35 Burst results for "Tory Party"

"tory party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:39 min | Last month

"tory party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The best comparison I guess. And then of course we've got interesting people perhaps like gove coming back and yeah, it's fascinating to see the dynamics of whether or not they balance out all the various wings of the parties. You said that mug has been shattered in many different ways. Yeah, I think to begin with hunt and sunac are pretty well aligned on what needs to be done. I think the challenge will come on the specifics. You know, where exactly will they find cuts and also, you know, I think both will be aware that the lesson from the George Osborne era is you simply can't just introduce austerity and end up with growth. And the public services were cut pretty much to the bone through out the years of financial crisis. We've seen capital expenditure in the country really drop. So they're going to have to find very creative ways to balance things out. And I think initially there will be pretty aligned, but you're right. This is very unique in British history. You have a prime minister who had worked at a hedge fund who's got an MBA. And who was the former Chancellor so knows his way around the numbers. But I suspect that at least at the start, that's going to be that's going to be a positive rather than a source of tension, simply because the alternative for the Tory party is really annihilation. Either they get their act together now and find a way forward or it's just curtains at the next election and that will come sooner than anyone in the party want. With the other challenge, of course, he has is he has to keep the party united around him. I mean, he was crowned leader without a full contest 'cause he was the only one who made the threshold of a hundred MPs, but how long does the party give him to kind of convince them that he's doing the right thing and will lead them away from that annihilation? Right, so I think there's a real tension here between two competing kind of two conflicting objectives. So on the one hand, you have the instinct of self preservation with the party, which is sort of avoid an election for as long as possible until the parties in a better position. And then on the other hand, you know, you have these individual agendas and worldviews and ideologies, which the Tory party is still a fairly, you know, traditionally a broad church so you have a lot of viewpoints within the party on things like immigration and taxation. I think what's interesting will be to see what happens at the grassroots, even this morning on the radio, let's listening to two Tory party members, one of whom was incredibly supportive of Rishi sunak right man for the time and the other was just livid at the fact that the vote did not go to party members, said they weren't sure they could lend his support. So, you know, we may see a clearing out of sorts of the rank and file, the party membership, and that might be a good thing because the membership has been whittled down from over 2 million years and years ago to a 172,000. Maybe that part of the party needs to be rejuvenated. It would be a messy task for whoever takes it on. But, you know, they've got the leader they've got. And if they don't make it work, you know, where do they go to next? But an election at a time when the Tories are 30 points behind in the polls. Okay, try as thank you very much, our opinion columnist columnist Therese Raphael they're looking ahead to what's next for Rishi sunak as he will be formally appointed prime minister today and will have his first address to the nation as the new leader the third conservative prime minister in just three months coming up next on the program will bring you our interview with the UBS CEO Ralph hamers after their latest set of results stay with us for that. This is Bloomberg. I was in the middle. Hear that. That's the sound of a patient whose health data is protected from a cyberattack. And that, that's the sound of a financial system that's digitally secured from bad actors. Right now, there's an invisible war being fought on a digital battlefield that impacts what we do every day. That's why a periton, we do that can't be done to help protect the vital systems we rely on because if we don't, the alternative is unimaginable. Periton. Of

Tory party Rishi sunak gove George Osborne Therese Raphael Ralph hamers UBS Bloomberg
"tory party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:27 min | Last month

"tory party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To try and implement any policy or is he going to spend all his time trying to hold the conservatives together? Well, that's the challenge really for whoever wins the new Tory leadership and becomes prime minister, certainly you can see very different views about the past forward for the economy within the party, but more broadly, there's a bunch of other challenges that they will face externally, how to maintain unity on the wall in Ukraine, trade tensions with the U.S. and Europe policy on China even. So you've got a huge slate of challenges and how you get unity of purpose, not just within the Tory party, but within Westminster more broadly and in parliament. That's a really big ask. And the first thing really is to sort of settle down the party and say look, it's not been a particularly good month for us a few months for us public facing at least in terms of the turmoil we've kind of displayed publicly and we really need to put that behind us and the question is whether a candidate like Rishi sunak even can manage that because of course he has had his own divisions within the Tory party and his previous tilt as leader. So there have to be questions about whether he can really bridge across the Tory party and do that. But then arguably could anyone really at this point achieve that quickly? That's probably the big question also. Yeah, it's searching questions. It's just interesting because clearly the reason why Boris Johnson didn't run is because he was told that he would not be able to command a majority really in the sense that when Liz trust went to King Charles, he would not be able to say with true certainty that they could command a majority in the House of Commons. So the flip side of that is that if there really were a hundred 102 Boris back as whether or not they form a rump and perhaps cause Rishi sunak sort of grief in the side and indeed it only takes 30 40 of them to sort of all of a sudden vote against the government. I mean, this is part of the sky stuff, but how risky do you think that a rump a Boris rump threatens rushi? Well, it was interesting because of course Boris Johnson and Richardson I used to work very closely together as prime minister and his Chancellor until they had a really big falling out, obviously a couple of months ago. But ideologically, they weren't that far apart, some of the time. The question is, does Boris Johnson then sort of use his level of support still in Westminster to try and undermine Rishi sunak from the site. What are his next moves? That's something we're so clear yet. What he might do from here because of course he is still a member of parliament. And he clearly does have aspirations still towards a political career of some sort as we've seen in the past couple of days. So the question is, does he sort of sit there in parliament and try and cause problems for Rishi sunak, thinking at some point perhaps he might have his own pathway to re leading the Tory party into the next election. That's something very much that we need to watch. But again, it seems like the games will not disappear just because we get a new prime minister as soon as today. Jimmy, you're talking about in that latest estimate that we put out today 30 billion pounds of consolidation needed to put the debt burden on trajectory. How does that sort of amount of austerity comparative previous drives to try and cut back on what the government spends? It's actually a similar sort of similar sort of size as to what we saw between 2010 and 2016 under the Osborne era. So it is material. And it's going to hurt. But I think the question is whether they finance it partly through some more pulling some tax levers maybe, which won't be popular, but many need to be done. The other option is that they had already penciled in a huge increase in investment spending over the next few years. And my guess is that if they're going to cut from anywhere, it's probably going to be from that budget. So that won't be immediately felt by people, but it will have longer term consequences. So Jamie, do the Bank of England take this all in their stride and still go ahead with a hundred basis points. I know you're thinking 75 as am I, but I mean, is there a chance now of 50? Well, so let's think. So the Bank of England had two motives for doing big rate hikes. The first was fiscal loosening in the budget, which is raising demand, pushing up inflation in the medium term. That's now gone away. The second most likely to get away. The second motive is to restore confidence in UK assets by lifting, lifting interest rates, increasing demand for those. So the pound doesn't slump further and raise inflation in the medium term for that reason. So these are the two motives. And they both gone away to a large extent because the premium has fallen back on UK assets. And the inflation shock is going away from the budget. So it does call them to do less than markets were expecting at the peak of the mayhem. I think 75 is probably what they'll do. But yeah, I think you're right that actually it does create 75 to the central estimate. There is risks now in both directions, 50 and a hundred. Raz, there is an argument which you could say that whoever is taking over the conservative leadership party is somewhat doing a caption of the Titanic role because we heard from two MPs earlier in the program, both from seats traditionally held by labor with very small majorities, and they were pretty clear that they're worried about losing their seats and of course they do support the party and believe that they can turn things around, but there are a lot of worries members of parliament who will be voting today who can see their very small majorities disappearing. Well, that's right. And you can see the level of public polling that shows how much labor has pulled in front, although you'd have to take that with a pinch of salt because people are sort of expressing themselves in the moment and election in theory is still some time away. But what you can see is a real effort by Tory lawmakers to above all avoid this careering into an election that they really don't want and they can't afford. You can see that even in the comments by Boris Johnson last night when he said he would not be standing for the leadership. He said this is in the interest of avoiding us cratering into an election right now, even though he might argue that he's the only one who would have a mandate having actually won an election previously in 2019. But what you can see is a real effort to try and sort of steady things down a bit with enough runway into the next election. Whether or not that timeline holds remains to be seen, of course, because if we go through further bouts of leadership term well, it's very hard at that point to argue a leader has any kind of mandate unless they go to the public, but certainly the polling is suggesting above or what the Tories need to do right now is hold it together enough to avoid an election that none of them really want. Okay, our executive editor for in charge of government draws on Mathis and chief Europe economist Jamie rush, thank you very much to both of you for your analysis. This is Bloomberg. Markets, headlines and breaking news 24 hours a day. The Bloomberg business app. Quick take. This is a Bloomberg business flash.

Tory party Rishi sunak Boris Johnson Westminster Bank of England parliament King Charles Ukraine House of Commons Boris Liz Richardson Europe China U.S. Jimmy UK Jamie Raz
Sebastian and Mike Graham Discuss Liz Truss' Resignation

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:04 min | Last month

Sebastian and Mike Graham Discuss Liz Truss' Resignation

"Given the situation, I can not deliver the mandate on which I was elected by the Conservative Party. I have therefore spoken to his majesty the king to notify him that I am resigning as leader of the Conservative Party. No U turns this lady's not for turning, I remember that catch phrase from Margaret Thatcher when I lived in the UK well, this one didn't just do U turn. She got off the highway, a record 44 days in office, shortest serving prime minister ever, gone, goodbye, Liz truss. What does it all mean? How did it happen? We stay on top of international news as much as anything else. I'm your host Sebastian gorka, and you're listening to America first on the Salem news channel. Who do we rely upon? Our good friend across the Atlantic, the man who speaks truth and common sense on the fastest growing channel there. It is talk TV. It's our good friend. Mike Graham, welcome back to America first. Sebastian, thank you very much. Indeed, well, it's been quite a day. It's been quite a week. It's been quite a 44 days. You might say, as you said, the shortest period ever, some think this has been a remainder plot. There are those in this country who still can't take the fact that Brexit was a success and that we left the European Union. You know, we now have Jeremy hunt, who's had Chancellor, who voted to remain in the EU. Let's trust was a remainer who changed into a brexiter and is now out. Boris Johnson, however, is the big name on everybody's lips tonight because but hang on, hang on, hang on, didn't you just get rid of him, Mike? Yeah. We might be getting him back. It could be the greatest political comeback of all time. You know how he's very much like Donald Trump. They're trying to get him every single step of the way. They are terrified of Boris Johnson coming back because he is the one man who can unite the Tory party who can win an election against the Labor Party and who could actually restore everything for them. Nobody's quite sure if he's going to run, but he's already in the lead in the polls and he's already in the league in the House of Commons as far as MPs is supported.

Conservative Party Liz Truss Sebastian Gorka Mike Graham Margaret Thatcher Brexit America European Union Boris Johnson Jeremy Hunt Sebastian Atlantic UK Tory Party Donald Trump Mike Labor Party House Of Commons
"tory party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:10 min | Last month

"tory party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Jeremy hunt is her only hope now, which is ironic given he doesn't have treasury experience. He doesn't have broad support in the party. Remember he's already had two failed leadership bids. But as you say, he's in the driver's seat, which is why lots of MPs are questioning whether they should just crown him as prime minister, but that would mean either another leadership election or bypassing the party membership, which would be ugly in either case. If there is a new leader, the mandate would be severely diluted, that would add to pressure for a snap election. And if you look at the polls at the moment, labor would completely wipe out the Tory party. Lizzie, enjoy the music, one year, and find out if we need to pay anyone. Lacey burden, thank you Dan in Westminster. Mister stoffers over at Oppenheimer, he has thrown the towel in. Here's the quote from him and the team. We are updating our yearend price target for the S&P 500 based on the indexes closing level of 35 83 last Friday. We now see just under 12% potential upside in the index by yearend to establish a target of four thousand. I think you all remember the previous target. I'm trying to bring it up right now. I believe it was something like 5300 at one point from mister stolfa and Tom, that is gone. This is the issue, and he's a grizzled pro and he's been dead on in the great great bull market, but if you put a level in a time on it, always you get in trouble. So I would suggest we haven't spoken to him yet, but I would suggest he's extending out his optimistic view. The last target we saw from John was 4800, and that's now down to four. Because of calendars moving on, year ended tomorrow. Who's left? Just to give up on this thing. One person. Marco clinic. And said there's risk now you achieve that and fit in 2023. You pushed out, but he didn't abandon the call. Okay. So what do you do now? I'd love to know. I'd love to talk to someone on the south side. It's got no problem with getting it wrong. People get it wrong sometimes. What do you just hold on to it for a couple of months? You've extend your time. We just say next year. My question is, how much can you really extend out when you have a fed that has to move more aggressively? Surely because of the resiliency

Tory party Jeremy hunt mister stolfa treasury Lizzie Oppenheimer Lacey Westminster Marco clinic Dan S Tom John
"tory party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:58 min | 3 months ago

"tory party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Forecast and that was already eye watering. It's based on the energy regulator saying that bills are going to rise to 3500 pounds in October and forecasters talking about 6000 pounds plus next spring. But even if 22% aggressive, what it shows is that economists hopes that inflation is going to peak in October a starting to fade. Goldman has said that it would trigger a 3.4% drop in GDP and even if energy costs moderate, they still see a peak of 14% inflation in January, so even either way, it hammers home the scale of the crisis that awaits the next prime minister and that the Bank of England is going to have to deal with and inflict pain on consumers to control. Yeah, although it also could signal the fact that perhaps we're going into a new era of high inflation and that's that. Another shot though by Vichy sunak against his opponent Liz truss in the kind of final days of this competition in the FT. And yet in the FT it's described as more moderate than his previous attacks on Liz trust because we're ending the contest and it looks like he's likely to lose. And so he shouldn't be wanting to disunite the party in the eyes of the bods of the Tory party. He's warning that her tax cuts could drive up borrowing costs if markets lose faith in the British economy. And if the Tories lose their reputation for fiscal discipline, he's saying that they'd lose one of their biggest advantages over labor, but really he's preaching to the choir by giving this interview to the FT, all the polling suggests that the Tory grassroots don't care about any of this regardless of whether he's economic. Can the toys keep hold of a leader a little longer for in the last 6 years for the UK? Interesting stuff, Lizzie bread, and thank you very much for all of that coming up next on the program. We will be getting back to our conversation about the markets

Vichy sunak Liz truss Tory party Goldman Bank of England Liz Lizzie UK
Who Will Be the Next UK Prime Minister

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:13 min | 4 months ago

Who Will Be the Next UK Prime Minister

"I do cover the United Kingdom prime minister. As you know, Boris Johnson has been forced to resign and announce his resignation. He's a caretaker prime minister. The 300 and 30 odd members of parliament who are conservatives will pick the next prime minister for 5 rounds. They've got 6. They started with 8. They dropped two off yesterday. They had another round of voting today. Dropped off in the lowest vote better than the lowest vote getter. Then they're left with two and those two people go to the 200,000. Here are the 6 finalists, penny, more daunt, they say it was penny more done. Well, you wouldn't know. You don't follow British politics. Her odds are four to 6. Those are very good odds. She is the clear favorite. A woman is rankings in recent leadership poll far out strut our public profile. The trade minister has consistently pulled is one of the top choices among Tory party members. In recent weeks, despite her relative lack of top level experience. Corelli and her 8th ministerial job, she was international development secretary for two years, and was made the first female defense secretary by Theresa May before mister Johnson replaced

Boris Johnson United Kingdom Parliament Tory Party Corelli Theresa May Mister Johnson
What's Next for the UK After Johnson Resignation?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:19 min | 5 months ago

What's Next for the UK After Johnson Resignation?

"No, mister secretary, you spent some time in the United Kingdom in the run up to the announcement by prime minister Johnson that he will be standing down. And the launch of the UK leadership election. Now, the prime minister of the United Kingdom matters a great deal to the United States. And you've known a lot of their foreign secretaries, your counterpart when you're at the CIA at M 6. You know, a lot of these people, what do you make of the needs of Great Britain in their next prime minister? Toughness resolve. Candor. Most of all candor to the people of the United Kingdom telling them that this is a tough honorary world out there that they are an important player. And now that they are no longer part of Europe, they need to step up and continue the kind of leadership that they had when president Reagan and Margaret Thatcher and Pope John Paul two worked so closely together. I was there. I was in London for a three or four days. Just before prime minister Johnson stepped down. And I saw a great generation of next conservative leaders from Tory party. Not every Tory is a conservative, but every conservative is a Tory and I think they will find a good leader who moves the country forward in a way that engages in the world economically and lets lending continue to be a massive, important, massively important financial center, but provides a level of understanding for other European nations about this is the way forward.

Prime Minister Johnson United Kingdom CIA Great Britain Tory Party President Reagan UK Margaret Thatcher United States Pope John Paul Europe Tory London
"tory party" Discussed on podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

03:05 min | 5 months ago

"tory party" Discussed on podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

"British correspondent or senior correspondent of the British Isles, Dave brockington, how are you doing this morning, Dave? Pretty good rob always always a pleasure to a converse with you. My fine friend. Yeah. It's been a minute. I feel like the last time we talked was also some sort of crisis within the Tory party and the British government. But the events of the last 24 to 36 hours have really been remarkable. Perhaps not shocking to people who have been paying attention. But certainly shocking, I don't know, in their ability to shock, right? So tell me a little bit about what's happened. Over the past 36 to 48 hours. We're recording the shortly after Boris Johnson's resignation, not a resignation speech. Which is your afternoon in my morning. But I guess give us the lowdown to what's been going on. Well, to be honest, Boris Johnson has managed to escape so many crises of his own making and several of which are much larger than what eventually brought him down is I didn't pay any attention to the fact that former deputy chief whip Chris pincher had some sexual misconduct charges against him and that Boris Johnson actually named Chris pincher, I'm sure that quite well. I mean, you got to hand it to the British for having a sense of humor about these things. I mean, the guy was born. He's like, okay, I've got one job. But I wasn't paying much attention. Because it's like, okay, he's a deputy chief whip, which is kind of low on the pecking order in terms of the government. He's a sexual misconduct or sexual harassment allegations. Well, he's a conservative MP. That's kind of par for the course these days. And there have been much bigger scandals in the past three to 6 months, 12 months, 24 months, that why this, why this and in fact, I had a look his name up right before we came on because I was on the radio one of the BBC outlets about an hour ago. And I completely botched his name. I forgot who he was. And I called him something else entirely. Or something like that. You have three company, right? But so this guy turns out that Boris Johnson knew that he had all these sexual harassment sexual assault allocations against. So I don't even know the nature of the actual sexual assault that he did. But there are several complaints of sexual misconduct. And Boris Johnson claimed he didn't know, then of course it turned out he did know when he appointed this guy. He claimed that the second he found out he sacked him immediately. It took him over 24 hours. And a couple of days ago, he was apparently in the cafe in Westminster or the bar or whatever. Basically telling fellow conservative MPs that, well, you know, the girl or the guy was drunk that he was sexually assaulting and so it's okay somehow. Whatever it was, this was the straw that broke the camel's back.

Boris Johnson Chris pincher Dave brockington Tory party British Isles British government rob Dave BBC Westminster
PM Boris Johnson Faces Vote of No-Confidence

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:03 min | 6 months ago

PM Boris Johnson Faces Vote of No-Confidence

"That's right, 54 members of the Tory party. Now the way it works in Great Britain, they're not going to an election just a bunch of the members of the Conservative Party have had it with Boris, and they send letters to something called the 1922 committee or the committee on 1922 or 1922 something or other. And the senior member of the party is the chair of that. And when he counts 15% of letters demanding a vote of no confidence, they have a vote of no confidence. And so Boris got hit with that this morning. The magic number of 54 was greeted. I think some Tory members of parliament were watching Boris get booed on his way into St Paul's Cathedral for the platinum celebrations yesterday and they said, you know, we're going to lose a couple of by elections this month and we're going to get crushed if Boris is the leader. So we better dump him now. We still have two plus years left and the majority we can get ourselves a new prime minister,

Tory Party Boris Conservative Party Great Britain St Paul's Cathedral Parliament
"tory party" Discussed on Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

03:30 min | 7 months ago

"tory party" Discussed on Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores

"And I kind of like that, you know, the whole idea is that he takes away, they take away his sight at the time he needs it most to get their revenge. But yeah, I loved it. I think Patrick McGee is one of the best things in it as well. I think I'll go with that. Just as stronger performance or maybe not quite as strong as maybe Peter Cushing's, but it's one of the most memorable performances in this film. As well. Again, it gives them a chance to be able to blankets like can't afford it. And then again, he's got his fire on. He's got all this food, like really fancy food, and they're having like basically gruel. And yeah, I thought it was really good. And again, you know, there's a lot of political allegories in there as well, I think. You could see a Tory party, story party. Not political at all. I'm not very political, but yeah, you can certainly see the haves in the house not. If you want to look into it that deeply, but yeah, I thought it was an excellent story and a good solid finale. But now, what about the framing device? We come to the end of this with our framing device. And what is revealed, Dennis, as you probably have already teased? The reveal of the end of the end of the film. That's it. We're going to reveal to actually Dennis is dead instead of all these people. He just died on me. Certainly died. Oh, wow. We're still going. Oh shit. We still got another film to talk about Dennis and the comparison. You were saying to the point that I think Dennis went blind for a second. Anyway, so anyway, so at the end, I'll go back to the crypt, the crypt keeper is kind of sat there. Oh, I forgot a little bit. Did the major is also a dick when he's in the crypt as well, isn't he? Yeah, he's an asshole. Yeah. Well, he's just an outside all at some. And also, we got to mention like the bit where the guys like literally we need to call a doctor, this guy's dying. He's like, no, you don't. There's three in the morning, what are you doing? Stop bothering me. They're like, we're freezing to death. He is coughing his guts, so he's dying. Please call it Doc. And eventually he goes okay, slowly puts on his dressing gown, goes down. And he doesn't even know who he is. It doesn't even know this guy is and he's like, what's his name? Where is he? And even the blind guy. Literally knows exactly where he lives, knows who it is and points directly to. Even though he's blind, he knows exactly where his bed is. And he's like, oh, let me check him and he's like, oh, shit, and this guy's dead, and it's like. And that's the turning point, because even though he's very begrudgingly doing something nice, he's actually just he's still via the delay and all the shit he's done cause, you know, it's manslaughter, I guess you could call it probably. More so than anything or but yeah, he's complicit in this man's death. Kind of sums up what kind of happened sort of thing with the group. And says, right? You can go on now, after your pot, this door opens. There's a white light. I can't remember which one stands up and walks forward first. It's the guy from The Monkees Paul story. Yeah. So he walks up to it and goes, oh, I smell something burning. What is that smell? Because.

Dennis Patrick McGee Tory party Peter Cushing
"tory party" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:29 min | 9 months ago

"tory party" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"The American system of government is unique in many respects, the founders thought of it as a nervous order, seclorum, a new order for the ages, but while being unique in some respects, it is also continuous to a degree inherited from these system of government in England in Great Britain. But when we look at Great Britain, we see that it has a different form of democracy than we do. We have constitutional democracy. I don't know if you know, but Great Britain does not have a constitution. There's no constitution. We have a so called presidential system of government. And they have a parliamentary system of government. Now, India, in fact, where I grew up also has a parliamentary system, very much modeled on the English system. And one key difference by the way between the English system and the American system is that in the English system, you run for office as a member of a party. And so for example, Margaret Thatcher or Boris Johnson, they're running as the leader of the Tory party. And then you have another guy who's running as the leader of the Labor Party, and whichever party wins, that party's man, a woman becomes the leader, becomes the prime minister. And in that sense, you may say that the prime minister is coming out of the legislative branch because the legislative branch is the party that has been chosen by the people to rule or to legislate to make to make laws. Interestingly, if you are a leader of one party, let's say your Margaret Thatcher and your Tori and you're the leader of the Tory party. And there's a fight within the Tory party and your challenge by other Tory members and the Tories to take a vote and decide we'd rather have a different leader, you're out as prime minister. Now notice that doesn't happen in America. The Democrats in the House or Senate can't get together and say, listen, we no longer want Joe Biden. Let's get rid of him. And Biden's out. No, Biden's not out why, because Biden is independently elected as the president directly by the people, or at least so the story goes. And the point being that when you're elected in America by the people, as the president, you have independent authority, you're not your position is not somehow obligated to your party or to the legislature at all.

Tory party Great Britain England Biden Margaret Thatcher America parliament Boris Johnson Labor Party Joe Biden Europe Tory westphalia earls legislature India Senate Anglican church House Parliament
Comparing the American and British Systems of Government

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:29 min | 9 months ago

Comparing the American and British Systems of Government

"The American system of government is unique in many respects, the founders thought of it as a nervous order, seclorum, a new order for the ages, but while being unique in some respects, it is also continuous to a degree inherited from these system of government in England in Great Britain. But when we look at Great Britain, we see that it has a different form of democracy than we do. We have constitutional democracy. I don't know if you know, but Great Britain does not have a constitution. There's no constitution. We have a so called presidential system of government. And they have a parliamentary system of government. Now, India, in fact, where I grew up also has a parliamentary system, very much modeled on the English system. And one key difference by the way between the English system and the American system is that in the English system, you run for office as a member of a party. And so for example, Margaret Thatcher or Boris Johnson, they're running as the leader of the Tory party. And then you have another guy who's running as the leader of the Labor Party, and whichever party wins, that party's man, a woman becomes the leader, becomes the prime minister. And in that sense, you may say that the prime minister is coming out of the legislative branch because the legislative branch is the party that has been chosen by the people to rule or to legislate to make to make laws. Interestingly, if you are a leader of one party, let's say your Margaret Thatcher and your Tori and you're the leader of the Tory party. And there's a fight within the Tory party and your challenge by other Tory members and the Tories to take a vote and decide we'd rather have a different leader, you're out as prime minister. Now notice that doesn't happen in America. The Democrats in the House or Senate can't get together and say, listen, we no longer want Joe Biden. Let's get rid of him. And Biden's out. No, Biden's not out why, because Biden is independently elected as the president directly by the people, or at least so the story goes. And the point being that when you're elected in America by the people, as the president, you have independent authority, you're not your position is not somehow obligated to your party or to the legislature at all.

Tory Party Great Britain Margaret Thatcher Boris Johnson Labor Party England India Biden Tory Joe Biden America Senate House Legislature
"tory party" Discussed on The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"tory party" Discussed on The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

"Now finally students are being told they must pass diversity and consent before they can begin their studies and are marked wrong if they don't accept that personal guilt and say what is the question to which online diversity causes all the answer so this is come from sort of been a lot of a lot of reporting pushback from the court that areas that you would expect around attempts that universities are making to include modules around actually diversity inclusion for students along actually during the sort of induction boarding stage as well and really. That's about taxing the challenge around sort of the lack of understanding and some people call racial literacy of students coming towards and that's part of a wider drive to improve experiences for students and stuff universities understandably not understanding as generous as you as as one expect had quite a bit of quite a bit of pushback and it's seen as sort of being seen as the sort of it's going straight into the culture cultural debate it seen as part of this attempt to drive to to make everything woke in universities and lots of people are are about it. I think what's interesting though From from my personal perspective. At least is that i actually think these this. This is a particularly effective way of actually building people's racial literacy or understanding of activist inclusion. Issues you really have if you want to do this properly. You really have to get people in the room at good facility on the scientist issues and talk stuff out get people to understand to unpack their own biases their own perspective and experiences and to take them on that journey understanding implication of certain actions and behaviors. You need scenarios in there as well so the whole debate is kind of going in circles really because on the one hand universities some universities in implementing. This is a book can say we've done. We've got the training online training bamboo. We've done it. That means that you know we take books in terms of a on this issue. You really need to get people in the room to discuss these issues. And and i don't think enough being done there but at the same time even that i mean that's one step further even that will cause lots of issues particularly the right wing media complaining about as well say comes onto university really have the stomach to make progress on this. But if they don't the outcomes are not going to change. And that's the reality and i mean this is interesting isn't it selena because on one level what you could argue is the amitai saying well you know these kind of online multiples work so if you really want to indoctrinate students get them in a rube. Lock the door again. Talk that racism out of them now on one level. That's about their kind of effectiveness of these private. She's on another level. I can see how people might right back up into something. even more. you know shell-casing than than the way that these multiples have been written up. Yeah absolutely. I mean. I think the real questions here which is first of all should universities. Do they have legitimacy to have expectations of community standards and values that go beyond. What would be expected in everyday society so you know within within the current law and i think that's one question i think the second is then if it decides that there does need to be advocacy around particular issues you know is the kind of mandatory online training the right route to raise people's consciousness and get people to buy into that and surface some of the issues that people might have in relation to those subjects whether it be you know racism sexual harassment whatever. The topic is And and we kind again. This is this an issue. That's really worthy of too much discussion outside. The individual university concerns in in terms of the online training. I died that because universities know their own audience says these things need to be seen in the context of induction induction the some courses it will be around professional standards and values. There's lots different ways in which these issues can be tackled in my personal view. I think most of the universities. I've been most of these issues. Are better tackled at a local level within the smaller community that operates around the course so certainly that would be what i would be looking for rather than something that was rolled along side. Your health and safety manual trading online macho. I'm a tie. What is the right solution for mistletoe. Pr media point of view. Is the trick hair to sort of you know. Head down The newspaper stories will pass doing the right thing. Internally let's crack on or is a sector should more props forcefully make the case for these sorts of interventions even if the particular interventionist particularly effective. I think i think the fact the should just do what is effective whatever. They do whatever they didn't do is going to be is going to be pushed back. I'd in fact there's an argument to say that the more the more pushback some of this might actually be working because it's showing that it is on the agenda so so so i think there's that element of it look. Things are only going in one direction. And i think dissect it just needs to to knock down. I think that's always missing from these conversations. And i guess it's partly because of the way they're framed is what the actual problem. We're trying to solve here and a lot of the people. Criticizing this have very many answers on that. We don't talk enough about the actual tangible inequalities. There are in higher education with. You're talking about diversity. Staff with talking about the unequal outcomes for students of color in relation to white students. Say there are actually very few debates about these issues. There's there's just you know one side and the other side and shutting at their own constituencies young that getting upset at each other of not actually seen any debates about these issues and that makes it really challenging because the people who are saying this is all woke. Whatever it was a communist tory party conference actually thousand gets confronted by a member of that. Party's saying you know with the suffragettes be woke today that that's actually a very rare. Actually a very rare encounter because people are not challenged. Okay if you think that going down this reading this training during this thing is the wrong thing to do. How do you propose that. We tackle these other inequalities inequalities that exist this is part of what we're doing and i think that's the bit that's missing journalists. Don't challenge on that front. So i think it's really about just -greeing this back to whenever universities do we'll have to respond is bringing back and saying fine. You may not be happy about this. But what do you propose we do about the fact that you know there are no senior academics in university. What's what's your solution to that. And i.

amitai selena tory party
"tory party" Discussed on Accidental Gods

Accidental Gods

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"tory party" Discussed on Accidental Gods

"The public's trust in it i would say my understanding from my one tory friend. Who's quite high in the party. Hierarchy is that they are fully intending to gerrymander. And he's convinced that they're going to have a one hundred seat. Parliamentary majority the next election. Unless i think we can manage to create a progressive coalition. Because as you said forty percent of the vote is all it's required to get at the moment to not seat majority. How do we get to a point where we're not living under permanent tory rule. Indeed i think. I've i've been an advocate for decades now of what is referred to as a progressive alliance whenever people here that term. They won't have an argument about what defines progressive from the labor left in particularly want to get to take it about the vote. They don't regard the dem's progressive tweets. My response is always a at the time. He's not for your benefit. The times got to be one that people in the lib dem's might support a labor government would find appealing. Say's not about you not the audience for it ready and secondly an alliance should be whether or not it's progressive should be defined by what he proposes to do not by what some of its can see. Two men have done ten years ago. The tory party is completely dominated. British politics for the past eight years. They're the they get the first first-past-the-post system delivers for them formal. Mp's let pervo. I mean all they need is votes to get an mp than anybody else. The anytime that hasn't been true in recent decades during the new years knew labor managed to get a vote must be parliamentary majorities on the basis of very low electoral. Turn outs and by winning over to revotes guy by perceiving effectively to reprograms so even if even not just talking about the conservative party. It's very clear the way the system is set up now gives you absolutely the undead..

lib dem tory party The times conservative party
"tory party" Discussed on Accidental Gods

Accidental Gods

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"tory party" Discussed on Accidental Gods

"Other political parties. Barring have you ever read. Donahue mccarthy's book the prostitutes state as fascinating book. So he was chair of the dem's for seven years and his book opens with 'em they're onto the nec's and paddy ashdown saying if mr mccarthy's motion passes i will resign and mr mccarthy's motion was that lord something hyphen. Something should not be patios. Stand senior political advisor while being on the board of rio. Tinto zinc and the motion failed and pakistan didn't resign and the rest of the first third of the book is donna. Mccarthy's attempts to assert an activist base within the dmz against holy establishment hierarchy and. It sounded pretty much like the dysfunction of the labor party but in terms of their rules in their laws. Somebody once said the problem with socialism. Is it takes up too. Many evenings and i spent too many evenings of my life sitting in labor party meetings where somebody at some point would stand up. Go to order. Madam chairman and we will be lost in process and procedure on the rules for another half hour which guaranteed that nobody with the functioning brain would bother to go back and the people in the right. Continue to push through it. They wanted to pursue. Does this happen in in the tory party and other parties or are they just okay and and carry on their well. As far as i know the tories don't really care about internal democracy. I mean they do get to choose their leader of the two. That have been shortlisted by the parliamentary party to all shortlists candidates and then the membership elects one right. There basically guided tours the one that the parliamentary party wants because they're only given to whom is unacceptable and the lib dem search for to the best of my knowledge of these v very much like that because they love voting on things but voting at least within the terms of the democrat institutions does actually matter says in amendment should do actually have power you get to vote for things and then they do end up determining party policy for example i mean the frustrating thing about the labor party is indeed as this sculpture of procedural But it was i. It doesn't mean anything because this no compulsion on the leadership to accept anything The membership Decide on any level and this has been the case sort of revenue. So that's the thing. I think that makes it really does make readings which frustrating Say the fact that you know. It's you know there are still lots..

mr mccarthy Donahue mccarthy parliamentary party paddy ashdown tory party labor party Tinto nec Mccarthy donna pakistan
"tory party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"tory party" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"An actual fuel shortage The only real tool left that toolbox after deploying the army would be to relax driving hours driving our rules to drive Alex there is a view among some that Boris Johnson are going to as this Teflon kind of characteristic when it comes to these crises Is this likely to do damage to the prime minister and the ruling Conservative Party longer term What are we seeing in terms of the political impact I mean it's a cliche right He's a terrible politician but Boris really is He seems to coast through and these crises unharmed I think you've taken a slight dent in the polls but the government seems pretty confident that this crisis is going to abate in the next few days because people have been filling their tanks and you don't really have anywhere else to store fuel other than your car's tank So unless you're driving around to use it up The problem abates it's not like the toilet roll crisis last year where people could buy limitless amounts of store them in their homes So the government thinks it's going to they're not even going to need these drivers in the current standby And I guess it is another of those storms that it's going to weather But it's clearly not a good look for any government to have these huge queues at petrol station Yes and we're heading towards the Tory party conference starts at the weekend doesn't Alex so certainly something that we'll focus minds Bloomberg government reporter Alex Morales thank you very much for that Still ahead on Bloomberg daybreak Europe will speak to Bloomberg opinion columnist Andreas clues about who will step into Angela Merkel's very big.

Boris Johnson Conservative Party Alex Boris army Tory party government Bloomberg government Alex Morales Bloomberg Europe Andreas Angela Merkel
"tory party" Discussed on Fallacious Trump

Fallacious Trump

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"tory party" Discussed on Fallacious Trump

"Politicians are treated differently from y'all in the streets on saturday night easing that. Yeah yeah i if your abusive bicycle the end of downing street shouting a policeman is appalling that they should be chucked van other that will tighten the yoga. The colon clinton said young man. Come this way your your phone. Yeah relieved to see how things are now. One rule for them and one rule us days gone by. That's a ritual. He wasn't sacks. You know nobody ever is in the tory party but he later resigned but not because of what he did but because he was finding remaining in his position. Untenable in the face of the media storm. And you kind of think well. That's a slightly troubling thing. Isn't it and more examples of politics. Opinion poll so bringing us bang up to date ish. May this year. Rachel johnson went on loose women pro tv program on tv calling like the british version of the view talking about her podcast difficult women and actually the titles. Both of those shows embrace ankawa weaponized the double standard applied to men and women. And here she is talking about the double standards apply to her brother. Boris johnson remind you will anti lorraine said about this because people point tax. She had a baby at sixteen. She's a grandmother. She was stompie big and boots and she said why. Aren't you focusing on the prime minister number of children number of marriages hair and suits and all the rest of it. And he's he's as you say he doesn't get scrutiny for those sorts of things. I think that is who he is. He's never tried to hide anything. He's never tried to pretend he's anything else than who he is. And he's also resisted any He's never used his private life on the public stage tool it for him. It remains private. And of course is a matter speculation that he's prime minister. An i'm sure. There is a double standard to restrictions to mike. Sure it's private. He has resorted to lawyers to candidate private. Listen i think that you wouldn't ask him on loose women and talk to him about me. So i think from joy joy it too close for the on. That note asked obey your brother the prime minister..

tory party Rachel johnson clinton Boris johnson lorraine mike
"tory party" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"tory party" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"And doesn't appear to have materialized but quite a few of the british ministers jackets are hanging on shaking. Ill don't you think oh tyson. Eat not just on a shaky now really on the floor right now to be quite frank. A cabinet reshuffle should have happened a long long time ago but then again when he took cabinet reshuffle. You have to think of us from the tory party would replace the cabinet. We are looking at really week. Tory government not just in terms of in the cabinet. But also tory backbenches as well because that not really pointing the thing as of blame at the tory party chuck tool so we look at these big folks in in the tory party. We look at hancock. County his own in santa java terrible replacement free to patel absolutely also we have so many minutes is dominate grop. Who's at the full front of one of these controversies as life. This is beyond a tiny cabinet. Reshuffle that we might need to say But actually at the crux of it i would say a total total shakeup. Not just a little tiny reshuffle but a shakeup of who is governing the united kingdom and yet if they were to fall tomorrow the opposition front bench is as bereft of talent and ideas and any kind of plan for taking britain and the crises multiple crises. That we are in. I've not known time. And i've been around a long time when the two front benches between them could barely muster estates menora stateswoman between them. How did they get to this. Shoddy how addressing. Is this george that neither the tory labor party. The opposition conti even oppose this has got to her brady really tragic state. I think you to the game of for the left. Was jeremy been Obviously in twenty nine teen in the general election it went so terribly wrong people getting behind him. I think not This ole this sock sound story. The subchapter already does begin the huge loss in in the twenty nineteen general election. Full the left really On it has just got west and west since then yes. The tory baccio now walking with a strong majority than before eighty states. That's fine that still doesn't mean the acquisition com apart what we're seeing s. Kiss stahl ma. Hey doesn't matter word on anything even the pandemic which all ghibli wasn't a political situation but that doesn't mean you called hold the government to account of how they're handling a house crisis you can still put political points against the government and he simply couldn't do that if the position contigent egypt opponents on a house. Brown's how on earth is used to post a political. I'm really getting to that sad tragic state..

tory party cabinet Tory government santa java tyson tory labor party patel hancock frank chuck conti united kingdom britain stahl ma jeremy george government egypt Brown
"tory party" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"tory party" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"And it is back to school for. Mp's mp's have returned to parliament today for the near term and bush. Intrigue is rutherford james. The stories has been leading newspapers over the weekend relates to social care. And how the prime minister of chance to fund this plan and we're hearing the knight's still likely cheese day but the some wrangling going on. Can you explain well. The first in person carbon-emitting is tuesday and given the level of cabinet disquiet about this policy. The obviously need to get the chance to been the policy. We are at the these days. We are a long way from that cabinet government happy sometime but what if he gives you is that you don't want to have a cabinet meeting and so obviously not supposed straight afterwards. The beating is a pure rubber-stamped. That's one of the things that most infuriates ministers. I think the difficulty for the tory party is that to manifesto commitments and a pledge made when he first went into chancery. It's promised all own in direct conflict with each other. The prime minister said promise to fix social care. The toys have promise that people don't have to sell the houses to pay for care. That's in the manifesto but the manifesto also promise not to raise people's taxes. The problem is you cannot come up with a solution which means that people don't have to sell their houses to pay for their cat without raising taxes. So choose your poison. And boris johnson has decided that fixing social care is more important than his pledge not to raise taxes this heinz sparked a huge respiratory party. Because the party is essentially doing something that new david they are basically saying. We're going to increase national insurance to put more money into health and sexual and said that there was a moment yesterday on the radio and deems a hallway. The vaccines missed. It was asked. Pretoria's were still a party of taxes and he replied were the party of that taxes. Which sounds for more social democrats van thatcherite and so. I think that you are going to see this tension. You're going to see lots of tour. Emp's kicking off about his proposal. And i mean is this moment. Where the fact that he's physically back in westminster is going to make a difference. Because i think it will mean that unease about policy will spread more quickly but it would have done in. The days of the virtual parliament is bad. G thinker party of fat tax is going to win at least some fans in the tory party. Well i mean there are. Mp's you've been arguing for quite a while. Jeremy hunting -cluded although he's not in favor of this existing plan but his argument has long been that conservative voters would be happy to pay more tax if it meant security.

rutherford james tory party cabinet government cabinet parliament bush boris johnson heinz Pretoria david westminster Jeremy hunting
"tory party" Discussed on LBC Election 2019

LBC Election 2019

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"tory party" Discussed on LBC Election 2019

"Porsche sounds porsche. And yet he's somebody who has managed to cop through that sort of view of the tory party otherwise he wouldn't have won a tory lead. A johnson led. tory party. Wouldn't have won those red wool seats in the way in which he did the The lab thing isn't it partly the way he behaves badly and gets away with stuff. No one else would you see. That's the other reason why i hate because i hate that. Sort of lads. You're you're right. I hate the way that he treated women in his life. I hate the sort of way you know. Some of the things that he's written just for sort of you know clicks on his columns all of that stuff. I just find morally reprehensible. Actually i think he's. This is a controversial thing. Disabled gonna say it anyway. Because i really believe it but where i really got to know. Boris quite well. Jackie was up until the twentieth fifteen election. I met quite regularly because the cost there was the idea. That miller band might win. Election against cameron and boris was preparing possibly to stand leader. I was working within on during those meetings and spent a lot of time at his house. He always arrive. Like i was always punctual enforced to me and i spend quite a lot of time because his wife rian often that and she was an amazing influence on him..

tory party Porsche johnson Boris Jackie boris miller cameron rian
"tory party" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"tory party" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"The message should be if you get pained you should take precautions. You should take taxed but you don't necessarily tyson so there was a battle between government departments as well about what the riots is. No coincidence scully's in the business. That's really interesting. Because i was talking to my friends about it. And they will say worried about being pained but they didn't know that it wasn't a legal requirement. Stay at home as opposed to being contacted by tessin trace by the fan katie coming back in september. Mp's who are breaking up full the summer today porsche. A torrid few weeks recently is that is the pressure going to let off with. Mp's back in their home constituencies over the summer now. Potentially i think also depends on the level of dysfunction that we're going to see because if we are actually going to start to see big of problems and safe markets and if you think about foreign travel you can. I think safety presume there are going to probably be some last minute changes on flight destinations. Which at least priest outgrown shops from having to you axing that is osteo could evect. Mp's they can be in recess but those things gonna affect that constituents. So i think we'll see in the sense of how bad the situational if it is not as bad as people saying will have an impact in terms of that. But also i think as we're ending. We're seeing a vaccine. Paul robbery building across the commons. And i think it's interesting that the government obviously a monday announced after saying many many times that they weren't going to developing postal. Set from tambioli the nightclubs. It quite quickly became. What slippery slope. There given that. Boris johnson and asked at the press conference when. Roll out the idea that these could potentially be used in a pub and now there's a riot by tory party conference where tennessee decimal..

tessin scully porsche katie Paul Boris johnson government tory party tennessee
"tory party" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"tory party" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"They've all come out so strongly against it. And how much damage do you think that does to britain's global reputation and how does it fit into this idea of being. Being great global britain. Nowadays body does a lot of damage. I think it definitely did some damage at the g. seven When there was some pretty feisty arguments down in golden rule of the subject turned over britain's role in the vaccine a program i think in writing saying the only one member of the most recent intake a rebelled against the government The two thousand nineteen intake so there is to some extent here generational thing. I think that there is this generation. That was very committed to what theresa may have once called the getting rid of the nasty party image and she was very Loyal to the no point. Seven targets And then commitment when it got to that. And i think nra people from that generation who regret the The passing of the ending of the the cameron osborne modernization of the tory party. And and all of that the younger ones though the new in call less concerned about that. More focused on the Leveling up agenda brexit. An that sort of thing. And i think the twenty nine thousand nine p. the one hundred ninety eight t nine p. who Who did vote for anti mangala. Think he's a former aide william hague next foreign office man. So so you know. He's is slightly different concern. Different backgrounds from From from the others think it should be said. Just the i you know. There are a lot of rebellion going on in. The tory party is quite a fissiparous. Mp's been some. Quite big revolts are on on a variety of over the past few months and the not always involving the usual suspects. I mean yesterday's bunch of Rebels was very different. Bunch from the people who voted against the covid tears. For instance i think does a culture of rebellion simmering away within the tory backbenches which is relatively little. I think to to to stop and go goes. They came to power. This pre-eminently came to power as a backed by rebellious force and the something of that still in the pots in the in the party. At the moment. So i don't think this is going to go away and i think probably need leaders quite neatly on to the the unlocking story. You know it's it may be and to others elsewhere that the government really did not feel like they could delay july nineteenth any longer with the support of the of the tory party and that was pretty much across the board in the tory party. Even among some people we might in the garden. Describe as the kind of sensible wing of the tory party and they weren't prepared to go along with restrictions any longer and the government weren't prepared to to see it through just on the back of labor votes and that political calculation to go ahead with the july nineteenth and knocking is a tricky reason to do. Isn't it i think there's a reasonable case for unlocking On i think that case has been made not just by boris johnson. Also yesterday by nicholas sturgeon. The difference goals is that johnson. Articulated it in the most absurd kind of libertarians..

tory party britain cameron osborne theresa nra william hague government nicholas sturgeon boris johnson johnson
Alarm bells are already ringing as Boris heads to Brussels

The Briefing

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

Alarm bells are already ringing as Boris heads to Brussels

"So the prime minister heads off on his make-or-break trip to brussels. Today but alarm bells are already ringing with brexit tears suffer major concession that means the e you have officials stationed in northern ireland from january. The first britain had rebuffed. Eu demands for permanent office in northern ireland until now and senior brexit tiers of warned. Boris johnson will be watching to make sure he doesn't give too much away he'd have dinner with european commission. President s lafont. Align this evening former tory party leader. In duncan smith outlines. Why the prime minister must know when to walk away and philip. Johnston asks whether mr johnson can avoid becoming the seventh tory prime minister to be brought down by europe.

Brexit Northern Ireland Brussels President S Lafont Boris Johnson Tory Party Britain EU European Commission Duncan Smith Mr Johnson Johnston Philip Europe
UK says EU trade talks 'over' but bloc sees room for a deal

The Leader

04:19 min | 2 years ago

UK says EU trade talks 'over' but bloc sees room for a deal

"Boris Johnson has dramatically told Britain to prepare for the new deal brexit after a bust up with Brussels on trade talks the minister put the country on notice that it's e you departure at the end of the transition period. On December, thirty first could be without a trade deal with the European bloc that could leave businesses facing tariffs and quotas to trade with European bloc and transport delays could see some food shortages. Deputy political editor Nicholas says spoke to the Evening Standard's Bonnie Christian. Nick, what happened today and we're we're expecting it. This was a bit of a surprise. This announcement by Boyce Johnson appear that the EU and the government were coming to an arrangement to continue talks next week on a trade deal. But there seems to be a difference in stance taken by the EU leaders and the European Commission. The EU leaders probably Egged on by Emmanuel macron. Stiffen the stance or the European bloc and particularly over the row over fishing. This led to a response for Mr Johnson threatening to walk away from the talks. Why has this decision been made completely out of the blue? Boys. Johnson had set a deadline of October, the fifteenth for a breakthrough. In, the negotiations in order for them to continue this has not happened basically. Going to be some woods agreed for them to continue of them pull the whole house of cards down now. One with the British demands was an intensification of talks. This had been proposed and flashed around Brussels. But when the summit conclusions came out, there was no mention of that. The government in Britain responded by saying that we were going to start prepare now for a no deal. So does this main? A deal is completely off the table? No. It doesn't mean that could mean that. But what happened Lychee now after Bush Johnson has made a statement is that the European Commission President Sheila Underlay? tweeted that a team from Brussels would be heading to London to intensify the talks. This was a key British demand. So it looks like there's been a political spat between the leaders at political level. But now that the Are, trying to keep the show on the road if we are to leave without a deal what are the big knock on effects of that, we could see here in the UK economically, they could potentially be catastrophic. You'll certainly talking about businesses, facing tariffs and also quotas. That could also be food shortages. Some shorter particular fresh food shortages in the UK I for weeks even before the threat of a no deal ruptured lunchtime the boss of TESCO's was saying that they could be some future tages. If there literally is no deal. Then obviously, the likelihood of those would increase dramatically shortly optimistic Johnson spoke that the pound fell against the euro, which is a sign of concerns. The next step is really the me t next week to see whether they eat negotiators and the okay Shakespeare's could make a break food. The meeting may not happen, but it looks like it will happen and is imposed. Sides interest to strike a deal both will play hard ball and often agreements are really only reach five minutes to midnight when both parties are staring into the abyss and the they know that unless a deal now things can get very very messy. These talks have been stalled for months. Now with a the side, not really bunching at all is there any sense of what the outcome could be? Is Too hard to tell given. The economic damage in Odio could calls and Boris Johnson will be fully aware of this and Michael is you would expect a deal to be reached but e you leaders they got the stronger hand and so we'll trying really go for the best possible for them. and. That will put pressure and strain on the British government because they really don't want to make many more concessions especially with so many hard line brexit is in the Tory party.

Boris Johnson Brussels EU European Commission Britain UK Political Editor Nick British Government Bonnie Christian Emmanuel Macron Tory Party Nicholas Tesco Odio Sheila Underlay London Shakespeare
As Brexit looms, the U.K.'s Conservative Party fights for survival

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:37 min | 2 years ago

As Brexit looms, the U.K.'s Conservative Party fights for survival

"Continue. Now today's newspapers on the globalist joining me is Phil Clarke professor of International Politics at Says University of London Hello Fil. A morning ever good to have you although I'm slightly baffled why you've chosen an article in the Daily Express Kickoff newspaper review. I. Know We live in Unusual Times And Fill. It might have come to that point where the the Daily Express is getting this morning at basically something that I think we've suspected in the UK for Awhile which is. The Conservative Party is going gangbusters to try to get a no deal brexit I think this has been building for a while at the UK has been playing a I really dangerous game of brinkmanship with the the European Union and today the Dow expresses reporting that. Bicycle UK saying that they will not toe the line on one of the issues. Absolute stipulations over the Brexit negotiations, which is that the British government cannot. Provide massive subsidies to be British companies. And I must sign up to an agreement with the EU on. Labor and environmental standards. These are the sorts of things that the EU is really worried about that. That basically that the government is going to tilt the tried situation. So heavily towards British companies that they're to have this completely free wheeling lack of regulation, which will allow British companies to violate anything that looks like a great international standards on Labour and environmental. Issues, and this is the kind of thing that really does push these brexit tokes right to the edge, and so it does look like we're getting closer to a what I think disastrous no deal Nigel brexit indeed I mean the the whole of the weekends newspapers was saying UK's ready to walk away from brexit trade talks. You case chop stocks trail in recovery as fears over Brexit 'cause invested jitters PM threatens deal Brexit and even over the Weekend we heard this is a European Union senior meeting in a couple of weeks time in Germany brexit will not even be on the agenda. I. Wonder whether this isn't just the the the brinkmanship that is absolutely necessary although being paid by two sides. One of which knows what it's doing and the other one is seeming that's an eleventh hour agreement can be made, but that's not how this thing works because it's too complicated isn't it? I think so and and the noises coming out of Brussels and this is part of the Daily Express Pace. This morning is that the European Union seems to be preparing for Nigel Brexit as well This is the first time that we've seen such a a stock statement by Michel Barnier the negotiated that this is what this might come. Up until now, the you have basically talked about the the no deal option as completely off the table as an absolute impossibility will that the EU tone on this say seems to be changing I think a real sense that perhaps when it boils down to it, this is what the Johnson government really wants that they want an ideal brexit have for all of the talk of doing deals. The last few years, what they want is this completely. Unregulated economic situation that Nigel Brexit a would deliver an and then that's the kind of thing that really fits with the ideology of of this British government at the moment. So it it does seem like the no deal possibility is is looming ever-larger. What's interesting though is, of course, a lot of people are talking better called. Brevard it popped up in the evening standard last week and it's floating around in Lamont at the moment which is. The moment when you have that perfect storm of Brexit and Covid, and there's a suggestion that because of covid the the brexit negotiations could actually be forced into agreement because you have a bigger fire to fight. So sort of clears your head when it comes to the other stuff. Yes I've also seen these reports of and this is much more favorable rating I guess on the current situation I think unfortunately, there's a more negative reading of this which is that. Covert may provide exactly the kind of covid the Tories want for the no deal brexit that. The undoubted economic disaster that would come from an ideal brexit can be covered by the narrative that look you know we were heading towards this. Economic Wonderland if only the BREXIT had allowed us at the kind of thing that we were looking for but but cove got in the way and completely undercuts at grand plans and and so I think the other narrative is that covert is giving the Tories. The kind of cow die wants to get to this completely unregulated brexit scenario that I think many many members of the Tory party wants at the moment CICADA making this worse. I. Think.

Nigel Brexit European Union British Government UK Daily Express Brexit Phil Clarke Professor Michel Barnier Conservative Party Brussels International Politics Johnson Government Covid Says University Of London Brevard Germany Lamont
'Complacent' UK draws global criticism for Covid-19 response

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:53 min | 2 years ago

'Complacent' UK draws global criticism for Covid-19 response

"I don't know what St elect means. Presumably we all live and normal types staying away to danger but if I see you message Novas steel air and you see to me but does that mean I stay at home or no? I can't give you a straight answer to that. Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon isn't the only one with criticisms of the leadership in Westminster Increasingly. Ridden is under international scrutiny. In the confused messaging is just the start. Reaction has been pretty confused to this. Emma Duncan is Britain editor so the new slogan is stay alert. The old slogan was stay at home and when you told people to stay at home they knew what to do when you tell people to stay alert. They don't really know what that means. They can't see this fire so they're not really clear what they're staying alert four there's been some actual confusion from the government about some of the loosening. Say for instance. The government was originally sang. The loosening was going to happen two days ago and then that was corrected to happening today. The foreign secretary when describing the restrictions. Goaty wrong about who you could meet and broadly speaking there is kind of worry about how people are supposed to get back to work even if they work safely when schools are still not open. That's not part of this stage of the loosening of lock Dan so there are a lot of questions at there and a lot of criticism particularly from the labor unions. And this isn't the first time the government has come under fire for confused policies or confused communications. Yeah that's absolutely right. There's a lot of criticism of the fact that the government started on a testing program early in March and then discontinued that early to start it up again too late and struggling to get to the position that other countries are in and there's been a lot of criticism of the fact that that has not been enough personal protective equipment particularly for people working in the health services and generally people in vulnerable jobs. And what is the public mate of all this? I mean the prime minister had his own. Cogan scare which calmed the criticism for time. But but broadly what to Britain's think now well? There was a huge band since support for Boris Johnson early on in March and April his popularity rating swords and. That's been true of some other leaders to but since late April they've been sliding again and that's really because of this perception that the government messed up early on because people don't really know what they're supposed to be doing so it's quite interesting is looking at the polls about how. Britain's think that the government has dealt with this crisis compared to other countries and basically Britain's think that we have messed up here. They think that we've done worse than anywhere on the European mainland worse than the Asian countries. And the only country that Britain's generally think they've performed better than is America will butts what's people within Britain think about Britain's response when looking abroad. What about abroad looking at Britain? Do we have a sense for how what's happening here has been perceived? Yes we do and this crisis is not doing burdens international reputation and he goods among Asians flurry on social media from worried parents whose children are studying in Britain. Who wanted to pull them out quickly and on the European mainland particularly web. Britain's reputation is not high at the moment because of Brexit and the handling of the brexit negotiations is been huge amount of unfavorable comments. About this government's failure. There was a German column. That caught my attention saying that. Boris Johnson going into intensive care a metaphor for the nation as a whole entire nation was in intensive care on ventilation and self isolating Which was what Brexit was if you look in America among newspapers like The Washington Post and New York Times there's also quite a bit of criticism so Britain which likes to think of itself as a country with high standing in the world is slipping pretty sharply as a result of its handling of this crisis. And so you genuinely believe goes beyond a bit of editorializing abroad and Britain's general tendency toward self-deprecation chattering classes certainly do have a tendency towards self deprecation. Decline is is a very popular pastime in this country. But we aren't seeing a stamp change in how birth news being talked about and this is feeding into some other difficulties. The country's having so the brexit negotiations are not going to a well it looks increasingly as they. Britain is going to crash out of your with is a deal at the end of the year and has started trade tooks with America. But there's going to be very difficult because there are some tricky issues involved for instance The NHS America wants to be able to sell it. Services and goods to the NHS Burton is very protective increasingly protective about the NHTSA. Having that as part of a trade deal will be tricky. And there's increasing tension between Britain and China and that's not unique to Britain obviously as a lot of criticism of China all over the world that the moment bodies particularly shop in Britain weather's as a faction of the Tory party that is increasingly critical of China and so Britain is looking a little lonelier than it would like to at the moment will just it. I wonder how much that description of the current world order has been changed than by Britain's response to go with nineteen what I think the response does and the reactions to Burton's response. It's made a little harder for Britain to do what it likes to do. In the old cliche punching above it wait Burton's punching below. Its weight at the moment. And that matters gang forwards birth news very keen on it soft power. It likes the idea that it has influence in the world when it comes to pushing agendas like human rights like climate change that it has a seat at the top table. It is listen to great a proportion than its. Gdp or Defense Forces might argue for and that really depends on reputation for competence and good governance and that reputation has taken a bit of an

Britain America Boris Johnson Burton Nicola Sturgeon Scotland Prime Minister Emma Duncan Secretary Brexit Cogan DAN NHS Defense Forces Nhtsa Editor
UK Labour Party to Begin Contest to Succeed Corbyn as Leader

Monocle 24: The Briefing

11:39 min | 3 years ago

UK Labour Party to Begin Contest to Succeed Corbyn as Leader

"The starting gun was probably fired this weekend in the race to become the next leader of Britain's main opposition Labor party it has already become a crowded field with each candidate trying to offer a clean break with the past yet unwilling to upset the Labor hardcore. He seems to be the only people he wanted to vote for them. In last month's general election Who wants to begin? I I let me start with you. Whoever takes over from Jeremy Corbyn does so from a position of absolute rock? Bottom for the party. Don't don't they let let's sort of set the scene I well. Let's hope so From their point of view that it's rock bottom because sinking further would not be a good thing and that's the spirit I think. Yes I mean. Obviously the last election was a disaster. I mean particularly I think a lot of the figures that came out made it pretty clear that in fact the Tory vote hadn't uneven increased that much it was more that the Labor voted collapsed. There was a very big problem for the neighbor policy. And I think a lot of that looking at the polling was to do with Jeremy Corbyn personally there was so say Brexit was a big issue for them But I think overwhelmingly it was coming out in the polls the person she with him say almost anybody who replaces aces him is kind of starting with the level of improvement there and in a sense brexit policy now moves into different states because of course we know Brexit is going to happen on the thirty first of January. And then there's a we're going to move into negotiation stage on withdraw and all of that now that kind of changes the mechanics of that for Labour leader. They can't anymore. There's not much political to revoke cool. Remain or anything like that or they just Phillips did talk yesterday about rejoin as a future possibility But I think really it changes the mechanics. It's about them talking. Just opposing do want this posted as an opposition government opposing what the Conservatives are doing so. We're probably going to hear it. Also talk about you know Brexit is going wrongly their mishandling it etc so we have the runners and writers stepping up Mary ranging from Remain human rights lawyer. Who is a shadow? A shadow secretary He campaigned hard for a second referendum. To someone who wants to think about rejoining to cookie cookie cutter copies but in the female email form of the Jeremy Corbyn style which went down so badly with the voters. Well I think we have to look really whether it did go down so well so badly with the voters because on the one hand yes. There appears to have been an antipathy towards Jeremy Corbyn personally but when you look at the demographic of the Labor Party vote what you see is actually quite a big enthusiasm if not for Corbin personally then for his policies very left wing very old-fashioned socialist policies of nationalization subsidies all sorts of things that we haven't seen in for decades they were very popular with a generation who were in there in the earliest stages of their youth during the financial crisis. And I think this this battle as it were for the soul of the Labor Party. It's not over yet And we're looking at the moment almost only half of it in terms of the candidates who have declared so far who want to be leader. Because we're looking at center center Yes cure storm to the left. But this the there's a big gap there And we have to ask whether this is whether whether the the old style Blair. It's do they exist anymore. They certainly don't exist very much in the parliamentary party as it was elected elected at the At the last election. But where is somebody. For instance like Yvette Cooper. Where is the where the noise is coming from? Somebody who's been incredibly vocal on the sidelines from his privileged perch in New York David milliband where where people who can influence that wing of the party. We haven't heard from them yet. Does that mean that that's over. The Labor is actually varying not exactly to Corbin awesome but that is sort of more the shape of the future then Blairism or any of them up to it Mary. Well I mean. I saw some comments yesterday which was the first day really. Really of sort of Campaigning on Sunday. Talk shows where the was some comment among sort of professional political pundits. Who said actually this could shape up to be quite a sort of a thoughtful election representing a lot of different currents in the Labor abor party But of course that has its plusses and minuses. We saw during the Tory party leadership. Election there again. You had some very different prince strands and what you've come at. What you've come out with is Boris Johnson and the right as far as Brexit is concerned? But maybe not as far I things consent feather appear to be two enormous jobs here. Alex which I is the the idea of rebuilding shattered party which does does not have a unified core. And secondly won't you have rebuild shattered party. You have to be strong enough to take on the Conservatives and not only beat them but beat them so much that you bring back. All the voters deserted them for the Conservatives in the last election in that is a double task of of huge huge proportions and bring about more than the ones who deserted them because remember Labor already were in a minority so actually doing back even more than their deserted voters says and and in specific places it is a tremendous task and it's always been difficult for Labor in the last few years particularly. There are huge divides in their own. Vote Their their membership is actually overwhelmingly remain But of course in those northern seats they lost Brexit was a problem for them because a lot of Labor members in those seats are are actually much more leave so these people want something very different than how united policy that is so split on. Those different issues is a tremendous challenge. I think mirror some actually quite promising candidates but it will be very interesting to see where it goes at the moment the polls have Kissed her in the lead And I mean you know it will be interesting you see. Of course everything can be shaken up during the campaign. Go and tell me who you are promising. Candidates his Co. your is it possible leader. Well do you think kissed has a certain competence to him actually I think it's interesting to see some younger people from the left of the party. Stepping up people like Clive Lewis I would say just phillips as a slightly more centrist candidate who who is reasonably credible And you know they're all these different voices coming up. Who are quite interesting and it will be a big choice flavor which those they go for Os? I think Angela. Rayner is very promising. Who I think is standing for deputy leader From the kind of soft mid left of the party is like find degrees between centralism. Gobert is that they have Mary would what are your thoughts on on what Alex just said. I mean the mentioning of a storm is seen as the leader at the moment the leading candidate despite the fact that he is called Sir. He is absolutely very very keen to storch stress the fact that he has very humble working class backgrounds his mother was a nurse and he just happens to have done the right thing. Some are suggesting that he's the right leader. But I the four years to Leo Leo few years too late Yes. I think there is some truth in that And I don't think it's just the Sir that his kissed Armas Problem I think think he would be seen by as it were younger. Newer members of the Labor Party who joined because of Corbin He will be seen as the establishment candidate and somebody that they they will not support You know it's been it's been said ever since Labor's loss in in the election that They've got not just this huge task to unite the party. But do they will uniting leader. Actually come from the London establishment. This is the this is what kissed on represents percents. I don't know if you're a woman over forty. Five apparently secure has rather something delicious about in this Christmas dinners. But you know if you're not a AH London metropolitan women over forty five. He might not be your bag but just looking at where the next leading light could come from Alex it when I look at the way that the United Kingdom is at the moment reminds me of France about three or four years ago when the Socialists collapsed and the main political structure just didn't it didn't seem to know what to do and and then suddenly Emmanuel macron comes in with almost a brand new party a brand new voice and a bit of razzle-dazzle to boot they. They sort of tried this in the United Kingdom last year with a I can't even remember change. Could change something lasted about ten minutes. But it was one of those little flag-waving flagwaving harassing come on. Let's have a breaking the mold. Oh we is the United Kingdom so stuck in a moment here that it contacting make space for foot for newness and change that that way. I think there's a tremendous problem with the current setup half the effective two party system which had the Lib Dem's done better? We might not be talking about tea fussy system but we really are now because because they didn't break through and as Fayez Change. UK The Independent group all of these various sorts of incarnations of of trying this kind of mass challenge absolutely kind of founded and just did not take flight tool But there is a problem in that we have a social system which is a is a funny compromise permits anyway and that we have a system that was designed refused to vote for an individual. MP I mean actually policy names weren't even on the ballot paper until the night at the end of the nineteen sixties. You just had to vote for your your local. MP and you have to find out who they were vote for the candidate you like so now. We have quite strong party affiliations. Everything is very whipped. All of that and those names are on the ballot paper and yet we're we're still voting for the individuals so there's a sort of complicated compromise I think going on in terms of what you want what you should vote. And they're sort of how we got a party. She system grafted on to a kind of individual constituency. first-past-the-post system and I think that is bringing up these events contradictions and great difficulties for actually eighty four. Both big parties going forward. I mean you know the Conservatives also have a problem demographically in the future and that they're under fifty The fifties actually the majority labor in most cohorts now which is much more extreme? It used to be so as they're kind of older more brexit voters pulse on and They how are they going to speak to younger. Generation who don't own homes don't have job security don't have pensions and therefore so traditional conservative values. This don't necessarily speak to them and it's going to be for them. I think there's another question about why the UK can't produce contact figure. which is that? We don't have a presidential the system And even though this past election was fought I would say on much. More presidential style lines. The was corbin versus versus says Boris Johnson Nonetheless To campaign in a presidential election where people have direct votes for individuals then an individual candidate can make that sort of mark between parties or different from parties setting themselves above those structures. We don't have that possibility ability.

Labor Party Jeremy Corbyn United Kingdom Brexit Alex Tory Party Boris Johnson Corbin Phillips Mary London Labour Britain Yvette Cooper Secretary Clive Lewis David Milliband
Boris Johnson's Conservative party wins big in U.K. election

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 3 years ago

Boris Johnson's Conservative party wins big in U.K. election

"The British elections have re ordered politics in the UK it was a white bout for the left wing labor party and prime minister Boris Johnsons Conservative Party comes out stronger than they've been in years Johnson says this gives him an overwhelming mandate to get brexit don John Pete is an editor for the economist covering politics and brexit welcome back to the program yes hello first just how big a victory was this for Boris Johnson well it was right at the top end of expectations I think most of the opinion polls suggested the concept has had a significant lead over labor but they had narrowed in recent weeks and there was some talk until yesterday of possibly him not having a majority tool so I think it's a pretty strong personal crime for Boris Johnson this triumph of the Tory party is such a shift from just a few months ago when members of the party we're changing sides to deny Boris Johnson a majority in parliament what changed two things have happened I mean the first is that Boris Johnson is a strong believer in brexit unlike his predecessor Theresa may who didn't really happen Esiason for it and the other thing that that happened has been critical of the areas that might kill her Aussies brexit policy which really sort of emerged at the beginning of the year and such to threaten the Tories oxygen Minish Bacall's Boris Johnson presented a brexit deal that even Rogers and faces soul as quite a heart full of bricks it the towards the end of this election the brexit party more less included on their fates went to the Taurus tells about how labor got so demolished in areas that had supported the party for a century in some cases well I think that's partly about bricks is because the same matter is also baited very strongly to leave the European Union back in twenty sixteen and a lot of the virtues that say why and we left already what's going on and then not to impress they would not impressed by Jeremy Corbyn the labor leaders ambivalence eva brexit right but the other thing frankly is enormous doubts about Jeremy Corbyn himself you know he presented a very left wing program with massive spending pledges and threats to sort of you know up and capitalism as we know it and I think a lot of traditional labor vases they all from the left but they just sold this is unrealistic impossible of a kind of vision of the revolution referred from London problem a more typical labor supporter and he's just lost touch with his old rebate as labor has traditionally been the party of the workers and many of these areas in northern England that had voted for labor for generations are working class lower economic status Boris Johnson meanwhile comes from a wealthy privileged background how do you think he managed to convince these voters that he is one of them or at least that he will side with them well to be honest I think there's a sort of parallel here with what Donald Trump managed to do in the United States I was gonna have what he did first willing the brexit obviously he said look you guys waited to leave the European Union I'm the one you need to back it orders to deliver brexit and deliver the future that promises but he also managed as he may play on the fact that with brexit and I'm a promise to spend more money on the National Health Service the conservatives would would do more to stand up to the old reworking man and would do more than labor and that was enough I think to persuade these pages to give a try to Boris Johnson some of them and some of the commentators in the people who know who these regions well say that in effect they have lent their fates to Boris Johnson which means that if he doesn't deliver what they want in a rising living standards and so on he could he could lose a fight in the next election that'll permanently Tory you could describe in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania here I think that's exactly the thing you know this is a kind of blue color but for the Tories which is unusual could last but it it you shouldn't take it for granted if I could just ask you to look ahead to Boris Johnson is promising he will get breaks it down by January thirty first do you think that's reliable yes he will do that but the problem that that leaves nothing to the first stage that's the withdrawal the much more complicated question if the future relationship with the European Union and that has to be negotiated and it'll be a very long drawn out process and we could easily have trouble with the planned deadline for completing that negotiation which is the end of next year that may not be enough time John Pete of the economist thank you

UK
U.K. general election voters flock to the polls

What A Day

01:02 min | 3 years ago

U.K. general election voters flock to the polls

"Start with the election. In Britain today British voters Are Heading to the polls once again. This is the second time that the country has held. General election since Britain voted to leave the European Union. The election was called by Prime Minister. Boris Johnson the former mayor of London. He's currently pretty unpopular. He and his Conservative Party. The Tories are hoping to win a majority in parliament so they can finally once and for all get brexit done in fact get brexit done is their campaign slogan. It's not a great one It's been three years since the brexit referendum and the politics and Britain are deeply divided as ever. You're just like America besides Johnson's Tory party. which has been in power for a decade? There's also the Labor Party helmed by Jeremy Corbyn which has promised to put a second brexit that referendum back to the voters and then there's the Liberal Democrats who have promised to cancel brexit altogether. The Tories had been projected to win in essentially all recent polling but in the past few days Labor has narrowed the gap something we saw in the last election in two thousand seventeen as well which resulted in a hung parliament where no party won a majority in that could happen

Britain Labor Party Boris Johnson Conservative Party Jeremy Corbyn Prime Minister European Union London America Three Years
Boris Johnson faces historic Brexit vote in Parliament

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

04:31 min | 3 years ago

Boris Johnson faces historic Brexit vote in Parliament

"Boris Johnson got his brexit deal in Brussels but now the focus turns to Westminster he's facing an uphill struggle to get parliament to back his agreement the DP says he wasn't right for the deal labor's calling for a second referendum saying Johnson's quite sellout deal should be rejected and all that drama is going to take place tomorrow an arrest Saturday sitting of the house of Commons let's cross over to Brussels with Bloomberg anchor on it woods is live for us I'm a good morning I I suppose in Europe the forty think it is a good morning but they think that center they might be let's say a little cloudy is that the right way of putting it yeah that's me waiting for the crowd was after they declared surprise and that there is a real sense of wanting to move on from saying related to brexit here in Brussels and and who can blame them more than three years after that I took place is still the conversation at well below but of course these decisions are not entirely down to the people here in Brussels is not down to the European Commission is not found visual code young girls on the set it would be down to the E. U. twenty seventh golf extension eight former all four I'm cut mixed responses away some of the eighty twenty seventy just suggesting that extension could be what would be completed at least some of that for heating it's gonna be interesting to watch from the east side I'm from the UK government as we head into the guys at the mall right as you say we've already had the T. P. Akron labor and the S. and P. hi Griffin amendments which they wanted to get the cool cool interesting to see some of those conservative MPs you what you need from the Tory party some of them do seem to be coming back on board and getting behind bars the steel others are asking some cutting questions about the economic impact where this goes next week he's a prime minister with nine majority of course and he's working majority of falling at eagle the general election count we follow is there any pressure Anna from the European side I mean I heard younger say look we we don't want prolongation it's either this deal or or nothing is there any pressure that the Europeans are gonna say there's no delay either you take it or leave it well we did hear that from you'll go you'll find it interesting that a lot of people using the same word I mean quite on vacation is also what that occur very often in the English language thank you he said as the one where I am but a in the location a yeah we have bones could you couldn't talk to him one of my colleagues like me points me yesterday we even got payment would be have to be a key on the decision of the twenty seven leaders of the E. U. excluding the Nikkei two grounds and kind of extension so cold it meant that the new you can get but it wouldn't be up to him he would be up to Boris Johnson so you come back and also an extension he said he got all that you may be dead in a ditch then decide pretty offer coronation I won the technical part location Sir G. but general election maybe that that how it would be strange but yeah there is a sense in Europe they won't push straight but I'm not sure anybody is shifting the door entirely on an extension it was to be requested because I stays guess technically on the recall Caesar he's legally bound to to ask for what you call a prolongation or an extension but that might be we will remove the ban act that it okay but I suppose the impact of Liz and he's he's on the U. K. coming we sing cable guy who will in all sorts of strange places because frankly no one's really very show lightning beat and it's about separating the probability of outcomes and also the short term the longer can impact the yesterday so the market wrestling with what you probably going to happen on time today and so there was this initial batch of excitement around the deal and then the realization that this is going to be difficult to come down to handle that and he is going to be difficult to get me through the house of Commons at but then you start to look at the center for disease that always jump as a greeting case something with a customs and border in the Irish Sea and a more distant relationship hardware business read made plans and all of them yeah that would be the economic more now but last night it's called the break is an increase at that point and that the impact that day I thank both of both respected and ideals that wouldn't be a surprise if he saw some sort of relief in the U. K. assets you take economy I have my colleague formal accepting the economic points out the free trade agreement is no substitute for a saying in the single market when it comes to the loan with an attachment we haven't done the job that he take chance that just in the last twenty four hours he says there's no need for impact assessment of what the deal will be for the UK economy the fighting on the short term positive he says Israel I don't ten at removal of that uncertainty

Boris Johnson Brussels Twenty Four Hours Three Years
 UK's Labour Party in turmoil as vote to oust deputy ditched

Monocle 24: Midori House

02:28 min | 3 years ago

UK's Labour Party in turmoil as vote to oust deputy ditched

"So if you thought the Conservative Party was leading the contest of devouring its own stay tuned because the Labor Party is planning on doing the exact same thing there has been heated discussion about eliminating the position of deputy party leader but what that's really all about out is about eliminating Tom Watson who is a voice of opposition within the Labour party to Jeremy Corbyn and someone someone who has also had a I think it's characterized in the papers as a rather spectacular falling out with Len mcklusky the head of the union that is the largest donor the Labor Party they want rid of that kind of high ranking opposition in the Labor Party and so they're going to essentially airbrush airbrush and I'm using that phrase with Mary intentionally for its Stalinist overtones they're going to they're going to airbrush that position -sition out of out of the books and with it. They Hope Tom Watson Mary. I think one of the one of the interesting things I mean it should be pointed out that the story is most prominent in the London Times which of course is no friend whatsoever to the Labor Party and is likely to highlight all it's difficult is that it it's difficulties are not easy for anybody to to play down plus they play into the current the the the the current split in UK politics and we're looking at a week of labor politics dumb dominating the headlines because it's Labor Party conference this week starting this weekend and I think there are two other people who who who whose names and in pictures feature in in the papers today in the Labor Party. One of them is shadow foreign secretary. Emily thornberry and another is Harriet Harman both both of them sort of would be regarded as centrist probably sympathetic to Europe more so far than Jeremy Corbyn his wing of the party so we're looking at really have seeing the split in the Labour party which is really a mirror image of the split in the Tory party being played out in all the headlines through the rest of the next few

Labor Party Labour Party Conservative Party Jeremy Corbyn Tom Watson Mary Tom Watson Len Mcklusky Emily Thornberry Secretary London Times Harriet Harman Europe UK
Boris' battle for Brexit

Between The Lines

15:25 min | 3 years ago

Boris' battle for Brexit

"Brexit circus continues in the UK and it's been more than threes since the biggest ever democratic vote in British history threes since more than thirty three million people went to the polls in a referendum threes since that vote authorize Britain's departure from the EU and yet Britain has filed to leave why I remember Boris Johnson's Dude manifesto deliver unite and defeat was the perfect acronym for election campaign since unfortunately it spills done but they forgot the final e my friends either energize. I say I say to all the dodgers dude food. We are going to the country. We're GONNA get Brits. It does deliver. WE'LL BREXIT is likely to be delayed again. Unite well as Britain conservatives who are divided more than ever defeat will. It's Boris who suffered several parliamentary defeats in the past week and energize is well. It's the reminders at least those in Westminster who are in so what on earth is going on so I'm in heaven is a high profile British commentator Haida and historian of more than three decades. He writes a regular column in the daily and Sunday Telegraph as well as the New Statesman. He's also a professor of history at the university city of Buckingham his new book staring at God version nineteen fourteen two nine hundred nineteen. That's published by Random House this month salmon. Welcome back to Irun. Thank you very much tom now. Give us a sense of where things stand with brexit well. We're supposed to believe in the European Union on the thirty first of October but apartment passed a law last week which was nothing to do with the government. It was the day that the opposition seize control of business in parliament of the law was to force Boris Johnson as prime minister to go to Brussels to ask for an extension until the thirty first of January he has said since then he won't do it if he doesn't do it he's breaking the law and he could be held in contempt of court and sent to prison so we're waiting to see what happens of course if he does go ask for the the extension. His credibility is completely torpedoed because ever since he started to fight his campaign for the Tory leadership in the summer it was on the basis that we would be leaving as he said do all die on the thirty first of October and if he does Austrian extension there's no guarantee also that the European Union will grant it it has it has to be grounded by unanimity of the other twenty seven members and they've been briefings over the last weekend from France that President Mackerel thinks we're just wasting wasting our time and the two where taking the Mickey out of the European Union. We leave immediately. We'll get to that in a moment but back to boras use side that he's credibility they will be damaged if he supports deadline of past the Halloween deadline of toby thirty one but surely some blog you'd that he's credibility is damaged because he has is expelled from the party twenty. One reminder rebels yeah. He's had a very difficult couple of weeks because he's strategist school dominic cummings who isn't isn't a member of the Conservative Party and isn't elected by anybody who has taken a scorched earth approach to those in the Conservative Party who oppose the idea that we might leave without a deal and Cummings Senator Johnson ten days ago have a force of Eight on this. If you lose the vote then throw out anybody who from your inside inside events against you and he is thrown out twenty one people including several former cabinet minister to X. Chancellors of the Exchequer an excellent translator and Nicholas serves Winston Churchill's grandson this caused tremendous outrage in in the Conservative Party in the country scorched earth tactics worthy of Donald Trump and that play will in a parliamentary. It's read democracy. It's very difficult and particularly in our parliamentary democracy add in Arkansas Seventy party whether there's always been ided individual constituency associations associations who choose candidates to become. MP's are independent of the center and can do more or less what they want and this is a very centralist almost dictatorship issue style way to run a political party which doesn't what one of the democracy okay well. The Commons has essentially overridden the prime minister by extending this deadline three months past October October thirty one but as you said before and as the support of all of the European Union governments what's the French likely to do well. France is is a problem and the European Union is not happy ship that the its adherence lighter percentages whenever there's an opinion poll in France it's neck and neck about whether French themselves ought to stay in the EU really yeah because they feel that this national sovereignty and their identity is French. People has been compromised by this also. They didn't like the fact act that they like the Germans are subsidizing other poorer countries who des necessary share all values in the suddenly anywhere near economically successful missile defenses in France the sixth biggest economy in the world we in Britain to the fifth so there's a lot of unrest about the European Union about interference in French live but President Macron Macron who of course his enemies early forties aspires to be the leader of Europe Anglo muckleshoot twenty five years older than him hasn't been well recently. She's twice while almost fainted in public appearances is standing down at the next election and she may not last much longer and it'd be a vacancy for the key player in Europe and macrumors to be that keyplayer he has a program he has a an idea of greater integration an almost federalization of Europe and he knows that written. If it were to stay in your opinion it will be completely opposed to that and so he wants personnel descriptors from your perspective from the perspective of other Conservative brexit tease you think the French could rescue rescue you by rejecting the the extension of the deadline yeah quite conceivable. They've changed their tune two or three times on this but then as recent word to come out of you've Paris last weekend was the British if granted a three-month extension would simply wasted. They've got no plan. There's negotiations getting on they haven't got a strategy to solve the problems that were in the deal that tourism April at Parliament in which was defeated three times because of its inadequacies and so the French are saying that foreign minister only real who spoke Sunday they're saying through him. We think the British had enough and we want to get them out so just say the French do due indeed reject this feel now that means that Britain will leave on October thirty one but still it just seems a fire that the only thing the British government is is doing at the moment and has been doing the lotteries is brexit. That's right. Actually it's an advertisement for what a wonderful thing that is not have government thing about the Belgium's about ten years ago and they didn't have government. That's right for about a year. I think we've we've we have passed laws in our country that I can remember. We've taken this different initiatives chiefs. We've just let people get on with this. Unemployment in Britain is about four and a half percent now. people frankly are unemployed in Britain. People whose health is cy battle junkies kids who just haven't called the brain power to get work. Everybody else go to job We've got very low inflation. We've got low interest rates. We're doing really well as a country economically and we are reasonably happy ship. It's really really brexit. It's appropriate. Maga Salmon Hefford the distinguished British columnist and historian. Let's turn to Boris Johnson. Someone you've known reasonably well over the last the best part of three decades in journalism now the Tory grassroots they love him. They voted for him to be their leader by warming the numbers you're leading conservative but you not like Boris Johnson. Why I Boris Johnson is a person. Who is you say I've known for years? A He is someone who has a very casual relationship with the truth he's known in the Labor Party. They put up tweets about him. Where they call Lavar Johnson I would get on Saturday but he certainly you finds the truth of difficult concept at times and I didn't think he's probity or the attention to detail all seriousness to be prime minister and the fact that he came into this office immediately cle- employed Mister Cummings as strategist and appeared to hand over the whole policy to him to do as immediately followed the as I say the scorched earth strategy suggest that Cummings Cummings his opponents rather than seeking to persuade the more reasonable him he just says because you're opposed to me you are clearly a worthless human being and I'm going. We're going to talk like Steve Bannon in the United States signed playbook but he's got more power than Steve Bounded had so this is this is very when Johnson was mayor of London. He had eight pitchy matters because he was notoriously idle. I'd had the attention to detail so he had to other people Lynton crosby officer Lynton of course was a former liberal rule and conservative party strategists seen all these well. Linson ran Boris Johnson's leadership election campaign and Boris Johnson wanted silence and when he collected his check which is a large one compact himself on the back of having a very successful job I didn't they with a Linson is still a a guiding Boris. There's been a word that he is but I presume has a general election and Boris Johnson has been trying to call on become get a majority sufficient in parliament eleven to approve that decision. Linda will be back in Blighty helping to run the election cabinet the many conservative voters and members of the Tory party the longtime readers of the Daily Telegraph often cruelly called the Tory graph they would read you and they might ask you does your hostility towards awards Boris out. Why your support for Brexit. No I really the thing I want most in life at the moment as an Englishman is for my country to be independent of European Union again I am hostile to Boris Johnson because I think he's very good record as a politician he was really second rate mayor of London where he wasted almost money the money and he was a truly bad foreign secretary he was a really I mean his officials at the Foreign Office absolutely detested him and he couldn't be trusted with any serious foreign policy. Theresa may continue to deal with the European policy with the policy towards America. He was allowed to go just places like darkest Africa unimportant to the Far East and shake hands there so he's he's not a capable politician. He hasn't got a grasp of detail and he's not serious and his response if you ask him a question he can't answer is to tell a joke. That's not good enough. I can't but he's defenders say he can unite the Party and in fairness opinion polls do show support for the conservative surging from twenty percent on the horizon May to thirty five percent under Boris add to that this is a point that phrase and Nelson the editor of the spectator. Mike's at two that the twelve percent support for the Briggs potty and you've got basically half the nation backing either Boris or Nausea Farraj saw even if the polls were to be tomorrow's election results you'd end up more or less with a fifty the strong majority for the Conservatives many people would say that's the best conservative results since Margaret Thatcher's third election victory in ninety seven well. There's a crucial assumption in which is an assumption rather than the facts in Fraser Nelson has jumped the gun on this and that this depends on there being a coalition between the Brexit Party and the Conservative Party is no oh such coalition at this stage at this stage but Nigel Farrell said the other day when Johnson went to see a variety of the Irish prime minister that he would regard leaving the European European Union without the deals offended of statecraft the minute that far out her that he said he's not serious about leaving without a deal therefore we can't do a deal with him. Okay Okay but just as soon there is a deal between Boris and Nargile Farraj between the Conservatives and the Brexit party this doing pretty good position because more than four hundred parliamentary entry states voted late in two thousand sixteen correct which is a lot more levers. That's true you must forget that there is a tribal determination of Labor Party vote. It is to fight for Labor Party even if it doesn't properly stand for Brexit so although Farrell she's very good at persuading working class former Labor voters to join the Brexit bandwagon had wagon we call it assume that they will also it's quite the puzzle says show a massive resurgence and support for the Liberal Democrats who are any two points behind the Labour party who basically written off when Cameron majority in two Thousand Fifteen yes and in twenty seven. I think they only had about twelve. MP's seventeen they WANNA by-election and they've had defections actions to them and I would confidently predict the Liberal Democrats win a lot of seats remain a tourism probably third of ill Tory party remains will vote for awesome in large quantities a lot of right wing. Labor people will them and quantities and the other problem that Johnson has got is it. He's loses his seats in Scotland because he's alienated. The Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson who retired at the age of about thirty eight last week saying that she'd had enough well. How vulnerable is Boris. I mean he has a majority in the Commons and I think you've argued elsewhere that he's hauled on his own. Marginal seat Ish Shakira era is what a majority of five thousand outs bridge which is a very mixed seat demographically in the West of London too high immigrant population many of whom are working working class middle class and not necessarily natural Conservative Party supporters of the Labor Party already flooding activists since oxbridge to to canvas and to try to defeat him so he could struggle to hold his seat but I think more than that the some of the things that he's Don John have really aggrieved people who supported him the early prorogation people thought the Queen in an embarrassing position the he's called call six votes on things such as calling a general election twice and other questions. He's lost all six of them. I don't see necessarily he's certain either to win the election far from it or even to hold his own seed. Well I mean this is a moving story and we clearly are in uncharted waters a back. Is it possible that brexit might not even happen. I've got about obviously if it doesn't happen it will be because he is. GonNa ask for an extension on what is being granted in those seconds as I say he's finished. He's in Party will turn on him. They that's not what they put him in there to do. Also it means that we will talk Frenchman so if we stay in until the study FESTA January. There's got to be some rapid footwork to get a deal together with the probably will be no extension after that. If we get a general election at a new party come in a policy of government then they might well call a second referendum the Labor Party at talking about doing that but the Labor Party is as divided if not more divided than the Conservative Party so we concentrate towards the party of government is a moment but Corbyn's is Labor Party isn't a real mess and they're far from shore to call the second referendum so we woke feticide the most lineup parliamentarians are reminders but a pretty significant segment

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Boris Johnson to suspend parliament in Brexit run-up

The Daily

09:35 min | 3 years ago

Boris Johnson to suspend parliament in Brexit run-up

"In our last episode about Brexit. We spoke for for colleague. Catherine bent hold just after Boris Johnson had suspended parliament and basically cut them out of the decision making process about how brexit would move forward and counter and talked talked about how that had set up this question about what version of democracy would prevail in Britain should be the version that prioritizes the popular will of the British British people who voted for Brexit with or without a deal with the EU which is what Boris Johnson wants or should the version of democracy be allowing parliament element the People's representatives to play a major role in what leaving the e looks like so. How has this all unfolded in the days since Boris Johnson made that move well. I think the answer is that it unfolded resoundingly in favour of parliament as parliament reconvened gene on Tuesday because remember Boris Johnson's suspension of parliament doesn't again for another week or so there was an atmosphere of high-drama NBA's takes the Duchy that when he turns up but our children's school as it was apparent. He's very well behaved fellow. He wouldn't dare behave like that in front with MP's going on TV on the radio the one nation this is not one dogmas complaining about Boris Johnson having committed a constitutional outrage is a constitutional outrage this extraordinarily he needs to be held to account by power but not shutting Dan Parliament and all of this emotion climax of course one of the most remarkable things took place during the statement was to see the member for Bracknell crossed the floor prime minister. You've lost your majority with a member of Boris Johnson's own Conservative Party crossing the aisle in front of the prime administer to sit with members of the Liberal Democratic Party and act which deprive Johnson in one stroke of his majority in parliament. He is it winning friends in Europe. He's losing friends at home his government with no mandate no morals and as of today no majority. Dr Thing so after this very stormy start the next thing that happens is tonight. The United Kingdom has been plunged into even deeper political. Oh chaos the opposition joined by twenty one members of the Conservative Party vote in favor of advancing this legislation that would effectively Saito Boris Johnson. You can't go to Brussels and pull Britain out of the European Union unless you make a deal with the European Union first the majority of British lawmakers including some members of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's own party voted to stop Johnson's plan to leave the European Union without without a withdrawal agreement good stuff the is to the right three hundred twenty eight the nose to the left three hundred one. The is the is heavy. I love so that's the first major defeat. He suffers in his term as prime minister and it's a big one. There is no consensus in this house to leave the European Union without a deal there is no majority see for no deal in the country because it goes straight to the heart of what Boris Johnson said he would do as prime minister <hes> and that is to withdraw withdraw on October thirty first dealer no deal regardless of this situation so when that one conservative lawmaker theatrically flipped on on the floor of parliament it turned out that was a signal of a bigger growing uprising within Boris Johnson's party over this approach he was taking to Brexit. Try to cut Hutt parliament out and just kind of crashed this thing through that's right and it's really very unprecedented. I mean the Conservative Party. British parties in general have iron discipline so to see twenty-one lawmakers peel off and vote against the prime minister and the government is really a wholly unprecedented development in British politics so from the very first session of parliament the British people understood that what they were witnessing with something entirely new in their modern political history and what exactly is underlying these defections affections and rejection of Boris Johnson's plan. I mean why is this so unwanted that even members of his own party are rising up against him. Well the basic fear is that if Britain withdraws from the European Union with no agreement in place overnight overnight it will cause a multitude of major problems you could imagine trucks that transport food and medicine from Europe into Britain being stuck at the border in Calais France. You could imagine chaos at the airports as people who are used to travelling back and forth without passports suddenly suddenly face the prospect of having to show identification you risk in short havoc havoc that could really hurt the economy but could also further polarize the debate over brexit so I think that even within Boris Johnson's party which remember is a party that wholeheartedly supports the goal of pulling out of Europe where e idea of pulling out in this disorderly abrupt way just scared a lot of the members of Johnson's own own party and that fear is what motivated this rebellious so this is not opposition to brexit per se it's opposition to a brexit brexit that creates no predictable trade scenarios ordeals that could suddenly just blow up the function of the British economy. That's that's right many of the rebels if not most of the rebels are on record as saying they think Britain should leave. It's just the way you do it that that is so important and for these twenty one pulling out in a chaotic sudden way is simply too big a risk and that's what they're pushing against or didn't the entire Conservative Party and presumably these rebels who voted against him didn't they know just a couple of weeks back when they elected poorest. Johnson is our prime minister that this is the manner in which he planned to proceed to crash out of the EU without a negotiated deal with the European Union. I mean isn't that understood. Stood that is understood. Yes Boris. Johnson never made any secret of his intentions here but remember. It's not just these twenty-one anyone people who elected Boris Johnson the leader of the Tory party and hence the prime minister he was elected by a slightly broader group of people and so Boris Johnson is tapping into a legitimate view on the part of many members of his party that the time for negotiation the time for for compromise is over and Britain really just needs to pull the Plug uh-huh but to these twenty one rebels he's setting Britain on a horse that they feel ultimately will be economically and politically destructive so they view their role as saying. Hey wait a minute. We want to deliver brexit but we want to do it. In a responsible way in this is not the responsible way to do it. So how did the Prime Minster respond to this rebellion to this smooth in parliament force Johnson does two things. The ruling conservatives are in turmoil. Boys Johnson has kicked hot twenty-one members of his own party after they voted against same disease control of the parliamentary agenda the first thing he does is he carries out what you almost have to call us. Stalinist purge of these rebels rebels. He kicks them out of the Party while I would have to say. Boris Johnson really had the worst week. I mean here he is. He's new. He lost everyone of of his first votes. In parliament which is unprecedented. He purged twenty-one people in his own party because they didn't support him. I mean I think it's kind of dunning and it leads to this extraordinary tableau of these conservative. MP Some of whom have served for decades some of whom are elders of the party giving these emotional farewell speeches in the House of Commons you have the grandson grandson of Winston Churchill Nicholas Soames the speak. I'm not standing of the next section. I'm bus approaching the end a thirty seven years service to this hice of which I've been proud. I'm honored beyond words to be. I'm not I'm showed a very sad that it should end in this way speaking very emotionally nationally about all the years he spent in parliament who have titans of British politics Kenneth Clarke who's known as the father of the house a former Chancellor Chancellor of the exchequer a man who might well have been prime minister himself party tonight. It's been taken over by a Roman knockabout. uh-huh so character

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Boris Johnson, Jeremy Corbyn And Dominic Grieve discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

15:18 min | 3 years ago

Boris Johnson, Jeremy Corbyn And Dominic Grieve discussed on Coffee House Shots

"I'm joined by cables and James for safe while James. We're expecting a number of resignations this week. We've already on from Sarah Duncan which we will talk about shortly but yesterday Philip Hammond went on the mall showing confirmed that he was going to resign after Theresa May's final Prime Minister's questions he's jumping before he's pushed isn't he in the whiteboard in Boris Johnson's campaign and during the cabinet is it oh no we had Hammond down for John Throw now. He said he won't serve raises. A more serious points about how he has behaved. I mean there's a very difficult question to answer which is which is he was the chancellor when trees I said no deal is better than a bad deal. He was the chance to win all school. Fifty one votes injuries may kept saying that so it does raise a question about whether he was ever actually committed to the policy of a day of government element of which he was a member where he actually meant it. I also think he's behaving in a deeply irresponsible manner because it is quite clear that whatever you think of it Theresa May's with Griffin is not going to Paul sounds comments so you need to ease off rob some kind of concessional compromise to get this thing through and by what he's doing and the interviews he's giving in the European press on his shenanigans in parliament he is basically saying to you. You do is compromise or for any concession because parliament's elements can stop no deal but as rebel dominic grieve says the only way we see Sir stopping ideal is to bring down and it is not clear yet for they have the numbers so he is paradox the actually making no deal more likely I mean the question you need to think about which is which do you think is worse for the British economy in the short even in the short to medium-term. No deal oracle been government. I think it's a fairly strong case that it is a Corbin government. He's also making that more likely I e P regrettable about the way that moment is paving the moment and it is kind of hard not to think that he is goes into his head that he wants to go down in history for something and and he also is driven. I think bar a personal dislike of Boris Johnson I mean they all they are about as different as characters. Come be and I think there is kind of I think you see it's going to be this is undoubtedly going to be a problem for. I want someone Jeez people for them. How does more technocratic mind almost find offensive and so they feel bound by the normal ties of Lords obligation that people would find to a former cabinet according to become Prime Minister K._t.? Philip Hammond is joining the Google could score. Does it become nine on the back benches of <hes> Torian Dominic grieve like David Goal obviously who are very worried about the consequences of no deal exit. Do you think sees himself as being the ringleader of this new group and if not who else I think he seasons I was having a pivotal role play and certainly to people who are involved. Perhaps on various this what's up groups for being proactive and interesting have those speculation but world theresa may might play but that is not seen as a row where you have some really leading from the front at all you might be able to bring them in a backward way whereas I I think when it comes to Philip Hammond he is someone who's very happy to go and bat for it and you see that has multiple media appearances. I think when you look the with squad and is going to be a wide ranging faction in the sense that perhaps you have ron thirty figures who are sympathetic to the coors the coups being to prevent a no deal brexit but they will have different points of high father willing to go so you mentioned Dominic Grieve Dominic Grieve is in a very small number of the squad in the sense he is willing to vote down the government or at least he has said he is in a will to stop. No deal brexit happened has suggested he might be willing to do that. He hasn't said Faucheux but he could laugh will be in the more hardline element say the bulk of the awkward squad so whether <unk> actually property matters most in the day to day running of Boris Johnson's government before you get to what we think he might be that ultimate showdown but you might have a confidence vote is what can they team up on. Now figures like David Gook I think he uh of azan we expect for example Greg Clark. We don't expect him to resign anticipation but will likely not be in the Boris Johnson Cabinet and fluker join this great when it comes to confidence as its deputy FAA supply SA- cutting off supply seems to be a step too far when it comes to finances so the things that they can team up on would be when you look to what Ambrose described as an activist speaker Joe Becker and he saw that last week with their Perot Gang Amendment Dominic grieve came up with that is. Something people feel much more comfortable going for because it feels like a less drastic mechanism so I think that's where this team can come together and when you look within that you also have a Muharan reports you could as as soon as Boris Johnson is appointed as prime minister barring a big shock for you could have Torri M._p.'s defect to the Liberal Democrats. Now that's different element here. Those people here very pro second referendum the anti no deal shoe but it it goes well beyond and I would say the bulk of the Gook squad have voted for Brexit deal many times free times so there is one way for Boris Johnson to almost end his his problem there which is if he can get change if he can get a due to Vatan this group that the not so hard line in their ears majority that they're not gonNA vote for anything. Boris Johnson comes up with but they do need it to be a deal. I've been the Golden Association from those cases right and then which is if you are working. WE'VE DOMINIC GRIEVE STEVE DOMINATE GREAVES AIM is not to prevent no deal is to have a second referendum into how the U._K.. Remain in the European Union and I mean this is actually a real problem for some members of this group which is essentially when when you choose your political allies here it becomes your message risk getting lost. It risks looking what you're joining move dominant grieve in his attempt to stay in the E._U.. Raleigh than trying to prevent is leaving without a deal and that is going to be a major kind of questionable how his group coheres when varies of stress intention put on that will be put on it when a deal okay for example if a deal does come back do the same gamers and then just ingredients as well still vote against the deal because they want a second referendum and remain all always have as spent so arguing that no deal would would be catastrophic that they would feel obliged to vote for a deal. I mean I think this is their difficulties and contradictions within this group Katie. Tell us about Sir Allen Dunkin's resignation so remiss as of this morning the minister was going to resign today expecting the bulk as for Hamilton the anti nausea to as opposed to have the minimum amount of time between the new prime minister taking over and the being a vacancy in your department. Perhaps a vacancy theresa may try and fill it. It seems now we're getting to the shorter time may just be the vacant so Annan Dunkin decided not wait until Wednesday's. He has gone on Monday morning now. I think this is attracted. Criticism for a number of reasons fest off some have suggested. The Alan Duncan hasn't always been the principal character when it comes to the cools attached himself to sue people point to the referendum when he was in talks about joining the board and then in the end decided apparently because he cannot get a certain position by his name to go for remain and that's what people think he's insincere. I think there is a more practical note here which is it may not be specific brief but clearly what's happening right now. In Iran the crisis in the factories May as haven't have Cobra meetings to to be a Foreign Office minister. Dan Ready have one. He was suspended in field -Unding who's quite busy doing the leadership contest exactly the Foreign Secretary Hughes O._T.. Trying to walk away he is getting Steve if he doesn't have his upset tomorrow. It doesn't really paint this picture of government that is taking a situation completely serious. They and I think it was just absence. Idea which is very easy right now. I tried to haunt you paint the Tory party as warring factions when if you want to be the party of you would think that there is a sense that you need to look at your on top of this I thought it was quite interesting as we've seen Greg Hands Jeremy Hunt supporter today take to social media and and say that he does not support preemptive ramp to resignations and he thinks does play into the hands of Jeremy Kuban so I think it's just Boris Johnson supporters who questioning some of the time yeah we've had some comments from people like Hugh Merryman who's Philip Hammons P. P. S. on Westminster unstrap last night saying that the government basically dropped the ball on the Iran Crisis James. Is it the case that this is about how the government relates to trump will try not to relate to trump in closely. I read this government moment was as it so often has been on the trump. Administration was caught between two stools which is once the U._K.. Via Gibraltar had impounded that Iranian tanker it was point clear for there was going to be Iranian retaliatory action of some sort when you consider the soy's of the Royal Navy at the moment is quickly if British flag shipping wants to be protected against retaliation that was going to need to be active cooperation with the U._S. and what appears to have been the case is that there was a hesitancy about going down that route even though the Americans were suggesting it because they didn't want to look like they were signing up to the full gamut of U._S.. Close John Roberts obviously against the Iran nuclear deal which the U._K.. is in favor of home not having that this is a big strategic confusion on the government's behalf which is once you take a decision to impound that tanker then you had to act to protect your own shipping in the most comprehensive way possible and the seizure of his ship on Friday shows that the Royal Navy simply doesn't clearly is not adequate soy's to do that right now and F. was going to need assistance from the U._S.. Which is the largest navy in the world and so I've been there is there is a question here of of how this was handled and I think if it wasn't for the fact that was storage contest ongoing? This will be a big story. Also the other issue is the Jeremy Corbyn is not exactly Joe. Jeremy Corbyn is taking predictable approach which is everyone should deescalate. What why are we upset? Iranians in the first place approach of his question here I mean there is there is a I mean the government is very vulnerable. Were more focused right on time. which is you made the decision to impound the ship because he believed it was going to Syria and breaking sanctions? You've failed to Defend U._K.. Shipping why and finally we get the result of the LIB DEM leadership contest test the softening Katie expecting Jo Swinson to win or we or is it much closer than it appeared start the contest but I think when it comes to leadership contests mistakes ulcer in the Tory leadership is very hard for the polling often into Western. What is exactly going on is interesting difficult? Speaking to Redemption Bove's is the sense. I think that Jason is more likely to get this biting. The margin is going to be interesting to the case that perhaps it didn't mean every time you speak to lived M._p.. They will tell you how friendly the contest is and how they're absolutely delighted rather not at David J Simpson even basements in will say that should be delighted if adcose obviously has so it definitely has a slightly different dynamic when it comes to and clearly has got attention in the past few weeks while the Tour de contests has been on but it is good to be a very important decision you think about the fact that we could be having an election anytime seeing that he looked Lib. Dem's are in the polls. The EH leader in contrast to re Party is actually inheriting a very positive situation where the party has got to whether or not that's pretty Vince cable assets or luck intangibles having the party until about gay sex. Eh Eh we've got the media fakers which is going to be hard before these leaders than what happened Tim Farron and the general election so I think it would be a surprise of Jo. Swinson didn't get it but ultimately do you get the the sense that whatever happens is not going to be as big upset as tomorrow. If Jeremy Hunt Somehow wins James Davey and Jo Swinson do differ in terms of how they get what they want in a hung parliament scenario scenario you say at Davy for instance would vote for Jeremy Corbyn Queen's speech of a hard legislation for a second referendum in it. Jo Swinson is much less clear on that but it's very uneasy about since she doesn't think you can trust Jeremy Corbyn too so the outcome of this contest is really important isn't it. I was very struck by in your writer for a debate that you took part on quizzing the Swinson and Davey on Friday night of this difficulty for the still skull by coach of what they say and also how they position themselves on the one hand they want to say to remain voters. You can't trust Jeremy Corbyn an inch on the other hand they want to try and create this brewed remain alliance and suggests that they'll they'll do whatever they need to do to stop brexit. They're not worried about their own party. I mean but he's going to be attention. I mean one of the things about general election is but even if general elections before breakfast it won't be for solely on Brexit and it'll be a difficult question former Lib dem's which is the Lib Dem's pro remain position is trucks into them a certain kind of middle class prosperous demographic but are probably probably you but not pro all of the taxes that Jeremy Corbyn with I'd like to place on them and how Lib Dem's navigate that question what was going to unconvincing in your blog. You're saying they were saying oh we'd vote for the Queen speed for them. Vote Down the budget. I kind of that way so I think that as a kind of tricky question also fascinating question which is we'll talk a lot on this bogas about Boris Johnson the polls how him getting a poll bounce with affects things I think is also worth noting gene to see whether the Lib Dem's got any kind of bounce service extra not where they're going to get that much but there's extra coverage a Nudie will get because I think if you look at the decline and support Jeremy Corbyn among Labour members if a new more energetically dome and leader you live in homes Po position is maintained. If Labour's can all regularly coming second in the polls because Boris Johnson is brought back some voices from the BREXIT party.

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 Voting closing in race to become UK's new prime minister

Morning Edition

00:57 sec | 3 years ago

Voting closing in race to become UK's new prime minister

"Voting closes today in the race to succeed British prime minister Theresa may who is resigning NPR's Joanna could kisses reports from London the new prime minister must deal with brexit and a growing crisis with Iran members of Britain's ruling Tory party have until today to return their ballots selecting a new leader who will be prime minister the winner will be announced tomorrow in installed in office on Wednesday the favorite is Boris Johnson a former Foreign Secretary in London mayor he's seen as brash and unpredictable and as a chief architect of brexit he's vowed to get the U. K. out of the European Union by October thirty first no matter what Johnson is facing off against current foreign secretary Jeremy hunt who could delay breaks and if it means a better deal for the U. K. since Friday hot has been managing a growing crisis with Iran which sees the British flag oil tanker in the strait of Hormuz Joanna cake is ascend P. R. news

Prime Minister Theresa NPR London Britain Boris Johnson Secretary Chief Architect European Union Jeremy Hunt Iran Joanna