35 Burst results for "Town Hall"

Rep. Ilhan Omar Blames 'Dysfunctional' Police for Minneapolis Violent Crime Spike

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:03 min | 13 hrs ago

Rep. Ilhan Omar Blames 'Dysfunctional' Police for Minneapolis Violent Crime Spike

"Ilhan Omar is back at it again. You know she's been kind of quiet lately over all this defunding the police nonsense that she engages in, but she's back and she's blaming the increase in crime in Minnesota on the police. She thinks it's the cops fault. That people are shoplifting. She told her constituents Saturday at a town hall meeting that the rise in gun violence in Minneapolis and the increase in carjackings is due to the police they have chosen she said not to fulfill their oath of office and provide the public safety. They owe to the citizens. Now, this is rich coming from her. She goes from wanting to defund the police to blame in the police for not being responsive enough as people are getting murdered and their cars getting jacked in Minneapolis. That's the left.

Ilhan Omar Minnesota Minneapolis
In Taiwan War Game, Few Good Options for U.S. To Deter China

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:54 min | 14 hrs ago

In Taiwan War Game, Few Good Options for U.S. To Deter China

"Washington Post this morning 5 a.m. Dan lamothe in Taiwan war game few good options for you as to deter China. The center for a new American strategy ran a war game involving the dung shoe island. I'd probably mispronouncing that. Didn't go well. It didn't go well. And in fact, they're even worried about bigger scenarios than that. I'm not surprised that you surprised admiral. No, I'm not. I've participated in several of those war games over the years. U.S. indo Pacific command runs those on a regular basis. And they're increasingly reflecting the reality that China has many more ships much more capability in their aircraft, longer land based ballistic and tactical missiles. That's been on the upswing for a decade and more and it's starting to really bleed into the results of these war games in a negative way. In the end, the article says the best advice is that warn the Chinese ahead of time of the consequences they would face if they moved on any of the islands, including Taiwan, with Japan playing a significant role. Haven't we already done that didn't President Biden sort of accidentally do that in the town hall last week where he said we would defend Taiwan? Well, he certainly said that we would defend Iran and we have a commitment to do so. But then within 24 hours you saw both The White House spokesperson gen sasaki and The Pentagon in Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin, kind of returned to this former policy. It's called strategic ambiguity of not telling China exactly what we're going to do. The truth is probably somewhere in the middle, my own view is that a, we should, in fact, assist Taiwan aggressively if they are attacked. And B, it's time to tell China that we are going to do that. And I think there is a growing sense of that in the public conversation about this.

Dan Lamothe Taiwan China Washington Post President Biden Gen Sasaki Lloyd Austin U.S. Town Hall Japan Iran Pentagon White House
N Korea slams US for supporting Taiwan in nod to ally China

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 3 d ago

N Korea slams US for supporting Taiwan in nod to ally China

"North Korea has accused the Biden administration raising military tensions with China through its reckless backing of Taiwan as says that the growing US military presence in the region constitutes a potential threat to the north in comments carried by state media north Korea's vice foreign minister criticized the US for sending warships through the Taiwan Strait and providing Taiwan a self ruled island that China claims as part of its territory with upgraded weapons systems and military training the pharmacist statement came a day after president Joe Biden told a CNN town hall event that the U. S. was committed to coming to Taiwan's defense if it comes under attack from China North Korea has increasingly criticized the broader your security role in the Indo Pacific amid an intensifying competition with China Pyongyang's major ally and economic lifeline I'm sorry I. Sheckley

China Biden Administration North Korea Taiwan Strait United States Joe Biden CNN U. Indo Pacific Pyongyang I. Sheckley
"town hall" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

CNN Political Briefing

06:00 min | 4 d ago

"town hall" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

"This is the CNN political briefing. Here's what you need to know when politics for Friday October 22nd. You know, it's compromise become a dirty word, but it's bipartisanship and compromise still has to be possible. That's what President Biden said last night at the CNN town hall as he sold his big domestic agenda plans while they hang in the balance on Capitol Hill. President Biden's town hall on CNN moderated by Anderson Cooper last night in Baltimore was perhaps the newest outing. I've seen this president have in the entirety of his term. We got a more detailed insight into the status of negotiations on his big, domestic agenda items, then I think we normally get from presidents. But we also got the real politic view from inside The White House about how difficult this is. When you're in the United States Senate and your president of the United States and you have 50 Democrats, everyone is a president. Every single one. How we get there, we're down to four or 5 issues, which I'm not going to negotiate in a national television. As you might guess we'd be hearing if you want. Oh, I know. But all kidding aside, I think we can get there. Optimism abounds from all corners of the democratic establishment. The vice president talked about it today as did speaker Pelosi, Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer. The latter two, the legislative leaders, they actually met with the president this morning. And their hopes of announcing a framework agreement that all parties have agreed to, on that build back better plan, they wanted that by today, that does not seem to be the case at least as of three o'clock this afternoon when we're recording this podcast, which means that it's still going to take some time here to solve some of the four or 5 remaining issues as the president described them. And in fact, President Biden sort of got into the nitty Gritty with Anderson Cooper last night very specifically about what's in the Bill, what's changed? What's had to be tossed out of the Bill to get progress on this and get it across the finish line. You're also proposing for the first time ever federal paid parental leave. The one point you talked about 12 weeks now, there's reports it's down to maybe four weeks. Yeah, it is down to four weeks. And the reason it's down to four weeks, I can't get 12 weeks. One of the other things that Democrats are looking to do is to expand Medicare to include dental vision and hearing. Will all three of those still be covered? That's a reach. And the reason why it's a reach, it's not this, I think it's a good idea. And it's not that costly and relative terms. But here's the thing. Mister Manson is opposed to that. Now it'll be critical to watch in the days to come how Bernie Sanders. The president's former rival on the campaign trail if you remember, and the leader of the progressive left in this country, how he is going to respond to this difficulty on that last piece, the Medicare expansion for dental and vision and hearing. But of course, mansion is not the only roadblock here to getting this thing done. Kirsten sinema of Arizona has proven to be a real thorn in the side of the Democratic Party, and President Biden is one of the few people in this town who has some real insight into her thinking. She keeps her cards very close to the vest. And even her own colleagues on Capitol Hill are not always aware where she is in any given moment on this bill. And this was how Joe Biden described where he sees kyrsten sinema. First of all, she's smart as a devil number one. Number two, she's very supportive of the environmental agenda in my legislation. Very supportive. She supportive of all almost all the things I mentioned relating to everything from a family care to all those issues, where she's not supportive, is she says she will not raise a single penny in taxes on the corporate side and or on wealthy people. Period. And so that's where it sort of breaks down. There's a few other issues it breaks down on. As the president said, that's where it sort of breaks down while it's that key part. How are you going to pay for all of this without adding to the debt because he promised it be paid for if the tax rates don't go up on the wealthy and corporations? That's going to be something critical for Joe Biden to solve for this bill to hit his desk and get a signature. Now, apart from the build back better plan, the president made pretty huge news when it comes to the filibuster. Of course, he still doesn't have all 50 Democrats in the Senate willing to change the filibuster rules so that voting rights or police reform can get through the Senate. But the president of the United States went farther than he ever has on showing a real willingness to join the fight with those in his party who've been arguing to get rid of the filibuster even if just specifically on voting rights. If in fact, I get myself into at this moment, the debate on the filibuster. I lose a three at least three votes. Right now to get what I have to get done. But I also think we're going to have to move to the point where we fundamentally alter the filibuster. That remains to be seen. Exactly what that means in terms of fundamentally altering it. And whether or not we just end the filibuster straight up. He didn't want to take up that filibuster reform fight because he'd lose the votes he needs. Right now on this package. But I think what he clearly said was senator mansion, senator cinema, I may get you across the finish line with this bill, but don't think I'm done trying to twist your arms on other key priorities. If you missed the town hall, I urge you to go to CNN dot com..

President Biden CNN Anderson Cooper Senate Capitol Hill Mister Manson United States Chuck Schumer Kirsten sinema Medicare kyrsten sinema Pelosi Baltimore White House Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Democratic Party Arizona
Joe Biden Fumbles Through Scripted CNN Town Hall

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:23 sec | 4 d ago

Joe Biden Fumbles Through Scripted CNN Town Hall

"Never let it be said that I don't sacrifice for you. I suffered through the Biden town hall last night and wow was it a doozy? Man was it bad? Beyond bad. He gave nonsensical answers all night long and he knew what all the questions were going to be. It was apparently like scripted all out. They approved the guest list. There weren't any

Biden Town Hall
How the Heck Is Joe Biden Running This Country?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:22 min | 4 d ago

How the Heck Is Joe Biden Running This Country?

"How the hell is Joe Biden running this country? After that debacle of a town meeting oh my gosh. Give him out somehow. Christie is right. I mean, I know there's some news that came from the town hall meeting last night like he doesn't have the votes for free college. He doesn't have the votes to raise taxes. He's stuck. He's in a hole, but other than that, you want to know what the major news is. I'm not kidding you. I watched the whole thing. I'm not making this up. You think I'm being partisan, I swear to you. I don't think I am. I'm sitting here as a human being, admittedly, I've spent 42 years of my life as a professional communicator. This guy didn't have a coherent answer to anything. He didn't give a he did not give a normal at one point he stood there with his fists clenched. It went viral last night because they were saying, oh my gosh, is he having a stroke? He doesn't know what to do with his hands. He had his like his elbows extended and he's got his fists clenched, why Anderson Cooper is blabbing on about a question. He doesn't know what to do with his hands. But these answers he gave every one of them was

Joe Biden Christie Anderson Cooper
An 'Utterly Incoherent' Joe Biden Mocks Freedom During CNN Town Hall

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:05 min | 4 d ago

An 'Utterly Incoherent' Joe Biden Mocks Freedom During CNN Town Hall

"Joe Biden was utterly incoherent last night. He didn't give a coherent response or make sense at all. I mean, it was quite the night. And I suffered through this thing and watched it and broke out in a cold sweat. Thinking if this guy gets that call at three in the morning, you know, the call that they always did Hillary talked about are you ready to take the call? We're in some big trouble. We're in big trouble. Kissing goodbye, 'cause lord knows what this guy's capable of doing. I mean, I hope there's enough people around him that are like pushing him into the next room and telling him what to say 'cause when he is one on one like that on a stage, it is utterly terrifying. Terrifying. I mean, here he is mocking freedom. Mocking people who are reluctant to get the vaccine. And he literally mocks freedom. Now, I've never heard a president do this before.

Joe Biden Hillary
Inside the Shade War Between Joe and Kamala With Jack Posobiec

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:37 min | Last week

Inside the Shade War Between Joe and Kamala With Jack Posobiec

"I've seen Jack talk about the shade war, I'm really interested in knowing more about Jill Biden versus Kamala, what's the dynamic like? Oh, it's huge. Build out some of that out more piece from The Bronx. Thank you. And thank you for subscribing to the Charlie Kirk show podcast. Go ahead, check. There you go. Yeah, so the shade war has been going on. I mean, we all kind of know that Kamala Harris, of course, was nobody else's pick either. However, in the wake of George Floyd, the Black Lives Matter movement, Joe Biden was kind of in a box. He had to choose someone who was African American. And then so Kamala Harris was the one a lot of the media, a lot of the elites have been pushing her early on. Remember very early on she did that town hall with Jake tapper, just out of nowhere. Nobody was talking about Kamala and suddenly CNN is feeding her on the entire audience saying, oh, combo is going to be amazing. She's going to be great. Very, very naked on her feet. Obviously. But like Hillary Clinton in many ways, she's kind of the California version of Hillary Clinton, where she plays the inside game. She understands what's going on. She plays people against each other and you know, the inside politics, the office politics, the palace intrigue, if you will. I mean, look, she went from somebody who was a staffer in San Francisco all the way up to being the senator from San Francisco. People want to talk about how she did it. My point is she did it. She made it happen. Right. That's ambition. That's a 100% ambition. This is what she is dedicated her life to. So I wanted to go to Joe, and say, you know, Joe, you're not supposed to put someone as your vice president that you know will betray you, then they get the chance, right? You know, with Trump and Pence, you never had that with wish and JD. And obviously with Obama and Biden, Biden was never a threat to

Kamala Harris Kamala Charlie Kirk George Floyd Jill Biden Hillary Clinton Bronx Jake Tapper Joe Biden Jack CNN San Francisco California JOE Pence Donald Trump Biden Barack Obama
AOC's Bill to Extend Pandemic Unemployment Benefits Spoonfeeds Socialism

Mark Levin

01:52 min | Last month

AOC's Bill to Extend Pandemic Unemployment Benefits Spoonfeeds Socialism

"On it. But another big story that has been the talk of the town today and I'm no, I'm no Larry Kudlow right when it comes to financial news. But the Dow tumbled 900 points as Wall Street's fears turned to China. Jane and this is bad and the reason it's bad is because people are losing their shirts. And have the potential to lose their shirts. Now we saw this. This plummet in Wall Street. And it's because of all this speculation over ever Grant this Chinese, this huge Chinese company that owns tons of real estate and is slowly becoming insolvent. And this is a problem. That is not only going to affect China's economy and send a massive blow to their economy. It's going to send a massive loader our own economy. And In the midst of all of that AOC all out crazy herself. She is, I guess. Maybe, um, thinking, let me take advantage of every good crisis I can find. And she says, you know what? We're going to extend the pandemic unemployment insurance, and I say, Hey, let me get some of that right there Giving out everybody Let me get some. But AOC. She's going to introduce a bill to extend pandemic unemployment assistance benefits, which expired in September. She talked about this last week and talked about introducing and I think, put it out there, but She's back. And she's saying this, uh, virtual town Hall. Sand, blah, blah, blah. We're going at it. We're doing this thing. Now I think that she may gain some traction with this. I'm not sure. I really don't know. But I do know that if we continue to do this The result is the same. And what I mean by that is Money that's constantly coming in from the government that isn't being earned by the people and again unemployment insurance is a different story. But that may be the easiest way to spoon feed

Larry Kudlow China Jane AOC
Top General Feared Trump Would Launch Nuclear War, Woodward Book Reports

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:13 min | Last month

Top General Feared Trump Would Launch Nuclear War, Woodward Book Reports

"The least interventionist president in modern history vats who donald trump is and. They expect you to believe that he was just about to press the button and the birds new china year right so this is the trouble with the story. We have this absolute hack of a pathetic. Individual would has been trying to clamber back in relevance for forty years. Although he's a credit and he was really the junior partner in the The deep throat story that brought down. Nixon then we have mealy who has established a fact pattern of being a scumbag is being a political actor in uniform. We'll see which which off the aspects of this story holds water but we've got to analyze it right now because that's why we're here. That's why we do live radio and we're going to do it with Very good buddy jennifer. Who sent me the video. It's out there the whole town hall if you couldn't make it to l. a. Watch it two hours without bodies. Dennis prager mark levin. Charlie kirk and larry elder. Let's posted right now and it's putting it on twitter and facebook feeds told to us john. Let's let's leave the recall. Let's let them vote on photocopy pass. Whatever they take those suitcases about it from under the table this story. Is there any way to glad this for the biden regime. I ju-. I just stayed first of all. I want to say that. You and charlie kirk dennis prager mark levin at were all on fire on sunday at town hall. Twenty twenty one. So if you don't get a chance if you haven't seen it janice we're like whoa to my friend. You guys were i mean just nailing it and it was so much fun to share a stage with you that being said. No there's no way to wiggle out of this. But the democrats control everything in the media is controlled by the democrats and so maybe they will wiggle out of it. But have you wondered. We've heard so much during the trump administration about deep state leaks about all of these people these sources within the intelligence community. I don't think we have to look very far. They're sitting right in front of

Buddy Jennifer Mark Levin Charlie Kirk Donald Trump Larry Elder Dennis Prager Nixon Charlie Kirk Dennis Prager China Biden Twitter Facebook Town Hall Janice John
Efforts Grow To Stamp Out Use of Parasite Drug for COVID-19

AP News Radio

01:01 min | Last month

Efforts Grow To Stamp Out Use of Parasite Drug for COVID-19

"Health experts around the country are still urging people not to take an animal anti worming drug for covert nineteen after more patients were hospitalized with toxicity the most recent reports of poisoning from the anti parasitic drug ivermectin we're in Missouri where a doctor at mercy hospital says several people suffered ill effects from taking the veterinary drug North Dakota health officials held a town hall on the internet to discourage the use of ivermectin and to tell people there are legitimate treatments for Kobe nineteen like monoclonal antibodies and ram desta beer people have been getting sick and animal supply stores are reporting shortages of ivermectin since some conservative talk show hosts and even some doctors promoted its use but there are studies being conducted in the U. S. and overseas to see if ivermectin might have any benefit in reducing the effects of cope with nineteen I'm Jackie Quinn

Mercy Hospital Missouri North Dakota U. Jackie Quinn
Midwest Tartaria, Giants, Reset Civilizations and Strange History with Randy Tartarian  - burst 09

My Family Thinks I'm Crazy

02:39 min | 2 months ago

Midwest Tartaria, Giants, Reset Civilizations and Strange History with Randy Tartarian - burst 09

"I'm crazy podcast. I'm your lovable host. Mark palmer investigator of all things weird researcher all things call journey into the mystic realms of the every day and the other world either way. And we're here today with randy. I call him randy tartari in because he's got a whole nother style. He's into tartari. He's into researching what they're really is to be seen when you take a look at some of these town hall buildings and churches structures that seem to have layers going underground or maybe were in places that have been dug up. It's fascinating stuff. And i was happy to have him on for his first podcast ever so we kind of went all over the place as he was definitely excited Told me he listens to this show. So it's cool. It's cool to have someone who's listened to some from my heart and soul my mind and i want to remind everybody that this is my purpose that i saw it out when i was younger. I was mentioned in psychedelics. Smoking weed every day reading these books. I told myself you know it's gonna find my higher purpose in align myself with that. I created that intention to help others to help the little ones the children and the animals and all the small creatures of the earth that create life that we all are so grateful for. I know i am so just a reminder folks set your intentions hi. This is a love cast. It's all love and show randy some love and kindness. Because like i said this was his first time. Ever on a podcast. And i think he was very very well researched. He had some really interesting pictures to show us a police. If you got the love bug like i do over the patriots dot com slash m. fdic and show some love. We'd love to see you there. Join the family and you know. That's where the scene is at synchro. Mystic exploration of the ever expanding now and on our latest journey we went to maka moody's state park and you can hear all the information about that on our patriotic as we heard some really interesting modest noises definitely google search that m. o. o. d. u. s. Noises either way. Enjoy this conversation with randi. The tartari and police will

Salem Portland Russia India Scherf Mark Palmer Randy Tartari Randy Maka Moody Fdic Patriots Google Randi
Interview With Rashida Jones of MSNBC

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:26 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Rashida Jones of MSNBC

"Before we start diving into all things about you and your career. We'd like to get started with lightning round just for all of us to warm up questions. Quick answers are you ready first job on your resume or while if i go all the way back. My first shot was fourteen. I was a camp counselor for a summer. Camp in virginia was the coolest job ever. Because i got to play with kids all day and had a lot of fun. Worse job on your resume. Here's the weird they. I have loved that i've worked. I would say if i had to rank them probably my stint at pizza hut. Yeah i learned. There's an art to assembling the pepperonis in a certain order where the kids were pretty hot. The tips weren't great. But i found a way to have fun with it. Do you have any secret hobbies or skills. I'm really into movies. And when i do have free time. I like watching kind of weird random movies on all of the streaming platforms kind of been a little bit of a of a release. The last like random weird movie so going to get the title wrong state wrong every time but the raynham verani newly this movie on amazon prime in. It's about this couple that goes to an open house in. They can't ever leave the house and they wind up living in that house in this community with no other people. I don't like the for like ten years. it's weird. it was super weird. And i watched it twice but it was. It was scary. Finish the sentence. What best describes your work day working nine till forever. It's nonstop in a good way. This weird thing about working cable is surprise were always on tv or always on some streaming platform. So it's just kind of a continuous thing and you just have to decide alright. I've done all the damage i can do for today out. Pick it up tomorrow. But it doesn't really stop. What is the hardest interview or panel. You have enough. Yeah you have to news team for. I would say the hardest one was that final debate. Kristen welker moderating and trump in biden and it was hard because it was so consequential it was hard because we were also in the process of planning for election night coverage we had just done a town hall a week or two before that with trump a for that with bide so it was all of those things happen at once on top of it being one of the most important interviews so to speak That i've ever worked on but when you get to work with someone like kristin it becomes a

Virginia Kristen Welker Amazon Biden Kristin
Putin launches construction of new warships amid tensions

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:20 sec | 2 months ago

Putin launches construction of new warships amid tensions

"President Vladimir Putin, launching the construction of new nuclear submarines and other warships. It's part of a sweeping military modernization effort. Amid the growing tensions with the West. Breaking news and analysis at town hall dot com.

President Vladimir Putin
Henri Now a Tropical Depression as Flooding Danger Remains

Balance of Nature with Dr. Douglas Howard

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Henri Now a Tropical Depression as Flooding Danger Remains

"Continuing unleashed downpours over a region already saturated by heavy rain. Earlier today. The storm was located about 10 miles southwest of Hartford, Connecticut, was expected to produce heavy rainfall and flooding across areas of New England, New York, New Jersey and northeast Pennsylvania. Through tonight and into early tomorrow. Connecticut governor Ned Lamont says even though Andrea has been downgraded, people still need to take it seriously. Don't get complacent. Uh, As I said before, Sandy, I see those were not hurricanes, either because the terrain is so wet. You do have just a 40 50 or not dust. Knocks over trees, and that's why we're watching the power outage situations so carefully. In Tennessee, at least 22 people are dead and many more missing. After record setting rain caused devastating flooding that swept away homes up to 17 inches of rain fell in less than 24 hours, setting a new one day record for rainfall in the state. News and analysis at town hall

Northeast Pennsylvania Connecticut Ned Lamont Hartford New England New Jersey Andrea New York Sandy Tennessee Town Hall
Explosive California wildfires could burn into December

Balance of Nature

00:17 sec | 2 months ago

Explosive California wildfires could burn into December

"Contributed to the fury of Northern California wildfire yesterday. The Cal door fire in the northern Sierra Nevada has destroyed dozens of homes and closed roads. It's one of about a dozen large wildfires that has scorched northern California more on these stories of town hall dot com.

Northern California Sierra Nevada California
Montana only state to ban vaccine requirements for employees

AM 970 The Answer Programming

00:18 sec | 2 months ago

Montana only state to ban vaccine requirements for employees

"Only state to ban vaccine requirements for employees. Many large companies across the US have announced that Covid 19 vaccines will be required for their employees to return to work in person law passed by the state's Republican controlled legislature. Wiring vaccines as a condition for employment is deemed discrimination. This is town hall dot com.

Covid United States Legislature
Biden administration backs ending regulations protecting gray wolves

Buck Sexton

00:07 sec | 2 months ago

Biden administration backs ending regulations protecting gray wolves

"Former President Donald Trump's decision to lift protections of gray wolves, breaking news and analysis. Town hall dot com.

Donald Trump Town Hall
Fed's Powell: There's No Returning to Pre-Pandemic Economy

C-SPAN Programming

01:41 min | 2 months ago

Fed's Powell: There's No Returning to Pre-Pandemic Economy

"A virtual town hall today with educators and students. Our next question comes from Salvador, a student at Northern Virginia Community College. Salvador s even as the economic recovery continues. Could you speak about some ways the U. S economy is evolving or might look different from our pre pandemic economy. Would it deal these days? Um, we can see that the pandemic has changed our economy in some important ways. Only time will tell how lasting these changes will be. But I think we know that we're not simply going back to the economy we had before the pandemic, but it'll take time to see exactly what the changes will be. And we know that the Fed we need to watch carefully as the economy continues to get through the pandemic. And try to understand the ways that the economy has changed and what the implications are for our policy. I think the place to start though, is covid is is still with us as you can tell, And that is likely to continue to be the case for a while. Uh, While more people are getting vaccinated, the pace of vaccination has slowed. A couple of months ago, we were ahead of many other similar countries in vaccination. Now we're falling behind. Um, and one result is you're seeing is the current outbreak of the delta, Uh, string that we're seeing in some parts of the country of the country. So, um, One thing that's happened, as the pandemic has continued, is that people and businesses have Improvised and learn to adapt to live their lives despite covid it, and I would say it's not yet clear whether the Delta screen will have important effects on the economy will have to see about that. In the meantime, you asked about

Salvador Northern Virginia Community Co U. FED
"town hall" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

CNN Political Briefing

03:14 min | 3 months ago

"town hall" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

"The filibuster respond to president biden saying nothing would get done and there would be chaos in washington basically saying he is not anywhere near supporting the demise of the filibuster and on the economy and inflation. President biden said that he believes the inflation that we're seeing the real rise in prices that we've seen in certain areas of the economy is going to be temporary and he believes he said that the injection of trillions of dollars of more spending primarily aimed at middle and working class americans and poor americans will actually keep unchecked inflation at bay all of which is why he does not subscribe to the notion that inflation is here to stay prices going to keep going up and up and up and that that will be the way our economy is for the long term. Obviously for the twenty twenty two midterms. He better hope he's betting right. And finally i just want you to hear from joe biden himself because i think he gave an answer last night. That sort of encapsulated. The entire rationale of his presidency. The kinds of things that are being said of late. I think you're beginning to see some of the democrats as well sorta venom get sort of sort of leak out of a lot of it. We got to get beyond this. What do you say to your grandchildren or your children by what's happening. Do you ever remember a time like this before the entire history whether you're a democrat or republican this is not who we are the rest of the world's wondering about us. Those of you travel abroad. Not a joke out of joe you ask you know when i went to this g seven. All the major democracies. I walked in. I know a lot of them because of my role in the past and they walk in. I said america's back and they go. I'm serious has a state. I give you. My word is by. So are you really back. I mean how. Can we believe you joe but will the country ever get it together. You'll recall he campaigned on restoring the soul of the nation. And when don lemon pressed him last night on the news about the demise of the one six select committee and kevin mccarthy pulling the republican members. And how we've gotten to this place where even an attack on our democracy. We can't have sort of an agreed upon path. Forward to find the truth in that and joe biden gave the answer that the reason he believes that the politics in our country are not permanently. Broken is because of his faith in the american people and then he went on to say that he thinks he sees sort of the poison atmosphere in american politics for the last several years starting to drain away and he connected it to how america also is perceived on the world stage and the questions that hang around that because of our politics this is joe biden getting at the core of why he sees his presidency as a consequential one that does it for today's political briefing. Thanks so much for listening and please follow us wherever you get your podcast. We'll talk to you tomorrow..

president biden President biden joe biden washington joe don lemon kevin mccarthy america
"town hall" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

CNN Political Briefing

02:47 min | 3 months ago

"town hall" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

"Hey everyone. I'm david chaldean. The cnn political director. This is the cnn political briefing or on the road for one last day here in cincinnati ohio. After joe biden's big town hall last night so sorry of the audio quality is not quite what you're used to but here's what you need to know in politics today. Thursday july twenty second twenty twenty one. Joe biden got a range of questions from voters here in ohio last night at cnn's townhall and he made some key news in big topic areas. So today we're bringing you the highlights of the town hall and my quick takeaways. First and foremost covert president biden made his most urgent plea to unvaccinated americans to get vaccinated. He basically said that the current surge in cova that we're seeing across the country is largely a pandemic of the unvaccinated and in his most stern language. Nearly begging the american people to be able to put this pandemic truly behind us is to have the remaining americans who are unvaccinated. Get the shot. So that life can return to normal fully for all americans beyond that most critical issue of the pandemic joe biden made a pretty interesting comment about the infrastructure negotiations on capitol hill. He sounded more bullish on being able to get a bipartisan. Deal done then. He probably has at any point since he initially announced the deal with those republican senators. He said he is hopeful that on monday. There will be a vote to actually move forward and proceed with this. Bipartisan agreement in the united states senate. We saw that vote fail yesterday. But that did not in any way dissuade joe biden from thinking. He's going to be able to get this across the finish line. Another topic that has dominated the washington political discussion during the biden presidency. Is that of the filibuster. And how much. Joe biden's agenda can get done. If there isn't filibuster reform. He was specifically pressed by my colleague. Don lemon on that last night about voting rights but joe biden gave his most clear concise. Answer as to why he doesn't yet support jettisoning the filibuster. He has talked about tradition in the past and the notion of may be trying to get back to the talking filibuster but last night joe biden said if the filibuster just goes away and democrats get rid of it that there will be chaos in washington and nothing will get done so now be on the lookout to see how progressives who are eager to get into.

joe biden cnn david chaldean big town hall ohio biden cova cincinnati capitol hill Don lemon senate united states washington
"town hall" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

02:22 min | 3 months ago

"town hall" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Pollsters are starting to scream. But he did. I'll play the audio when we come back. Listen i got to spend some more time on. Joe biden's townhall with don lemon last night. But there's actually some other really really big big news and we need to spend a few moments. We'll get back to jill biden but this may be the biggest news of the day in america texas and oklahoma. Wanna move into the sec. And i kinda. I've always preferred the the longhorns to the aggies in the sec although it did make sense for the aggies to be they're not a big aggie face. Sorry rick i'm sorry governor secretary and i'm sorry i'm i'm i've always liked the longhorn cheerleaders That that's that's what it is If i'm honest about it but a so he would bring it. You know i missouri. I mean it's the this sec. I never quite understood why. Missouri was being brought into the sec. But if you're gonna bring missourian and you're gonna bring texas in you might as well. Bring the longhorns in an oklahoma and then divided up four ways so that you got the these rivalries 'cause like lsu. It's big rivalry is with arkansas. And every thanksgiving you got the big rivalry game. Of course you've got alabama and auburn. Big rivalries georgia and florida big rivalries Texas and oklahoma but also texas and texas am. I mean the texans fight with everybody. And i just i in you know you do have to put vanderbilt tennessee on field together because both teams suck. And you've got to figure out which ones sucks the most and the mississippi state and ole miss after after played out. So how'd you divide this up there. There's another side of it. Though that i think is very important here and that is if all of the teams that are good are in the sec. Doesn't that make the national championship the sec championship and then the actual national championship which will have ohio or or giner team. Nobody cares about except the pig farmer..

sec aggies don lemon oklahoma texas jill biden Joe biden longhorns rick missouri america Missouri lsu arkansas auburn alabama vanderbilt georgia florida Texas
"town hall" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

05:16 min | 3 months ago

"town hall" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Rehire the deputy junior assistant undersecretary of of of call screening after. I beat golf yesterday. figured i humiliated him enough on the golf course and i humiliated myself. And that's how bad he was that. I probably didn't need to keep him employed so nonetheless you can call today. The real culture is back. If i just if a tree falls in the forest and no one's around doesn't make a noise of this is a longtime question. If joe biden dozen national townhall and no one watched diddy actually do it. It's remarkable how little news coverage there is of joe. Biden's news conference last night. In fact the lead story at cnn. Today is actually about Kevin mccarthy and the gop not joe biden which is fascinating to me that they're giving the headlines or moving across the screen fury in congress is gop hides trump crimes. Five take away from biden townhall judge forces. Us capitol rioter to unlock laptop seized by fbi. And underneath that. Like listening to nixon. Drunk rambling. anderson. Cooper reacts new trump audio. That's it's a fascinating dichotomy there these stories about Gop bad are high listed higher on his website. Then joe biden's town hall. That was done with don lemon at cnn. Last night there really is not a lot of coverage of what he said. And when you listen to some of it you kind of understand why there is not a lot of coverage of joe biden's townhall. This is joe biden last night. Here's the question that was asked. This is the question asked win. Will children under twelve be able to get vaccinated. That is the question. Joe biden was asked. This is joe. Biden's answer that's underway. Just like the other question is logical. And i've heard you speak about it. Because y'all i'm not solicits but you you're always straight up about what you're doing and the question is whether or not we should be in a position where you are. Why can't the the experts say. We know that this virus is in fact. It's going to be are. We know why all the drugs approved or not temporarily approved but permanently approved..

Joe biden Gop biden townhall golf cnn Kevin mccarthy Biden joe don lemon nixon fbi Cooper congress town hall anderson Us
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Back with a recap of town hall Ohio moments from over the past year one of my personal all time favorite guests who's been on multiple times as Dr Michael Drake the president of the Ohio State University doctor Drake I I found it interesting as I was studying through the strategic plan that you grouped access affordability and excellence yeah it seems like you could possibly make the case that you have to have access and affordability or excellence at how they fit together yeah that's a loser yeah you could do it you could do either one of the three alone pretty easily and you have nothing and so we don't want to have access to something that you don't want or need that's no there's no value with that we don't want something to be cheap but of note quality I mean that there's no value that's a that's what really is you have to have all three it has to be access to something that you can afford and there has to be if it has value it has to be really really excellent and and the tension between them is what really makes things up a beautiful they're balanced together and and that's that but that makes it fun on the west end of the O. S. U. campus is a two hundred and sixty one acre tract known as Waterman farm well it's a great asset for us been there all these years and very very important for us to be able to continue to use that you allow students to be on main campus but then also get to the farm on a daily basis for research and other project for education so we've we think it's great we continually try to modernize and learn how we can best use the space and resources to your property of the universe is huge and it's cut out with it was on the outskirts of the town you know years ago now to read it pretty close and but we find it to be about invaluable part of what we do at at the college and you mentioned that you mention a college and and you mentioned cath and grass and I just wanna say that Catherine presses a wonderful dean and we're really really love having our or just I joy traveling with around the state and work with you here but really traveling with around the state and being out with people is great so I have wonderful calling what one of the grand challenges I think is the way that doctor crest frames it to is food security production human health love to talk a little bit about how that really is at the core of what began Ohio state remains there today yeah yeah we were a and M. at the beginning and that was agriculture was ever culture that was kind of the economy and science was technology and engineering and railroads that was kind of what was happening at eighteen in nineteen seventy so it's been a at the core of what our mission has been there since the very beginning we've expanded and compartmentalize things so we go from the farming and growing to processing and then it goes to public health and food safety and food health and food all those things I together by the great things about our university is that as a comprehensive university we can we have all the different links for all the different pieces that place of these things all come together and it's a wonderful place for students to study because they can look at kind of from soup to nuts are from production to consumption or transport all those things are part of what we do in it at that makes it a great place to learn and grow issue president Michael Drake regular gas tear on town hall Ohio another issue representative was on this past year but for the very first time Ohio state director of athletics gene Smith so all those football games or watched you want us watching them on Friday nights when we go to northwestern yeah you know I'm not a big proponent of big fan of the Friday night games but it was great for our conference is great for a number teams in our conference and will play northwestern at northwestern next year Friday night we actually got very lucky with the scheduling of because we we have an open weekend before end date and then after that we play Wisconsin at home so we gave a day and a half of of rest before we have to play that so it actually kind of fell in a sweet spot for us but hello my played I'm on a roll just don't want to do it at home there's a whole lot that goes into managing the program and the people that are involved with it what's it like to wake up every morning knowing that your your day or your career rests somewhat on the judgment of eighteen and nineteen or twenty year old sometimes sixteen seventeen yeah the bands and you know I've been doing this for a long time over thirty three years and then that's that's the beauty of what we do you know we give here about the north to two hundred freshmen every single year and they come to us a different levels of maturity and immature he and many young people we have to totally reprogram based point of arms that they come from Seoul but that's the fun part is light bulb moments Cardale Jones for example who you know made that if for this tweet when he was a freshman about going to class and then he goes through it ultimately gets his degree and now he's talking about possibly getting his masters you know those type of stories that's why we do what we do that's why we take the risk that's why we give of ourselves is to take the risk that we can positively impact the young person like that and other great Goldens of the world who you know were too challenging experience in this life and as he said publicly was alcoholic and it had to overcome that it is but now he's got his degree family.

Dr Michael Drake president Ohio
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Welcome back to town hall Ohio the director of the Ohio environmental protection agency is Laurie Stevenson she joins Ohio farm bureaus executive vice president Adam sharp as we talk about some of the things happening at EPA and more particularly how they impact us as Ohio's we talked a lot about water air quality is another subject that is very important to quality of life and death and our our ability to to to run businesses for that matter talk a little bit if you would director about EPA's role in protecting air quality well you know what water an error in and waste I mean those those those are the typically the big three but you know from an air quality standpoint or we have a really important role overall we we have a statewide network of your monitors and that you know are designed to ensure that it is a state we have clean air when that we meet our obligations related to national ambient air quality standard so we have important responsibilities just on a day to day basis to make sure that our is clean we've had quite a bit of recent success in Ohio achieving attainment status for some of our criteria pollutants are our major air pollutants and so we've made some really strong progress and some good headway and again I think that's as a result of you know we have our strong regulatory framework obviously but we have a lot of businesses that have really stepped in with state of the art technology and controls and they're really doing their part as well to make sure that they are reducing their emissions overall so I I know the water sector far better than anything but it if I want to measure water quality act at a somewhat defined area to do I'm I'm a drop of monitor in a stream all put a monitor in the lake how do you monitor air quality it's everywhere what what's what's the system for collecting that data well you know believe it or not there are there are air monitors that are out there everywhere in the state in their design till bring in samples that determine the level of different air pollutants that we have out there and the ambient air so it's it's not unlike the water quality world where it can be measured you know the other indicator that we have is we have obligations that companies have to monitor what's coming out of the stack as an example so that's another way for us to determine what is going in the ambient air and whether we need to have additional controls and just kind of where we're at as a state over all we have to pay attention to air quality out on on farms to Adam that slowly is not so much in Ohio when we talk about to things like dust and particulates because of moisture and kind of our our connected conditions here a little bit different but in some parts of the country air quality in the just in the space of dust so wind blown particulates coming off of farm fields or from livestock facilities is a big deal in and how you manage that but in Ohio absolutely we get into odor is a is a big one but that it but odor for example does not really regulated under the clean air act that becomes a nuisance issue it's still an issue but it's it's handled at the state at the local level but first for sure air quality in the agriculture space a big deal and even though we don't focus on as much in Ohio it nationally it's important in parts of the country where you have agricultural burning so you you burn fields in certain times of the year to prepare them that's a very much an accepted cultural practice in agriculture in the western parts of the country so what does that mean for air quality to it's it's is it a serious issue but also livestock I touched on briefly but they're also when you're talking about large livestock facilities the air quality around that facility in addition to odor also is something that always should be managed so we're building large livestock facilities are frankly any livestock facilities you wanna be cognizant of the clean air clean air act in the in the requirements in there that do pertain to agricultural emissions one of the challenges for air quality I would think automobile emissions what what are some of the things that EPA keeps tabs on there I well we do you know it is yes folks in the northeastern part of the state now in particular read we still have a mission testing programs that are in place because we're we're still challenge to meet some of our national ambient air quality standards in that area so we do you know we're obligated to continue those types of programs and that's that is one tool in the tool kit that we have to use to to make sure that we continue to move in the right direction I think one of the more innovative and creative things that we started to do recently as leverage some grant funding to get improvements made to feel better control emissions so we have some we're doing some creative things with school buses large locomotives larger of vehicles to incentivize changes and new technologies to reduce emissions so that's that's another Avenue that we can exercise tale incentivize changeovers to reduce emissions the director mention the next day innards and and these are quality stands for vehicles you got cut on road in the off road vehicles so on the off road sign agriculture also has often been part of those conversations to because right we want we run big equipment that has exhaust so making sure that that equipment also is parties conversations is always been one of these pieces well that agriculture's dealt with USEPA in with state we're going to continue our discussion with the director of the Ohio environmental protection agency Laurie Stevenson in just a moment and sharp also in the room with us today he's the exact for the Ohio farm bureau federation we.

Ohio director Laurie Stevenson EPA executive vice president Adam sharp
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:57 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Welcome back to town hall Ohio we're talking about farmers and how they manage their operations to not only feed the world but also protect Ohio's water quality telling the story Doug beard or five USTA's NRCS Jordan Hey we're sure of the Ohio farm bureau and Erin filers who is managing the Blanchard river demonstration farms network Erin described force quickly a little bit about edge field monitoring basically capturing the water the leaves the surface or through underground tile measuring the nutrients ran it dug a part of this that's the that's really the research component or one of the key research components is the fact that you have what you call paired field sites what is that why do you do it okay appeared appeared is essentially to individual is set ups each with rage of field monitoring equipment set up on two different fields that have similar characteristics as far soils and terrain and slow and Donna it's great if we can have the same farmer operate those two different watersheds what we try to do is capture the base of condition so what is naturally coming off of that through the farmers normal method of practice and then what we can do is change of variable and that farmers operation whether be a cover crop installation whether it be a change a nutrient management whether to be a change in some other part of his production system and we can measure that impact by a comparing what we see coming off the field with that change as we can repair it back to the baseline so it's a it's a great opportunity to do great research so Jordan as you look at this edge of field monitoring what what sticks out in your mind is maybe the top one or two things that we we've learned to a half three years into this yeah I think the biggest thing we've learned with the edge of field not only fits my new or or commercial fertilizer is placing another ground so getting that many were covered up in the soil to some degree obviously of the balance between full Telligent full incorporation and then you know sometimes you'll put him there differ letterman or just on the surface so you the balance between those two and make sure that you get that those nutrients covered to some degree so I learned a lesson the first time I visited the Kellogg operation they apply commercial fertilizer and you know if if you don't know anything about agriculture say well let's just put all of our fertilizer under the soil surface or let's inject all of our maneuver into the into the ground so the Kellogg's are testing it with the commercial fertilizer of the US state learns of testing it with with liquid manure what's it cost the testing the did not just the testing the equipment I'll do that the equipment gather the Kellogg's they use strip tillage so they're putting their fertilizer out with that that type of tool bar I'm not granted there a large operation so they have just bigger equipment in general about their strip tillage barb was of gosh about a hundred ninety thousand dollars for that bar to put that fertilizer below the soil surface the the sailors with their minore operation probably in the fifty to sixty thousand dollar range and then the technology that goes on top of that to give it the ability to variable rate that new Trent he is also many thousands of dollars so that the equipment costs add up quickly and that doesn't even count the tractor that might be two hundred thousand dollars and that's gonna pull this equipment so it is a very costly endeavor to accomplish that goal so I go back to the math we mentioned at the top of the show there that basically in order to meet some some target forty percent reduction types of of goals we scene we're talking about a farmer that's losing roughly twenty five cents per acre and nutrients but fixing that problem can run twenty thirty forty dollars or more per acre to actually fix it so thus the math of how do we balance productive agriculture with water quality Doug there's a another practice that farmers are beginning to adopt and and we're learning more about planting cover crops what's a cover crop in what to do for the farmer and what to do for the water what I talk for farmers I tried to use the analogy that cover crops are like a crescent wrench they can do you they can be used to to do a lot of different things they can be adjusted to to accommodate that farmer specific objective whether it be organic matter depletion they would have billed organic matter where they want to sequester hold nutrients whether they are trying to to just stop build soil health and so are those objectives can be accomplished with a lot of different species and so what we try to do is is asset producer what do you want to do with cover crop and then we can make a specific recommendation to the farmer this far species and rates are concerned but there is a tremendous amount of interest and we have worked with literally hundreds of by the thousands of farmers who are interested in are applying cover crops in the western base someone asked the same question of you Jordan again so if this works why doesn't everybody do it yeah I mean I guess our our goal overall is that you know we're we're trying to be a conduit to all this information right you were bringing all this research information all these results and every farmers different every farmers in different situation there's there's a bunch of different soil types and capabilities in and willingness to do certain stuff and then and so what we try to do is provide a suite of things they can they can pull from so we talk about the few different buckets.

Ohio Doug beard hundred ninety thousand dollar two hundred thousand dollars twenty thirty forty dollars sixty thousand dollar forty percent three years
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"To town hall Ohio and welcome back to Dorothy planted director of the Ohio department of agriculture Adam sharp back in with this he's the executive vice president of Ohio farm bureau and direct play in a week we appreciate you making time we were talking about a a new industry that has the opportunity to develop in Ohio and that is the production of help now I'm not a scientist but let's just make it clear hemp and marijuana are basically the same plan but one is an intoxicant help is not what what kind of things will we use help for that might be grown here in Ohio well Joe first of all the definition of hemp is a can of annoyed that has less than delta nine point zero three T. H. C. that's what I meant to say so an important distinction so big because visibly you cannot tell whether a certain plant as marijuana or half to answer your question help is primarily used for three major things of grain fiber and CBD and so you will grow a particular type just like we have different kinds of corn you'll have different kinds of him other will be manufactured or grown for different purposes typically and and how we're going to do it in high that tip it typically a farmer will contract with a processor will provide that farmer with either the cutting or the certified seed to grow it because the process or once the farmer to be successful are they may be very calm very involved in the harvesting of that product our team has to go out right before harvest to certify the THC level of that hemp products before it can be sold to the processor CBD is an interesting product and that the hemp that's grown for that is an interesting plant all of but C. B. D. is still considered by the FDA to be limited in its use primarily now has been approved for very two very specific juvenile diseases other than that it's deemed to be homeopathic Joe so whether or not it is a benefit to certain individuals is is going to be up to the user right now you can buy CBT products all over the place everywhere from giant eagle to DSW our job at the OTA is to begin testing those products to determine two things one whether or not it has CBD in it and how much to whether or not it's been adulterated with pesticides are metals and so we have an opportunity if we determine that a server products certain product is unsafe to ask the store owner to either remove it or re label it but I I would just say at this point buyer beware there's a lot of things out there that are really not safe for human consumption or use in our job DA is of course to protect the public so Adam the director just described DA's role of this done at the university of the college food agricultural and environmental sciences doing what they do researching production marketing on and on what what what a farm bureau members ask their organization to do in this whole help space well we'll get a lot of questions right about what is him one of the markets in particular for it where can it be grown how can be grown so all of those types of questions so we've been doing that work as well right of being able to help but try to answer questions and also guide them toward either of the work that it would be a will be doing or the work that I wish she was doing so so that's been a lot of what we've been working on it is interesting I mean there's there's some help growing in Ohio right now right there's a little bit grown out of the part of agriculture little bit growing out here at the farm science review site and at Ohio state has so so work continuing right now on these different types of him but the director described in what will be the best types of plants that will work here in the state of Ohio and that could be marketed you know a farmer's look at him I think a lot of a look at it like they do any other product as far as potential for a specialty crop opportunity some will look at it and say there might be something here that I can invest in and and work with a producer and find a market for and figure out if it if it fits my type of farm or not into and I think that's the debate that a lot of farmers are having right now they're learning a lot though they're asking a lot of the right questions you try to determine is are gonna be a market or not and it in can I produce it or not so so those are all the right questions as we move toward next year which is when a lot of this will really kind of a rubber will meet the road because this past year with the farm bill was passed that's what's on this in motion when you when when you have the farm bill passed at the national level allowed states to start taking actions like this I will mention to those of you who are Ohio farm bureau membership ID New York next the addition of our Ohio magazine tie Higgins as an article he and Jack Germond of our team went down to Kentucky met with the help farmer and lots of great information that you'll want to take in in the next edition of our Ohio magazine there's a program that DA administers called Ohio proud it is an exceptional program we're going to learn about that in a few more things that are going on at the department of agriculture when we continue today's conversation our special.

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Back to town hall highland to special guest joining us this week is Dorothy planted director of the Ohio department of agriculture executive vice president of the Ohio farm bureau Adam sharp in with this as well a director planned a before the break we began talking about the got your back campaign and out reach opportunity to get to the farm families of Ohio and tell them they're not alone give us a little bit more detail on how got your back is actually going to function what how does it work well governor to wind has dedicated recovery Ohio monies to efforts are that will be available in all eighty eight counties we have really set about a marketing mission with the help of farm bureau with the help of the department of mental health services and with other agencies Adam can talk a little bit about more to about help I and others have have really taken this on the purpose and the goal we have right now is to market this to me to really help farmers understand that there are resources out there the governor to one has dedicated resources so that families who typically as you said are resilient don't like to talk about these things very much we recognize that it's upon us to reach out to them to tell them about these about the services that are available at any one talk a bit more yeah it's it's a very important point the director makes that to you know the farming community you know we we were used to helping our neighbors and and helping each other in some ways but when it comes down to you know some of that mental mental stress and that mental help we maybe not do that it's quite as well end up that's the idea behind this campaign is to really make it easy make it easily accessible to a series of information what you're talking about economic stress or mental stress of the things that are bothering you with your farm this year with things that are going on we put together a nice resource page here DA has this up and running so it's got your back Ohio dot org got your back Ohio dot org that's the website that we encourage people to go to to find these information resources that the department bags put together and as you mentioned ourselves and our our other agriculture partners are trying to heavily promote this right now so that farmers have a place they can turn to find some additional resources as are looking for them so our hope is that got your back is only needed for a very short amount of time an issue though that came to the forefront back in twenty fourteen and is being worked on but isn't going away quickly is how do we resolve agriculture and water quality issues in Ohio director planned I know that when the governor was in here he began to talk a little bit about what each to Ohio was going to look going to look like give us your take on the program from the beginning governor to whine identified that going forward we really need to engage the farm bureau the commodity groups other stakeholders including Agra businesses and looking for solutions about how we move forward with water quality nope the governor believes and rightly so that the people closest to the problem probably have the best solution so one of the purposes in in my listening to around the state was to talk to farmers about water quality and you know we clearly knew going into it that there would be some very real conversations what we learned was that there really is not going to be one single solution to improving water quality rather in meetings with farm bureau members with Agra businesses and with the commodities we're looking at about twenty interventions that exact combined together in part such as soil testing nutrient management plans variable rate of fertilizer application and cover crops are things that we know over time will result in better nutrient management and better water retention we also know however from conversations with our friends at farm bureau and farmers in the field that no one field may be appropriate for certain practices even parts of that one field and may not be for others so it's been a really interesting fascinating process to work with these folks to figure out what where we want to put H. two why how monies to to you know recover the best solutions we don't yet have all of the specifics as the DA why did ministration is working through that but the concept data miss of of of putting money into programs on the ground we've been pushing for that for a lot of years and governor DeWine listened yeah I would say a couple things you know first off you have a series of already current mandates on agriculture across the state you have mandates on large livestock yet mandates on all livestock you have a series of special restrictions in the northwestern part of the state on what farmers can do around nutrient application whether it's fertilizer Irma newer in then you have additional fertilizer mandates that actually director mentioned earlier on when we talk about fertilizer trainings so we have a whole series these mandates that are already out there then we have a whole series of voluntary actions behind that that agriculture is a broad community has engaged in so you know that the the if there's things out there that people think of the easy win those things are done right I mean we we are those things are happening already we're down into the complex situation at the director was speaking of of how do you address agriculture as part of this issue at that ground level in a very different environments across maybe even a single field so we're down into that very complex level it and we appreciate that the governor and the director has listened agriculture saying that's where we are if we're gonna dress this issue we got to get down to that level and deal with it in that regard in in that case H. two Ohio is a very new approach it's a great way that it's gonna allow that flexibility to get down into the three technical issues the key to this is which of these practices will have the best return on investment and we can talk about that a little bit more but that's that's people ask me.

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"We're talking animal sciences on town hall Ohio with the chairman of the animal sciences department at the Ohio State University doctor John faults Adam sharp exec for Ohio farm bureau and Roger high farm bureaus director livestock policy and also the exact for the Ohio sheep industry association a doctor faults kids grew up on a farm when they think of animals they think of them as a a part of the livelihood of folks who don't grow up on farms haven't been around cattle and and poultry and and the lambs they tend to think of them as Pat's primarily companions that seems to me that because some conflict at times in societies weakened as we consider what the appropriate role of animals are in our lives as as you look at that complex issue where do you start to help sort things out so exactly as you said Joe per pretty complex relationships I think relationships back in the day if you will which you described people grew up in rural areas on farms and so if you had a for each project enough a project your parents set you down and said you're gonna love this animal and when you take it to the fair you can show it and some is combined somebody can eat it and so the kid may not be happy but they know that that's going to happen today and and I actually blame one of my former employers from this for this gonna introduce dog Chow okay back in the nineteen forties that moved dogs from the barn to the house okay we used to feed those dogs and cats on table scraps today you pay a lot for a bag of dog food that changes the relationship and what what we in agriculture want is for people to give us some space we want to do the right thing but we also want to produce products for them that are nutritious and safe in a manner that that Billy wants to do so white white people eat animal products in particular meet its nutrient dense it's super protein but people have to make a choice and so we help produce those but I will say that the undergraduates that we work with today are exactly in the environment that you're talking about as I look at the classroom where companion animals come in and supporting animals the stuff that I never saw before and so that relationship that people have with animals has changed and will continue to change challenge that we have is you have a conversation with somebody that maybe has one of those companion animals and they say well I would need a dog why would eat a steak and so it's it's that balance so from the agricultural standpoint we go you should eat a steak because it's good for you then it's good nutrition and it tastes good and society was evolved beyond of wars you know we both plant in a animal products balanced diet is good and there are a lot of people who are highly critical of animal agriculture some of them it it it's a cause central to their life and and they have very strong opinions there are others though that may have opinions based on something they read online or something they heard from a neighbor you wrote a column in our Ohio a few years back about the need for people to look beyond just the simple headlines in to learn from farmers who are trying to be transparent about what they do yeah the farmers have to depend right on the how they raise those animals and how they care for them in the in the product they're producing right which is the healthy animal that's nutrition that the market once in that increasingly if they don't the market doesn't want it and that is become a major change and how the food chain works in this country and so that's come from some of the this conversation's out there but there there is definitely a public demand there's also a food chain demand on hal animals into the market place these days compared to how they did before it so there's different expectations I am the farmers understand that in respect that and and want to talk about that so a you know often times yeah those who who might have a problem or challenge with it with the animal care may raise some issues but I would always encourage individuals to to dig a little deeper learn a little bit more about animal care what happens on farms but despite the size of the farm whether to large farmer a small farm or whatever type of species is being raised take the time to learn a bit little bit a little bit more about that and I think you'll be on a two could be both interested in fascinated by what does go into animal care on the livestock side of things Roger just real quick put you on the spot here explain for folks who are in tune with with how what we've grown Ohio that much what are the major livestock species the week that we raise and the state I know you're gonna start was she even let us not necessarily certainly the poultry industry eggs Turkey a chicken we have a a pork industry had a dairy cattle industry beef industry sheep and then some goats and and those are the main protein sources that I would say that our consumers from Ohio what were produced in what they're consuming here in Ohio and we always hear about these large corporate farms that have taken over animal agriculture agriculture in general that's not the reality is it no the largest proportion of our farms are still family owned farms you go across the state and and their family owned farms so so so I can I jump in on that Jones so I think part of that miss conception comes from I teach agribusiness management many families set up in the corporate for business because it's the right thing to do that doesn't mean that they're a fortune five hundred company it just means that closely held corporations yeah grandpa is the chairman of the board certainly adds the CEO and mom is the chief financial officer and it's right in our family I was the labor but that's another whole show we're talking about animal sciences and its impact on all of us as Ohioans helping us understand that is doctor John folds the chairman of the animal sciences department in the college of food agricultural and environmental sciences at Ohio state.

Ohio chairman Ohio farm bureau Roger high farm Ohio State University John Adam sharp
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Welcome back to town hall Ohio our topic is access to justice in Ohio and in particular in rural areas of the state our guests in the room with the sand you Lloyd who is the exact for the Ohio legal assistance foundation justice Judy French of the Ohio Supreme Court Adam sharp of the Ohio farm bureau we've been chatting for awhile I guess I never really did even introduce folks to your organization's Angie what's the Ohio legal assistance foundation we are the foundation that funds legal aid in Ohio which means that we support any efforts to provide direct services to Ohio ends who are living at or below hundred twenty five percent of the poverty level which for a family of four is about thirty two thousand dollars and then we also try to do other big state projects the like the Ohio justice boss I hope we'll talk in a little bit about Ohio legal help and work with the Supreme Court the bar associations the metro bar associations the law libraries the public libraries to just try to provide any resources and access that we can to all of highlands a lot of what you do takes money where's the money come from so legally in Ohio is funded by primarily three sources we are the largest funder and we are very lucky to have wonderful legislature that twenty five years ago designated interest on lawyers trust funds and a civil filing fee surcharge so there's a statutory source of money when people go to court and pay a filing fee there's a little bit of that money that comes to us and when lawyers are holding client dollars the interest on that money comes to us and we use that to find legal aid I learned this I guess I should have known this but legal aid you're you're using that as a proper noun I mean that the name legal aid actually means something it into it it's not just something that's done there are what legal aid societies yes there are seven legal aid societies around Ohio we they all cover geographic areas legally of greater Cincinnati southeastern Ohio legal services community legal aid I'm working clockwise around the state legal aid society of Cleveland legal aid of western Ohio advocates for basically low quality and legally to Columbus justice French we we we've had Chief Justice o'connor on the show and and several other justices over the years so I think most people recognize that the Supreme Court in Ohio is just that the court of last last ruling in the state but what else does the Ohio Supreme Court do what are some of the functions of the court one of the things that the court does is is is work with local courts so we've got hundreds of local courts around the state and each one would be serving that local population that local community so there are lots of things that we can do to give resources to those local courts to give education to the judges around Ohio about what the what the legal needs are of of someone who can't afford legal services can't afford to pay for legal services we work on providing resources rule making so there's a whole other side to the Supreme Court that I think most people aren't aware of in in many ways in addition to funding giving grants we can encourage specific programs that help with the legal aid problem in Ohio so Adam folks who are regular listeners know that the farm bureau has its fingers in a lot of different things and I think our our our two biggest sweet spots have always been work with the legislature in in in in writing laws and the regulators that that implement them in and of course in public outreach programs like town hall Ohio our our Ohio magazine but increasingly we've had to find ourselves moving also more into this whole legal arena in in in terms of the kind of services that farmers need from farm bureau fortunately or unfortunately I would say unfortunately we have to spend more time on what's happening in in the court rooms Jr farmers rural landowners role homeowners a real communities we find all kinds of need for information sharing especially the legal area of for this whole range of issues out there so absolutely we have several full time a staff attorneys now that spend a great deal of their time communicating on basic information out to our members and many folks across the Ohio on these very specific issues about this right also sometimes we do help bring things to court it when need be especially the precedent setting believe they could be precedent setting and we do get involved in the courts unfollow behalf and support those cases as well when we believe there something that's very important to us add to our world members in our former members across the state of Ohio so it is it is big deal is becoming ever increasingly part of what we do are a farm bureau policy council Lee Curtis is one of the thousands of studio audience members that are in here with us today and Amy mile I'm on the on the legal team as well here at Ohio farm bureau and and I I I can tell you from personal experience it's rare to walk back to either of theirs desks and not find them on the telephone helping a member find some legal help on one issue or another and they tend to be pretty complex issues so I just want to add to what a great service that is you know to provide that kind of legal advice to their members and and I'm sure some of it is just being a traffic cop to say here's the kind of problem that you're describing and here's where you can get some additional help whether that's really glade organization or something else the other thing all I'll say is that the Ohio farm bureau is kind of a frequent fought filer at the Supreme Court of Ohio and I mean that in a good way they do provide a quality work to us we we have what we call a make us briefs that make us just to make history I as in friend of the court because we like to speak Latin sometimes and it's just a way for the Ohio farm bureau come in and say let us help you understand the problem it let us approach the problem a little bit differently so that you know the impact that what you might rule on in this case how it's going to impact on our neighbors on on our members and said that that is a tremendous resource and it's one that that I want to.

Ohio hundred twenty five percent thirty two thousand dollars twenty five years
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Welcome back to town hall, Ohio, we're talking about no plant nineteen. That's the hashtag that many farmers of slapped on this year's cropping season. If you've been with us throughout the show, you've been hearing a lot about the economic consequences of nonstop rain. But there are emotional consequences as well. My co worker here at Ohio farm bureau, Jordan. Hey, wisher produces a podcast titled field day and ended up coming addition that he shared with talks with Highland county farmer and a member of the Ohio farm bureau board of trustees Nathan Brown chat about the impact of this year on farmers. Mental health. This has been something that's been really hit home to me being a first generation farmer, I didn't necessarily come from that culture background, but mental health and, and your mental wellness has been a part of my life from beginning, my brother and my mother, and my father have all had issues at one point in time. And you know something that I've struggled with in just, you know how do you how do you navigate life, you know, we're young parents. How do you know that your parenting your kids? Right. And then you know, once you throw in the agriculture and, and all the twists and turns that are thrown at you as a farmer. I see so many guys that are struggling, and they don't know where to go, and you know, we treat mental illness in this country as taboo, we don't talk about it. Yeah. It's, it's not something that may affect me, but that's not something I wanna show and in a mental wellness is the same as my physical wellness. I need somewhere to go if I need to go to have a checkup that can help me sort through my issues are usually once the tough through a lot of things. Right. They shoulder the burden of a lot of things, maybe their, their families income debt just just the day to day like physical work that's there. And then, by the way, like if they have a kind of a blip that comes up mentally are in their in their mental health shoulder that too, without actually expressing anybody, we bear so much ourselves. And, and we don't. At, like asking for help, we don't you know, I know more farmers, the farm by themselves have nobody else of that helps them on a daily basis than I know operations that are, you know, six seven eight ten people, you know, it's, it's that one person. And he's, he's the one that. If doesn't go right? He's the one to blame for if he goes bankrupt. He's one to blame for you know if his crops fail. It's all on him and that can be more than people can handle sometimes and. I've heard people say, well, if you can't can't handle the stress and get out. Well, you know, that that's not really a fair statement for anybody. Because if you had cancer, you know. You just need your job because you have. No. I mean you're going to go find help and it doesn't always have to be a professional help. I don't think you know you need to build a good support of, of peers. I mean, you know, me and my wife have one of the best relationships, the two guys for I mean, we are open and honest with each other, and it was just this weekend. We were joking around. Oh, we were in the card. Are we talking about this subject a little bit? And she said, you know, you're, you're getting pretty good with us. You mean a whole lot better hide, at the used to be what are you talking about? She's like what you're probably sitting there thinking about. Well, you know we just finished planting beans, but we got spray to do, do we've got this going on. We got cows litter just turned to blow out so we're in the process of Breedon. And then we're talking about three four five six inches of rain, come this week got, plus you got board meetings. All this other stuff, family kids, that are playing T-ball and baseball. And, you know, just trying to navigate life. And I think as a as a business owner and an ultra list, there's just more weight that is put on that person. You said it's kind of taboo, and it's tough to subject, because it's, you know, farmers generally haven't been the most expressive. But I think hopefully our generation can can help lead the way a little bit more on saying, okay hand up help go, go see somebody, you know, those guys, I say, reach out to your family reach out to your buddies. You know, put together of of group, you know that's one great thing about how you act professionals group. I mean you can meet so many guys and so many agriculture. Listen farmers from around the state and gather your network, and find people that you connect with and use those relationships. Those bonds to get through tough times, like you know mentally that you're having or whatever. And that's that's one thing I like about organization in organizations in our cultures. They bring people together, and you can.

Ohio farm bureau wisher Ohio town hall Highland county Jordan Nathan Brown baseball Breedon cancer business owner three four five six inches
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Welcome back to town hall Ohio opioid education is our topic today. Chad gesture of nationwide. Jennifer Martinez with the whole drug mental health board of Franklin county in the studio with us. And we were talking chat about some of the other parts of controlling opioids besides parental, and kid education. Besides law enforcement you made the point that the state of Ohio is taking this quite seriously as well. State of Ohio is a fantastic partner. And again, this is a public private partnership with everyone taking accountability. So few years ago, the state of Ohio took action to reduce the number of opioids prescribe to Ohio. And so at the peak in twenty twelve there, probably seventy pills for every man woman child in the state of Ohio that were prescribed, it is down nearly one third to about fifty pills, so it's still a lot of medicine in the marketplace. But the state's been a great partner and their leadership makes all the difference in terms of involvement in it. Both of you have made the point that this needs to be a high priority for the community. I'm thinking back three four years ago or at a higher farm bureau meeting, and the farmers are talking about the farm Bill and they're talking about clean water in Ohio, and they're talking about property taxes. And then this voice comes up and they start talking about drug abuse Cisco is farm bureau's vice president of public policy. I shouldn't be surprised, but it still set you back a little bit when farm bureau says we need to start paying attention to this. Yeah. Absolutely. And you know, part of our mission farm bureau's to strengthen our communities and a component of that. Our folks have recognized is the drug epidemic and what we're doing here in terms of this opioid crisis. So our members have made it a priority issue for the last three years and only seven or eight topics rise to being what we consider a priority issue at farm bureau, it's where we're going to put our resources where we're going to put our effort in ended has risen to that level. So much of what happens in farm bureau, the, the initial steps were taken a locally Michelle spec, who's one of our organization, directors and her counties over eastern, Ohio. They jumped on it with both feet and kind of brought everybody along. Absolutely. They were kind of the role model for how other counties. Could engage in this. The first thing we encourage everybody to do is take a look around at your community. Farm bureau is really good at that networking at using our grassroots model of actually having feet on the ground. But we encourage every folks, and we've put something out to every single county farm bureau. So they know look and see if you have prevention action alliance already organized. And if so, join their effort, there's no reason to duplicate those kind of the same thing that the board went through and saying, how do we collectively bring everybody who's working on this individually together? So we want to be part of solutions of community already has one to help strengthen that solution by using our grassroots network. And then our other major component, though, to this entire thing has been a youth where we know we have a strong point is our for H and R FFA students, we have an in with them. They're listening to the voices of the leaders of those organizations, who are who are helping them. And so we put together program called help for a hope, for Ohio, and then also came out of eastern Ohio and a local group that came together and said, we need to help educate the students about what they should be doing. How to have peer to peer conversations how to stay away from the drug themselves to begin with, but then how to have peer to peer conversations might as well, pull the adults in have conversations with them about what to look for. That might not be normally what you would look for in your household that's called hidden in plain sight. And so we have had hundreds and hundreds of students. Now, we did a statewide version of hope for Ohio. We've replicated it a road show all the way around Ohio to help those students who are active who are engaged to look at another peer and say, there's something off there. I have a conversation with them that might help in the long run. So a lot of different ways that we're using kind of that peer to peer conversation. Both in our communities and with our students in American Farm Bureau kinda saw what was happening here and it started a county. It's moved up to the state level and became a national priority as well. It absolutely has it's done the exacting. It's supposed to do communities. They were vocal and they, and they spread the word that we've got a dress this at moved up to the state, level, USDA an has let has met with our. Our county farm bureau's on several occasions. And she's now, actually moved over to the White House, so they, they recognize the work. She was doing in the rural communities and said, we need what she's doing to be replicated everywhere. And so our voices being heard at every single level in terms of we need help. We need the programming, we need the dollar think Chad for folks who may not know the relationship between farm bureau nationwide goes way back to win. We started a mutual automobile insurance company and it grew into nationwide. And we've had our hundredth anniversary. You're coming up on yours. But, but this whole community thing, and people working to help each other. It's kind of a shared value that we, we have with nationwide and foreign of your immunity is the shared value in. It's no surprise that the farm bureau is so engaged in this issue and so many others, and no surprise that. The Ohio farm bureau was actually one of the first members joined the Ohio opioid educational lines and said, what can we do so the work together on a complicated issue? Like this is all about complementing. Each other. It's not a competitive environment. It's leverage. Reaching more youth, and we highly valued, the Ohio farm bureau, and we highly value, the work that nationwide and the mental health board. Everybody's putting into this problem that we all have to tackle we've got a few minutes who wrap up to today's show, and perhaps sheer few more ideas on.

farm bureau Ohio Ohio farm bureau Chad gesture partner Jennifer Martinez Franklin county USDA Cisco White House Michelle spec vice president three four years three years
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Coming off headlines from the federal government this past week about the biggest police action against medical professionals as it relates to the opioid crisis. Dozens of doctors and nurses arrested. There is word from this weekend about a spike in overdoses in the Columbus area police and EMT's called to eight overdoses in the capital city on Saturday. One of those OD cases was fatal it all happened Saturday afternoon. And there is no word yet. If those cases are related police across Ohio in the past have suggested that people who are addicted should not get high alone, an Akron woman whose daughter died from exposure to frigid cold back in February has now been released from prison early Twenty-three-year-old tear Williams was originally sentenced to eighteen months a county Common Pleas judge has now placed Williams on probation for eighteen months. She must also attend parenting classes, and the judge suggested counseling. Investigators are asking for the public's help when it comes to an arson incident that happened earlier this month in Putnam county. The village town hall building in Cloverdale caught fire in the early morning hours of April seventh the investigation being conducted by the state fire Marshall's office and the Putnam county. Sheriff a reward up to five thousand dollars is being offered by the blue ribbon arson committee for information leading to the arrest and conviction of a suspect and in Ohio amusement park, kicking off the two thousand nineteen with rain and cold temperatures at ten AM Saturday kings island opened for its fortieth season in Mason this year. Also marks the fortieth anniversary of the beast roller coaster, and for the first time in a decade and a half the anti cars attraction has returned for those who like to enjoy a craft beer a Miami river brew house is one of the new attractions, and international street has some new edition subject out. The park will be closed today in observation of Easter. I'm Sean Gallagher. And I'm Jack crumley keeping you up to date. Trendy new stories at the top and bottom of every hour. Columbus news, he's on NewsRadio. Six ten WTVN..

Putnam county arson Williams Columbus Ohio amusement park Jack crumley federal government Cloverdale Ohio Sean Gallagher Miami river Akron Marshall eighteen months five thousand dollars Twenty-three-year
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Traffic for Columbus. Newsradio six ten WTVN. Now. Welcome back to town hall, Ohio the four folks around the table are going to have a lot to say about what farm bureau gets done tomorrow and probably for the next thirty or forty years. They are the finalists in our discussion. Meet and they are Michaela ride of our Canham. Jeremy Trustor of Bethel, Victoria, pop of Cincinnati, and Dewey man of Asheville there. One of the rounds of the discussion meet competition was centered on this particular question in our modern world. The rapid dissemination of information and opinion about agriculture and food technologies can make difficult to distinguish fact from fiction given these challenges how can farm bureau best protect farmers and ranchers access to production technology options jump in guys. All at once. I can tell. I'll go ahead and lead off on this one Joe. So I think that there's a lot of things that farm bureau can you to help predict customers access excuse me, producers access to technology. And I think part of it is recognizing where consumer preference plays in. And so we talk a lot about educating people. Right. I like to make assumption that consumers are generally good people with good mines. And when armed with good information. May they make good decisions? So I think that the more that we can have conversations with people, you know, take it down the street to your local supermarket and really make it a point to discuss the production technologies that we're using most people are afraid, it's fear. So if we can have that one on one conversation and make it a point to speak to them as a mother as a wife as somebody that cares about their family too. I think we can make a lot of progress explaining difficult technologies in a simple way. Yeah. I think it's important that we focus more on relationship building versus educating people because it's it just sounds condescending. People don't want to be educated. There's always there's already so much information out there. Getting it for all these directions. Are they supposed to know? Why what you're saying is better than what they read in another article. So I think relationship building and just showing them that you're just like them. You are a mom, and you care about what your kids are eating or whatever that she may be telling our story is so important. Why do we do different production practices, and we spoke to the diversity issue? We have people that are passionate about different production practices about different food seed technology. They're going to help tell that story. Very well. The other piece I think we haven't really brought in is the soil and water quality there that takes me to machinery technology. Is there an opportunity to educate the consumer to say, here's some of the technologies that we're utilizing whether it's production practice, whether it's digital agriculture and using data to drive the decisions that we make. We're we're we're traditionally known as good stewards of the land. What are the things that were implementing to improve our our bottom line? But also to have a positive environmental impact. We are visiting with our discussion meet finalists, and our topic of conversation is this particular time is there's a lot of information out there about agriculture, and sometimes it may not necessarily be one hundred percent accurate. I wanna I wanna follow up on this real quick. I'll throw this out to all four of you. Is there a pet peeve? Is there something you've heard about food production farming food safety, whatever that you just wish people would take the time to explore further antibiotics. And I'll go ahead and just say that's a pet peeve of mine because I think that taking care of our animals is one of the best things that we can do as farmers. You know, if you talk to any livestock, pretty sure, they'll tell you that, you know, their cows eat, I usually in in that household, and so I think the more that we can talk to producers and help them understand if a callous sick, our primary duty is to make sure that that animals, okay? And is taking care of. And when we talk about withdrawal periods. Right. We talk about all of these big scary words what we're really saying. Is that we care about our animals, and we wanna make sure that they're healthy and taken care of. So I know that's one that I I often talk about I think a bit of an extension of that is scale of agriculture in the United States. There's lots of land in this country. That's cultivated various uses and a lot of people might have an assumption of how large an individual farmer is or how it varies, and you know, the average cattle herd in this country still under fifty head. So we have a large number smaller operations in this country. Unfortunately, I think people that are exposed I culture often aren't aware of that. I'll I'll take a shot in. Turnley us as producers us telling our story, we tend to get wrapped up on whether it's production practice, whether it's different technology. And we like to think that whatever we're doing is the best. We think about telling the story about convincing our friends convincing and the neighbors convincing the general public that no till farming organic whatever the production practice or the system is it is the best because we don't do a very good job of setting on the fence looking both directions and saying here are the pros of this system. Here the cons. Here's why I choose to implement it. Here's why choose to have this size of a herd. Here's why the pros and the cons of each production system technology, and I think another pet peeve is just labeling in general. There are so many different labels out there. And so you have to think about like, even labels can be confusing to me. So how is the average? Consumers supposed to understand what all these different labeling terms. Are. We'll be back to wrap up our conversation with.

town hall Michaela Jeremy Trustor Columbus Canham Asheville Ohio Dewey Bethel United States Joe Cincinnati one hundred percent forty years
"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"town hall" Discussed on WTVN

"Welcome back to town hall, Ohio. I anti Higgins this week. We're showcasing a new partnership that be beneficial to farmers and consumers and all points in between recently at the two thousand nineteen mid American restaurant expo in Columbus. Specialty growers got some booth space along farmers crossing a section highlighting agriculture and building relationships between those farmers and stores, restaurants and other entities that may want to distribute their products to farms one free booth space through a contest with Ohio farm bureau. Lisa. Rowe Taylor is with Bloomfield meadows. A you pick blueberry, strawberry and raspberry farm in center Berg, that's in Morrow county. She told me what being at a trade show of this magnitude means for her farm. It means getting out to local people what we had to offer. And how we grow our berries. And how great our product is. I know you're located in Morrow county and soon Aberg tell me about the farm in. What are you grow? We grow all kinds of. Mostly blueberries in red raspberries, but we have elderberry excuse, berries, strawberries, we also have some fruit trees. I noticed dandy lion jam. I grew up on a farm. I've had a lot of my fair share of different kinds of jams never heard of that one. Well, I looked at one day and saw a lot of dandelions in five. What can I do with those? So I put them into our jam jam packed in free. So a lot of people like that, especially some people that are glucose intolerant have found that they could eat it is an all-natural concept. Yes. It's all natural. We grow some herbs that we put in and but yes, all natural. So when you have people at the trade show her you look into connect with what kind of relationships are you looking to start here today. Well, I'd like to get our products out into the restaurants. If they're looking for fresh, berries, we have those to offer if they wanna use our jams into we put them on meats, and pastries, we don't use them on toast, usually. So there's lots of other things you can do with your jams. So I'm hoping to get to restaurants, and then small stores, I would love to be in some small. OT's you're a farm.

Morrow county Ohio farm bureau Rowe Taylor Aberg Higgins town hall Ohio Columbus Bloomfield meadows center Berg Lisa one day