona. And the interesting part about this is, is they're not saying we're not going to debate because we don't have good ideas. They're saying we're not going to wait because we don't like our opponents ideas. We don't like what our opponent has said. Katie Hobbs and Josh are being cowardly and Katie Hobbs more than she's basically all in TensorFlow. I'm not going to carry because she's what she'd ask about the elections or what she said about track Donald Trump. Again, what Katie Hobbs is saying to the American people. And if I was a Democrat in Arizona, I would be furious that my candidate for governor who wants to lead the state is refusing to get on a debate stage, even one time with Carrie Lake. Look, you might not think that you can compete with Carrie like oratorical. You might even think that, you know, you can't, you know, you get run over. We'll practice. Look, if you're wanting to be governor of the state of Arizona, you dag them well, better know how to stand up for what you believe and how to get it done. And that would be by debating ideas thinking about ideas or tells me that are simply you're going to follow orders from somebody else not yourself.

Katie Hobbs Josh Shapiro Arizona Republicans Carrie Lake Pennsylvania Donald Trump Josh Carrie
CPAC's Matt Schlapp Discusses the Political Climate of New Hampshire

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:50 min | Last month

CPAC's Matt Schlapp Discusses the Political Climate of New Hampshire

"Joining us now is the man behind cpac, great organization and also really understands what's happening in the midterm elections. Better than almost anybody else. Matt schlapp joins us right now. Matt, welcome back to the program. Hey, Charlie, great to be with you from loud New Hampshire. Tell us, what is the vibe on the ground? Do you think both can pull this off? Yeah, for sure. Talked with the general. We just had a town hall in this tavern, and I just came from Nevada, by the way, Adam laxalt is closing really strong in New Hampshire. A lot of people have been tracked New Hampshire because the D.C. insiders didn't they told us it wasn't a pickup opportunity, but I'm here to tell you, Charlie. General's going to win this race in New Hampshire. If you look at just the environment of the issues, it all goes our way. It's all just about defending America. So in New Hampshire, it's a tricky state because Matt you and I have heard for years that New Hampshire is possibly able to be won by Republicans, but it always feels like a near miss state. Why do you think this year is different? Well, I think this year is different because just look at the fundamentals in polling on what the people care about. It really cuts our way. New Hampshire, you know, the big mistake we make in America as we say, oh, there's red states and we say there's blue states. And we assume that some kind of like a lifetime contract, but politics is different. You know that 'cause you're down there in Arizona. It's always changing and what I've noticed just being on the ground in a short time in New Hampshire is what made New Hampshire solidly Republican in previous cycles. I think, is it play again? Our constitution our basic rights as citizens are right to govern ourselves and our own lives and for the government to get out. And not dictate every part of our life. You know, there's a libertarian flair to that that really plays well in a state that whose motto is live free or die.

New Hampshire Matt Schlapp Adam Laxalt Charlie Cpac Matt Nevada D.C. America Arizona
J. D. Vance: Dems Want to Redistribute Money to Their Favorites

The Dan Bongino Show

01:54 min | Last month

J. D. Vance: Dems Want to Redistribute Money to Their Favorites

"You know I watched the town hall and watching Tim Ryan play dumb about the inflation reduction act It was really an insult to everyone's intelligence I mean JD this wasn't hard or complicated to figure out We're going to print a bunch of money We unquestionably don't have We're then going to give it out in Green New Deal handouts in government subsidies to companies I'm frankly not interested in I have a gas powered car And you're shocked that in an 8% plus inflationary environment printing more money was going to add fuel to the inflationary fire And Tim rising but I don't know Playing the sergeant Schultz now So that's one of two things JD either Tim Ryan's an idiot or Tim Ryan's a calculating politician who made the inflation situation worse There's no option to see there Well I'm a generous guy Dan It could be both I can tell you both Look you're exactly right Look people can't afford food right now in the state of Ohio and all across the country He wants to raise middle class taxes and give the money out for rich people to buy electric vehicles does not make an ounce of sense but again this is the thing that I think we have to wake up to on our site and we have to recognize what we're up against If you look behind these policies it's not just redistribution It's very often a redistribution to the Democrats favored interest groups So if you invest in electric cars if you are a green energy person if you have financial stakes in China Democrat policies are not bad for you They're actually good for you So this is not just your granddad's Democrat party that maybe wants to tax the rich a little bit and give it out to the poor This is fundamentally realigning the American economy in a way that's good for financial interests and globalists and that's one of the reasons why we have to beat these guys and beat them good in 6 days

Tim Ryan Schultz TIM DAN Ohio Democrat Party China
Grant Stinchfield on the Most Offensive Comments Biden Ever Made

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:47 min | Last month

Grant Stinchfield on the Most Offensive Comments Biden Ever Made

"To my good friend grant stinchfield, co host of the morning answer with Jennifer horn. That I think we're about the same vintage. We're very, very fine vintage. I can't think of any president of either political party who's done that. Clinton did it when she was running for the presidential with her deplorables comment. This is even worse, basically calling half of America fascists. Give us your perspective as somebody born in America. On what this means and whether the GOP has had a requisite response to such a statement coming from outside of independence hall grant. Well, I will tell you that I think that is the most offensive comments that Joe Biden has ever made. It may be the most offensive comments ever, ever made by a Democrat or any politician against the opposing party. Look, the fact that they would call us terrorists in extremists because we love the constitution because we love freedom because we want government out of our lives because we believe fundamentally that we are better able to make decisions for us and our families than government is for that they call us extremists. We're extremists because we gather for a town hall in Los Angeles. We get a thousand people together and celebrate freedom with great patriots like you and the rest of the Salem radio host that we're on stage that day. That makes us extremists. To me, it is offensive. And I remember going back to my NRA days. I'll never forget when Wayne Lapierre told me. He says grant, they're not coming for the NRA. They're coming for all of our members. And that was in 20 15, maybe. Before it even got worse, he was so right, and it's prophetic because they're not coming for Donald Trump. They're coming for all of us.

Grant Stinchfield Jennifer Horn America Joe Biden Clinton GOP Wayne Lapierre NRA Patriots Salem Los Angeles Grant Donald Trump
J. D. Vance: Tim Ryan Uses Out-Of-State Funding to Act Like a Moderate

Mark Levin

01:36 min | Last month

J. D. Vance: Tim Ryan Uses Out-Of-State Funding to Act Like a Moderate

"Right you know I watched during the break in this program some of this town hall on Fox and I'm listening to Tim Ryan and here's what I conclude Even if he were elected he'd have no cloud He'd had no say he'd wind up voting for Schumer for the majority leader He'd wind up voting for whatever Joe Biden wants All this talk from him about his moderation is if it's all theoretical Because he's going to fall in line like he did before under Pelosi in two seconds He knows how the Washington game is played am I right That's exactly right Mark And this is the whole the whole narrative of his campaign is that he's run away from his own record 20 years in Washington voted with Nancy Pelosi a 100% of the time Voted for $6.7 trillion of tax increases voted to strip police of their qualified immunity came out and defensive banning gas powered cars by 2040 and yet because he's trying to hoodwink the people of Ohio He's now saying that he stands for energy independence for Law & Order for a strong southern border It's all a farce Now here's the thing Mark because he has so much out of state money that the Democrats have poured into this race He is used that money to dominate the airwaves and define himself as much as he can at the moderate It's fake it's not true it's not supported by the record but of course he's got the support of the Democrats in the media as well So if folks want to help us out they can go to JD Vance dot com Mark because this is really the way that we've been able to correct the record over the last two months And I do think that we've done that actually I think people in Ohio realize that this guy is a phony and because of it we're ahead in this race

Tim Ryan Schumer Joe Biden Washington Mark Pelosi FOX Nancy Pelosi Ohio
General Don Bolduc Is on the Brink of Changing New Hampshire

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:53 min | Last month

General Don Bolduc Is on the Brink of Changing New Hampshire

"Don baldick joins us right now. General, welcome to the program. How are things on the ground in the beautiful great state of New Hampshire? Charlie, thank you for having me on. It's great to be on your program. And, you know, things are going great. We have the momentum. She does not her, you know, senator Hassan's campaign has stalled. I wouldn't even call it a campaign. I signed up for 7 debates and we were only going to really debate twice. And that's coming up on Wednesday, the second one. The other one she has changed to forums where she speaks and then she leaves and I come in and speak. So she's afraid to confront the voters. She's afraid to stand in front of the voters and explain to them why her vote, which in many cases would have been the deciding vote has caused people to choose between heating and eating significant diesel fuel, shortages, significant natural gas shortages and open border, high crime, crime is going up here in New Hampshire as well as it is in any other place, the police have been defunded to the point where we can't recruit. We can't retain our state police has openings at a record high. I mean, what she has done to the granite state in America with her votes, she can't account for and she refuses to. On the other hand, I've done 75 town halls. I've been campaigning for over two years, I've been every town and city multiple times, and people are looking for a change. This hurts the Democrats independents, Republicans, libertarians, and free staters up here in New Hampshire. And they are sick of it and all she does is distract from the issues. And everybody is on to her game and we have the momentum.

Don Baldick Senator Hassan New Hampshire Charlie America
Decision Desk HQ Projects the Senate Will Go to Republicans

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:03 min | Last month

Decision Desk HQ Projects the Senate Will Go to Republicans

"Town halls official town hall dot com has an official election results partner decision desk headquarters for the first time in 2022 now specifically projecting that Republicans are going to take control of the Senate 51 49. The decision desk headquarters. Their model and they've run millions of different combinations and 14 million simulations, they've got the U.S. Senate races in Nevada, Georgia and Pennsylvania as the only toss ups while North Carolina, Ohio, Florida and Wisconsin are all lean or likely Republican races. I don't say that to give you a sense of cockiness, don't be complacent, make sure you vote, get ten people, 20 people, 50 people to vote, it's important. It's crucial, but we are 8 days away of quite possibly getting this country back.

Town Halls Official Town Hall Senate Nevada Georgia Pennsylvania North Carolina Wisconsin Ohio Florida
Charles Thorngren on the Value of the U.S. Dollar

The Trish Regan Show

01:42 min | Last month

Charles Thorngren on the Value of the U.S. Dollar

"U.S. dollar have any value? Yes. It's the same value as always had. What you perceived is worth. And that was established when we established a fed. It's interesting you bring up OPEC because we did talk a little bit about bretton Woods in the beginning. And much to nutritious point. At some point, you can't have just a fixed economy. You have to have, when you have a responsible government, it has to have the ability to flex and contract as needed to grow an economy. When you do it responsibly, it's a beautiful thing. When you do it irresponsibly, you have today. But we left the brenton Woods agreement because our currency wasn't doing very well. Our economy wasn't doing very well. And the world decided they wanted the goal that was backed by that dollar because we had the biggest reserve of gold. So we took the dollar off that reserve, so the rest of the world couldn't get our gold. But Nixon did a beautiful, brilliant thing. He said, you can only buy oil with dollars. And that gave us the strength of a country for the past 50 years. So now that we see that oil is being sold in other currencies, we do lose some strength. But not enough to make us not the reserve currency because everyone still has dollars. And they'll spend them out before we have no value. And at some point, things will get fixed here, whether it's ten, 15 years from now, whether it's a massive upset with the way we do things, America will still be America and we will have strength and we'll come back.

Brenton Woods Bretton Woods Opec America Nixon
Charles Thorngren and Trish Discuss Biden's Non-Existent Energy Plan

The Trish Regan Show

01:30 min | Last month

Charles Thorngren and Trish Discuss Biden's Non-Existent Energy Plan

"David Zimmerman asking, do you think the current administration will eventually have to re tap into domestic energy sources or do they want perpetually high gas? This is the good one, David. Do they want perpetually high gas prices? I think it's kind of stupid if you want it because you're not going to get reelected. But what's really going on there, especially when it's so evident, this administration has no energy plan. Well, they came out and said they want to make energy prices more expensive to push the green agenda. That was their goal. And the big question there is, do they have the ability to restart it? It's really not up to them. That's the thing that we have to understand. It's still private companies doing it. The reason they're not putting more money in it because they know this administration wants to shut them down. Why would they put energy into a system that they know that government is going to fight them on? So not only do they have to come out and say, sorry, all those people that we may promise to do that we were all going to be powered by the sun and the wind by the end of my election, they have to get the companies that fund drilling and pipelines and open up pipelines to believe them that if they do it, they're not going to shut them down again in a year in a two years and three years. Because they will lose tons of money by doing that. It's very expensive to get it restarted. So that's a big part of the problem as well.

David Zimmerman David
Are We Actually in a Recession? Charles Thorngren Says YES!

The Trish Regan Show

00:27 sec | Last month

Are We Actually in a Recession? Charles Thorngren Says YES!

"Go down here to Steven, who's asking about whether or not we're in a recession. The administration keeps saying we're not in a recession. And God help me if I daresay we are on social media, but anyway, Charles, we're not on social media right now. So what's the answer? Are we in a recession? By definition of recession, yes, we've been in a recession.

Steven Charles
Charles Thorngren, CEO of Legacy Precious Metals, on Stagflation

The Trish Regan Show

02:05 min | Last month

Charles Thorngren, CEO of Legacy Precious Metals, on Stagflation

"When you hear the likes of Jamie Dimon from JPMorgan smart guy, very, very smart guy, by the way. When he's talking about something that could be worse than a recession, let me ask you Charles before we get to and thank you guys for all your questions before we get to some of these other questions. What does that mean? We're sort of recession. I'll tell you there's depression, right? And then there's collapse. But in between those between recession and depression, you have stagflation. Yeah. Which is massive. Very hard to combat, and this is why the inactivity of the fed is so hard. We know we're going to raise the federates to four and a half percent. We already know that that's a given, right? They've already said that, but we know they're going to go higher. And really what you need for stagflation, 5% on those fed rates, 5% unemployment, and two quarters of a down GDP. So we're almost in a stagflationary period. We're not over again. The more ways than one. It is, because we know, we're not showing too much outside the question, but home prices. You have a massive issue that's coming that people haven't. They're beginning to talk about it, but not in the correct way. When you have interest rates this high and you have houses this on affordable, you now make it tough for people to maintain their houses. To create extra income by refinancing their houses to help spur an economy. Especially one that's in recession. So you have a scenario here where there's not enough housing. We know supplies are limited. And it's only going to get more limited because who in their right mind is going to sell a house. They almost have paid off and get this new loan at 7%. Yeah. We don't have that turnover. It doesn't make financial sense.

Jamie Dimon Depression Jpmorgan Charles FED
Is the U.S. Too Powerful to Damage Other Global Economies?

The Trish Regan Show

01:33 min | Last month

Is the U.S. Too Powerful to Damage Other Global Economies?

"We've got a ton of questions coming in already. So let me start here with Ian. And he's asking that, you know, you've got countries around the world, like here in the UK, U.S. actions that are dragging the pound and other currencies down with saying a U.S. recession is on the way is the U.S. too powerful to damage other countries economies. This is an excellent question. I'm going to let Charles weigh in. I'll give my take sort of first on it. I get a kick out of the left is very sort of, okay, we don't like America. We don't like America. Well, here's the deal. Since World War II, America's kind of it, like we're the game in town, right? And that's because we became the world's reserve currency. Right. And then, and Charles knows more about this than I do. But then, of course, you know, we lost the gold standard. We had all the gold, right, following World War II, and that's one of the reasons why we became the world's reserve currency. And we used a peg, our dollars to the gold. Well, now that we don't anymore, because we undid that whole brand wood system, now that we don't, our Federal Reserve has an enormous amount of power. Enormous amount of power not just over us as individuals in terms of our livelihoods, but the entire world, so look, the U.S. has a massive impact on inflation everywhere else in the world because as the U.S. dollar gets stronger, well, guess what? Every other currency goes down.

America Charles IAN UK Federal Reserve
Kelly Tshibaka: 100% Confidence to Win in Alaska

Mark Levin

01:59 min | Last month

Kelly Tshibaka: 100% Confidence to Win in Alaska

"A 100% confident that we're going to win even though all the polls are still showing us tied 50 50 This is the closest Senate race And the least expensive Senate race in the nation but the way you win a race like this in a state that's twice as big as Texas is you go out and you've got that voter to voter contact grassroots elections still work in America and this is one of the places it works I've knocked thousands of doors just before our interview today I've been out here in I think it might be a warm 15° And I've been out knocking doors and Fairbanks Alaska You've got to meet the voters where they are and talk to them about the issues and persuade them decided voters to vote for you and even Murkowski voters how much she's changed And that they need to come over and vote And we have picked up countless votes that way mark That's one of the ways we're moving the needle And we're in the middle of a two week road trip right now My husband and I all through the state we started on the Peninsula We're moving up to Fairbanks in the interior And we're knocking on all the doors we can having get out the vote rallies in every community we are doing several of these rallies and town halls and then they're having debates and forums Do you know that Murkowski is skipping three of those She just refuses to connect with these voters and she won't talk about these issues with people And those are the reasons why I'm really confident that in less than two weeks alaskans are going to say do we want to politician or do we want a public servant Do we want someone who stands with alaskans and those families that are being crushed those workers that are suffering has shaken those hands and gone to those doors and understands those stories as funded by those grassroots people or do we want the senator who's been standing with Joe Biden and has literally confirmed those radical environmentalist nominees shutting down our state and is funded by all the dark money coming from the establishment in D.C. That's the simple choice before alaskans and our ballot box And I would say Mark that's the choice before every American in every ballot box this year Are you going to pick the candidate that stands with the people Are you going to take the candidate that stands with Joe Biden and the establishment

Senate Murkowski Fairbanks Alaska Texas America Joe Biden D.C. Mark
Jim Hanson and Kurt Schlicter Discuss the Upcoming Midterms

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:50 min | Last month

Jim Hanson and Kurt Schlicter Discuss the Upcoming Midterms

"Do another segment with my co-conspirator and run and buddy colonel Kirk's lictor author of the Kelly Turnbull series inferno. Get it because you will read about what it would be like if all you did all day was shoot bad guys. I kind of think that'd be fun. But Kurt, I want to get into the fun stuff, man. Are we going to win this election? I mean, is this the route that I'm starting to see or am I being a little too optimistic? Well, as my brilliant town hall column today points out, the route has begun. This is where the enemy's formation is about to break. And then the cavalry is going to run them down across the field. Right up there. Dude. I've seen your saber. I have a 1864 cavalry saber myself. I would love nothing more than to be cutting swaths through the woke mob. Well, that's the thing. Figuratively. As you know, in ancient battles, an excellent modern battles, when the enemy's formation breaks and you run them down, that's when you run up to school. That's when you run up the casualties. Now, they're now their play, the traditional play in a wave election where it's Republican Democrat is suddenly it's every man for himself. It's only got a lot of Democrats going, well, you know, I don't know what Biden's doing a really good job. He's doing, I'll stand against him or Republicans abandoning, you know, whoever the president du jour. That can't happen here now the same way because so much of what the Democrats do is now kind of a religious kind of a religious a almost. Yeah, they're committed to it. I mean, it is a secular religion, wokeness in the left now, believe that. If you're not with them, you're either a heretick or an apostate, and they will attack you.

Buddy Colonel Kirk Kelly Turnbull Kurt Biden
Kevin McCullough Dissects His New Article at Townhall.com

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:05 min | Last month

Kevin McCullough Dissects His New Article at Townhall.com

"Article that you write a town hall dot com, you make it real clear that, you know, we shouldn't rest on our laurels. We need to fight, fight, fight, fight, fight, fight, fight, because everything is at stake. And folks, if you didn't know that, you've got problems because everything is at stake. This is a big honking deal, but Kevin, you, whom we have dubbed votes through damas, you are pretty keen eyed when it comes to prognostications, politically. What do you see happening? Well, I got to tell you before I get to that. I was a little bit hesitant to do any prognostications in this cycle because I got beaten down so badly in the 2020 cycle on nothing but the presidential race on the president. Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. Took it in the tea. Why would you bring that up? The presidential race was stolen. Thank you. No, but I mean, you're not familiar with that. I'm very familiar with it. I just want people to say, well, you know, you got it all wrong in 20. Well, I don't think I did. But those people, a, don't listen to this program, be if they do listen to this program, I want them to go away and no longer listen to the program. Because we've covered this AD nauseum, okay? So no longer. I just want to say, I think my map was pretty close in 2020. People outside of this conversation will disagree with you over that point, but I don't care. I hold to my theory. And there's been wasting our time. That's why I think those people. I went ahead and made a promise. About this coming election. And in 22 days, again, reemphasizing what you just said, that the candidates have to work like they are down by 200 points. They've got to work every day. They've got to give an extra stop somewhere. They've got to make an extra speech. They've got to shake more hands. They've got to work and they've got to get their message out. But if they do that through the Tuesday, November 8th, I think there are at least 5 good reasons as to why the Republicans will not win, but win big on that election night.

Damas Kevin Republicans
Colonel Allen West Addresses the Herschel Walker Saga

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:33 min | 2 months ago

Colonel Allen West Addresses the Herschel Walker Saga

"Your take right now on the Herschel Walker situation in Georgia? I know your Friends with Herschel Walker, some conservatives, are turning their back on Herschel and what's your thought on that and how should we react to the media smear job of Herschel Walker? Well, it's good to be with you, Charlie, and it's incredible. I'm out here at your compound in Phoenix, Arizona, and you're there in Texas where I live. So obviously our plan is to pass each other in the middle of the day or tonight. Look, the thing that we have to understand is that there are two different sets of rules for the left and for conservatives. And right now, I think there was an article written in town hall dot com but I think Scott Morgan and he talked about looking beyond these attacks and these things that people are bringing out and focus on, what is the long issue? Do we want to have Raphael Warnock continue to be a senator from the state of Georgia to continue to vote along a very dangerous agenda, which undermines the morality of this country? No person out there is completely perfect. The only perfect person to walk this earth was our lord to say that Jesus Christ. So we all have our flaws. And I think that one of the things we have to start looking at is again. Let's address the issues. And the left is always good about attacking personalities and character that they believe. But I think that in the long run, if you want to talk about who's going to be best for the state of Georgia, who's going to be best as a senator, or the United States of America without a doubt is for sure. And

Herschel Walker Georgia Herschel Raphael Warnock Scott Morgan Charlie Phoenix Arizona Texas United States Of America
Townhall: A Compilation of Joe Biden Pandering to Minorities

Mark Levin

02:16 min | 2 months ago

Townhall: A Compilation of Joe Biden Pandering to Minorities

"Cut one hat tip town hall go I got raised in the black church He knows that I'm not kidding I got my education for real in the black church And that's not hyperbole It's a fact I was sort of raised in the Puerto Rican community at home politically It's a large very identifiable Somali community I might add if you ever come to the train station with me you'll notice that I have great relationships because there's an awful lot of driving cabs I probably went to shore more than many of you did You all think I'm kidding We've got the first sort of mainstream African American Who is articulate and bright and clean Nice looking You can not go to a 7 11 or a Dunkin Donuts Unless you have a slight Indian accent I'm not joking If you have a problem figuring out whether you're for me or Trump then you ain't black Have you taken a cognitive No I haven't taken a test Why the hell would I take a test Come on man That's like saying you before you got in this program you take a test where you're taking cocaine or not what do you think huh Are you a jumper you say to president Trump who brags about his test and makes your number say an issue for voters Well if he can't figure out the difference between an elephant and a lion Young black entrepreneurs are just as capable of succeeding given the chance as white entrepreneurs are But they don't have lawyers They don't have they don't have accountants Poor kids are just as bright and just as talented as white kids What you all know but most people don't know unlike the African American community with notable exceptions but Latino community is an incredibly diverse community Romney wants to let He said in the first hundred days he's going to let the big banks once again write their own rules Unchanged Wall Street You're going to put you all back in chains

President Trump Puerto Romney
"town hall" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

CNN Political Briefing

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

"This is the CNN political briefing. Here's what you need to know when politics for Friday October 22nd. You know, it's compromise become a dirty word, but it's bipartisanship and compromise still has to be possible. That's what President Biden said last night at the CNN town hall as he sold his big domestic agenda plans while they hang in the balance on Capitol Hill. President Biden's town hall on CNN moderated by Anderson Cooper last night in Baltimore was perhaps the newest outing. I've seen this president have in the entirety of his term. We got a more detailed insight into the status of negotiations on his big, domestic agenda items, then I think we normally get from presidents. But we also got the real politic view from inside The White House about how difficult this is. When you're in the United States Senate and your president of the United States and you have 50 Democrats, everyone is a president. Every single one. How we get there, we're down to four or 5 issues, which I'm not going to negotiate in a national television. As you might guess we'd be hearing if you want. Oh, I know. But all kidding aside, I think we can get there. Optimism abounds from all corners of the democratic establishment. The vice president talked about it today as did speaker Pelosi, Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer. The latter two, the legislative leaders, they actually met with the president this morning. And their hopes of announcing a framework agreement that all parties have agreed to, on that build back better plan, they wanted that by today, that does not seem to be the case at least as of three o'clock this afternoon when we're recording this podcast, which means that it's still going to take some time here to solve some of the four or 5 remaining issues as the president described them. And in fact, President Biden sort of got into the nitty Gritty with Anderson Cooper last night very specifically about what's in the Bill, what's changed? What's had to be tossed out of the Bill to get progress on this and get it across the finish line. You're also proposing for the first time ever federal paid parental leave. The one point you talked about 12 weeks now, there's reports it's down to maybe four weeks. Yeah, it is down to four weeks. And the reason it's down to four weeks, I can't get 12 weeks. One of the other things that Democrats are looking to do is to expand Medicare to include dental vision and hearing. Will all three of those still be covered? That's a reach. And the reason why it's a reach, it's not this, I think it's a good idea. And it's not that costly and relative terms. But here's the thing. Mister Manson is opposed to that. Now it'll be critical to watch in the days to come how Bernie Sanders. The president's former rival on the campaign trail if you remember, and the leader of the progressive left in this country, how he is going to respond to this difficulty on that last piece, the Medicare expansion for dental and vision and hearing. But of course, mansion is not the only roadblock here to getting this thing done. Kirsten sinema of Arizona has proven to be a real thorn in the side of the Democratic Party, and President Biden is one of the few people in this town who has some real insight into her thinking. She keeps her cards very close to the vest. And even her own colleagues on Capitol Hill are not always aware where she is in any given moment on this bill. And this was how Joe Biden described where he sees kyrsten sinema. First of all, she's smart as a devil number one. Number two, she's very supportive of the environmental agenda in my legislation. Very supportive. She supportive of all almost all the things I mentioned relating to everything from a family care to all those issues, where she's not supportive, is she says she will not raise a single penny in taxes on the corporate side and or on wealthy people. Period. And so that's where it sort of breaks down. There's a few other issues it breaks down on. As the president said, that's where it sort of breaks down while it's that key part. How are you going to pay for all of this without adding to the debt because he promised it be paid for if the tax rates don't go up on the wealthy and corporations? That's going to be something critical for Joe Biden to solve for this bill to hit his desk and get a signature. Now, apart from the build back better plan, the president made pretty huge news when it comes to the filibuster. Of course, he still doesn't have all 50 Democrats in the Senate willing to change the filibuster rules so that voting rights or police reform can get through the Senate. But the president of the United States went farther than he ever has on showing a real willingness to join the fight with those in his party who've been arguing to get rid of the filibuster even if just specifically on voting rights. If in fact, I get myself into at this moment, the debate on the filibuster. I lose a three at least three votes. Right now to get what I have to get done. But I also think we're going to have to move to the point where we fundamentally alter the filibuster. That remains to be seen. Exactly what that means in terms of fundamentally altering it. And whether or not we just end the filibuster straight up. He didn't want to take up that filibuster reform fight because he'd lose the votes he needs. Right now on this package. But I think what he clearly said was senator mansion, senator cinema, I may get you across the finish line with this bill, but don't think I'm done trying to twist your arms on other key priorities. If you missed the town hall, I urge you to go to CNN dot com..

President Biden CNN Anderson Cooper Senate Capitol Hill Mister Manson United States Chuck Schumer Kirsten sinema Medicare kyrsten sinema Pelosi Baltimore White House Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Democratic Party Arizona
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Injured. This was a pretty big fire. Cleveland Fire says The second alarm brought a total of 60 firefighters at the scene. No cause for that fire. I'm Tom more more than 8400 to Covid 19 cases were reported Saturday in Ohio, Along with 169, new hospitalizations and 26 new ICU admissions more than 3200 Ohioans remain hospitalized with Covid. There were 33 fewer patients receiving treatment for the virus over the last 24 hours. Toledo police say an eight year old girl was killed in a woman is in the hospital after a crash on the Craig Bridge over the Mommy River Saturday morning. Police say 37 year old Christina Price of Toledo was driving west just before 10 o'clock when she crashed through the gates intended to stop traffic on the bridge could be raised with prices carbon crashing into the drawbridge as it was going up. The child was pronounced dead at the scene Prizes condition is not known at this time College football Saturday, third ranked Ohio State falling to number 12, Oregon, 35 28 at the Horseshoe. Toledo had number eight Notre Dame on upset alert in South Bend, taking the lead late, but the Irish would respond with a touchdown seconds later as the Rockets came up short. 32 29 Miami of Ohio, also coming up short losing at Minnesota, 31 26. A rough afternoon for the Ohio Bobcats. They were upset in Athens by du Cane 28 26 can't see it in its home opener Rolls by VM E. 62 10 Akron Falls, The Temple 45 24 at home bullying green, who led by seven after the third quarter, dropping its home opener to South Alabama, 22 19 and young Sound state losing at Michigan State, 42 14. I'm.

Christina Price Ohio Saturday Craig Bridge 60 firefighters Notre Dame Athens South Bend Mommy River Rockets third Tom Ohio Bobcats Saturday morning 169 19 cases Oregon more than 3200 Akron Falls second alarm
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Federal funding state funding private funding partnerships on every level communities engaging, so it's going to take some time. And there's not one answer to fix it all. But all of the combined total will get up there at the end. I believe Said to that's generous director of state policy with Ohio Farm Bureau and Tom Reed, Broadband consultant with re consulting group. Thank you both so much for your time. Appreciate the insights. Thank you. Time take care more our Ohio Weekly after this Many farm families like to plan ahead. But is there such a thing as too far ahead? Ryan Conklin is an attorney with right and more and Ryan, the downfall of any and all plans is that they sit on a shelf and collect dust. Does that go for succession? Plans as well? Absolutely does go for succession plans Tight. I, uh what we look for with clients. You might put plans together when they first have Children, and then they sit there for about 10 20 years and think about 10 20 years. That's a long time on a farm. That's a long time for major family have been Two major life events to happen. How far ahead, though, is considered to be too far ahead. For these plans, plans should be set up to accommodate the next 5 to 10 years. If you start looking too far in the future can really bogged down the process. You can go down. Number of rabbit holes where you start planning for every possibility with that said what types of changes in law or family circumstances call for a fresh look at a plan A good one right now, if something that's pretty popular and farm bureau policy circles as changes in tax law, that's a really good opportunity to pick up the phone or go into your attorney's office and talk to them about what changes need to be made. In your plan, but as far as family circumstances, if you've got a son or daughter that decides to come back and take over the farm or start helping on the fire, you've got other Children that would be considered off farm. There's now you need to look at that plan in the context of helping the foreign survive. We have a matriarch or patriarch that passes away that can be very disruptive. Divorces. You might be another good example as well. But, you know, ultimately, what we encourage clients keep in mind is the goals that they set for their plan to begin with. And as those life changes come along. Just making sure those goals are still worthwhile..

Ryan Conklin Ohio Farm Bureau Ryan Tom Reed both about 10 20 years 5 first Two major life events 10 years one Ohio Weekly Broadband
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"I'm Ty Higgins. And this week Tom Reed joins us. He's a broadband consultant with re consulting group and generous is director of state policy with Ohio Farm Bureau talking rural Broadband and Tom, You've noticed something. Pretty interesting in your studies over the past few years about broadband in rural parts of Ohio. We talked about the disconnect between people have broadband. People don't have broadband. They don't understand. There's another disconnect between urban dwellers and rural dwellers. And I've had a number of people who live in urban areas, and we're talking about how much money it's going to cost to solve this problem going well, why don't we just relocate them to towns where there is broad band and you just kind of do a palm slap on your head? Go, you know, farmers kind of need to be on the farm. We can't move them all into towns and then the grocery stores are empty. And some people just they don't even have an understanding of the supply chain. You know, they just go to Kroger's and Wow, look at all this produce and all this food like, yeah, that came from the farms and those farmers need broadband and their Children need broadband. And that's something that we have directly been using, as one of our reasons for supporting broadband is that we're not seeing The next generation returned to the farm because they don't have the access to jobs, healthcare entertainment All the things that we take for granted, who have access to Internet these areas that don't nobody wants to return to these areas because they are stuck in out Tom phrase that the 19 thirties in a lot of places. So that's a huge challenge that we are facing. As we're trying to get the next generation into agriculture, Tom, What about other methods of connectivity? We see satellites flying over us at night? We we've heard now of of ideas of having rural broadband in airplanes as they fly over the homestead. To get that connectivity for that period of time is broadband. The end all be all There's really no replacement for physical infrastructure, So I use the example of well gee, the road washed out. Let's not repair the road. We'll just have everybody use ultra lights. So we drive your ultra light until you get to someplace that you can get to a road. It's not really an adequate answer, and people go with Tom on ultra lights not similar. It's like well, it is. It's constrained by weather. It's constrained by the train. Add just like wireless Internet services are just like satellite Internet services are so things like StarLink, which Elon Musk's company, where they do the low Earth orbit satellite. It's going to be important. It's going to fill some niches. It's going to provide some competitive pressure, but in really bad weather, it's not going to work in situations where you have even the slightest. College between you and that satellite. It's not going to work and terrain limitations in southeastern Ohio. You have to have a clear view of the northern sky. Well on a lot of southeastern Ohio. You can't do that. So It's interesting. It's not mass market solution that's going to solve our infrastructure problem. Wireless is just very constrained again by the technology itself. The frequencies that are available the foliage the weather. And then five g. A lot of people say Oh, five G's the answer, but five G requires transmitters. Every few 100 ft. And those transmitters have to be connected to extremely high performance fiber networks. So you already have to build the fiber network to get five G. Jenna When we talked about broadband and getting it through this, uh, new Biennial budget, we talked a lot about not just reliable broadband. We also used the word affordable and sometimes some of those other options. Aren't so affordable crack. It's definitely a twofold issue when we're addressing accessibility that that comes before affordability because you have to have the product before you can get to an affordable product, says the The conversation around this broadband program has been on the acceptability side and they had. The state Legislature has said they would like to do more in the future. Regarding Affordability. Last question will go to both of you, Tom. I'll start with you. What could listener due to get involved with this issue? If they feel so inclined, we've got connecting Appalachia dot org a number of ways that people can feel more involved of online survey how they do a speed test so we can pick up their data the next time we get a monthly file. Of that speed test data and kind of articulation of a lot of these common sense solutions. So having a unified voice from rural Ohio that these issues matter, and we don't want to leave any any area behind. I think that's the best thing we can all do. What's your short and long term outlook for broadband? I'm pretty bullish. I think the money that is coming through is going to be extremely helpful. The money coming through the infrastructure bill is going to go through the Department of Commerce instead of the FCC, which I think is a positive thing because we need accountability and transparency on how this money is spent. Apartment. Commerce has a good track record on accountability and transparency, absolutely essential that we really spend this money wisely so that we solve the problem instead of, you know, it's just disappearing again like the past 100 billion Generates final thoughts. Yeah, I think we've talked about. Ty just said this, at least on the state level is the largest investment we've ever seen in broad band from the state of Ohio. So I'm incredibly optimistic. We know it's going to take a lot of time, though we try to set expectations. For our members. Tom really did a great job of outlining a lot of those challenges and talking about how there's not one simple solution. It takes.

Tom Reed Ty Higgins Ohio Ohio Farm Bureau Earth StarLink Kroger Tom FCC Jenna southeastern Ohio both this week one Apartment. Commerce 100 ft 19 thirties 100 billion Elon Musk G
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"To feature someone who will always be one of our own while Keith Step but retired from the Ohio Farm Bureau, he will always be a friend, an example for his leadership here, but also at the Ohio Soybean Council. Let's hear more from Mr Stanford in this week's to the Beat of agriculture, she steppers. We live in Worthington, Ohio, and, uh, I've had a 42 year career with the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation and several different capacities. I mean, I grew up in town, as I say. But, you know, I was thinking about maybe getting into law or getting into medicine or something like that. But With dad and his influence and and, you know, kind of wanting to be of service to others, you know, and feeding, hungry population kind of a pretty cool place to be in terms of helping others and so Um, add kind of hit home and that encouraged me. You know, telling me about the great people in agriculture they give they did work with so and so forth. So, uh, just kind of came home. With the big at school here in Ohio Miami University now that just getting there, but I went to Miami and had a chance to study overseas. At the time I was studying economics and international trade. And had occasion to kind of research the AG policy of your European Union and, you know, I kind of came home from that saying I'm going to turn this economics degree into agriculture, economics and and kind of worked on that. This is funny, But.

42 year Ohio Farm Bureau Federation Ohio Farm Bureau Keith Step European Union Stanford Miami Ohio Soybean Council Ohio Miami University Worthington, Ohio this week
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"The last several years. I believe, potentially as long as I've been here, so I've been with Farm Bureau for five years, so I will. I'll speak to that at least the last five years. It's been a priority issue. And we have really only for the first time gotten traction with it End up Covid or post Covid world where everyone understands. Yep, we get it. This problem is huge, and we were not prepared for a global pandemic because we didn't have half of our Ohioans connected to reliable, fast enough Internet to support all the functions that needed to happen during The shutdown. So we have been working on this for about five years. But diligently, uh, due to interest for the last couple of years, So right now I know that we've talked a lot about the rural broadband X An expansion program and the $250 million of the state just voted through the state budget for that program. Currently, they're working on the administrative rules through the Department of Development, and so we have been in contact with them to make sure that rural Ohioans needs are met. Couple of things that we've noted or just Hey, how can residents asked questions about why their residential address is not included in the project area? Another is most of the, um Notice the public notice that we've seen it's not all of it is online. And question is, if our 50% of Ohio and don't have access to the Internet, and I know a lot of our members don't have email addresses. How are they supposed to find out about this? We need some type of Publishing in a newspaper or something to make sure that that information is getting out to the rural residents who we are trying to connect to the Internet point, Tom there's still a I mean this with no pun, but there's still a disconnect between those that have and those that have not. There's just not not that understanding that some people simply can't get online. Right now, it is really difficult. It's about 720,000 households in Ohio that don't have access to even 25 megabits down, three megabits up, and we think a lot of those. There's just no availability at all. And you know those of us who have it. We do just assume that it's out there. And so we have an email distribution. My story post information on the website as genocide talking about and it's not sufficient now. A lot of people do gain access through our excellent library system and the network that supports the library systems, and some people get access when they go into the office. Of course, A lot of offices were closed during the pandemic as well. You talk about how old this problem is, I'll really date myself. Here in 1994. I chaired a committee for the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio and the subject was Universal Service and we identified at that point. That most rule, Ohioans could not have 56 kilobit per second access on their modems. That was the common speed that was available and already in 1994. The copper was not sufficient to support those modem speeds. So really rule rural Ohio and most of rural America has been in a digital divide for the entire Internet age. And the frustration levels and a lot of these areas. It's totally understandable why people are so frustrated with the broadband situation. Jenna. This show airs in some major metropolitan areas where people didn't have to worry about getting online through the pandemic. What were some of the challenges that rural Ohio face through the 2020 pandemic and early 2021, for that matter. What are some of the things some of the stories you heard some of the things that not having rural broadband caused? Like Tom was saying how they're most people rely on other locations to get access to the Internet, and they all shut down libraries offices. McDonald's everywhere that our members had typically used to get access had been cut off. So we have heard stories of families going to their, uh, sell company to try to buy more service and they've used it up because parents are working and kids are all going to school. So that eats up the entire plan with in a very short amount of time, or I've heard of Parents driving around with their cell phone, trying to find enough service to to submit a assignment for their kids. So it got pretty dicey during the pandemic, and I will say there are a couple of urban areas that also lack access to the Internet. And I'm not sure if that's because of the strict access issue or if it's more of an affordability challenge. They do know that Our urban counterparts in minor areas struggle throughout the state as well. That's really good point. You know, That's one of the things we discovered in our mapping. The analysis we did was based on this Kukla speed test intelligence data. Where if you Google.

1994 $250 million five years Google 50% Tom 25 megabits Ohio Department of Development early 2021 Public Utilities Commission Jenna three megabits 2020 first time Farm Bureau 720,000 households McDonald's Kukla about five years
"town hall" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

CNN Political Briefing

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

"The filibuster respond to president biden saying nothing would get done and there would be chaos in washington basically saying he is not anywhere near supporting the demise of the filibuster and on the economy and inflation. President biden said that he believes the inflation that we're seeing the real rise in prices that we've seen in certain areas of the economy is going to be temporary and he believes he said that the injection of trillions of dollars of more spending primarily aimed at middle and working class americans and poor americans will actually keep unchecked inflation at bay all of which is why he does not subscribe to the notion that inflation is here to stay prices going to keep going up and up and up and that that will be the way our economy is for the long term. Obviously for the twenty twenty two midterms. He better hope he's betting right. And finally i just want you to hear from joe biden himself because i think he gave an answer last night. That sort of encapsulated. The entire rationale of his presidency. The kinds of things that are being said of late. I think you're beginning to see some of the democrats as well sorta venom get sort of sort of leak out of a lot of it. We got to get beyond this. What do you say to your grandchildren or your children by what's happening. Do you ever remember a time like this before the entire history whether you're a democrat or republican this is not who we are the rest of the world's wondering about us. Those of you travel abroad. Not a joke out of joe you ask you know when i went to this g seven. All the major democracies. I walked in. I know a lot of them because of my role in the past and they walk in. I said america's back and they go. I'm serious has a state. I give you. My word is by. So are you really back. I mean how. Can we believe you joe but will the country ever get it together. You'll recall he campaigned on restoring the soul of the nation. And when don lemon pressed him last night on the news about the demise of the one six select committee and kevin mccarthy pulling the republican members. And how we've gotten to this place where even an attack on our democracy. We can't have sort of an agreed upon path. Forward to find the truth in that and joe biden gave the answer that the reason he believes that the politics in our country are not permanently. Broken is because of his faith in the american people and then he went on to say that he thinks he sees sort of the poison atmosphere in american politics for the last several years starting to drain away and he connected it to how america also is perceived on the world stage and the questions that hang around that because of our politics this is joe biden getting at the core of why he sees his presidency as a consequential one that does it for today's political briefing. Thanks so much for listening and please follow us wherever you get your podcast. We'll talk to you tomorrow..

president biden President biden joe biden washington joe don lemon kevin mccarthy america
"town hall" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

CNN Political Briefing

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

"Hey everyone. I'm david chaldean. The cnn political director. This is the cnn political briefing or on the road for one last day here in cincinnati ohio. After joe biden's big town hall last night so sorry of the audio quality is not quite what you're used to but here's what you need to know in politics today. Thursday july twenty second twenty twenty one. Joe biden got a range of questions from voters here in ohio last night at cnn's townhall and he made some key news in big topic areas. So today we're bringing you the highlights of the town hall and my quick takeaways. First and foremost covert president biden made his most urgent plea to unvaccinated americans to get vaccinated. He basically said that the current surge in cova that we're seeing across the country is largely a pandemic of the unvaccinated and in his most stern language. Nearly begging the american people to be able to put this pandemic truly behind us is to have the remaining americans who are unvaccinated. Get the shot. So that life can return to normal fully for all americans beyond that most critical issue of the pandemic joe biden made a pretty interesting comment about the infrastructure negotiations on capitol hill. He sounded more bullish on being able to get a bipartisan. Deal done then. He probably has at any point since he initially announced the deal with those republican senators. He said he is hopeful that on monday. There will be a vote to actually move forward and proceed with this. Bipartisan agreement in the united states senate. We saw that vote fail yesterday. But that did not in any way dissuade joe biden from thinking. He's going to be able to get this across the finish line. Another topic that has dominated the washington political discussion during the biden presidency. Is that of the filibuster. And how much. Joe biden's agenda can get done. If there isn't filibuster reform. He was specifically pressed by my colleague. Don lemon on that last night about voting rights but joe biden gave his most clear concise. Answer as to why he doesn't yet support jettisoning the filibuster. He has talked about tradition in the past and the notion of may be trying to get back to the talking filibuster but last night joe biden said if the filibuster just goes away and democrats get rid of it that there will be chaos in washington and nothing will get done so now be on the lookout to see how progressives who are eager to get into.

joe biden cnn david chaldean big town hall ohio biden cova cincinnati capitol hill Don lemon senate united states washington
"town hall" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"The vast majority of the experts including wall street are suggesting that it's highly unlikely that's going to be long term. Inflation is going to get out of hand. There will be near term inflation because everything is now trying to be picked back up and by the way. That's one of the reasons why i also signed an executive order dealing with the whole idea of competition. You know the idea that we're in a situation where there are so many companies who are keeping people out of the competition over six hundred thousand people out there signing six million people signing a check number of society. Non compete agreements. Not because they have state any secret but because they were worked for one fast food restaurant and they're told they can't get ten cents more going across town going the other fast food restaurant why to keep wages down and so what's happening now. All of a sudden people are having choices you know. I always thought the free market system was not only that there's competition among companies. But guess what companies should have to compete for workers. You what maybe we'll pay more money. Okay sounds good but there's a little sleight of hand here in what he's doing first of all wall street is starting to say inflation's going to be around for a while and the bigger issue is growth economic growth because the viral rebound. But there's something else as well. Four former treasury secretary this back to axios former treasury secretary larry summers who has warned about inflation. Since january met with the white house last week summers told axios who he doesn't think that the one point two trillion dollar hard infrastructure package being negotiated with congress will increase inflation. But the rest of the spending could additionally though the white house said during the president said during the cnn townhall in cincinnati there will be near term inflation. The vast majority of the experts on wall street or suggesting. It's highly unlikely that long-term inflation is going to get out of hand. They are also saying that it won't get out of hand because it's going to happen in the feds are gonna raise rates and that's going to slow growth. There's a carve out there. The experts are saying yes. Inflation won't last long term because the fed will raise interest rates and that's going to cripple growth. He's ignoring that but again going back. What are the experts say. What is larry summers say. It's the spending that's causing the inflation. The mass amount of federal spinning is causing the inflation. So what did joe biden say last night. Only look. Here's dale moody's today when our wall street firm not some liberal think-tank said if we pass the other two things. I'm trying to get done. We will in fact reduce inflation. Reduce inflation reduced inflation. Because we're going to be providing good opportunities and jobs for people who in fact are going to be reinvesting that money back in all the things we're talking about driving down prices not raising prices and so it's is i. I sincerely mean this prices are up now and they're up for example. You're in a position where you're trying to build a house. Try to find two-by-fours the lumber. Well guess what. People stop working cut lumber..

axios larry summers treasury white house summers dale moody cnn cincinnati congress joe biden fed
"town hall" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Pollsters are starting to scream. But he did. I'll play the audio when we come back. Listen i got to spend some more time on. Joe biden's townhall with don lemon last night. But there's actually some other really really big big news and we need to spend a few moments. We'll get back to jill biden but this may be the biggest news of the day in america texas and oklahoma. Wanna move into the sec. And i kinda. I've always preferred the the longhorns to the aggies in the sec although it did make sense for the aggies to be they're not a big aggie face. Sorry rick i'm sorry governor secretary and i'm sorry i'm i'm i've always liked the longhorn cheerleaders That that's that's what it is If i'm honest about it but a so he would bring it. You know i missouri. I mean it's the this sec. I never quite understood why. Missouri was being brought into the sec. But if you're gonna bring missourian and you're gonna bring texas in you might as well. Bring the longhorns in an oklahoma and then divided up four ways so that you got the these rivalries 'cause like lsu. It's big rivalry is with arkansas. And every thanksgiving you got the big rivalry game. Of course you've got alabama and auburn. Big rivalries georgia and florida big rivalries Texas and oklahoma but also texas and texas am. I mean the texans fight with everybody. And i just i in you know you do have to put vanderbilt tennessee on field together because both teams suck. And you've got to figure out which ones sucks the most and the mississippi state and ole miss after after played out. So how'd you divide this up there. There's another side of it. Though that i think is very important here and that is if all of the teams that are good are in the sec. Doesn't that make the national championship the sec championship and then the actual national championship which will have ohio or or giner team. Nobody cares about except the pig farmer..

sec aggies don lemon oklahoma texas jill biden Joe biden longhorns rick missouri america Missouri lsu arkansas auburn alabama vanderbilt georgia florida Texas
"town hall" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"You. I want to go to the phones. jeremy is calling about biden. Jeremy welcome to the program. Hey good afternoon eric. I just wanted to bring up that. I just see a lot of inflation which will to different aspects of of employees. You know we got orders dealing with a minimum wage but we also got you know risk front workers who you justice on dealing with the minimum wage. But that's two different things. One has the option of the option the availability to make more third through tips whereas the factory wasn't yeah that's never equation. And i you know you hit on it. And i'll just listen to you. Yeah you know. That's actually a really good point. I hadn't thought of jeremy. I appreciate you calling in and raising it. Because you're right restaurant workers. They tend to actually make less than minimum wage. Whatever minimum wages they make some discount of minimum wage On the assumption that tips will make it up and in reality overwhelmingly They make more now in fashion in restaurants where there's not tipping so for example. A fast food restaurant. They do make minimum wage. but we're not talking about those restaurants. We're talking about your fine dining establishments. They can't get workers to come back and in many cases. I mean i know what i tip i mean i i will say i honestly i. It's the way my dad raised me. My dad raised me to tip very well. In fact i remember kid My dad always tipped in cash because he didn't want to have to deal with the whole credit card stuff And occasionally when. I was a kid my mother would have to send me back into take back some of the tip or leaguer. I remember that distinctly on a few occasions. My dad likes to tip well And i do the same thing. I fundamentally do the exact same thing Sometimes if i go to waffle house in particular. I tend to tip About fifty percent of what. The bill is and 'cause i know they could use it and you know what i'm sure. They appreciate it. And i know they appreciate it and it also helps your service in the future but also they because of it tend to make more than minimum wage buddy mind runs a fine dining establishment and his workers not only get well above minimum wage and benefits and vacation pay and tips. He still having trouble hiring people to work in the restaurant. They're paying more than fifteen dollars. An hour they give benefits they vacation pay and they are still not able to retain people. It's a remarkable problem in the country. And if joe biden says because they got other opportunities he's not living in the real world. You know this gets back to you. Know when george. H w bush was president and then running against bill clinton in nineteen ninety two. The media was complicit with the democrats in running a campaign against him that he was a very nice man but he was out to lunch he had been in washington for so long could relate to people. The media will never do that to joe biden but part of that. I wonder is. The problem. has joe biden just been washington's along he really believes the stuff he's out to lunch on the stuff Because it's not true but that's not the only stuff he talked about last night. That is deeply problematic. You know inflation. Democratic pollsters are now telling the democrats you have a problem. Polling is going against you now on inflation. It's going to hurt you. And the president said last night undercuts the democrats ability to deal with inflation. And i was really stunned. He was willing to go there in light of what democratic..

jeremy biden Jeremy eric joe biden bill clinton washington bush george
"town hall" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Rehire the deputy junior assistant undersecretary of of of call screening after. I beat golf yesterday. figured i humiliated him enough on the golf course and i humiliated myself. And that's how bad he was that. I probably didn't need to keep him employed so nonetheless you can call today. The real culture is back. If i just if a tree falls in the forest and no one's around doesn't make a noise of this is a longtime question. If joe biden dozen national townhall and no one watched diddy actually do it. It's remarkable how little news coverage there is of joe. Biden's news conference last night. In fact the lead story at cnn. Today is actually about Kevin mccarthy and the gop not joe biden which is fascinating to me that they're giving the headlines or moving across the screen fury in congress is gop hides trump crimes. Five take away from biden townhall judge forces. Us capitol rioter to unlock laptop seized by fbi. And underneath that. Like listening to nixon. Drunk rambling. anderson. Cooper reacts new trump audio. That's it's a fascinating dichotomy there these stories about Gop bad are high listed higher on his website. Then joe biden's town hall. That was done with don lemon at cnn. Last night there really is not a lot of coverage of what he said. And when you listen to some of it you kind of understand why there is not a lot of coverage of joe biden's townhall. This is joe biden last night. Here's the question that was asked. This is the question asked win. Will children under twelve be able to get vaccinated. That is the question. Joe biden was asked. This is joe. Biden's answer that's underway. Just like the other question is logical. And i've heard you speak about it. Because y'all i'm not solicits but you you're always straight up about what you're doing and the question is whether or not we should be in a position where you are. Why can't the the experts say. We know that this virus is in fact. It's going to be are. We know why all the drugs approved or not temporarily approved but permanently approved..

Joe biden Gop biden townhall golf cnn Kevin mccarthy Biden joe don lemon nixon fbi Cooper congress town hall anderson Us
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Is our Ohio Weekly. I'm Ty Higgins from a battlefield to a farm field. This is to the beat of agriculture today. In our weekly segment, you're going to experience the story of one soldier who felt a sense of duty back in 2000 and one, however, after a series of life changing events, he still has that same feeling of direction. But in a different type of field, Matt Sharp from Native Hut in Ohio, and I am the owner operator of VDs Ranch. I was in high school and 9 11 happened and I remember just watching that go down. And I just kind of thought for our generation like this is the time for people to step up. I left for basic training, and then I went to airborne school. Immediately following that. From what it sounds like I'll go down the Fort Bragg and get signed into the 82nd airborne and then we're going to I'll be back up for Thanksgiving. Well, whenever I arrived in my unit at Fort Bragg, The guy said. Normally, we'd have you outside in the sandpit make any of you all kinds of crazy stuff. But here's the packing list. We're going to Iraq next week. So I called my mom and I'm like, Mom, I'm not coming home for Thanksgiving. We went to Iraq for four months, and that first night I remember hearing a firefight going on out in Baghdad, and it was, you know, I just laid there looking at the feeling of the tent like This is what I signed up for, like It's time to do what I signed up to do. I've had bullets were praised by my head so close you can feel the wind. You know if I was six inches to the right it would have hit me would have been shot if someone's injured and they're laying out there where they're inspire. You know, bullets are flying. Someone's going to run out there and get them. You know that people don't think twice about it. It's just they don't know It doesn't even cross their mind that this could be the last decision I make on the services to run out here. To help my buddy..

Matt Sharp Ty Higgins Baghdad Iraq VDs Ranch 2000 next week Ohio four months six inches twice Fort Bragg one soldier Thanksgiving one today 82nd airborne Native first night 9
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Want to know a little bit more about those extremes as well. And how does that affects, for instance, planning dates and harvest dates? And how can we take steps to mitigate some loss there? Dr Robin Wilson. I think the example that comes to my mind is something that Aaron just mentioned there with the planting dates in the harvest dates that the windows seem to be getting a little bit narrower. As we see the climate start to shift. What are some of the ways that agriculture might be impacted by climate change? And is it all negative? It's not all negative, right? So there's the potential for longer growing seasons as well. So if you're planting date in a given year kind of shifts earlier in your harvest eight shifts later, you've got a longer growing season. And so there's even, you know, opportunities for double cropping, which could be could be considered a benefit. So there are certainly some some opportunities. But like Aaron mentioned, I think what we hear farmers, uh, concerned about and mentioning are those shifts in those dates. But the uncertainty and the variability in that it's not like we're going to get a consistent longer season are consistent, shorter season. It's every year. It's a surprise. And I remember in 2019, you know specific farmers saying, you know, I always thought will always get the crop in like, no matter how late it is, we'll get it in and then 2019 happened and crops never got planted And so Those sorts of events and interestingly, we sent this survey that we conducted out in the late summer of 2019 and we the timing of that was not on purpose. Um, it's just kind of how it works, and we thought either farmers will be so frustrated by the weather. That they'll see a survey with changing weather patterns on it and throw it away or they'll be so frustrated that the one away in so we actually kind of sent this out. I think at a at a good time, I hope where farmers were aware of these sorts of impacts and then giving us feedback on the impact that those sorts of shifts and the dates and changes in rainfall. Er, more importantly, like Aaron said. The timing of the rainfall getting it all in the spring is not when you want it. Um, and so we're able to get their thoughts on how that's impacting them and how they might want to respond. Dr. Robin Wilson is professor of risk analysis and decision science at Ohio State's School of Environment and Natural Resources. Within the college of the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Dr. Aaron Wilson also joins us this week on our Ohio Weekly research scientist at Ohio State's Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center. And Dr Mary Deutsche assistant professor of agricultural economics at McGill University in Montreal. Dr George What did the survey ask in particular to these farmers that and how was the response to this survey? Yes, well and let me just say to you that we had to kind of on the fly adapt the survey because it was implemented in late summer 2019 to just ask how they had experienced that spring, and if it had changed, change their planting at all. The survey asked about their current practices that they had taken other farm what kind of experience that already had with climate change in terms of what changes they noticed on the operation over the past three years. I think we framed it as um, since they began farming what changes have they noticed the growing season become longer? Have things become more variable as their planting date where it used to, maybe be more consistent, and now it's become more variable. And then asked what action be taken to deal with some of those changes whether they have purchased new equipment to make planting quicker whether they have changed the varieties that they grow, whether they made changes to their crop insurance plans to kind of to account for some of this variability, and then we gave them different scenarios based on Erin's work about their like the impacts in the future of climate change. And as presenting them with these scenarios and saying Now, if this was the scenario with the planting date was 30 days sooner you had this much more rainfall went changes Would you make to your operation in the future? Would you put more land and conservation? Would you purchase more equipment? Would you change your crop insurance plan but again, just to kind of ask how they would change in the future. Given this Potential new scenario. What did you find out? Our farmers actually thinking that far ahead. Um some of them are some of the heart the in terms of the applications they've already taken on their farm. It tends to be the more incremental adaptations, so they made some changes to the varieties that they plan to maybe looking for more resilient varieties. To reduce some of that, um, that variation. They made some changes to their crop insurance plans. Maybe adding a little bit more coverage or a different, you know, switching to revenue insurance rather than just yield coverage, installing more tile drainage. Maybe you know these things that they've already done kind of doing more of them. And in terms of the future scenarios, the kind of came out into a couple of groups. So there was one group that whatever we would give to them, it really wouldn't make much more of an adaptation. And these farmers tended to be older, You know, maybe more established in their ways, um, and wouldn't be affirming that much into the future. So weren't really thinking too much about what they would have to do to adapt to this climate is changing weather patterns, ones who tended to adopt more again. They were taking more of those incremental adaptations. Um, so, you know, switching variety. Is maybe installing mortality image but the ones they were more likely to adapt. They typically intended, um so that they would pass their farm on to future generations. Um, so kind of thinking more of What would happen in the future? Um, not just for them, but for their family members, and they tended to be larger farms. I think that's the other consistent kind of difference. We see as the group who were kind of like, No, I'm not going to change anything, no matter what the future brings. That was about a third of our farmers and like Mary said they tended to be older, operating smaller farms using more traditional Methods like conventional tillage versus more limited forms of tillage, and they even reported less experience with climate impacts. Maybe that's because they've been doing it longer, and they seem seem more variation, and they chalked it up to normal. Variation in the weather. But then about two thirds of our farmers to varying degrees did report wanting to change things. And, yeah, like Mary said. It tends to be kind of doing more of maybe what they've done before, but as a way to mitigate that risk. But again, we saw some of those differences where those groups did experience. You know more of those impacts in a negative way did operate larger farms would probably have to have greater capacity to make these changes than the smaller farms do. And then the one that we found her. I found most interesting as a behavioral scientist was that those who are more likely to keep the farm in their family. They were the ones who reported the most adaptation in the future. And we in behavioral science. We often study as humans how when we think about our legacy, and we think about what we want to leave behind, and how we want to be remembered, we tend to do more sustainable things. So I thought it was really interesting that farmers who were thinking about that kind of long term transition.

2019 Robin Wilson Mary Aaron Aaron Wilson Montreal Mary Deutsche George late summer 2019 30 days McGill University Ohio State's School of Environ late summer of 2019 Erin College of Food, Agricultural this week Byrd Polar and Climate Researc one group Ohio State Ohio
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Morning in Cleveland. Five people were killed and four others were injured after three separate shootings took place within 90 minutes of each other. A 23 year old man was killed in the Glenville neighborhood. Another man died after he was shot in Fairfax and in the Kingsman neighborhood. Three men to 40 year olds in a 36 year old man were all killed in a shooting in the 8800 block of Buckeye Road. Those injured included three women and a man. A stabbing at a Columbus gentleman's club left one person dead. Early Saturday morning. Police were called the confidential Gentlemen's Club just after 2 30. 34 year old Clyde Woods Jr died from his injuries among Caramel East Hospital. A man accused of stabbing a 74 year old woman more than 30 times earlier this month, was taken into custody early Saturday morning in Mansfield. 19 year old Isaac Lawhorn was arrested at an apartment in the 100 Block of East Cook Road. He's charged with Felonious assault and is being held at the Richland County Jail. The condition of the victim is not known. The final Jeopardy answer is an audio clue. Katie with 7999, u R R Jeopardy champion. The question is who is Katie Sokolski of Kent, who works as a graphic designer. In the main street can volunteer Czajkowski won jeopardy Friday night and we'll be back Monday with Savannah Guthrie starting here two weeks as a guest host, actress and neuroscientists Biamby Olic was the guest host on Friday. Former Cleveland Indians pitcher Jim Mudcat Grant died Saturday at the age of 85 Grand began his career with the tribe playing in Cleveland from 1958 to 1964 and made the All Star team in 1963. While with the Minnesota Twins, Grant became the first black pitcher to win 20 games in a season in the American League and the first black pitcher to win a World Series game for the American League. Grant would play for seven different teams during his major league baseball career, which ended in 1971. A cause of death is not known. I'm Sean Gallagher, keeping you up today to a trending news stories at the top and bottom of every hour. Columbus is used is on news radio 6 10. W T V. N. There's a.

Katie Sokolski Sean Gallagher Isaac Lawhorn Savannah Guthrie Clyde Woods Jr Minnesota Twins Fairfax 1963 Mansfield 1971 Monday Glenville Biamby Olic Czajkowski 20 games 1958 Jim Mudcat Grant Grant Five people Kingsman
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:55 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"FARMING Ohio Farm Bureau together with farmers Our Ohio Weekly with Ty Higgins continues after this Columbus is news radio 6 10 w T. V N Another round of covert 19 checks will be going out to the vast majority of American households very soon. The $900 billion covert stimulus package includes up to 13 billion and funding that directly benefits agriculture and that help reaches even farther across the farm spectrum in the bill passed earlier this year. My entire Higgins joined by a Brandon Curran. He is the senior director of State National Policy with O F B F Hi, Brandon. Hi. Hi. How are you doing? Fine. You've been following this very closely over the past week, and I mentioned that there are some sectors of agriculture that will see some support This time around that maybe didn't see it the first time. What sectors are they? Yeah, I think that's probably the most important component to the bill. To be really honest with you, Ty. I mean, if you look at, um you know, livestock producers in particular, I think are really going to see benefit here that they hadn't seen an earlier phases. There's been a lot of coverage in the news about disruptions in the supply chain. We all know that And for those producers when those backups have occurred, they really, you know, felt the impact of and so if you have producers who have felt the impact in terms of Of having to depopulate. You know their livestock not being able to move them to the market. There are provisions in this bill. They're going to allow them to recover up to 80% of the market value for those animals, So that's gonna be a tremendous help for producers who found themselves in that situation. Similarly way you know, have many operators across the spectrum do work on contract on before you know those growers who experienced this Russian contracting. Their contract was canceled when the contract was delayed because of those logistics supply chain issues that were created in the middle of the covert crisis. They're also going to be able to seek some relief up to 80% of the losses that they incurred. From those canceled contracts or delay contracts earlier in the year, so there's air. There's a huge benefits again, Both of those examples covered in this bill that weren't addressing all in earlier release packages. Mentioned that food supply issue we saw earlier in the year and and Gary was one of the first ones that we saw have issues at the front end and the back end of the food supply chain. Nearly $1 billion of this bill going to support a dairy donation program and supplemental dairy margin coverage payments for small and medium sized producers across the country when you look at those, especially in non specially crop growers, they got some things earlier this year in that first bill. Well, that Support Continue? Absolutely. You know, we see in this bill some additional supplemental payments for that seat hat program. Um, earlier they were, you know, growers were able to, um, recover, you know 80% of their losses. This is just gonna be a straight on a per acre payment for in this bill, so a $20 per acre payment. For those growers. That and the situation, so that's you know, continued support from Congress. You have clearly showed that they recognize you know how big of an impact the pandemic has had on on agriculture and Grover's Cross country, the correlation between the issues you and I were talking about in this bill, and the priority issues that came out of our annual meeting just a couple of weeks ago are amazing. We talked about the Meat processing and the livestock producers seeing trouble dairy producers on one of the policies that came out one of our priority issues for 2021 is rural broadband. What are we seeing in this bill as far as that's concerned Yeah, a lot of important work being done in this bill for you know, just rural communities in general, which we obviously supported Farm Bureau. $7 billion will be allocated in the relief package for broadband development, including 300 million for rural broadband on specifically 250 million for tele health issues. I know that that's something that people across rural Ohio have continued to be concerned with. Access to broadband being able to, you know, take advantage time. Health. Certainly in the wake of covert has become top of mind for a lot of Ohio. And so I think that's really important work that that farm here is very supportive of Finally, we thought very hard earlier this year for the P p p the Paycheck protection program. Many Ohio Farm Bureau members took advantage of that in the first bill is that part of this new package as well? Absolutely. There's gonna be another infusion into the p p p p program. I think this is really important as well for rural communities and are partners, not just farms who can absolutely take advantage of this, But you know our partners across the food spectrum. If you look at the situation that we are partners, for example in the restaurant industry are facing. It's really just dire and certain in certain circumstances. And so a new $284 million infusion into that. Program will provide a significant level of help for small businesses across the spectrum, and there's more focus on small businesses. So they've reduced the size of the number of employees that they're targeting this time around out of 300 employees and you know, so they're trying to target the smaller mom and pop operation small business in particular who are really in need right now. Brandon current, a senior director of state national policy with Ohio Farm Bureau. He's still going through this bill and finding out all those little nuggets that could help the agriculture sector. Of course, at the national level. The American Farm Bureau also going through this and they'll be updating us and we'll be updating you on. You can actually click on the link on this post, and you can get all the details from the American Farm Bureau federation. Braden Appreciate your time. Thanks for the insights. Thank you. This week is a big week for from you remembers all across the country and it's gonna be a little bit different than the usual American Farm Bureau annual convention. As this year's convention is going virtual with that said, it means everybody involved in farm bureau and those curious about the organization can join in for free and see what.

American Farm Bureau federatio Ohio Farm Bureau Ty Higgins FARMING Ohio Farm Bureau Ohio senior director Brandon current Brandon Curran Farm Bureau. Columbus depopulate Braden Grover Congress Gary
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Our guest this week, Susan Schwalier's president of food and beverage with MPD Group, and Kevin Ryan is founder of Malice shite Strategies. They talked about some of the top food innovations of 2020 due to the covert 19 pandemic, obviously in the home space with countertop kitchen appliances. We start tremendous growth there and re engagement. I do think some of the innovation in the home space you like air fires. The poster child has been great because it's allowed consumers to Have a better experience quicker. There's lots of benefits they've offered. You know you You cannot underestimate the pivot towards digital, both in the restaurant world that was doing it quite well with delivery Third party delivering curbs curbside pickup, but they even pivoted faster. And you can't underestimate what's gone on with that acceleration at grocery retail, so that has just grown exponentially. And, yes, it may moderate Because some people do enjoy the shop, but it's not going to go back to where it Woz. It is going to be much larger part of our our life. So I would say that's another Another thing That's been, you know, really, really big. They increased both piss and online shopping for edible grocery. I do think that going forward both for CPG, consumer packaged goods and restaurants. I think that there's gonna be we're gonna have to start thinking stop thinking about there's the restaurant way to get food. And then there's the There's the There's a grocery store way to get food. Consumers don't think about Isles they think about. I need cereal, right? So it's the same thing Now. It's like, how do I get it? Pick up my phone. It could be Kroger or or Walmart or Amazon. Or it could be zul. It's all about accessibility, right? Yes. What What is going to do it for me? And if you think about this in a way and Samsung with the refrigerator that's got the hub, the kitchen hub. Think about it. I mean, there are kind of ahead of their time, but that's potentially As technology and spark comes into the kitchen and really meaningful ways that really becomes it, especially with this personalization that you're talking about. We have appliances. Whether it's gonna be a refrigerator, your wearable or whatever, it's going to come together and understand your inventory, your preferences and all of that, and it's gonna you're gonna have a screen that's going to show you how to cook. It's going to reorder. And it's not. The kitchen is gonna be the hub. That's right, whether it comes from the ghost kitchen or our distribution center, and that's how retail I think is gonna have to shift. I don't know when it'll happen down the line. But I think now, though, is the pivotal moment And the reason I say that is because Right now, It's still humans picking and choosing my list of grocery and all that kind of stuff. I can see a future where digital assistants take a lot of that. And you are you as a manufacturer US A restaurant are trying to pitch to a digital assistant because they're going to be the gatekeeper for most. That sounds futuristic, but that is not to drink it, Doctor. That bubble that is, there's already stuff that you don't see when you go on Google. Because the algorithm already kind of screens it out because it's not fit your thing. Home meal preparation has certainly taken off over the last 10 months. I have made more meals in the last 10 months than I have for the last 10 years, I suppose, and Susan Swallowing and Kevin Ryan's say that trend may last quite a while. One of the things I think about people being involved with their meal preparation more. And with having these concerns about help. I think it's caused them to really reevaluate. To an extent. What are they eating and putting in their food? And so I think that that mentality is going to carry forward and one of the things I think about with restaurants and their metamorphosis is who is going to continue to Really? Do that well or capitalize on that. So if I think about the last economic downturn granted, there was no pandemic. I think about who came out of that and capitalize that really well, particularly millennials. It was chipotle A and it was the you know, we resource all natural. You know, we're real food. We're you know, organic and in all of that, and that was kind of The health thing and that movement towards clean and whole if you will. I think consumers are gonna be looking. Some consumers are gonna be looking for that more and may stay more engaged with their food. But then there's the opportunity out of home for someone to capitalize on that. I think they're going to want to know if I get it from a restaurant or if I buy it a little bit further down the line where where it came from, So I think transparency continues to be really important. And storytelling around it, So Kevin will have more to add to that, but, yeah, no, I agree. I agree. I, um this is I'll go back to alternatives again. And I think alternatives are a great example of that. I think it's a way to kind of feel better about what you are getting. And some of the biggest alternatives right now. Talk like this so impossible. They're about You know, um, decreasing the carbon footprint and all of that, But I think that the best way for this to happen is if it's a win win for both the manufacturers. Well, it's for the consumer. And I think alternatives is another great example. Because it is plant based. It makes you feel good about eating it and you're getting what you want in a taste you want. But on the manufacturer side as we start getting down to, um Cost parody and things like that. You could see that within the meat industry how much covert disrupted you know how difficult it was, because it's diff more difficult to do automation and meet manufacturing and all that within alternatives. It's not as much because it's you know, it's a lot of automation. So that's what I mean about win win. You can see how things that really will kind of resonate, and that's what you're told. They did. I think really well is they figured out a way to get a message marketing across and make money.

Kevin Ryan Susan Schwalier Samsung Walmart Isles MPD Group Google president founder chipotle Susan Swallowing US A Amazon