3 Burst results for "Torres Bi"

"torres bi" Discussed on The Semi-Social Life of a Black Introvert Podcast

The Semi-Social Life of a Black Introvert Podcast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"torres bi" Discussed on The Semi-Social Life of a Black Introvert Podcast

"Without, looking around and seeing that our anger is crushing ourselves. Hard. Forgive others. You. Know I look at the life to park in In Two podcasts so much external. Beef. He has so many external issues. If he wasn't warring with to East, coast or the Torres Bi Jian in Em- puff daddy those p. diddy right now what every is right now. He was fighting the system. WHO's. Fighting the government. System. He still a young black men in America. There's rage. This there's reasons to be upset. His anger? He's a young black man growing up in urban. America. The son of. A black, panther. The son of an organization of product of organization that was calling for black liberation yet was infiltrated by the government and really just destroyed internally. Because the government saw the power of black people uniting to not only fight the government. But also to build up the community. To Pot was part of the community that was supposed to be built up yet was destroyed. By. The government's hands he had external. Beef..

Torres Bi Jian America Pot
"torres bi" Discussed on The Cave of Time

The Cave of Time

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"torres bi" Discussed on The Cave of Time

"All right. Well, her his history is a prosecutor that was kind of a big a big story when she was running in the primaries for the Democratic nominee for president few ran it. We didn't mention that she ran against Joe Biden in the. Primary elections. So or history is a prosecutor. Is Unlike. Many Democrats and certainly not what the progressive left would like to see in a candidate. She pursued parents of children who were truant from school would put them in jail. So kids kids who were late or absent from school, she would legally pursue with the parents and potentially put them in prison. She resisted. Resisted an order to ease California's prison overcrowding by releasing prisoners, which is something that would be popular among a lot of the Democrat constituents opposed marijuana legalization in two, thousand, Ten and two, thousand twelve, but she since changed. Position on that since she famously told I believe it was hot ninety, seven and Charlemagne. The God that she was smoking weed in college while listening to to park and Torres Bi and snoop doggy Dogg Yup before they hit even became musical artists. Went to school. So I do look us up. She went to school law school in Nineteen eighty-nine and snoop dogg's for seldom nine, hundred, eighty three. So this is not her undergrad that you do for three or four years. This is her post Grad for one or two years, but she would have graduated by the time snoop Dogg came out A blatant lie it's blatant fucking lie. Well, it's possible. She misremembered. You know. Maybe it was when she was working those late nights she had actually. This was one year before the album came out one year before she got that job. So she was actually probably sleeping with Willie Brown smoking joins But this is this is one of many straws on the camel's back for Kamala Harris is the genuineness but going further on her history as a prosecutor, she aggressively prosecuted a lot of misdemeanors she didn't support the banning of the death penalty she she basically supported the death penalty. Her reason for all this that she says now is that she was working to change the system from inside and that she couldn't always go with her instincts. Her client was the state of California and that's what she was trying to serve. So it wasn't her acting as herself. It was more just her acting as a lawyer on behalf of the State of There's also like she was again statewide body camera Weyermann's. She refused to respond for victims that we're abused. By Catholic clergy. She supported bills that support seizing assets for forfeiture. She fought against releasing nonviolent offenders so that they could be used to find wildfires in California. Did, you have other stuff wanted to go through or am I just step on Tokyo history as a prosecutor not I'd gone through my. Big Balloons. So she she got in trouble for like fighting, allow false testimony in which which put somebody in jail for a double homicide when they were actually innocent and then DNA, evidence came out the. Thinks she was like a big proponent of like three strike law that. Would somebody in jail for the rest of their life even when they were had like to police witnesses say they were free And then most recently I think she got in trouble for..

prosecutor Kamala Harris snoop Dogg California Joe Biden Torres Bi president Charlemagne Willie Brown Tokyo marijuana
"torres bi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:13 min | 3 years ago

"torres bi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome back to all of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart. Thank you for. Joining me this hour say Adams personally, witnessed some of the biggest cultural transformation New York City in the country's music industry has ever seen from his beginnings, creating graffiti art becoming the creative director of the legendary label def jam recordings to his current work. Say Adams has been adding to the cultural zeitgeist for decades, he created album covers logos and artwork for hip. Hop. Royalty. Jay Z, Rondi MC L, cool, j Torres BI G and has a new product project. Adams's partnered with Pabst blue ribbon. Yes. The beer. No. It's not a commercial here to support the national mural day on may seven say Adams, welcome to all of it. Thank you having me. So before we even start this interview, you told my producer something that blew my mind def jam record used to be in this building our building, we're WNYC's. Yeah. Almost ten years. Yeah. And back then won a lot of places to eat lunch. This was this wasn't what it was now apparently on this mysterious eleventh floor. Nobody none of us know about. Wow. That's so funny. So what does it feel like the re back here? You know? It hasn't been that long because I was loosely involved in helping to put together the Jerome L Greene space when my friend Indira was here, and she's been gone for quite a few years now. But I was in the building quite a bit back then. This is interesting. Okay. So whenever producers just text me that says, it's one of the reasons that the raiders station is here because it was so soundproof. So well, yeah. Yeah. And it it was just great to see new energy in this area because we were making magic upstairs, but nobody knew anything about what was going on in lower Manhattan at this point. So there was nothing really happening around here. So your native New Yorker. Yes, I am from Queens New York. So what was the street art scene? Like when you were growing up. Well for starters. It was. Very rough. And this is the the late seventies that we're talking about early eighties. It was rough. I mean, you up was a much much rougher place back then, and you know, I I lived in queens, so talking about the suburbs for the most part, but I would venture into Manhattan Times Square and then later by the early eighties hanging out in the west village, the east village, the lower side like places like that downtown Manhattan, and that was a time when those areas weren't condos. It was really were artists and musicians were hanging out and doing thing and a lot of what was going on was a a lot of creative people trying to find their voice and trying to take what they were doing to the next level. And I was one of those people. A teenager just really trying to figure out how to take my art to a place that is going to sustain me as an adult, and it was very difficult because there were no blueprints to follow is interesting. You said that it was a rough. And of course, nobody wants to go back to times when you had to put your jewelry inside your shirt and hold your bag goes. But there was something about the sort of toughness and roughness that was a part of the sort of artistic tradition of that time for you. What did that sort of grittiness give you as an artist? Well, I was hungry and everybody around me was hungry. Whether you are a punk band or hip, hop back starting out or break, dancer or an aspiring DJ oh rapper. Whatever was everybody was hustling to try to make it. And I think growing up in New York just gives you a tough skin. And although it was, you know, very simple time. There was so much great creativity that came out of it. And I knew that what I was doing was eventually going to bear fruit. Because you know, I could measurement my talent by, you know, my friends in the folks around me, so I always knew that I had something special. It was just trying to figure out how to connect with somebody that could help me get to that next place. My guess is artists say Adams when was your earliest memory say of when you thought to yourself, you know, I can do this. I'm going to be able to make it as an artist. I don't know if I was ever really that confidence. No like say that out loud. But I think when started designing at def jam and I saw the record starting to sell and I thought to myself is long. This selling records. There's a place for me to design album covers and maybe I can own living. I was never overly confident because def jam back. Then was what I imagine. It was like being at Motown. It was this amazing incubated of talent. But it was also hectic and chaotic and there are no rules about how you did things. And nobody was in charge. It was just a bunch of people sort of scrambling to make something happen. And the only thing that, you know, was evidence that we would doing something, right? Was when you would see the success of the recording artists on the charts. How did you wind up at def jam in the first place is in the very beginning. Well, I knew Russell Simmons. When he was a talent manager he had a company call Ross productions and rush was lie. Like a finishing school everybody that he managed was trying to get their careers started. Whether they were an R and B singer or Curtis blow of run DMC, Houdini beastie, boys. Public enemy rush managed everybody. And they also manage people like Eric and rock him big daddy Kane's. That's a sonic so many artists that went onto, you know, bigger things they just manage everyone. So I was there designing t shirts and flyers and posters. And then later giant tour backdrops that everybody at the label. So when you became its creative director of def jam what did you what were you going for? Well, the first thing that I sort of always understood was that. I wanted to take hip hop art to another place I wanted to create something that was going to have lasting value because I. I thought that the music was doing that. So I wanted to make sure that what we would doing was respected from visual perspective and back, then it was very difficult because nobody really believed in me, and they didn't believe in the music. The only thing that sort of saved us were the fans, and like I said when the record started to chart, and then the label started to make money, and then that was when people started to pay attention to the work. I was doing because all of a sudden we were in demand. It's interesting. I think for maybe somebody who's twenty five thirty years old to think that hip hop wasn't welcomed that people really fought hip, hop and its rise describe what that was like as you said that people didn't believe in it. Well for us we had nothing to go back to so everything look like you would Vance. But it was very. Difficult because def jam was distributed by CBS records and later Columbia records, and they were a huge label. They had big stars everybody recorded for them, you know, Barbra Streisand Springsteen, you know, Frank Sinatra at one point, you know, so many amazing artists, and obviously laid a Mariah Carey and so on and so forth. But when LL cool J comes along that's something that they didn't understand because they didn't understand it. They might have been distributing it. But they didn't welcome me when I came up town. So I came from this building up to fifty second street trying to be a graphic designer, and I did not get a lot of support, and you know, without going into too much detail. It anybody else would have you know, ran home crying. But because I came from a place where you couldn't, you know, be defeated. Like there was nothing to go back to a new couldn't go back downtown and say, oh, they wouldn't let me do something you had to be forceful and def jam was one of those places that was like, no excuses. They throw you in the water in the swim or you would sink. And because I had a, you know, like, I grew up in the streets of New York. And it was a tougher time. I knew that dealing with corporate types was not going to be something that I could not get past. And so just fought to make sure my voice was heard my guest is say Adams. He was the creative director of def Jam's artisan his own right. Some of your eye conic album covers the roots things fall apart beastie, boys. Hello, nasty marriage. A blige's. What's the four one one? You design logos. Do you have anything that you think is a real favorite? Or something that you really feel particularly proud of any Amort new. No after all these years. I think about the body of work. And I and I heard Spike Lee say this, you just sort of put your head down, and you make work and very recently. I've started to take stock of just how much I've done and how fortunate I've been to work with so many amazing recording artists and now corporate brands, I just think that all of it is important because. People that look like me won't getting those kind of opportunities in the seventies and the eighties certainly people that came from a graffiti and street art background. So I'm proud of all of it. And I think about you know, nod to the show, thanks. We will be isolating later. It's it's the journey. And that's the thing that you learn after you get to a certain age, and you look at a body of work, and you think wow. There might have been great, you know, stops along the way. But it's the whole thing that you know, you sort of step back, and you feel proud of not to say that I'm done by any means. But I appreciate the whole journey. You were a neighbor of Jay Z's. You kinda grew up around the same time and you worked on hard knock life. I wanted to can you express a little bit? How important relationships were at that time. Well in the music business. Trust is a big thing, especially when you're dealing with artists of color. They're trying to express themselves and for me being a creative. It's my job to sort of make them comfortable because I'm trying to take them to this visual place that in some cases, they've never gone to before. And so with Jay z. He was always very curious. But my idea was okay. I'm going to try to create something that hadn't been done before. And I just had such great energy. We would have conversations about certain things as released design whether it was a logo or a jacket that he was gonna wear or certain kind of car, and they would just be this exchange. And if he didn't like something he would tell you, but he wasn't a yeller or screamer, and you can see how far that's carried him. I think a lot of that is to his credit that he would listen, and we would discuss things, and he gave me a lot of space to do what I do which is great because I can certainly recall times when other artists if they didn't understand something you would just immediately get pushed back as opposed to them trusting you because you've been doing it for a while. My guest is say Adams, we're gonna take a quick break..

Adams Jay Z WNYC director New York Manhattan recording artists producer Alison Stewart Queens New York raiders Pabst blue Russell Simmons Jerome L Greene space Spike Lee queens Manhattan Times Square Indira