24 Burst results for "Torres Strait"

Rio Tinto docks CEO pay over destruction of ancient caves in Australia

BBC Newshour

02:36 min | Last month

Rio Tinto docks CEO pay over destruction of ancient caves in Australia

"Executives at the mining giant Rio Tinto have paid a price for the company's destruction of ancient aboriginal caves in western Australia, and that was despite fierce opposition from the local indigenous community. The caves themselves. Among the oldest historical sites in Australia may have bean priceless, but the company has put a figure on what it called a failure to respect local communities on their heritage. A total of around $5 million in bonuses. Patrick O'Leary is director of country needs people. It's an organization that works with aboriginal groups to manage land. Aboriginal, entire stride Island. PayPal's have many secrets, thoughts that are imbued JJ brought throughout the land Skype. This thought in particular is of incredible significance, not only to the people that a traditional owners of those caves but really as a record of human history. For the last 46,000 years, there's a demonstrated direct link between some artifacts found in those caves and the people that are living there today. Incredibly important, not only for the traditional line is but really for the Entire global story of human development on Earth. So when they were destroyed, how would you describe the feeling our time working with average plantar stride on communities in various some places around Australia for many, many years, and unfortunately there has been a litany of impacts and destruction of sacred sites. But outside this particular incident has struck a very significant note right across the country. So has this apology and the decision to Doc A few million dollars in bonuses from senior executives at Rio Tinto gone down. People are looking at this as a gesture, perhaps, but not something that I want to say in terms of significant change. I think people are looking for a lot more. The rial mark off. The response will be not so much from within the companies but in the regulatory system. And the industry's response to the strengthening of regulation both at the state and the federal level. In Australia. It's a week fable, a regulatory system, a system that's really stacked heavily against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders people that is at fault here. Many people would argue that over the last 40 years, there's been significant industry influence on the designs. Off those regular true systems. We have wake systems in Australia for protecting cultural heritage. And that is fundamentally the problem. The problem lies with government and perhaps the ecosystem, which allows those industry desires around the weakness or strength of the system to predominate. How do you change that?

Australia Rio Tinto Stride Island Patrick O'leary Torres Strait Islanders Paypal JJ Director
"torres strait" Discussed on Psychology of Entrepreneurship

Psychology of Entrepreneurship

08:17 min | Last month

"torres strait" Discussed on Psychology of Entrepreneurship

"To start by Colonel Jean, the traditional custodians destroyer and recognize their continuing connection to land borders and community. I pay my respects to them and their cultures and two eldest poss- present and emerging of land I'm standing on. Today. I extend my respect to the aboriginal and Torres Strait island the people who listen to this. This volume is bought three of mini series that made us look ads stomach race inaccuracies stereotyping, and the biased that is clearly all around us. In volume thirty, seven, we spoke with. Poulsen. Who I am and I am. A. Facilitator. Particularly around indigenous leadership will what's called into cultural leadership where you try to bring groups together that's that's my main thing that are too. And this is a continuation of that conversation. And again in Williamsburg Nine, we also did a whole volume on what it really means to be limited by racism. I have to admit that my narrative abilities were kind of lacking in that volume, but we just had to publish it despite me re recording the whole narrative. So, if you haven't listened to volume thirty, seven and thirty nine, then I suggest you listen to those straight after one. When I was talking with mock I was telling him what is almost common seen every time I enter an uber or taxi. The driver where you from. Me Australia. Deafening silence. The driver interrupts the silence and says where we warn. Me Barring In the Middle East. Silence. Again. Driver weight live. Brisbane Australia. Silence finally, the driver. What about your parents me? My mom has a US possible into my dad has an Indian possible driver Oh you're Indian I knew it this happens all the time and it's really really annoying but can you imagine if it happened to you when you belonged to this land? Going back thousands of. Generations. And then I found this. Done by the University of Sydney. When was the last time you and candid casual racism? Everybody REBA. Way from you know and I'm the second abridged. Coverage, and then I'm black look racist. Okay sorry I'm just GONNA drive. Said this. Is. Exactly the same and. The lamb. Vigna. It's. Where you from where you from this This. And it's not until. The confession. One of my eighth grade grandparents is from Vanuatu. That's what it is. That's what. Is. Like a like a like a avenue, an anthropological genealogies specialists in their own. Making no determinations around the city both unelected searching for this. Give me the thing that I'm missing. So. I've I've seen this play out. Right. I've also seen this player between. Many years ago is your friend of mine. Chinese heritage. and. The. The what filler student who is just he walked straight into this because he thought he did the same. Where from WHO starting? WE WON'T China. What. Parents on others and this went on lock on and on because her great grandparents came over. Even one low great tim over in the. So she's like my family has been here since eighteen thirty. My style we've been here, very, very long time. All trying. And he could just see this is. Difficult, to compute. To My, my antidote tha that. is to encourage Australians to carry around the story of the. Eight grade. Grandparents. Before we get into this. I say Oh, man how we are you from? Okay. Before we get into this, do you know the story of your? Eighth Grade Grandparents Because in order for me to give you your a ha moment. I'm going to have to break it down to you with my grandparents. And then then you got. CONVICT UNIQUELY DO Research. Because I could. Legitimately site. From Scotland. Because I have coached one of my great grandparents. Hula Restaurant Aboriginal. Some one one grandparent. Actually. Don't know where he's from some on somewhere. But. The real original. The people don't want to say that they want to see the pontiff makes it okay for them. To carry them into. A perception. That's what it is. Now. Now feel comfortable and they're not doing. Well, where you from. Melvin. I. Told you a story for half an hour and then you just give me one way to answer. This fed. For context I wanted you to know what challenges first nations jailings face from the beginning of this volume, and if you really wanted to know how to show up I didn't WanNA. Keep this bit to the end. So mock mother challenges we face was really drawn to even the way that you position the work that you do as being away to amplify. That's that's a fantastic role in the world. It's one of the ways that you know to to be able to broadcast. The kind of. Two messages get out. I think we. I think our challenges face us. Are, the mirror. Or Shadow side to the opportunities that fight us. We like you said the way we grow up. Impacts the way we. Comprehend Truth and the way we cognitively worked through the environment around us and then declare way of being in the world. And that is shifting. and. In twenty twenty, that is shifting in major wise beyond all of us. are think that We've got to amplify. The way of saying. We need to break free from the negativity of the stereotypes. We have to break free from. The stuff that we have been holding onto. that. This is why we cannot be with those people. Because, they are on the other side and they don't like us and we don't like them. If we're going to keep going as a humanity. As people's we have to find solutions to things much bigger than any of us. Climate global economy. The way we can deal with fit security and the way we do with each other religiously culturally as well. If. We can't do, those challenges. If we can't..

Australia Torres Strait island US University of Sydney Colonel Jean Poulsen Middle East twenty twenty Williamsburg Hula Restaurant Aboriginal Vanuatu Brisbane China Scotland
"torres strait" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:22 min | Last month

"torres strait" Discussed on Conversations

"Autistic try and at that point in time I been teaching in Hong Kong and I head him in Hong Kong and then when he was three months old I returned to Sydney among plan was not work for a few years that was not a luxury out head with my daughter. Who's eleven years old them brother and I thought this'll be lovely and I had this image of myself. We had a little lower worker's cottage on the border of Ashfield in some hill and I kind of had to see me myself being one of those moms that united went for coffee and set around Tubing Saiful's and so on and really none of that was to bay because. He started showing some developmental differences very nearly. Lost Woods that he'd had all sorts of things that that ended up with an autism diagnosis say at that point I, I was thinking what? Can I do with my life now And I think like many parents when you first get an autism diagnosis feo child was very frightening to. And you kind of your. told a whole lot of potentially very negative outcomes. Ovalles seem very negative and you're trying to grapple with the let grief and and that difficulty You know I guess as is my wont to try and make everything understandable intellectual. Some. Research talking to the mothers interviewing them and four from an I enrolled in a second Ph. Day. And, completed that. which was about mothers experiences of enrolling kids Nice with autism into primary schools in Sydney. And you sort of made that your life's work. Now, a lot of the work you are doing in this moment in time is very much around childhood development. And Autism yes I'm working on a number of different tribe jinx at the moment. So for about ten years, the world was doing was very much with other mothers of children diagnosed with autism. And it was focusing on kind of processes of social exclusion stigmatization and so on and a lot. Some of it was an education research. More. Recently, I've diversified. So, now I'm working on a number of different projects. One of them's a really fascinating project on the oral history of light diagnosed autistic adults people who were dog nuys offering their forties sometimes in the fifties. And working with autistic researches on that project. I'm also working recently finished another project, which was the first research on experiences of autism in aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities and I'm very proud of that research the report winds launched. Last year. Something I'd like to ask you about your parents, starkey and..

Hong Kong Sydney Torres Strait Woods Ashfield Tubing Saiful starkey Ovalles
Ana Forrest & Jose Calarco - Forging Your Own Path

The Flow Artists Podcast

04:53 min | Last month

Ana Forrest & Jose Calarco - Forging Your Own Path

"Hello Joe. It's Jose Calico and Anna Forest Tia on all CA silent USA. And just by what you see what's going on in the mainland in the US I. And we're I a Saif. He only island in a Beautiful Anna's house thirty acres in lush forest with owls and eagles, and deason vouchers. Would really enjoying actually the lockdown. After five or six years of non stop touring thirty five CDs and countries a year. With had the chance to settle down and? We do have still very, very busy with our online channel and running out business each day we do a nice lengthy yoga practice. I'm a vegan chefs are cooking more than ever. Where actually very, very healthy. And so much has changed joke. Since we last spoke the world has gone absolutely crazy. And the US is one of those places where just off the mainland here. And not too far from here there's riots and shooting and racial tensions. All sorts of crazy crazy stuff going on a lot of it is a countdown to the election. Coming up here in the US I. There's a lot of manipulation lots of lies. Very hard to trust many people right now. So. Much. Going on. But We a happy to announce that old during this lockdown. We've had the opportunity to finally record all online yoga music ceremony shamanism philosophy Joe Prayers, go out to Victoria and all Ustralia Week here how harsh the lockdown is over there and I just lucky that we were able to do the lockdown thirty Acre forest. However, we seem to allow best wishes to Victoria and Australia, and we pray that our freedoms come back again. Go, and Jose. Thank you so much for speaking with us today all the way over in New Zealand the beautiful. Put Her. Could. We stop heads of your connections to first nations culture. Would you like to share how you live and work within indigenous communities and Foams what you share today? Absolutely. Well. I have been director all descendants aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Dance Company for twenty. Five years. People can see that descendants dot com you. We've traveled to the four corners of the planet we have done the world's biggest events over forty countries were visited. And this is where I got my background. In, aboriginal culture and my aboriginal Mahba spiritual mother Imelda Willis came from the dingy. Kanju clans Al-Faw North Queensland. She is now deceased. And we still descendants still together. And this just gave us the idea I had already. Doing first nations work in forest job. But I took it a couple of steps further by doing. Exchange all over the world while wearing Australia, we do Australian aboriginal stuff while we're in the US CY cultural exchange with the Americans. All first nations people in Mexico in Canada. Everywhere we go. We liked to do cultural exchange because first nations have spirituality was is beautiful and untouched by white middle class sort of new age is symptoms. So, with the aboriginal culture, it's the world's all this culture. It goes well over fifty thousand years and it was well before yoga and a lot of people site what has first nation. Philosophy principles and culture got to do with Yoga. And it actually has a lot to do with Yoga when we look at Yoga in the broader perspective as a place learning and healing.

United States Jose Calico Imelda Willis Australia Victoria Anna JOE Torres Strait Island Dance Com New Zealand Usa. North Queensland Director Mexico Canada
"torres strait" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

Casefile True Crime

05:02 min | Last month

"torres strait" Discussed on Casefile True Crime

"Cousins just center rose and Melissa Smith had been inseparable since childhood the two goals but just one year apart in age and grew up close to one another in the small town of book located in Central Northern New South Wales. . Just Cinta who was the younger of the two was better known by her nickname of Cindy. . Shea was born on October twenty, , three, , nineteen, , seventy two and was the youngest of seven children with four brothers and two sisters. . Cindy lived with her mother Yona don't Smith and her siblings in a house on the east side of town. . She was often looked after her brother Loyd who was seven years her senior. . Mona Lisa's family resided on an aboriginal reserve. . Now, , the L. Said Woods village, , which was like I did about two and a half kilometers west of Burke. . Known by locals as the reserve the yellow said Woods village consisted of twenty cottages which were run down and overcrowded. . It was entirely populated by indigenous Australians from two families, , the Edwards and the smiths. . Siblings cousins, , and other extended family members lived side by side and the close community provided a sense of safety and belonging to its residence. . Nine. . Lisa was born on November twenty, , nine, , Nineteen seventy-one to parents June Smith, , and dougie shillings worth. . On the nausea was born have father had walked to Burke Hospital to visit June and their newborn singing. . Nat King. Cole's . Song of Mine Ole saw the entire. . This led the couple to name their baby goal after the famous song. . They also had another daughter Fiona and four sons. . Dougie held big dreams for all of these children hoping that they would have good jobs and delayed successful lives. . The close knit family spent their evenings together, , dancing and singing. . But when Mona Lisa was just six years awed Dougy Center, , a heart attack and Pasta way. . Cindy and Moaner attended primary school together before enrolling at the same high. School. . . They were both happy go lucky popula conned and dwell locked. . Cindy was the nurturing top taking on babysitting Judy's and caring for her younger cousins when needed. . Minor roles. So . babysat her cousins and was sporty playing regularly Internet Bolton. . When Cindy was in her early teens she left high school and Moan followed suit at the end of nineteen ninety seven when she was sixteen years old. . Cindy. . who was now fifth Dane often travelled the short distance to the reserve to spend time with no nine her family. . The two goals occasionally got up to mischief together, , but they will well behaved and widely regarded as good kids. . Because there wasn't a lot to do in Burke, , which was a remote ap Bac town, , they would spend their time hanging out with friends visiting pox and swimming and fishing at the nearby darling. . River. . On Saturday December five, , nine, , hundred, , ninety, , seven, , Cindy. . Dimona spent the day together and accompanied one of their aunties to a nearby park. . By the time evening fell. . The two of them had decided to go into town. . Burke was a small town with a population of just three, , thousand, , four, , hundred paypal. . It was originally home to the Nimba people, , but when Watt settlers arrived in the area during the mid eighteen hundreds as traditional landholders would dispossessed. . Lock old indigenous people across. . Australia. . The Nimba paypal battled loss of land and culture were hit hod by European disease and experienced conflict with colonists. . By the late nineteen, , th century, , their population had dwindled. . While some continued to live a traditional lifestyle in the region surrounding book others found employment on nearby. . CADDO stations. .

Cindy Mona Lisa Melissa Smith Torres Strait Cousins paypal June Smith Burke L. Said Woods Dougie Burke Hospital Cinta South Wales Woods Shea nausea Nat King Edwards Loyd
"torres strait" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

07:42 min | 7 months ago

"torres strait" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. Aikido got You Butterfly Net Enhancement. Gravity Heaven and what she step. We're right next to the Bank of Torrens River on Ghani country in the heart of Adelaide plays. Don't fall in the torrents. Those of you that are not South. Straighten off a good ribbon polling today on the white out feeling very sorry. Try and start wipers water Do into the podcast of last week. Show if you've arrived at the dorms late because we're on camp here on science friction and it's going well. Everyone's getting on. This is the C. Syros Aboriginal Summa School for Excellence in technology and science and I'm living in with the nearly forty indigenous students from across the strategy here from Perth to the Torres Strait. They've come from far and wide and it's great to have you with us to on the Tesha Mitchell. You've caught an enormous something or dragonfly. It's huge thing. It was just innocent. Thought Maybe we could Kate Me Swan and then if we get any more or less just Alana line Patched candidate the University of Adelaide so working on parasitic wasps. My mission is to teach a bit more of an appreciation awareness of what's around which these kids have embraced wholeheartedly fishnet Connor Looking. It's camouflaged really. Yeah so as part of ABC's walking together. I'm bringing you powerful personal stories from three generations of indigenous. Australians today on racism in classrooms on triumphantly pushing past the low expectations others can have foyer and are knowing who you Would Hi this is a Science Camp Theresa? Let's get some of that good stuff at by the reba without insect. Nate's I love it because when I was little I used to do this in the backyard. I'll just for the fun of it. Like we did. Ones and lacked playful the bugs and stuff and Done things we went touches. The real big because that's scary. This is year eleven student Catherine. She's from Queensland. I've always had a interest in biodiversity because when I was lying about it in school I just found it fascinating the way things like adapted to the surroundings and how strong Some animals off. But do you think you might study in Uni? I definitely want medicine like the medicine. Science and even in science medicine side of it because on surf fascinated about the way humans like animals too but mostly humans alphabrain the actual workings about nerves and our nervous system and everything. I just find it so fascinating to fix people with your knowledge of that. It's just it's mind blowing to me. If you're ever original or Torres Strait islander you make up about three percent over strides population but just under two percent of all students enrolled at university are indigenous. That's growing by around half of a said over the last decade or side when it comes to Unical says in the natural and physical sciences. It and engineering. Less than one percent of students are indigenous for first year medicine. That's around two point. Four percent and of course completion rights alarm but this camp is about helping to change that. It's about road tasting university. Simon names macaroni. I'm an epidemiologist with. Csiro food and nutrition and things are about to get very real for the students right now. We're talking about their activities for the rest of the week and in particular their inquiry which is quite a lot of pressure for them. They'll need to spend a lot of their time thinking about the question that they want to investigate for the next few days and then they'll have to be ready to present it by next week. You asking them to do scientific experiment in two days scientific inquiry. That might be an experiment but it might be some other activities but yet in today's Yep they'll spend a lot of the allison a day. Doing it will be under a lot of pressure but based on previous years they do a great job so they've got to collect data definitely have to collect data they'd go to interpret data and they'll go to present it all of the precious situations for them so the pressure is on from pretty much all mice now not quite a couple of days. I think they'll feel it from tomorrow morning. Hitler research can be conceded. A A dirty word Saith West head is a young research scientist irregular mentor on these caves. He comes from Alaba Coal. And we're edgy. Country in these half miles research was something that was done on. Aboriginal people not with Aboriginal people and certainly not let by aboriginal people but as we get more aboriginal academics in high positions within the academy. This is where we can start to see a change of the culture so we need young people. All of the students present curious and inquisitive mind and from my perspective. That's all you need to be a scientist. The rest is just learning the specific language to answer the specific questions that you come up with and that's just a process. Anybody can do that. We really made more indigenous people in science. We've got so much work today. But we need more indigenous people everywhere. It's hard to access education for aboriginal people and are stolen papal. It's hard to walk to welds of wanting to preserve your own culture and sense of identity. Sometimes studying integrate main sacrificing culture identity and sometimes staying strong culture means sacrificing education. Perhaps no one knows these more than an ano education later. I made it a gathering by the five page of the Wheelchair Boarding House. Where all staying at Miami's Ruben and direct for education does P. Y. Yeah we didn't on almost for you know all the people it's our language and then another language as we had last week students from the remote traditional lands of the unindo people in South Australia. Come stay here. We'll check to go to high school in Adelaide. Now looking at you know dairies. To Wolves do peak will come together. You know the wisden world is really important that are now people need to get educated through sure school to get a job and money travel around you know speak language English and understand where there was an will come from and why why we see really important pulled in you know kids to university by his crowd. I need to build than me on the stand with coming from and you're not educated to vision. It's a big thing you know.

Torres Strait Adelaide ABC C. Syros Aboriginal Summa Scho Torrens River University of Adelaide Kate Me Swan Tesha Mitchell Csiro Connor Queensland Miami Wheelchair Boarding House Nate Alaba Coal research scientist Alana line Unical scientist
Racism at the school gate and education reclaimed (Part 2)

Science Friction

07:37 min | 7 months ago

Racism at the school gate and education reclaimed (Part 2)

"Aikido got You Butterfly Net Enhancement. Gravity Heaven and what she step. We're right next to the Bank of Torrens River on Ghani country in the heart of Adelaide plays. Don't fall in the torrents. Those of you that are not South. Straighten off a good ribbon polling today on the white out feeling very sorry. Try and start wipers water Do into the podcast of last week. Show if you've arrived at the dorms late because we're on camp here on science friction and it's going well. Everyone's getting on. This is the C. Syros Aboriginal Summa School for Excellence in technology and science and I'm living in with the nearly forty indigenous students from across the strategy here from Perth to the Torres Strait. They've come from far and wide and it's great to have you with us to on the Tesha Mitchell. You've caught an enormous something or dragonfly. It's huge thing. It was just innocent. Thought Maybe we could Kate Me Swan and then if we get any more or less just Alana line Patched candidate the University of Adelaide so working on parasitic wasps. My mission is to teach a bit more of an appreciation awareness of what's around which these kids have embraced wholeheartedly fishnet Connor Looking. It's camouflaged really. Yeah so as part of ABC's walking together. I'm bringing you powerful personal stories from three generations of indigenous. Australians today on racism in classrooms on triumphantly pushing past the low expectations others can have foyer and are knowing who you Would Hi this is a Science Camp Theresa? Let's get some of that good stuff at by the reba without insect. Nate's I love it because when I was little I used to do this in the backyard. I'll just for the fun of it. Like we did. Ones and lacked playful the bugs and stuff and Done things we went touches. The real big because that's scary. This is year eleven student Catherine. She's from Queensland. I've always had a interest in biodiversity because when I was lying about it in school I just found it fascinating the way things like adapted to the surroundings and how strong Some animals off. But do you think you might study in Uni? I definitely want medicine like the medicine. Science and even in science medicine side of it because on surf fascinated about the way humans like animals too but mostly humans alphabrain the actual workings about nerves and our nervous system and everything. I just find it so fascinating to fix people with your knowledge of that. It's just it's mind blowing to me. If you're ever original or Torres Strait islander you make up about three percent over strides population but just under two percent of all students enrolled at university are indigenous. That's growing by around half of a said over the last decade or side when it comes to Unical says in the natural and physical sciences. It and engineering. Less than one percent of students are indigenous for first year medicine. That's around two point. Four percent and of course completion rights alarm but this camp is about helping to change that. It's about road tasting university. Simon names macaroni. I'm an epidemiologist with. Csiro food and nutrition and things are about to get very real for the students right now. We're talking about their activities for the rest of the week and in particular their inquiry which is quite a lot of pressure for them. They'll need to spend a lot of their time thinking about the question that they want to investigate for the next few days and then they'll have to be ready to present it by next week. You asking them to do scientific experiment in two days scientific inquiry. That might be an experiment but it might be some other activities but yet in today's Yep they'll spend a lot of the allison a day. Doing it will be under a lot of pressure but based on previous years they do a great job so they've got to collect data definitely have to collect data they'd go to interpret data and they'll go to present it all of the precious situations for them so the pressure is on from pretty much all mice now not quite a couple of days. I think they'll feel it from tomorrow morning. Hitler research can be conceded. A A dirty word Saith West head is a young research scientist irregular mentor on these caves. He comes from Alaba Coal. And we're edgy. Country in these half miles research was something that was done on. Aboriginal people not with Aboriginal people and certainly not let by aboriginal people but as we get more aboriginal academics in high positions within the academy. This is where we can start to see a change of the culture so we need young people. All of the students present curious and inquisitive mind and from my perspective. That's all you need to be a scientist. The rest is just learning the specific language to answer the specific questions that you come up with and that's just a process. Anybody can do that. We really made more indigenous people in science. We've got so much work today. But we need more indigenous people everywhere. It's hard to access education for aboriginal people and are stolen papal. It's hard to walk to welds of wanting to preserve your own culture and sense of identity. Sometimes studying integrate main sacrificing culture identity and sometimes staying strong culture means sacrificing education. Perhaps no one knows these more than an ano education later. I made it a gathering by the five page of the Wheelchair Boarding House. Where all staying at Miami's Ruben and direct for education does P. Y. Yeah we didn't on almost for you know all the people it's our language and then another language as we had last week students from the remote traditional lands of the unindo people in South Australia. Come stay here. We'll check to go to high school in Adelaide. Now looking at you know dairies. To Wolves do peak will come together. You know the wisden world is really important that are now people need to get educated through sure school to get a job and money travel around you know speak language English and understand where there was an will come from and why why we see really important pulled in you know kids to university by his crowd. I need to build than me on the stand with coming from and you're not educated to vision. It's a big thing you know for

Torres Strait Adelaide C. Syros Aboriginal Summa Scho Torrens River University Of Adelaide Kate Me Swan Tesha Mitchell Csiro ABC Connor Queensland Wheelchair Boarding House Miami Nate Alaba Coal Research Scientist Alana Line Unical Scientist
"torres strait" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"torres strait" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"This is only what those two researchers could kind of glean from publicly available information but there's a big underground current going on here yeah and it's not like instagram is actually allowing the payments to happen ed elsewhere on yeah exactly what happens. Is You want to see us. Go human remains to say or whatever you D._M.. Someone that's been posting about their skull and you organize a payment bank transfer or or whatever your take off the platform. Maybe your post it through Royal Mail or whatever and I think it's fair to say the most people that do this. Although some people do it exclusively this is that fulltime job they see themselves as collectors of curiosities as opposed to traders or or profiteer said Oh say why schools because they want to buy more skulls and that that's really what they're doing so it's not exactly like this is a huge occupations kind of individual trinket collectors. I guess and you mentioned earlier that some of these skulls are going the thousands potentially even tens of thousands of pounds. Why are they say valuable? What kind of skulls are we talking out so we really are talking real human skulls but what inscribed collectors really like at the moment once a decorate decorated in certain tribal style so most of the goals their trade on instagram probably originated as medical specimen so what happened in the eighteenth and nine hundred thousand nine hundred early twentieth centuries British medical students kind of pressure people in India rather than having being a cremation ceremony they'd say can you just ship your bones to our our scientific institute so we can train our medical students or we can before tests on these phones so a lot of them afford to arrange originates sorry from colonial era but people are not van interesting just trading these schools in the unadorned state collectors light to do is perform their own modifications of these skull so this could be adding decorations carving them drilling into to the attaching Weber's anything like this really popular thing is to make skills look like those from the Asthma People Papua New Guinea so what they do they traditionally decorate the remains of ancestors say beeswax reg seeds feathers or ornamental jewelry but he's not just decorated skills one instagram trader we spoke to this piece showed us around their collection which included stuff like pelvises medical schools and tiny skeletons of human fetuses so it really stretches to the grizzly under the spectrum this all sounds rather ethically dubious first of all trading skulls that how seem to have been taken from people perhaps against their will and then you know raising the history in a sense by pretending they're from a different culture the something dubious about this surely yeah I mean even though as we kinda stay there's nothing explicit illegal going on? I think fairly agreed this feels pretty pretty wrong and really the the kind of people we spoke about this theologists and historians say this ties into this really worrying ongoing historic trend of western cultural appropriation so really even talking to the eighteenth seventeenth century. Is We have evidence that when humans humans in Western people I make contact with untouched indigenous people on contacted indigenous people that would push up the demand for scores and it actually 'cause kind of wars and it causes increased killings and tribal groups groups is basically we saw these as curiosities bring them back to our Victoria museums or whatever this is really nasty passive appropriation stuff from coaches taking them put in the museums and being like wow isn't that amazing but what's happening is the museum world where all of this really took place historic starting to come to terms with this dark history so in April nineteen Germany repatriate. If the remains of fifty three aboriginal Australians have been on display in museums around the world and the British Museum has been a bit more stubborn is refused most repatriation requests including appeal to return to scores from Torres Strait islanders in two thousand six it did return to Maori bone fragments to the New Zealand's National Museum Liam..

instagram Asthma People Papua Weber British Museum Royal Mail Torres Strait National Museum Liam Victoria New Zealand Germany India
Podcast gets conviction overturned

podnews

02:54 min | 1 year ago

Podcast gets conviction overturned

"So it's nine o'clock right now. So the supreme court announced a decision so they reversed they overturned his conviction a US true crime podcast in the dock has been used in court to help overturn a conviction. The US supreme court reversed the conviction of cut is flowers on Friday. His story was covered in, in the docks second season. The ven a non-partisan podcast recommendation newsletter around the twenty twenty US elections redesigning their newsletter this week to focus more on their deep. Dive topics time magazine is reporting on podcasting. Their headline big money is pouring into podcasting. Some podcasters love it, but others are freaked out an interesting snippet of news from the Acosta and Radio New Zealand online survey of podcasting in New Zealand released last week twenty five percent of podcast listeners, do not use apps at. Dole presumably, listening on web pages editor pass me recommended podcast websites should have a bloody big play button last year. If you're curious as to what the Kiwis are into we have a list for you in our episode notes, and our newsletter today, and our editor that's me. Again, is speaking of the power of audio an invite only conference tomorrow morning here in Auckland New Zealand. Did you date covers the efforts from some parts of the podcast tech scene to get attribution for kost advertising? I did this podcast at work, mediaweek, Australia appears to have launched a week people caused column called podcast week. It's discusses Acosta newscast Paul, costing arm of news, cope and Brexit cast eighty four percent of recently released podcasts or MP three says Castro the other sixteen percent of them were a sea is a sea, by the way, if you use it to produce Pocock spillway that Google hangouts on air is going away. Later this year in need. Find something else to use podcast veteran. Rob Greenlee has finally given up his windows phone. He's shifted to an iphone excess max in other news. Hell has just frozen over in the UK. The Sunday Times has a long piece from a self confessed podcast addict hidden behind that pay wall and the second most popular podcast app. Spotify has decided that it paid songwriters and publishers too much in two thousand eighteen and according to a music website would like their money back plays in Poku today, we linked to the real podcast, which launches today show, casting the voices of talented and empowering aboriginal, and Torres Strait island people and coming off the back of that second nomination in a row for best comedy or the Australian podcast awards. Welcome to patchwork, his back for season four

United States Acosta Editor Rob Greenlee Dole Radio New Zealand Auckland New Zealand Torres Strait Island New Zealand Spotify Poku UK Google Australia Pocock Castro Brexit Paul
"torres strait" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"torres strait" Discussed on PRI's The World

"She's also the lead lawyer on the case who were the Torres Strait islanders behind this complaint. What exactly are they alleging Klein's comes full of the most low-lying islands in in the tar strikes, and they are among some of the most vulnerable people and communities in the world to the impacts of climate change in particular Salem rise. And they are alleging that Australia through its failure to help them to adapt to climate change by building infrastructure another defense coastal defenses. But also by failing to mitigate close of great house emissions that Australia is breaking its human rights locations onto the International Covenant on civil and political rights. And the k- breaches alleged of the right to culture, so that Surat of minority peoples to enjoy the coach on the right to family in home life and also the run to life. So we've got the thoughts of one Torres Strait Islander his name is Kobe Tamou. And he described their dilemma this way. If we asked to move away or feel that it we call as shall over again because being calling is you get taken off you land. You stop using your language is still practicing culture. And that's what's going to happen. If we eventually a moved and become environmental climate change Fiji. So Sophie margin. Nocco? What exactly are the people of the Torres Strait islands saying is happening to their homeland that would force them to leave like how do those people? Describe the pressure facing. They are living with the impacts of climate change every day. The most obvious thing for them is the erosion of the island, but. It's not just the the sea level rise that they're experiencing. They're also saying impacts in the marine environment or coral bleaching, which is affecting Spacey's crayfish which isn't important economic industry in the tar strike. They're also saying fix of loss of Sega's, which affects totals dugong by gonna very important, ceremonial spiritual, cultural foods and symbols for Torres right artists. But another thing that we heard again, and again was the season seasonal patterns are also changing, and that that's impacting traditional ecological knowledge, it the plan to have a lot of things to point to to show how their lives of change. But what grounds are you filing this complaint on like, the Australian have legal obligations neglected when it comes to tackling climate change. Yet does start Australia signed up to these international human rights trading. So it has promised to guarantee these broads we are saying that Austrailia should be judged in relation to these allegations by reference to the Paris agreement on climate change in international Lauren climate change. And that means that not just Australia, but Allstate's should remain potties to the Paris agreement. A nice showed base aching to reduce emissions. So as to make the one point five degree temperature target of the Paris agreement 'cause that is really what's required to avoid dispossession of torch islanders, but also people from other low lying islands around the world. What fiction does the UN heaven? What sanctions could it impose if it ruled against Australia? They humanize committee contacts full Australia to comply with its with its Rollings. Unfortunately, it doesn't have the power to enforce its views and recommendations, however, a decision from the committee would still make new international law, and we hope bay influential on by Australia in all countries, but Sophie margin, knock with a nonprofit client earth of the lead. Lawyer in a case, alleging Australia has not done enough to tackle climate change. So thank you very much. Thank you a little lesson. Now in an indigenous language called MiG MMA spoken language, say by not more than ten thousand people in the whole world almost all of them in eastern, Canada, and a few in Maine the mic my word of the day is boon. Liscio? It's the first word in this song. So you'll probably guess what? It means police games Lebanese. See it lie. Jordan means black. That is sixteen year old Emma Stevens.

Torres Strait Austrailia Sophie margin Paris Surat Torres Kobe Tamou Klein International Covenant Salem UN Emma Stevens Spacey Sega Jordan Allstate Canada Rollings
Your Daily News Brief from the UN

UN News

04:12 min | 1 year ago

Your Daily News Brief from the UN

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations. Young people in the South Pacific are leading the fight against global warming UN secretary General Antonio Gutierrez said on Monday as he continued to spotlight. The issue ahead of the climate action summit that he's convened in September in New York speaking in New Zealand, two young Maoris and people of the Pacific islands mister Gutierrez to express his gratitude to them for highlighting the importance of limiting global temperature increase to no more than one point five degrees. Centigrade above preindustrial levels by the end of the century. The UN chief also recognized the important role played by generation zero a New Zealand based youth led organization that provides solutions to cutting carbon pollution through smarter transport and independence from fossil fuels mister Gutierrez insisted that three steps would make a major difference to addressing climate change a carbon tax as opposed to a salary Levy ending fossil fuel subsidies and stopping the construction of new coal plants by twenty twenty. In a related development. Indigenous Australians are to ask a you and human rights committee to investigate its claim that the government is doing too little to limit climate change. According to reports Torres Strait islanders in the north of the country say that global warming is a threat to this viral. Thanks to rising seas tidal surges and coastal erosion, they maintained that the lack of action by the authorities is a threat to the human rights as part of their claim. The group is calling for the UN panel, which is one of ten human rights committees that meet regularly throughout the year in Geneva too cool for Austrailia to reduce its carbon dioxide emissions. An attack by gunmen on H urchin Burkina Faso that left six people dead, reportedly, including a priest has prompted widespread condemnation from senior u n officials including secretary General Antonio, Gutierrez, according to media at the attack took place in the town of Dablo situated in a region that has seen a spike in violence in recent months. The church was burned to the ground along with other buildings include. Ding a health center. In a statement, mister Gutierrez urge all citizens of Burkina Faso to stand firmly with one another across communities and not to succumb to efforts to sow discord and breed further violence just last week three top UN humanitarian officials from bikini Vassar Mali and Niger warned of an unprecedented rise in sophisticated on tax in the Suhel, which are putting the future of a whole generation at stake. Violence is spreading in Mali and Niger as well as became a faster and risks spilling over into other west African countries this has led to a fivefold rise in the displacement of the local population in the last twelve months who have seen more than three hundred and thirty thousand people leave their homes in addition to one hundred thousand refugees, and finally Gaza is a place. That's collapsing socially amid growing and serious humanitarian needs that are making an escalation of conflict there more likely at any time. That's the message from unra the UN relief and Works Agency which settled Monday that the. En Clave is seeing increasing despair and depression among the two million people who live there seventy percent of whom are refugees speaking to journalists in Geneva, Mattias Schmil, director of unrepaired in Gaza said that twelve years of blockade by Israel had left people with little hope more than half of those of working age in Gaza unemployed with little perspective of a job. He said while eighty percent of refugees live below the poverty line and depend on food handouts for the first time in my year and a half there on a herd. Three people separately from each other talk to me about noticing increasing drug abuse, increasing suicide attempts and prostitution, and they put this down to the places. Collapsing. Socially in socio, economic terms and one can see it. And of course in a background against a background like that. Again, esscalation is possible at any time. The UN official added that the recent missile exchanges between Gaza and Israel had been more intense than during the. Fourteen conflict before warning that under urgently needs between forty and fifty million dollars to fund essential humanitarian work in the second half of the year. Daniel Johnson UN news.

Gaza Secretary General Antonio Guti Mister Gutierrez United Nations UN Burkina Faso New Zealand Mali Geneva Israel Mattias Schmil Niger South Pacific Torres Strait Pacific Islands New York
Brexit parallels with Australia

Correspondents Report

04:47 min | 1 year ago

Brexit parallels with Australia

"Reporter Bridget Brennan has just arrived in our London bureau has a new Europe correspondent, and she's arrived at a very historic time for the United Kingdom. The parliament will soon finally begin crucial debates on the bricks at deal negotiated by the British Prime Minister, Theresa may. Now, Bridget's new appointment means she's wrapped up time as a domestic correspondent covering aboriginal interest-rate islander communities as the first national indigenous affairs correspondent she traveled the country for nearly two us listening to the concerns of indigenous people also at a momentous time for the nation. And although the Brexit debate might seem a million miles away from reporting from remote communities, she's actually found some parallels. Now that I'm living in London waking the bay. This is often how my morning start and my evenings and increase the payments. My other nations remaining in their projects. Let's endless coverage of these mixed Brexit debate, which is split the United Kingdom, and tens of millions of its residents, the bricks stories often described as complex and maybe dense. But of course, it's vitally important for the world's fifth largest economy. And this is a palace struggle fueled. By the concerns of Brit sued felt that that bane forgotten model ladies in London in Europe. And I heard about that from an Hillyard who we mating payback this week a couple of hours north of London. Virginia's passing over person. So I that's what I see. I wasn't here in London for the build up to the Brexit referendum, which was such historic moment for the world, the total number of casting faith of leaf was eighty two thousand much of our reporting now is on the debate over the Deel to get Britain out of the European Union. But this week I went back to the brakes at heartland Bain, remembering my time reporting on the late up to another push for a referendum. Judicial owners invited dozens of original and tourist Rhode Island nations onto their land monitoring, Allah one day, welcome these in the restatement from the hot was a defining moment in indigenous affairs, it's been a push for a referendum to establish a first nations advisory body to really advise our politicians on policies to close the gap and boost prosperity for indigenous people, but it was swiftly rejected. You might remember by the government, and I can't help. But think of some of the Brexit voters who now feel that they've owed to leave. The European Union has been badly executed by British politicians as indigenous phase correspondent I had an intimate and illuminating window into our aboriginal and Torres Strait onto communities and this much to be proud of. Celebrate learn your culture as well. And what is significance of these side? It's such a beautiful area is ceremony site for your clan. Yeah. Was ceremony clan. So many plates, still so much despair. I've learned that really made me sad in that role. And they're still too many people who feel forgotten in central Australia in the community of law rambler. I spoke to families worried about the high levels of uranium in their water. Kids kids need fresh water. They need to have good water. It's just the basic human Roydon and north of Alice Springs in Senate race a residents with devastated of the quality of the housing and fighting for better living conditions three quarters of households are suing climbing, they waited use for emergency repays on the houses. They leaving. Good. We strong insight in Hyde. Got to go to talk to you, talk and fight for your right? And of course, the high rights of removals of aboriginal children from their families continues to be a source of pain, and a story that needs so much more reporting more than seventeen thousand Debra gentle interest rate island children living in out of home care, national disaster. I ran the nation, and I think every state as much same like different issues, but a sense the communities feel shut out of decision making really fueled this idea for a referendum for indigenous people on constitutional WikiLeaks in Australia hasn't had a referendum for more than twenty years and indigenous people who believe in this idea thing twenty nine thousand nine is the right time for such a vote seeing what's been a divisive in protracted debate on Brexit in Britain. It really have to hype a stride is next referendum ease more forcefully executed, everyday people who had disparate for change. This is Bridget Brennan Fakhr. Correspondents report.

London United Kingdom Europe Bridget European Union Australia Bridget Brennan Bridget Brennan Fakhr Brexit Britain Parliament Rhode Island Virginia Heartland Bain Prime Minister Debra Reporter Theresa Torres Strait Hillyard
"torres strait" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"torres strait" Discussed on Conversations

"What did they wait for the Hawaiian grass goods were made out of rope. And I can remember the vendor of as being strung up these this rope was strung up all the way, and daddy and his buddies would have come in. They were teasing all this. This rope and mccranie waistband if you can imagine. And so the ripe was ideal because had lovely weights. It would swing and the first show they did was was an Hawaiian night. Right. And I would have been about seven and myself and my cousin Dulcie who was one of the children who was born from the tropical tree below days. So anyway, she she, and I came on as attendance, and this enormous rose was carried on by these gorgeous, gorgeous tar strata island men flanked by the hula dancers. Right. So the rosewood let was load and Dulcie, and I were Daiva, and we pulled down the pedals and from it emerged my sister. Well, you can imagine the gas. Would come and see these. It sounds wonderful all the noca- people. All people the Torres Strait all into community would be on mixed race. There were Filipinos Chinese Malays were just just a title mix, but they became so popular the prejudices started to break down it ended up being literally a black white Brown and Brindle situation. It was fantastic. And then the they when I say that traveled I'm taking the show to Mossman for a night or two somewhere night that and if someone was sick guessing stood in for them. Well, this is it did you start performing just the beginning of your performing Hagen. Remember that for the ballet show, and they do the song mummy sangha? Oh by when twilight is defend this guy by oh. Oh, come out and wear. We've girl he was sick to a her costume which had to be taken in and dance on one of those forty four gallon drums that had been cut in half. I just I honestly I thought it was very great. Were you getting lessons music lessons as well from early? Yes, I started learning music when I was six started when I was six and from the day, I learned how to play Colonel bogey datum. But but but I was playing the marching that was the marching tube for the kids coming into school. My first performances would you play with your family at home play music to get all the time. I mean as is great party house, and they were always guitars and people singing and people down saying, and yes very much. So we'll you playing music at high school to is as playing music, they're very much doing my exams when I did my first diploma exam, this wonderful teacher system Ariella wishes, and they had to make me look older the first time ever wall make up and put my hair up. And my mother made corduroy navy blue suit with as little cream color and shoes it had heels. Honestly. I thought I was twenty seven I wasn't fifteen or sixteen..

Dulcie Torres Strait Ariella Brindle Mossman Daiva forty four gallon
"torres strait" Discussed on podnews

podnews

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"torres strait" Discussed on podnews

"In the latest poll news. Spotify has announced sound up bootcamp, Australia for aspiring podcasters who identifies aboriginal or Torres Strait islanders to take part in a four day residential podcasting workshop to be held in Sydney in November, signed up, bootcamp, US received over eighteen thousand applications. Earlier this year, mid roll has released the newest version of the company's listener survey, Eighty-one percent of minerals. Listeners, pay attention to podcast ads, seventy two percent of people who've listened to podcasts for more than four years have bought from podcast advertises as lots more data. Jacob Weisberg is leaving slate probably best known to podcast listeners as the co host of Trump cast. He's off to work with Malcolm plant wells, new audio venture kost podcasts. Now valuable for distribution on Spotify. The company has announced we understand that Acosta ads will benefit from pass through so acoss can still use dynamic. Ads in that content rather than Spotify cashing all of their audience. The apple podcast shot is screwed. How should we replace it as the title of an editorial from pod news is editor James Cridland. That's me highlighting some recent activity around manipulation of the chart, including a Twitter threat from Kevin Goldberg. The question I say is whether we can get a truly global replacement for the apple podcast chart. One less susceptible to being cheated one more Representative of the industry as a whole, a one that is just as acceptable for passion podcasters as for the backs podcast publishes

Spotify US Trump Torres Strait apple James Cridland Jacob Weisberg pod news Sydney Acosta Representative Twitter Kevin Goldberg Australia Malcolm editor seventy two percent Eighty-one percent four years four day
How should we replace the Apple Podcasts Chart?

podnews

01:47 min | 2 years ago

How should we replace the Apple Podcasts Chart?

"In the latest poll news. Spotify has announced sound up bootcamp, Australia for aspiring podcasters who identifies aboriginal or Torres Strait islanders to take part in a four day residential podcasting workshop to be held in Sydney in November, signed up, bootcamp, US received over eighteen thousand applications. Earlier this year, mid roll has released the newest version of the company's listener survey, Eighty-one percent of minerals. Listeners, pay attention to podcast ads, seventy two percent of people who've listened to podcasts for more than four years have bought from podcast advertises as lots more data. Jacob Weisberg is leaving slate probably best known to podcast listeners as the co host of Trump cast. He's off to work with Malcolm plant wells, new audio venture kost podcasts. Now valuable for distribution on Spotify. The company has announced we understand that Acosta ads will benefit from pass through so acoss can still use dynamic. Ads in that content rather than Spotify cashing all of their audience. The apple podcast shot is screwed. How should we replace it as the title of an editorial from pod news is editor James Cridland. That's me highlighting some recent activity around manipulation of the chart, including a Twitter threat from Kevin Goldberg. The question I say is whether we can get a truly global replacement for the apple podcast chart. One less susceptible to being cheated one more Representative of the industry as a whole, a one that is just as acceptable for passion podcasters as for the backs podcast publishes

Spotify United States Donald Trump Torres Strait James Cridland Apple Jacob Weisberg Sydney Kevin Goldberg Twitter Acosta Pod News Representative Australia Malcolm Editor Seventy Two Percent Eighty-One Percent Four Years Four Day
"torres strait" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"torres strait" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Quote unquote won a trade or you're looking at someone else's trade in saying, oh, they got the better end of that or or even what are they thinking they're, I mean, just from the perspective of someone who sometimes writes about these transactions even since I started doing this, it's just a lot less common that I can say this was bad or this was good. It's not that that's always the goal. I mean, you know, it's not a zero sum thing and both teams can get better, but they're definitely instances you can think of where it's just like even on day one. It's like, you know, what were they thinking in this team clearly got the best of it and that just seems rarer and rare? No doubt I don't. I think that when it comes down to these days, is that, yeah, that there's, I think I've already I already said it. It's just there's not that sort of team that that everyone wants to pick on out there. There may be one or two, but there aren't ten. Then? Yeah, you know. And I think it comes down to the fact that I might mention even mentioned this in that in that stat, cast podcast that that we've talked about, you know, just take the the aroldis Chapman, a labor Torres Strait, you know, people want to talk about maybe the cubs making making a bad move or whatever, but they knew exactly what they were giving up. And I think what you're seeing in these cases in in a lot of these types of trades is that a team understands what it's going to take. They have similar a similar sense of value in they know what players worth just based on past trades based on their internal analytics, and you essentially have has to convince that other team that they have to give up a player that maybe they don't wanna give up. You know, it's not like you're just robbing, hey, give us that player and they have no idea what they have in a lot of cases, they know exactly what they have take Michael Fulmer for example, you know, I don't think we expected. He was gonna win rookie of the year, but we, but sandy did spend that entire day, not. Trying not to get up, but we understood in our situation. We were on the cusp of making a playoff appearance for the first time in almost ten years, and we really needed a bat in the outfield and the Tigers knew where we were from that standpoint and they weren't going to budge. They didn't have a ton of leverage. I mean, we already talked about the fact that Cessna's was rental player and the Tigers weren't. They weren't going to get, they're going to get more than they would get back now, but they weren't going to get that much back if they held cesspit ass- but but they stuck to their guns and Volmer was the guy they wanted in..

Tigers cubs Torres Strait Cessna Michael Fulmer Volmer Chapman sandy ten years
"torres strait" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"torres strait" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Spreading Sports radio Mike's on I can't, believe this I again I said this earlier and stop using. The words rock bottom if, you're a met fan stop using the, words rock bottom I don't know. What they mean because they keep getting redefine I just heard, this during Bob's. Update and I have not heard. This earlier today for. Mickey Callaway, about Noah Syndergaard and the hand foot moved off and mouth. Disease hand foot mouth disease, that's so rare in an adult It is kind, of odd I'm. Glad he helps them kids but Contract that's kinda, rough Are you He might have to be to work at this. Point man Singing from pineapple express he's, laughing stock from crying man I'm glad he helps them kids but Contract God does what he. Did he win Windebank chronic car back in. A roommate That's, it down I'll cut them some slack but. I don't think that's what it was and I know there ain't a whole lot to laugh about and, you're gonna find something if you're Mickey but I'll tell you he cannot get out of his. Own way in front of a microphone I tell you what that is the most. Dangerous weapon that he has a microphone he's. Still wish, he, was, the pitching coach he's a. He he he's talking to? His wife what? Did we sign up is he married I assume so I know exactly what did we sign up for because you only get so many shots to be be be be the head guy anywhere in if he gets fired at the he wasted one John and Oxford Connecticut John what's going on Hey, guys thanks for, taking, the, call go ahead All right listen from my point of, view now you now correct me if I'm wrong. A single position player doesn't mean focus in? Baseball. What's. What's. The angels do with Mike, Trump, nothing, nothing okay now you tell. Me that What you do? Maybe. This. Is. Just tie in the sky Labor Torres Strait up I wouldn't I wouldn't do it what you. Just said Would want more About being the next coming off king com is BS. I don't know, first of all I don't know if. He's, King Kong Secondly I think he's going to be. An excellent player don't talk about this guy. Is. He's, untouchable yes now here's what I think with the Yankees get get rid. Of labor tortoise you give them to grab for the. Next five years they went. To World Series? Am I wrong probably right if they reassigned, for long term I think they win at. Least two? World so why why do people like the guy you're filling in from that guy is so untouchable because because the general manager of either the general manager is pretty, much indicated it everybody has indicated that every Yankee fan is. Afraid to trade the guy away for me If I have a chance to get to Graham at this stage in his career as dominant as he, is and as consistent as he has been and it means. Tortoise plus one other prospect I would do it Sheffield's. I would do it. That's what I'm saying that's. What I don't understand like. Nobody should be untouchable you talk. About a pitcher guy you put hill with Severino you can you can pretty much would that would, that would that lineup you, can Bank those two you go and see them twice in, the series come on man and folks. Don't get me wrong we understand how, great gleyber Torres is but we also understand how great Jacob degrom this side of. That they sleep on it's, unbelievable, cabinet bay. Ridge Kevin what's up Hey did someone say rock bottom got Mickey sounds like such. A doofus I can't even get, over it They. Find a new way every day Who I. I'm, a, I'm, a big. Mets fan I I'm I'm I'm. Getting I'm getting close to accepting that we. Need to get rid of the ground..

Mickey Callaway Yankees Noah Syndergaard Labor Torres Strait Mets Bob Baseball Mike Graham general manager gleyber Torres King Kong John Oxford Connecticut Severino Sheffield Jacob degrom Trump five years
"torres strait" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"torres strait" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Arriving at two nine for the first time we were we really motorized canoe which was manned by indigenous digits islands of the torres strait it a bit like film i mean that that part of it was a bit like film it was so classic desert island we would bouncing over these little wave lit sir in a blue blue sea ahead of us this island we were going to live on for a whole year ponte's waving white white signed sun blazing down but when we actually got a new crunch as the boat on on the beach there and then it was just practical stuff we had some things we had to unload we take just very minimal supplies that jolted suggested russia at the beginning seeds to grow that was very important emergency water bottles very important but really a very small amount of what you might call groceries to keep us going until those seeds spread a little bit of rice some support jobs and of course tepe thanks there were larger things like the tent that gerald had provided there was an axe a bucket i did take off my clothes pretty well strange way didn't see much point in keeping the morning we will we will hot and he did the same after a little while and rather impressed by that an old man like that would be so uninhibited jokes getting the tent up i well is that the groundsheet very slow when he goes we all put my head studies tiny he just went to sleep an i lay wait for ages just loving being there and thinking of doing morning beginning we had those minimal stores we go out we walk through the shallows to get to a good spot for fishing climb onto a big rock so that we got by the shocks that will come in pretty quickly as soon as we throughout bill when we went fishing we both got called cuts but mine healed he's didn't again this was from quite early on these cuts that he got in his knick's began to turn into hoes and they just got deeper and deeper these serious choral ulcers and the cost awful lot of pain i was expecting this leader this man this.

ponte russia gerald torres strait
"torres strait" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"torres strait" Discussed on Omnibus

"Well if you're game let's let's let's let's see you know i can't do it i don't have there i can do eddie vedder yeah it's just that you're ready but higher now now knocking on heaven's dow the moon elision has also been noted not just by torres strait cannibals and xl rose right who's maybe also a cannibal not sure children see it it's regardless of age respective age did you say irregardless irrespective i'm afraid that that totally obviates all of my mispronunciations i like the word irregardless actually i don't want to get into it you can reduce it by looking with just one i'm an ocular vision but it does not go away completely you can get rid of it completely by working in the mood upside down by bending down and looking between your legs hold on you can get rid of the completely looking at in photos by the way it's not in photos at all the idea or at least the the explanation that i've heard my my whole adult life is that as you look at the moon through the atmosphere at an angle at an increasingly low angle you're looking at it through a larger cross section of the atmosphere and that acts as a lens that creates a larger moon how do you answer this by saying that that's incredibly wrong and naive you're in good company you know who else thought that do some dummies like aristotle ptolemy yeah so this observation of this obvious.

eddie vedder torres strait aristotle ptolemy
"torres strait" Discussed on WREK

WREK

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"torres strait" Discussed on WREK

"Influential performances thinkers and artists kurigram come are in together sydney this to you discuss will feature queah a series performance of creative from first development people's workshops perspectives of people's quit and performers showtime acumen will be zi the forum black to discuss malik cabaret relevant issues held in and redfern challenges for first the traditional people's hat communities of sydney's aboriginal as speaker's and torres platform strait islander where community an international which showcases panel of influential ustralian thinkers indigenous and squeak artists performers come together with special to discuss international kwiet performance guests fist from year first people's perspectives and showtime pete will lau be the black malik cabaret you all held in redfern the traditional play heart of my sydney's aboriginal and torres strait islander community which showcases ustralian indigenous squeak performers aboriginal with special drag queen international nana guests fist mouskouri year will be hosting via veins this year bayne pete nana mouskouri lau it's about expressing myself play mike i love bayne on stage one and in our presenting myself as a drag queen aboriginal it gives drag me the queen ability to nana to mouskouri actually bay myself we'll be hosting to express the event myself this year you know i'm i'm still bayne myself nana mouskouri but up until that it's goes a bad expressing on i myself get into a professional pasana i love um on which stage is how much fun and it's not going in to stop here presenting all myself on now i'll be going as a drag for queen her for quite some it gives some me the time ability to to actually be myself to express myself you know i'm i'm still myself but up until that we'd guys on i'll get into a professional what pasana is unique um about which is being how much fun an aboriginal it's not going to dragqueen stop here all on ma now cost i'll james be going some for her for quite some i some like time to identify ma costumes three michael trump and and all side with my low pipe my my company and and.

sydney bayne james michael trump malik redfern torres platform strait torres strait
"torres strait" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"torres strait" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"I am blessed to lead a wonderful culturally diverse team and in the last twelve months we've lost five parents including my own father and most recently a former colleague who died at forty one from backhand sir we started having open and frank conversations about what we're experiencing we talked about the practical stuff the stuff one for page you for dealing with government agencies hospitals nursing homes advance k directives funeral directors and extended family members making decisions about coffins headstones headstone wording heads stein font size all swale sleep deprived we also discussed some of the issues triggered by various cultural backgrounds and we realized they can be simpson if he can differences and how we honor the passing of a loved one a great example of this is sorry business practice by aboriginal and torres strait islander papal during sorry business family members will take on specific roles and responsibilities protocol such as limiting the use of photographs saying the name of the deceased and holding a smoking ceremony are all the sign of respect and allow for a peaceful transition of the spirit faced customs can be a complete contrast today's we might practice in western coaches where would honor the memory of a loved one by talking about them and sharing photographs semi lesson from this last year is life would be a lot easier to live if we talked about test now why we're healthy for most of us we white and so we are to emotional too ill or too physically exhausted.

frank simpson torres strait twelve months
"torres strait" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"torres strait" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"I am blessed to lead a wonderful culturally diverse team and in the last twelve months we've lost five parents including my own father and most recently a former colleague who died at forty one from backhand sir we started having open and frank conversations about what we're experiencing we talked about the practical stuff the stuff one for page you for dealing with government agencies hospitals nursing homes advance k directives funeral directors and extended family members making decisions about coffins headstones headstone wording heads stein font size all swale sleep deprived we also discussed some of the issues triggered by various cultural backgrounds and we realized they can be simpson if he can differences and how we honor the passing of a loved one a great example of this is sorry business practice by aboriginal and torres strait islander papal during sorry business family members will take on specific roles and responsibilities protocol such as limiting the use of photographs saying the name of the deceased and holding a smoking ceremony are all the sign of respect and allow for a peaceful transition of the spirit faced customs can be a complete contrast today's we might practice in western coaches where would honor the memory of a loved one by talking about them and sharing photographs semi lesson from this last year is life would be a lot easier to live if we talked about test now why we're healthy for most of us we white and so we are to emotional too ill or too physically exhausted.

frank simpson torres strait twelve months
"torres strait" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"torres strait" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"But you even jam out some new thank you you can speak into the microphone okay i wasn't enough of that i so william agean sins postings and i've i've coin this term sold a self entitled and if you don't realize i'm right by now you haven't been listening to the show enough and maybe you grab a young person and get them next to the radio because the real problem with the legal marijuana with opioids with all this stuff is we're creating an entire generation that doesn't believe in anything how am i supposed to function in this world at johnson says wherever i go i see degeneracy that just the first line a race you don't think these kids i have never heard in my life after the obama administration more young people labeling themselves by race in two decades over two decades of teaching i've never heard as many kids talk about race label each other i this guy ruined these kids and i'm sorry the president as culpable in this eight years of race race race your this and we are going to feel the effects in bringing us trying to bring us together he torres strait apart is a country in i'm sorry he is culpable not frustrate about you read this kids note before he he had a list of things to do six twenty work patch up i can't even hardly read it seven two seven thirty prep seven thirty two eight walk eight o'clock die that's his todo list you tell me these kids don't believe anything anymore and then you've got this call last call and blesses heart i get where he's coming from there are people who need to use medical cannibus but if we just change the language on it canvassed suzy what are you doing in your room but that cannabis down put that cannabis down it's not going to alter you're like i didn't even to understand what the hell he was saying i think we're coming at is that you're talking about the illegal stuff he's talking about the legal stunner gap at the legal stuffed just as bad freezing at all leads to drug dependency psychological altering the hardest riyal the.

marijuana johnson obama administration president william agean torres strait cannabis two decades eight years
"torres strait" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"torres strait" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lot of the time modern odd in communities where traditions a still really strong i guess the thing that i've most researched use how many inhaler is were used as whether predict is just to give some background moon hailers aw transient optical phenomenon where we get a beautiful ring around the mirror a lot of the time it indicated rainy weather now but there is quite a lot of nuances sir michael have approached suits silica our case if they say that we're not going to get much rain because the merger leave does that make sense with what's physically happening in the system and surrey if you think about it if the moon's brought all there's less refraction happening sir that could potentially be less water vapour mia less water veba with going and have less rain and so this all of these specific details about what the moon blackwill two main highly looks lack name really interested in how these differences in what they're saying ultimately affects the weather all there is a morale when i made an aboriginal and torres strait on the person who is in in stan makes me sorry happy that's way after is as the human race but i'm i'm not really happy with how many they're all sir i was the first arab raton torture on onto person to graduate with the degrees that i graduated from on the side of his strongly up so as one of the person's one other indigenous bassem in australia who has the same degrees that are have i'm i'm not happy with alec i should be the thousands this is sorrow a part of our culture to be observers in to be innovators and i think it's sorted relevant for today to be in this field i would really like to see more vicinity omiss two and you can read more about colley's work at b c dot godal uk one hundred women we continue with the heritage theme but now move to the ancient english cathedral city of york home to the old gospels a wonderful exquisitely illustrated medieval volume put together by monks around nine hundred ninety a d within its covers off four of the new testament gospels oaths that the clergy's swore to the church and a letter from king commute but in its parchment pages there's another hidden history a rich record of medieval livestock in the guise of one thousand year old molecular remnants.

stan australia colley michael torres strait york king one thousand year