Audioburst Search

36 Burst results for "Tori"

Fresh update on "tori" discussed on Prime Minister's Questions

Prime Minister's Questions

00:36 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "tori" discussed on Prime Minister's Questions

"And sympathy in the whole house will be with Alan Alan, his family. I would liketo join Tommy on DH. Shay and Kelly on my only friend in thanking hospital are all hospices for the incredible weapons that they did. Lets you sent to Scotland to visit the leader of the SNP in black. Thank you. Mr speaking. I'm sure you the prime minister and indeed the whole house for want to join me in mark in seven. It's her Memorial Day, which takes place this Saturday. And for the first time happening online, which should never be that they forget the terrible Genocide to place 25 years ago. It can I associate myself with the concerns about Tori Hospital parking charges. The SNP government abolished in Scotland 12 years ago, and I would urge the Tory government to do the same, so any chance workers and patience will not be penalized. Mr Speaker, 3.8 million people across the United Kingdom could face unemployment when the funnel scheme and the job retention scheme has been a lifeline to millions. Yet we could see progress unravel has the ski man's millions of people could potentially find themselves out of work struggling to peoples and to put food on the table? Will the prime minister commit today to extending the frontal scheme? People must not lose their jobs because the Tories refused to act. Well, Mrs Speak, I I I think most people looking at what has happened in the UK over the last three or four months around the world have Bean overwhelmingly impressed by the way that we azad government to put our arms around people, £164 billion invested in in jobs. And.

Prime Minister Alan Alan Scotland SNP United Kingdom Tori Hospital Mr Speaker Tommy Mrs Speak Shay Bean Kelly
Turkey reconverts Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into a mosque

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:08 min | 2 d ago

Turkey reconverts Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into a mosque

"Eight acres court is expected to announce today that the conversion of Istanbul's world-famous argue severe into a museum almost ninety years ago, it was awful. The decision would pave the way for the building's Restoration Mosque and we'll represent a victory of sorts for president recipe type one, but it may cause anger elsewhere, including in the Kremlin and UNESCO HQ, joining us on the line now is Hannah Lucinda Smith is stumble correspondent of the. Times Hello Hannigan off new thanks for being with US I. Guess this was what we had perhaps predicted nevertheless. Oh, that's not gonNA. Stop a number of people being pretty disappointed with the outcome. Yeah well. Absolutely I mean affair is such a symbol, not just in Turkey or not just in the region in the whole world at points it was built in the sixth century. It was the biggest cathedral in the world. It was the seat of eastern Crescenzi for more than a Millennium and then it's really been kind of the symbol of the struggle for the soul of Istanbul. I guess when the autumns took control of the city in fourteen, fifty three, they converse into a mosque, and then when Kemal Ataturk the first president of the secular republic. Took over the country he then. Signed an order basically deconsecrated intending into museum in nine, hundred thirty four, and that's the status it. It's hard since then, but it is such a powerful symbol for Muslims. Christians and also for the Turks who are really bondage this idea of a second second they sit. It's kind of one of the ultimate symbols of their secular country. Just when you're out, and about as it sounds like you are indeed right now, is this one of these things where people are talking about it, and it's upsetting people, or is it one of these strange things? Actually seems to be much more stark much more controversial through the prism of I'm in London or etc. People looking on from Moscow which maybe we'll come to in a in a minute it does it excise people out in about. March she stood in the courtyard. Safia right now. It is a few Tori style. It's actually quite quite mean that's mostly because of the current virus pandemic coming normally at this time of year that would be crowded with tourists actually took his most visited tourist attraction, but I think the interesting thing. Is that inside Turkey this debate? That's not new. It's been going on for a couple. Couple, of decades, it's a question that sort of comes around quite six. In fact, you know I've I've been in Turkey for seven years. Now is the ton. This is come up in my time here and so there is this of feeling of fatigue I you know this is just the same policy policy again but I think it's undeniable, the for certain positive the Paul is. Very, much behind prison on the move is part of the society would be seen as. A big victory pick symbolic victory, but I think in terms of the kind of. The opposition to it. A lot of that comes from outside country. As you mentioned that the star obviously the Greek government's in holy. They still see Istanbul Constantinople. This is the as the center of Greek Orthodox also the Russian Orthodox Patriarch earlier this week, voiced his objection and of course UNESCO Ted. This is a world heritage sites listed by UNESCO. That's partly because of the The mosaics that were uncovered once this was ten years. In the nineteen th that is. On. The big questions is of course. If this is ten back into a mosque, what will happen to those mosaics depict Christ pizza version married picked him of the apostles. You know seen in, Islam, FIT Is is not allowed inside mosques. So this is the kind of places where the real objections are coming from, but it's quite interesting I'm you know it's? Really doesn't feel like much. Is happening at the moment here high? Sophie, let's see. We got the announcement in June a couple of hours. That's what we're expecting so. Possibly something will happen after that, but it's kind of. Yeah. It's still the same very peaceful, very unique. Is indeed sort of an eerie call just on some of those other international stakeholders. And he'll be watching on. We mentioned already you mentioned the Russian. Orthodox Patriarch of course. What about the relationship mean does this tell us anything about the relationship between assemble in Moscow more broadly, maybe more politically because there's various other sort of proxy disagreements agreements. There's other places Libya that seemed to sort of muddy. The waters is this. Does this need to be to be viewed in that context in your view? Show, I think the relationship with Russia is actually the one thing that might give president or pause for thought on this now what we see as I said before the Greeks are. Very opposed to this the US. State Department might POMPEII stems as well, but you know that's kind of old hat fred when he doesn't really care about. Stoking rows with Greece and with the US. Because he's got huge amounts of disagreements with those countries anyway, but when it comes to Russia, it's been quite an interesting situation in Russia. Turkey for the past five years on one level as you say in Libya also in Syria they're. Backing opposing forces, but at the same time, the personal relationship between two President Putin has gone incredibly close, and in other ways. Russia has been backing sick. I guess trying to woo. Tick to a certain extent away from its more traditional allies in the West, so we've seen for example side of the one hundred defense system. From Russia Turkey we've seen many many pets meetings in about trade and defense mutual security between. One impeach him now. The question is if this. Decision goes ahead and the conversion goes ahead then how much opposition will come from from the Kremlin? Clearly, the Patriarch Russian Orthodox Patriarch. Expressed his opposition. That's to be expected, but we also know that religion plays a big part in Russian. Politics today, so would it. Would it carry on further? The featured does it were? Would President Putin be the next person's kind of expresses displeasure, and how would that affect the relationship Tweeden's? I stopped really great to speak to you and thanks for reporting for us right from the scene of this Hannah Lucinda Smith In estan standard joining us on the briefing Monaco Twenty Four.

Turkey Russia President Trump President Putin Istanbul Hannah Lucinda Smith United States Patriarch Russian Orthodox Pat Russian Orthodox Patriarch Moscow Libya Restoration Mosque Kemal Ataturk Unesco Hq Crescenzi Istanbul Constantinople London Tori State Department Paul
The Voice of Healthcare

The Voice of Healthcare

03:20 min | 4 d ago

The Voice of Healthcare

"It's good to have you with us. We have a show that I've been really Jones in four. I somehow got lucky. and was reading online about really creative folks in the space of Covid. And came across. A group of people that created a skill called the hand wash. And I thought to myself. What is this and it was artists? It was creatives. It was musicians singing in a simple way in order for us to handle a hygienic me during the time of pandemic, which is handwashing something that believe it or not, a lot of people don't do very well at all so I've got three special guest today. Lane Harris Daniel Bremmer and Lucy Cullen Tori. They're gonNA. Talk to us about how they got started why they started it and where it's headed from here so me. Open it up to questions here. I'll start with lean and Daniel. Tell us about how this guy going where you decided to build it. And how did you end up? Incorporating musicians into this tool set that we could argue as a public health benefit more than a musical entertainment sort of enrichment benefit. Well, this this actually start is a shower thought. I had recently seen video that that demonstrated how detergent molecules physically break up the virus behind covid nineteen, and it made it really visceral seeing it seeing it like that and made me understand the whole twenty second. Recommendation from the CDC. Like okay. We all know we're supposed to wash. Our hands are washing your hands long probably should, but oh, this is probably like a speed limit where it's exaggerated in some some give room, but when I watched this I was like Oh. Wow, this is this is I see how this is important, and and as you know, take a shower with thinking about I'm like it's really hard to make people sit there and do something boring for twenty seconds when it got like twelve other things in their mind, especially during this time And what can we do about that? And I had heard about Of course, the alphabet saw on the thing. I heard people talking about like their favor taking their choruses, favorite pop songs and I was thinking what would be something that would be a little bit easier to do. Consistently and I thought well. We have all these the smart speakers in our homes and a lot of us have our bathrooms. Maybe there's something we can do there and that's what I started to think lane. The the I thought. I had in my mind before. I reached out to lane was like maybe this? This'll be like an internet variety show. It's a different. You know different things every time you open it like a magic box and we'll be like. Oh, it'll be a joke one day, a weird fact or a story or a song. And so yeah I, give a call the pretty much straight shower to see if he was interested. And we immediately started batting around ideas and He felt pretty strongly that it should be one thing and be consistent to provide the user with with Only one thing to to to expect, and we very quickly decided that it should be music and he knew Lucy and let him go to his side of it, but I think it was about a day and a half that we had a demo.

Lucy Cullen Tori Daniel Bremmer Covid Jones CDC
Will the Economic Recovery Slow With New Coronavirus Cases?

WSJ What's News

05:47 min | 2 weeks ago

Will the Economic Recovery Slow With New Coronavirus Cases?

"The latest economic data shows the US on target for a gradual recovery, but a spike in corona virus cases in several states is now making that pace more uncertain. The lack of clear direction led to a choppy day on wall. Street, but all three major indexes ended the day up more than one percent joining me now to talk more about the economic picture. Picture is Wall Street? Journal reporter, Harriet Tori High Harriet high so Harriet. Let's start with weekly jobless claims still very high, but they've been holding pretty steady on the other hand arise rise in Corona. Virus cases could now threaten that as the economy is beginning to reopen. What is your sense of what's happening here? Yes, we saw another week of these claims. Claims at about one point five million. This is you know slightly below last week, but more or less unchanged. It's still phenomenally high though when you think that before the coronavirus pandemic started kms kind of the two hundred thousand poet so now you know they've just exploded compared to that, and although they're not as bad as they were at the beginning of the. The public, there's still a lot of people who are losing their jobs every week and implying for unemployment. So this is just another reminder that the recovery could take them all on. It comes on a day was saying this very worrying increase in coronavirus infections and sentenced states, and just is a fresh reminder that things are not getting back to normal fast. What are we seeing among the states where infections are picking up? There's a fear now that restrictions may be imposed or reimposed in some cases, and as you say, that could further slow the economic recovery. Yes, so we've seen a few things happened in the past couple of days for one there are now quarantines in some states in the northeast, or if you want to travel from from states like in the southwest, and go their vacation, or whatever you have to quarantine two weeks, and that is that was kind of a big. A blow to these reopening efforts, and we've also seen some other things going on in Texas differences, some elective surgeries have been canceled and things like that. These are all just signs of. Hunkering down the hospitals you know reading to focus on on the more and more people come into the ICU because the very very sick with coronavirus infections, and this is just a sign that you know that people are still suffering from this. So this is spreading around and that re-opening efforts might have to to cool off a little because you know. People need to stay home to stay safe in many places. We talk a lot about small businesses and their worries about being able to reopen, and how long they may be able to stay closed at the same time. We're also seeing big companies like macy's which just announced his laying off thirty nine hundred workers, so even larger companies aren't immune to this. Yeah, and for macy's. This is actually the second round of layoffs. They had a layoff of two thousand in February. So this is of the of the retail story that was saying I. Mean we did see retail sales. Increase Law may bounce back off the very severe drops in March and April, so they seem to be improving kind of on this across the board level, but. But one thing that is going on that a lot of analysts talk about. Is that the retail sector? So one thing the pandemic has done is it's really sped up this shift this pivot to online so businesses that have very significant online presences. You know they might be physical brick and mortar stores like say for Instance Walmart, we think of Walmart is like a supermarket and. And in town, but they've made a big effort to pivot to online, and then, of course you have companies like Amazon, and so on so some companies are weathering this pandemic well because they they were kind of faster than others to shift to this to online, and they're able to serve customers very quickly and demand in online fashion because you know with the current ivars pandemic. Pandemic, a lot of people are too scared to go out to the store, or they don't want to be in shopping malls, and so on because of the risk of infection, other companies have really really struggled with that, and that's I. Think we're seeing that reflected in the in the employment situation, you know we have some retailers that cutting jobs and other retailers that hiring. And, what about the consumer spending picture I mean we know this makes up a huge portion of the economy, and if we're talking about reimposing restrictions or further lockdowns. That's going to suffer. We'll see consumer spending data for May Friday morning and consumes Benny's expected to increase a lot eight point seven percent, but this would. This is coming on the back of a thirteen point. Six percent decline the prior month, so it Stephanie Climbing out of a big hole, and it's not back to to where it was pre pandemic. The one thing that is really helping consumer. Consumer, spending the moment is the supplemental on insurance benefits and unemployment insurance benefit, so this is six hundred dollars a week that people are getting alongside regular unemployment benefits. That is hugely beneficial. Some you know some people have actually seen the personal income increase based on this benefits, but they not expected to last beyond July, and that that will be a real crunch point you know whether consumers, particularly the low income spectrum are going to be able to carry on spending. Is They have if unemployment benefits a cuts and the labor market pitcher does not improve. Harriet something you've mentioned even with the consumer spending data. Coming out tomorrow is that all the data were talking about now? We are seeing of course on a lag, and it's not even giving us necessarily the picture of what we've been seeing. Unfold over the past couple of days or a week right? Yes, so this is this is kind of an issue with some of the gunman data we it does come with a quite long lag so today for instance we saw GDP data the final GDP data, but that was for the first quarter which ended in. In March, which was now you know seems like a very long time ago, and we also know now that the economy officially entered a recession in February, so we won't get data for the second quarter for about another month we can look at private data real time data that comes from companies, but it's not quite the same as government data that is very thirty sort of tested and so

Pandemic Harriet Tori High Harriet Walmart Corona United States Harriet Macy Journal Texas Reporter Amazon Benny
"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

03:09 min | 2 weeks ago

"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"And they WANNA move. Because it's so dark here. That's okay. We're we are wrapping up. I appreciate you, ladies. It's so cute because it did just keep getting darker and you just kept getting closer and closer screen. That it's okay, though because it's a podcast, so we don't need to use this footage. No. Black. Listen, listening, you can open. The way you know seven PM clanging pots. That no I always. Jason's brother showed us wants because I love that so much, but we're literally in the BURBS and nobody does it out here right well. We have a lot of banging broken sweep schools by the way. was really shows your heart. You know you're just really into it. That's sweet. We'll. Why don't you tell everybody where they can find your podcast instagram? Anything that you want to promote I. Guess Right now. Yes, so me and my mom have a podcast. Obviously Bruno's. It's called, got it for my Mama and it's on all podcast platforms spotify. I turned, and we also just launched it on Youtube, so we have full episodes now on my youtube channel so now I can you hear us, but you can see us like after the last episode we have like a full blown mother daughter fight Oh. My Gosh, I'm going to watch right after this. It was that deal. That's on I'm going to watch youtube. Channel Tori, Pigskin T O R I. P I s K. I n. you can follow me on there as well on my instagram. We have podcast. Instagram called got it from my Mama podcast. Mom, do you WANNA say your instagram. Wine is new Piskun. Oh. You of instagram now I'm going to follow you. got. A lot of the dog. It's all about. Even the grandchild. It's the door you. Well, I can't wait to this. I'm so glad that I you guys even came into my world, somehow because it was such a pleasure talking to you and Ice Oh. Sweet your. Thank, you. I appreciate I. Appreciate you saying that and I can't wait to chat more because I feel like you as a special to what? So much fun and listen stay safe. Yes, take a breath. I hope you've finished your construction. Thank you, yes, Tomorrow! It should be all done by this week, so you know that means three more weeks. And you just you just like a breath of fresh air. Oh Ho. Thank you so much and I can't wait to just chat with. You guys again once this. Season of the Bachelorette starts then. We're doing recaps together. Absolutely okay well. Thank you and stay safe to you both as well. I think you I by I'm Kaitlyn Bristowe. Your session is now ending. Thanks for listening to off divine. Therapy, tune into here new MINNIE's codes. Every Thursday and checkout new full in episode every Tuesday exclusively on podcast one dot com, the podcast, one APP and subscribe on Apple podcasts. TV!.

Instagram Youtube Ice Oh Piskun Kaitlyn Bristowe spotify Jason Bruno Tori Apple
"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

05:42 min | 2 weeks ago

"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"C. A., R. I. Macari the selling up business name hanging sign love. In a pandemic. I want to know you feel I think you can because. Look at the couple from love is blind. Okay? They were in pods and they didn't get to touch and they got engaged within a week. Of Filming and they're still married like a year and a half later point, and and so dating in quarantine is kind of like dating on love is blind where you're like in pods and like just doing online, but you still get to know the person. In fact, you could almost argue that you could find more sincere love in pandemic because. You are probably having more conversations and getting to know each other better before taking it to the physical level. Would agree with that. Yeah, yeah, I so that that was another good show. It was a good show. I got to interview Jessica from it for my podcast of Lines Yeah Jonathan. Yes, and she was so good about it because you know, she had a rough edit or whatever you wanna call it, and so I kind of talked to her about that, and she just said like it was so hard for her to watch back as she was like I definitely did drink too much. I was wasted. I was in this like intense situation. That I've never been part of. It's like a social experiment and I was just kind of like. She's like almost like really anxious set I was drinking, and then they showed my drunk parts, and yeah, it was. A real. One. Kenny Kenny Barnes on our podcast. Remember him. He was like the tall. Blonde Guy Yeah Oh and he was. was like the life coach and she was. Like the like the least exciting couple. Dramatic. They were the least dramatic. Yes, yeah, but he was saying like I'm sure that's how you feel like the Bachelor Bachelorette. It's like you're when you're under these circumstances. You say the word love, but it's like in that moment. was like trying to explain it. But I understand. It's kind of like when you spend like two days with a guy. It's like a big -cation. Nothing's really like real. Yes, it's such an experiment because you're put in unique like especially on the bachelor. Your put on these extravagant dates. It's like the most romantic setup I mean. That's why we will love it exactly, but it is kind of ruined when you're there. You're like about all these producers are watching me and there's cameras everywhere and like you kind of it kind of takes away from some. Some of the Romance, but you are put in these unique situations where all you're supposed to talk about is love and where you came from, and you're like how you are in a relationship, and they break down your walls, and they obviously do that in the pods to on love is blind, and it's just like a whole other situation that you would never be in in real life so it it does totally break you down and make you so vulnerable with your emotions because you're forced to talk about them. I look at that the to what Joe Joe and Jordan. They were very successful. Yes, right here with with the unknown very intrigued by them yet. They're still not of that, yeah..

Kenny Kenny Barnes Jessica Joe Joe C. A. Jonathan
"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"So sad I mean that's so sad. That is sad. It's so sad you can't. You can't even hug like well. It's funny because. Him So! My other daughter is married to adopt so I said to him. How could toy date? What can she do? What is the parameters? He said only touch the hand because Tori was like I can't go with a mask on, and I said you better go with a mask on personal she she's a hypochondriac so now she's going lead so open for covert. I'm going to kill myself and we told her thing. Is I already had it and they do? It tells the dates back, and it's also this weird thing it's like. Do I. It's kind of like what you know what it feels like dating in Kobe the code if you'd like you had an SSD. That was curable, but you don't want to bring it up, so it's like. Oh, you're. Like. Tell them I had Kobe. Do I not just let it slide? Yeah, like I was just saying that same. It's like having herpes and be like, but it's not flared up right now, so we're oak. Cliff. It's fun. You know those things go away. My niece just tried to facetime me so. That! You. Know? That was good. Quick question for everyone listening. Is Your home like mine? CLUTTERED WITH STEFFI? Don't use anymore close shoes. You don't wear taking up valuable closet space, old foam hiding in a drawer, or maybe you have toys and games that your kids aren't interested in any more. You know what I'm talking about. Let me tell you about an APP. You can use to sell the stuff. It's called Macari so macari is the selling APP that makes it fast. Fast and easy to sell almost anything it couldn't be simpler. You just take a few picks of your staff at a description and your items are listed just like that. Then once it sold macari e mails, you a shipping label you to stick it on and send it off. No meet ups no hassles..

STEFFI Tori facetime Cliff
"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

05:32 min | 2 weeks ago

"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"Be like. Performance. Because you were performer, too, so my mom, my mom was a professional ballerina and performer, growing up, and her dad would always be like okay honey you're on. She'd have to entertain friends and family. And then my mom was kind of the same way to me, and then it was totally a performance like she's watching me on national television, and she's just like I mean there's a whole thing about how I had sex before the fantasy suite, and it was this controversial season, and my mom's like cheering me on and life. Yeah Yeah. My Dad high five to me. It was really weird, but. But it did change a life my right. Oh absolutely, Yes, and now she's just you know so proud and my whole family's proud and they love coming on the podcast, too, so it's cute, but I heard you interviewing pilot Pete. I'm like I'm a big fan excuse. My I must be. Dad watched the bachelor. Okay, amazing now most of the demographic I people, my age, but my mom and dad love it like we'll have episodes where my dad literally. He's does the same thing to every girl listen I. Don't want to tell you, but I'm falling in love with you and my mom's like you know my dog like. I think he's Nice. What do you mean he's Nice? You thought you went out to dinner with. What did you like all my mom? They trash the people then. My Mom trashes my dad for like thirty minutes then I get one word then. You should do a podcast with your husband doing bachelor recaps. We have we have. Very. Good, but he like. Sometimes you won't come on. Sometimes. He's very inconsistent. He's yelling in the background. I'm not coming on always in natural happy. Fish listen. This show is is the reason it's so popular the OH. My Gosh! Yes. I mean they know what they're doing. It's been thirty, however many seasons of both bachelor and Bachelorette, and then there's Bachelor in paradise, and all that stuff like this show clearly knows what they're doing now. My favorite part is. There's all these douche bags that come on to promote their music, and like I'm a singer Songwriter, and then they come on with the guitar, but and then ABC's so sick of people being like get you know ABC sets them up for success after then they go now they have all these followers can promote their music. So ABC was like you know what our GonNa make show about musicians. And then they did listen to your heart, and I'm like that's hilarious..

ABC Pete
"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

05:01 min | 2 weeks ago

"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"I love that you have this relationship because I totally have one of the best relationships with my mom. She's one of my best friends. We Banter I. Love having her on the podcasts like everyone just loves it I think people love to see that relationship. Relationship between the mother and daughter, and it's fun and especially if you can have it like you guys and I just wanted to know like. How did you decide to start a podcast together? Because as much as I love my mom and love having her on the podcasts to actually work together I feel like it would be really challenging. I'll it it. It's tough. All Lot of blowouts before the PODCAST, we hit record okay. Tori go ahead. How how did you decide well so about almost two years ago, I went through. Every bad breaks up and a lot of my boyfriend I've had only two I don't know why say because I'm sure my mom's GonNa correct me. You've only had two. Let's be real plural. Yes, so anytime. I've had a boyfriend. They've always gotten very close to my family this. Dead get very close. We were GONNA move in together. Then I had a relapse. Lyme disease got very sick he. Dumped me out of the blue went on a family out here she goes. She loves tell the disarray. we treated him. We all went away. Him included just collecting. No, we we pay for everything. Just have to throw that in. We met his parents three weeks before it. WE'RE GONNA move in Iraq. Go Tori now. Okay, thank you for thinks that little piece of information. Thank you I did. I did. So yes, he dumped me so depressing shop that we were gonNA move in together. It was very serious and you know my mom, would always she would. She was saying things about my ex. That was very mean but very funny into only really the only one that was making he'll better at that time. And whenever I had my momma, my instagram people would be like your mom so funny. My mom started giving advice to my friends and all just very funny. Funny but I, but it always even though the way. She said it was funny, it was actually very good advice. And I thought and people kept saying I did videos at the time with our people get saying. Why did he do longer content with so I thought oh? Why not just do a podcast with her and almost a year and a half later? That's how it started from escape border dumping me. That's how the podcast took off. I think you. Thera people both of us. Kind of get out basically reach wished for your on podcast. That you had to stop yet. No, it felt so good because I was broken off with..

Tori Lyme disease Iraq relapse
E-commerce Is Changing. Heres How to Prepare

Marketing School

05:32 min | 2 weeks ago

E-commerce Is Changing. Heres How to Prepare

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Neil, Patel and two and today we're GONNA discuss e commerce changing. Here's how to prepare. All, right I wasn't prepared to do this intro. To do the episode is so that's what's important. So ecommerce changing as a matter of fact shop advice dog is going through the roof right now. WanNa. Talk about comparing a lot of people right now. We have a guy on the growth accelerator do he's brushing it with his vice store, so if you're just starting out, I would. there's more bands, but there's for beginners to do. I'll just get started. Go shop fibers. Basic starting point I. Yeah and the thing with ECOMMERCE isn't Amazon right now? Like everyday is like black Friday or is that shop if I? was saying like everyday day is like Black Friday shocked by? It's just ridiculous. The big thing with ecommerce right now is you would have a lot a big set. It's an ECOMMERCE Amazons of the world selling everything, but what's doing really well right now is people to selling one product, and that's it may have your up sells down cells, but just like a one product e commerce store. You know I know someone who sells insoles for high heels and she's like yeah, I'll Outta high heel. Shoes are uncomfortable. She created better insoles for high heels and I think she's doing around like two hundred, thirty, two hundred forty thousand dollars a month in profit. Yeah I think so fashions coming back. What is fired luxury fashion? Not so much right? So I think what's important. There's link that I shared. If you Google, covid nineteen within I think you should be defined this. Basically, it's numbers around how ECOMMERCE is performing right also co Van Dyke Jane. Within DOT CO and have been for the retail sales, so you can see where trends are right now and what I would say is. If you're E congress in terms of how to prepare, what would you say? People need to do Neil for people that are a little more established right now. The big thing is make sure that you have your inventory. I think if you don't have a good supply chain and you don't have a ton of inventory going. You could end up. Getting screwed the other big thing with ECOMMERCE. If you're trying to adapt your goal is you're trying to maintain right, or is it to grow grow? The other thing that I would do is if you're ECOMMERCE is spend a lot of money on conversion optimization. There's way too many people that are spending time trying to figure out a new AD channels figuring out new creatives instead just focusing on. Hey, how do I maximize conversion by my downfalls might funnels, so I can scale from one hundred to two hundred three hundred. Because if you don't have that, funnel right over time. It's already proven you. You know other than co bid that adds continually rise, even during a recession I think covered was a rare circumstance because you had a lot of people had a shutdown, because business couldn't have people but I would really focus on commercial optimization, because it's pretty much guarantee just like taxes that Google ads on facebook. ADS ARE GONNA, go up a year from now and getting more expensive three years from now even more expensive five years from now. Yep any related to emerge. Read. Optimization is talking on my your funnel to so in the last episode talk about having a one time offer or or bump on her pages, so the most important thing I think at least to me or one of those things is making sure your supply chain lockdown amateur. It does matter how much you scale your ads, but as you have that lockdown, you're driving people. They by the. Thank you. Page you another offer right there and then. Maybe there was another offer right after again. Cleveland's doesn't really good with this, but I think. Think a lot of people in the e-commerce world. You're not taking as much advantage as they could be. The say to is so I. Remember I bought a bustle records just to cut up. You know, be safe if back, wait, but silver coins They're actually Tori. If you're out of inventory, they actually do. Would you like the texture lower back? We have inventory yet, so I thought that was really Nice I'm pretty sure there's a fly out. I appreciate it must be on platforms must also that was helpful and came back and it was a big burden. Yeah and then the other thing, too is think subscriptions ECOMMERCE. It's been around there for a long time, but a lot of products that you sell. People constantly need when I get him to subscribing to the Senate products so ECOMMERCE business and turn it into subscription. Kind of like a Chewy I think to offer subscriptions and even Amazon does as well versus just selling people something one off especially if they continue need your product like bursts bursts offers really amazing fos I don't know if you use the Eric. It's legit. Do like you just gotta by the birth squash. Ten dollars, but don't buy from their website because they make you subscribe to school by from Amazon. Faster shipping to? are going to try. It aren't Ya. It's like ten bucks by. Way Birth the brush. No, they have lost to be U. R. S. T.. A.. You are at the. They know you're big on glossing lake me, trust me, it's best loss. I've ever tried all right. I will do that the only thing I'll add I have the retail polls thing. But, yeah, looking at Omni Channel e commerce is continuing like when I hit. The numbers were flat now everything's going up into the right so things. Spends cutting back consumer confidence something about so yes, you want to capitalize on it, and it's always good look at. The other thing Neil night light look. Every now and then is looking at railroad traffic meeting. How often are goods being transported least around the United States that would we're kind of confidence is as well

Amazon Neil Ecommerce Amazons Google Wanna United States Cleveland Patel Dot Co Senate Tori Facebook U. R. S. T
Rocket Roundup for June 3, 2020

Astronomy Cast

05:12 min | Last month

Rocket Roundup for June 3, 2020

"Twenty twenty. Today's livestream was hosted by Anne Wilson. And our audio is reported by me Allie Pelfrey. Most Mondays through Fridays. Our team will be here putting science in your brain. Usually Wednesdays for rocket roundup, and we have some catching up to do. Let's get to it, shall we? A JAKSA H. to be rocket launched the H. T. V. Nine Mission Aka. WHO NATORI Nine on Wednesday may twentieth, twenty twenty at five thirty one PM ut see. The mission patches a gold ring around a blue and yellow graphic of the H. T. V. Capsule with a yellow image of the ISS in the distance against a black background. The text H to transfer vehicle and mission designation HDTV, nine, or in the yellow ring. The Japanese characters say Kuna Tori nine. There were to last for this flight. This was the last flight for the H. to be the first flight of the H. Three is planned for later this year. This was also the last Katori. A new Japanese cargo vessel is expected to launch and twenty when he to. A lot of cargo went to the ISS ON HDTV nine. Six thousand two hundred kilograms to be exact. That's four four thousand three hundred kilograms in the pressurized compartment and one thousand nine hundred kilograms in the unpressurised compartment. This includes a solid combustion experimental module. The module will continue research on combustion in microgravity, also on board were six new lithium ion batteries for the space station and fresh bell, peppers, Kiwi and citrus fruit for the crew. All fresh fruits and vegetables were grown in Japan. One of the other experiments was a wireless. Lan Demonstration or W. L. D. pronounced wild. Wild was an experiment that was performed during Kuna Tori nines flight. This was tested during Katori nines approach where video taken by a camera attached to the craft's propulsion module was broadcast in real time on board, the space station via a wireless data link the technology tested by wild will enable ISS cruise to monitor approaching vehicles during an autonomous docking. This was the first time to spacecraft communicated using w LAN during a rendezvous. On May twenty second at seven thirty one am ut see Russian. Armed Forces launched a Soyuz two one B rocket with the cosmos, two five four six mission. This was a military mission. So details are a little scarce. Here's what we do know. The payload was the Tundra Fourteen L. satellite that will be used for an early warning system, replacing the aging US K. and US Komo constellations. This is the fourth satellite and the newer. Tundra Constellation. The satellite was placed and ammonia orbit, which is a highly. The satellite was placed in a Molnia orbit, which is highly elliptical and highly inclined. When I say elliptical I. Don't mean a tiny bit. egg-shaped were straight into severely stretch territory with altitudes ranging from six hundred to nearly forty thousand kilometers above earth. At that long oval of an orbit and place it at sixty three degree angle relative to Earth's equator, and you get the highly inclined orbit. The what's the purpose of this orbit? Thanks to orbital mechanics. Ammonia orbit is uniquely suited to providing useful satellite coverage for earth, observation and communication services needed by ground terminals operating in high northern latitudes. Those areas are not easily serviceable from satellites in the typical geosynchronous orbits over the equator. Because any antenna you're using would be pointing at such a low angle that a small hill could easily block the path of the signal. And even though polar orbiting satellites can reach these same latitudes, they only have coverage of any given spot for several minutes at a time. The MONJA orbit is inclined in such a way that the desired areas are not only clearly visible. The satellite is pause for a time at its highest point. Thanks to orbital mechanics, which provides several hours of uninterrupted coverage that. L. E. O. AND GAO satellites simply can't

H. T. V. Nine Mission Aka Kuna Tori Nines United States Anne Wilson Twenty Twenty Kuna Tori ISS Allie Pelfrey H. T. V. Capsule Japan Armed Forces GAO W. L. D. L. E. O.
"tori" Discussed on Unladylike

Unladylike

02:46 min | Last month

"tori" Discussed on Unladylike

"We're back with Tori Amos and heads up to listeners. We will be discussing. Sexual Assault Caroline. Something jumped out to me when I was Internet researching for this episode because I noticed that whereas Tori content is all over Tumbler. There's barely a stiffer on gifts. And that feels like an apt analogy for her IRA fandom because it is deep and significant and like the feelings that Tori Amos simply cannot be contained in a Gif. Yeah. The love is too deep. Kristen it is too deep and her connection to feminist fans is really remained just so strong over the years. One Tory move that I love was hurt. Two thousand one album strange little girls which consisted entirely of covers of songs written by men but reinterpreted from a woman's point of view so one of the standouts on the record is her cover of Eminem's ninety seven Bonnie and Clyde which she sang from the perspective of the fictional wife that eminem kills in the original earaches place call. Heaven place called him. Please call prison place call jail. Data's probably on his way to all from one because mom was Stepson. Amazing and Look Caroline. I also incorrectly figured that her lasting feminist just came from the politics of her music but she's also inspired incredible real world activism ever since she went solo in the early nineties. Yeah one of her biggest hits off of little earthquakes is a song called me and a gun. It's about when Tori was raped at gunpoint when she was twenty one. It was terrifying and traumatizing and like so many survivors. She didn't report it to police. She only shared the details of what happened. A couple times in interviews but for six straight years Tori performed me and a gun at every single one of her live shows. It's Acapella so no company meant and the song is written sued. You were there with her with me as it's playing out with me. Hanoch on on my and I say Holy Holy.

Tori Amos Assault Eminem eminem IRA Stepson Kristen Internet Bonnie Clyde
"tori" Discussed on Unladylike

Unladylike

01:47 min | Last month

"tori" Discussed on Unladylike

"Music came naturally tour. But song she says sometimes come from another world entirely. It's not as if I hear voices but I call them the muses all of a sudden I am getting full structure and I have not thought of this before it is being plugged in almost like I take plug it in and all of a sudden. I'm getting reindeer king just there and seven minutes on we're back and that was Tori Amos on CBS. This morning and twenty seventeen explaining the songwriting inspiration. She gets from her own personal muses and she means by quite literally like Tori says nine muses have been with her since she first started playing music as a kid they feed her bits and pieces of songs but hard work of putting it all together falls on Tori heart. These these muses. They can be very very tough with me and that's fine. They expect a certain amount of work. I have to work for it they. They don't just drop a whole song on me. Usually earlier. Adult Career Tori learned the hard way. What happens when she doesn't pick up what her music dropped down. Yes a Tory. Left the DC piano bars and move to la in her early twenties there. She started a sit-in pop band called. Why can't Torey read? Here's the single big picture off their one and only self titled Album released in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight..

Tori Amos Tori Tori heart CBS DC la
"tori" Discussed on Unladylike

Unladylike

02:18 min | Last month

"tori" Discussed on Unladylike

"tori" Discussed on Unladylike

Unladylike

11:13 min | Last month

"tori" Discussed on Unladylike

"This year Tories published a new memoir. Slash manifesto called resistance a songwriter story of hope. Change Encourage Kristen. In a Lotta ways. Resistance has defined her career and what still endeared her to fans the kind of Song. She's written the way she's played them and the politics they've given voice to have continually broken. The rules of how female Solo Artists are supposed to perform? And she's still breaking rules to for one thing female. Solo artists are essentially put out to pasture thirty five but fifty six year. Old Tori is in her Cornwall Recording Barn working on a sixteenth album. Yeah and even if you aren't a Tory head you've probably witnessed her pop cultural influence. Oh yeah think of Lady Gaga is most avant garde piano performances or billy eyelashes anti pop queen aesthetic. She talked about how her daughter. Tash has even been like mom. They're cribbing your moves. Yeah I mean I really feel like Tori Amos is the mother of music. I was constantly listening to growing up and obviously I'm still constantly listening to things like Fiona Apple Sarah mclachlan Atlanta's Morissette and solicitors. I cried after we wrapped our interview with her Carolina. You cried yes. I mean. Like by the end of the conversation. I was just so overwhelmed by her warmth and what it took for her to make the music career that ultimately changed a lot of lives. Yeah me too but Carolina. I gotta be honest that I missed the Tori Amos boat growing up like by the time I was in high school and was forming. My own musical tastes. I was way too worried about fitting in to get into an artist like Tori. Who was known by then as like the Superintendent of Mystical feminist which was just not on brand for girls in the early two thousands Brittany? Spears era will kristen. Your ship is finally come in. Because today we're finding out why is Tori Amos such an enduring feminist icon? The Way Torrey tells it she was basically born with music and her blood. She inherited it from her mom's Dad whom she adored. Everybody called him. Papa beautiful tenor voice. He would come off the shift from the factory. They worked in the mills and he would sing to me and we believe that that's what triggered the music. Dna or the music language really came from him and my mother says she always told me that by two and a half. I was playing the piano and it would be hard to reach so they would find ways on their be phone books that I could step onto to climb up to get onto the stool. Remember phone books. Now I guess little piano prodigy is just have to perch on stackable iphone boxes or baby. Tori really was a legit prodigy though like by the time. She could tie her shoes. She was pretty much a classically trained pianist. At the age of five she became the youngest person accepted to the uber prestigious. Peabody Conservatory of Music in Baltimore and fun fact Tori Amos is still. The youngest student ever admitted to peabody problem was Taurean. Peabody weren't a great match like shirt. She could bang out Bach with the best of them at school but at home Tori was secretly falling in love with rock. Gods like led Zeppelin. My mother would be spinning records when once my father went to church in his minister outfit and she would close the door and take off her apron and start playing. Dj and then when my brother would come home from school he would have albums of things that my mother didn't have so they would get me into play everything before my father would come home and he had no idea when I would break out into the stones he thought I was just practicing stuff for the body. Nothing energy wars the devil and then Robert Plant was you know Satan and all that stuff Carolina Tories rebellious streak also reminds me of preachers daughters. I knew growing up. Who were the Queens of sneaking around? Well little toy wasn't much of a sneak when it came to her skepticism about church. Her Grandmother on her Dad's side was always on her about minding her Christian ps and QS and told her dad that Tori didn't know how to love Jesus to which told her dad like Jesus is not the problem. Grandma is the problem. Meanwhile she was also dealing with being by far the youngest student at school. How did being a child prodigy affect you like at that time and also as you were gonNA growing up and finding your own voice will ladies? It is a double edged sword because on one hand you can't process the emotions of others and their expectations. I couldn't anyway at that age. So the idea that you could hold so much promise and then you start to realize. Wait A men. I'm not a concert pianist. That isn't my path that isn't my that is who my skill set. It's it's a particular skill set to be able to play somebody else's work for eight hours a day. Okay and commit your life to that so you have to be one of the best in the world to do that and I'm thinking new. Wait a minute these guys. They were documenting their time. And this was the remember this was the late sixties and the revolution was being driven. When I say the revolutions the change was being driven so much by music and art and so I wanted to be part of that I wanted to document the time so very very early on I started to deviate and that's why I'd have to trick my dad's so he thought I was doing when I suppose to be doing practicing my lessons. So then when I got kicked out of the peabody eleven Dan I think he was brokenhearted. Blessing and I was seen as a failure and somebody that had so much potential and that was a lot to take on so I started smoking. Pot well why did the conservatory kick you out? So you would analyze music in theory you would look at music in be taught theory in a certain way and they were teaching classical. Niro Teaching Jazz but I want them also to look at the songs from the Beatles and somebody said they're not going to be round thirty years time nobody will know who they are and just looked at you me see people you are out of your freaking minds and that was at eleven and that didn't go down so there was a rebelliousness that I guessed I had because I loved this music so much whether it was the Beatles or Joni Mitchell or Nina Simone. Weren't we can go on. And on stevie wonder and they wouldn't allow it at the time and it seemed like wow. I was disappointment to everybody. And that was that was a lot to hold. That's the double edged sword me talking about whole where. Where did this rebelliousness come from? Because I feel like you know a lot of kids might have just said okay. This is my assignment. This is what I'm supposed to do. This is my responsibility. I have to toe the line. But here you are coming to these conclusions about your own voice and this moment in musical time at eleven like where did that street come from so being exposed to such great music just made me more bloody minded. I think to steal from the Brits and just dig my heels in say no. I'm going to write more. I'm going to I'm going to do this. Tori's father remain convinced that she was going to do it too. In fact he was kind of a stage dad and helped her secure her first paying gig at a very surprising venue each week. Thirteen year old Tori. Ammos played a downtown. Dc Gay bar called. Mr Henry's and eventually that earned Tori other piano playing spots bars and hotels around the city. Why do you think your dad though changed his mind and was like okay with you? Playing music like secular music to in a gay bar. I mean that feels like a real pivot. I think it was a pivot. I think with the capital p. I think there is a bit of Mama rose. Gypsy rose Lee Her mother in my father and there is a side to him. Wanted to Billy Graham. So he used drawn to that flame and he wouldn't give up and I don't think he could accept my my failure. He couldn't accept it. I I kind of accepted being kicked out of the peabody because I was writing my own music in secret like you guys are in closets. I'd be writing. Whatever under the bed would ever just creating and when he wasn't around really working toward that but then I think it just need decided. No I'M GONNA get on side and if you're GonNa do this then do it right and do well and be good at it. And with that the child prodigy had become a teenage to professional but before teen pro-tory could become adult POB icon contrary she. I had to learn how to fail. When we come back. Tory flops at the start pop on the charts and introduces us to Hermes says. Don't go anywhere..

Tori Tori Amos Carolina Billy Graham Peabody Conservatory of Music Lady Gaga Peabody Kristen Cornwall Recording Barn Jesus Tash Superintendent Fiona Apple Sarah mclachlan At Robert Plant Torrey Spears Beatles Baltimore Brittany
"tori" Discussed on Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

03:02 min | Last month

"tori" Discussed on Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

"And not as you're saying wait for something even if it's waiting for the muses to come do it they don't just sprinkle the the stardust Every day or every week. Sometimes it's really you know. I call a chop wood. Carry water stuff where you have to go out there. And I'm not sure how you both create but I find that I have to sometimes push it and I listened back and there's some things that really aren't worth going to record so I keep working through it and they're hundreds and hundreds of entries in this audio file that I've been building for the last two years since twenty seventeen. I was on the road. Then after the trump administration got in and now it's documenting those observations than those songs and building the bones building the structures that then I'm collaborating with the energy of the songs themselves and they can deform guide and that's the thing about collaborative experience with ether. Because I I know that the muses exists there are alive. They've always been alive. It's just sometimes I'm not listening. And sometimes I've chosen the commercial path over the spiritual path and when I do that. This is just my experience. I I fall on my face so then I have to remember. What is my intention as an artist? While when I remember that the songs became again I think your book I think resistance is necessary reading for all artists all artists no matter what stage there in in terms of you know whether they're struggling or thinking about it or whether just locked inside right now and have an want to make art so I think you just capture it so perfectly what that creative process feels like like us called chop wood carry water. You have to sit down day after day and face yourself and right even when you don't feel like it but what you do beautifully throughout your book is You let us into your relationship with the muses and that is what allows you to show up and face yourself is this reminder that you're not alone and you're surrounded by the great artists throughout history their energy their spirits coming through who have walked this path before you and so. That's what I think is so inspiring about reading. Your book is that you let us into all. The relationships is spiritual relationships sustained you. There are all these years of breaking through and making your art and like you said out creating them there in taken out take moments in a project for me and so sometimes to really get those fires going. I have to intake so breathing artists whether it's film books visual art the dance world. Whatever it is sometimes it's history sometimes. It's all kinds of things.

The Secret History of the Korean Bat Flip

ESPN Daily

07:47 min | 2 months ago

The Secret History of the Korean Bat Flip

"Can you explain in your own words? What a best slip actually is so normally. When a baseball player has a big hit he just kinda gently lays down his right and continues on his way down the base path. But sometimes that doesn't happen sometimes. A hitter is very proud and here. She will watch the ball takeoff and sometimes they'll pause sometimes. They'll do this while they're running. But instead of gently laying down the bet they will launch it into space. There are many different ways of doing this. It can be a flick of the wrist. It can be a throw a defiant curl. Perhaps the bat can travel feet. The back can travel very far but often it sort of twirls through the air majestically like a baton and flip is it's almost like spiking a football Pablo AIDS Celera Tori gesture and as you know. This is something that is taboo. In the United States in major league. Baseball violates the unwritten rules and executing this maneuver will often result in a hitter. Getting next time he's up but in Korea. Backflips are not only accepted. There are also extremely common. That was yes. Our Own Mina cards describing a unique feature of baseball in Korea. The Korean baseball starts it season today as one of the only pro leagues on earth playing amid this pandemic and you'll be able to watch those games on ESPN. So since you might just see. K B O Player flip is bat. I asked me to be a guest on her own show to share my favorite story that she has ever written on why Korean players love to flip their bats. And how it start. I'm Pablo Torre. Tuesday may fifth this is espn daily presented by marathon. I feel insane power right now. I don't know how I feel about this. Meantime is a senior writer for ESPN and the host of this podcast ESPN daily. I am the captain. Now you will feel how I want you to feel. I think is how this works. People can't see this but Pablo was doing the thing where he points his fingers at his eyes and then he's pointing them at my eyes and it's it's very upsetting. So how did the story which I love so much? Actually come about what it was. I think the spring or early summer of two thousand sixteen which is important because we are coming off of the two thousand fifteen. Mlb playoffs whereas. I'm sure you will remember Joey. Batista flipped his Bat. Which feels almost like. I'm understanding what he did after a home run in the AL between the Blue Jays and the Texas Rangers and there were much hand wringing and commentary debate as a result of that critics called the Bat Slip Disrespectful. Not only to the opposing pitcher. Button the game in general if I were a player I wouldn't do that. The fact that a matter is what he did did not offend you. Just don't sit. There is flip your badge especially in the seventh inning but throughout this time and before that there were these videos of backflips coming from Korea. Right ed where Korean baseball players were flipping their bats do as defiantly as Batista and with great joy and style and panache. These videos had gone viral social media. Just so I started looking to a little bit. There's a it was an account on twitter. A website called my K B O. Run by a Korean American guy named Dan Kurtz and so he was sending them out and then they would go. Viral asked him how he got into it. He used to live in Korea. He was huge B O. Fan Korean baseball organization. But then I asked him okay. So why why are they so common in Korea? Why is this normal there? Why our guys not getting drilled in the head and? He didn't know and super intrigued by that. So I got in touch with another Korean baseball expert commentator for the O named Daniel Kim who is based in Korea and he had so many great stories about that flips and what not they there and how they were so common but he also didn't know why or where it started and he told me you should just come here and figure it out. So that's what I did so you actually go to Korea and this. I remember I remember it sounding like one of the great expense report boondoggles ever but you actually go to Korea with Mickey and your story begins in Bussan right and so what you're actually find when you travel across the ocean and get there so we went to Poussin which is extremely large seaside city on the southern tip of South Korea so they have a very popular team the low tae giants and the first thing we do. Is We go to a game at the stadium and it was revelatory cream. It is just crazy crowds. They're much younger than American crowds and they are cheering and dancing and going nuts. And they're they're drinking beer. I guess that's also different. They're all these events. There are cheerleaders cheer master and they're standing on a platform and it is just so much fun. There's an American Fan Mickey and I met at the first game that carry my her and he told us. Mlb is like opera and K B O is like rock and roll so were there and we're having a great time and all of a sudden this player who we. I'd seen before because I had seen of backflips name was Choi Jin Sook and public. He is enormous. That's just the only way to describe is an enormous? He would be so he comes out and his song is Elmo Maceo shots just were not I remember that

South Korea Baseball Pablo Torre Espn MLB Batista Choi Jin Sook Twitter United States Elmo Maceo Writer Dan Kurtz Joey AL Daniel Kim O Texas Rangers Bussan Blue Jays
Dating at a Distance

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

08:44 min | 3 months ago

Dating at a Distance

"Should PEOPLE STILL DATE? Everything is aligned. Date no no no no blind date center definitely not but even before this tender. I'm kidding that was mean on the late show with Stephen Colbert. A month ago before most of the country was staying at home at the time. A conversation about dating during a pandemic may have felt like late night comedy fair. You know Stephen. Everything in life is is a risk reward. Proposition is riskier to do things versus before. Perhaps being in close contact with somebody especially somebody. You don't know Is Is. It's a different time right now. But as their new reality has evolved so as the act of finding love people are using dating apps more both tender and bumble have reported an increase in daily messages and user engagement. Other APPS had a video chat feature and some people are reaching out in ways I would have never imagined a look out my windows. Bill dancing traps to take and needed to say here down. She waved back. That's the start of the story you may have heard before. It's from a video on Tick Tock by Jeremy Cohen a photographer from Brooklyn New York. After Jeremy Waves to the dancing girl he flies his drone over with his cell phone number. She picked up my job and I guess it works. 'cause I our lady's Jeremy's video went viral if we're still allowed to say that it has over thirty million views on talk now. I'm not at all surprised. It's the meet cute of our time if our time is defined by isolation and physical distancing Jeremy and Tori Cigna Rela. She's the girl on the roof have gone on a few dates after that. Here's Jeremy and Tori. The first date was we had dinner. There was another restaurant she is on her roof and I was on my balcony. It was so funny because we'd be talking to other on facetime and then sometimes I like look over like I'd see him there and then we'd look at each other. It was like such a weird scenario lovely on another date. Jeremy win inside a huge plastic bubble so he could take a walk. I just couldn't stop laughing. I like hit the ground. Basically I was not expecting to see him in a bubble. It's a lot more effort to go through than your average date and it's hard to express the usual social and physical cues when you're six feet apart but there things about this new normal that for Jeremy Cohen. Surprisingly work well. It's really nice to get to know her. Just not have any of this pressure at the end of the day like okay. Am I going home or am I gonNA invite her back to my place? This awkward moment of okay. What what is the other person thinking? I don't WANNA be too forward but I also don't want to be a scaredy cat. Jeremy isn't immune to the loneliness of social distancing of not actually being physically around someone even though he's found this new connection I am in my apartment either remained but he's with his family in Minnesota. So I'm alone in this two bedroom apartment for about a month. Now it makes me realize how much the small things in life such as a hub. Like hug skill great. I've actually putting myself a couple of times. It doesn't feel the same because it isn't the same. There's a lot of research that shows. That physical touch is important for health and wellbeing. One behavior that we have focused on in some of our research is interpersonal touch or affectionate touch. We've shown that touch has powerful effects on our physical. Health are mental health. Our relationship health. That's Professor Brooke Fini. She's a social psychologist at Carnegie Mellon University. She studies how relationships impact our health throughout our entire lives. It increases feelings of security so it just makes people feel more secure. It increases people's willingness to embrace life opportunities affectionate touch has been associated with lower daily stress lower reactivity to stress A lower likelihood of even perceiving something as stressful in the first place for Professor Feeney affectionate touch has benefits even above and beyond sexual intimacy. Which is something else were missing in? A time of isolation can engage in sexual intimacy for a variety of reasons that have to do with reproduction and drives and less to do with communicating care and acceptance and love and value. And so on. They're both important forms of touch and Communicate very important information to significant others But we think they are very different types of processes hearing about all the benefits of touch at a time when a lot of people are deprived of. It isn't exactly comforting. So what happens when we do lose it in our everyday lives? Here's Professor Brittany Kubiak. Who Studies affectionate touch in romantic relationships? Children form attachments with their caregivers in a lot of ways through touch and in adulthood we think that some of the same processes happens you form an attachment to your romantic partner just like you form attachment to your parents. Although the relationship is obviously different long-term not having the ability to touch. I think there's the possibility that you may not be able to form as secure attachment to that person but Professor Jacoby Act doesn't want to overstate the benefits of touch. Either it is still possible to have meaningful connections with each other without it. We know that people maintain very satisfying long distance relationships. Even when there's not a pandemic going on people do things reminiscing about times that they did spend together or planning times that they will spend together and so I think we can find ways at least if this is going to be a somewhat short term separation to make sure that we're maintaining high quality relationships even through physical distance for Professor Feeney. There is a positive outcome at least in terms of human connection about the fact that this is all happening to us together our rates of loneliness and social isolation even before they pandemic had been increasing and people have just been feeling more relational disconnected across the board. One positive thing that I think has come out of this. Pandemic is that people first of all are all in this together. You know so. We're now all part of a big group of people who all this happening to them. When people are facing adversity together they usually reach out to each other more and try to connect stance. Oh I do see one positive side effective at this is that there are these more creative ways that people are trying to connect and help each other out and so on like Jeremy and Tori and whether or not they do end up together doesn't even matter to them anymore. We're absolutely going to meet up. Probably something a little bit more low key like drinks but definitely still could never forget it honestly no matter what happens between us like we're going to remain friends like there's nothing like this that doesn't bond to people and said it's just like look if he's not like in my wedding he'll be at my wedding like that's. I certain that's a powerful connection. Now there was a study from Harvard. That came out this week. Saying we might have to prolong intermittent social distancing measures. Up until two thousand twenty. Two professor. Feeney doesn't know what that means for physical and mental health. No one does she and a team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon are just about to begin a study on this if we don't find these other creative ways to connect It remains to be seen. How well We can continue to abuse remote connections as a proxy for the more physical connections but I think the the core issue that underlies it all is. What touched communicates and so I think what we have to do. During the pandemic is just find other ways to communicate to our loved ones that were available to them if they need us even though we can't be physically proximal to them right now and might be more difficult to communicate that remotely but I think we can do it. Human beings are social creatures by nature. We crave connection. We're not meant to be isolated. These days. Some people might not have the security that comes from physical touch. But that's not all our relationship is built on find those other connections and lean on them. I think you'll be surprised by how strongly though resonate in your life.

Jeremy Professor Feeney Jeremy Cohen Jeremy Waves Stephen Colbert Stephen Carnegie Mellon Carnegie Mellon University Tori Tori Cigna Rela Professor Brooke Fini Social Isolation Professor Brittany Kubiak Professor Jacoby Act Bill Professor Harvard Minnesota Partner
Your immune function, is it your natural vaccine?

Dr Ron Unfiltered Uncensored

05:53 min | 3 months ago

Your immune function, is it your natural vaccine?

"We have a device in our system called fighter flight. You know in the old days when you're chased by a tiger or whatever any big mammoth your your body went into fighter flight. Mood your adrenal. Glands are producing up an effort and you start feeling strong and You had to fight that the tiger whatever area how to get out of there that you pay a price that because your cortisol levels go higher and your immune system goes low and what have we said from day one. This is a disease that requires a strong immune system. If you'RE NOT GONNA get sick and your immune system is the vaccine that you need not an artificial vaccine okay so the should be for vitamins. And I for immunity and no one's talking about the natural immune of part of your immunity. Is this this fighter? Fight fight or flight complex. And if you're always in a state of fear you're always in a state of panic and you're not getting restorative sleep at night you're setting yourself up to get an infection a really important to again. I don't know what he's talking about fighter flight but it's definitely lowers your immunity so now the New Times. Start with them incredible. They came out with an article. Get a flu shot because it could be protecting you from the deadly corona virus. And you know what they know won't do a damn thing for that how could it? They say it'll stop the flu and flu symptoms and be so similar to corona virus. You'll scare yourself after that if you get it. And you're probably whole yourself to the doctor's office or hospital where you could get the actual corona virus from ineffective patient and number two. They say. Hey it can't hurt well. They're wrong this common piece of mainstream advisers pretty close to being made up because the experts know they've got nothing to say they take the useful stuff like wash your hands very important. I add wash your face to stop touching your face and then also say get some exercise and eat your Greens. Sounds good right. Keep the camera's rolling because now they'll toss in the flu shot for good measure. I the flu shot isn't exactly very good at helping anywhere. One avoid the flu maybe about at best estimates thirty six percent fact of and it's a crummy way to avoid the flu and it won't even come close to prevent preventing it completely and how about the can't hurt part last year. There was a study looked at the phenomenon called virus interference specifically when a vaccine for one virus interferes with your immune system's ability to fight off other viruses. At the time the mainstream was able to tout the study is good news overall. The INFLUENZA VACCINE DIDN'T LEAD TO INCREASE INTERFERENCE. Except if found a couple of exceptions this vaccine flu virus it was significantly associated with interfering with the corona virus and the Human Meta lumo virus. Can that be any good because last year? I didn't hear ANYTHING ABOUT CORONA VIRUS CELL. It's in the label cause for concern. I'm GonNa give you another reason to avoid the flu. Shot a study. That came out of recent military of disabled veterans. So I'll just read this. A recent military study shows military personnel evaluated. Who received the flu flu vaccine? Where thirty six percent were attic. Thirty six percent increase risk for corona virus with only small benefit against catching influenza quote examining none influenza viruses specifically the odds of both the corona virus and the Human Meta Numa viruses corona virus in Mona virus and vaccinated individuals were significantly higher when compared to unvaccinated individuals this was a article titled Influenza Vaccination and Respond Tori virus interference among department of Defense personnel during the twenty seventeen twenty eighteen influenza season. And this there. They up with his backs vaccine flu interference. So there goes your vaccine and we'll be reporting more on this as the year goes by but they have totally miscalculated. The aluminum burden from these vaccines. You know aluminum is not good for you. And not only that with the five G. coming there are scientists all over the world that any metal in your body can be an antenna for this five

FLU Flu Vaccine Cortisol New Times Department Of Defense
Trump defends lawsuit over NYT op-ed, calling it 'beyond an opinion'

The 45th

02:17 min | 4 months ago

Trump defends lawsuit over NYT op-ed, calling it 'beyond an opinion'

"Trump campaign just filed a lawsuit stuff nation against New York Times for an article in the opinion section. Okay Yeah Okay that I do not understand what is remotely going through their minds other than using this as you know a campaigning tactic to look or suing the time but also like if there was actual bad reporting. Surely you'd have found an article that was not in the opinion section to make peace. Yeah I was GONNA say opinions are allowed what are their good or bad but unless there's something factual report in The New York Times. I mean they report on Him Fifty Times a day. I'm that is really interesting. Do you think who is the piece by was is it more. Personal like is a particular person Max Frankel. And it's about the the real trump Russia quid pro quo But the this article came out in March of two thousand nine hundred and the claimer just before we started courting but the central claim of the trump campaign's loss appears to be that this March Twenty nineteen opinion column. was knowingly false because it was rebutted by the mother report the claimant. Lados published in April. Two thousand nine hundred so okay. Yeah so also. They're open themselves to discovery. They are now. That's who don't understand depositions. I don't I don't get their strategy. There's there though it's like Devin Nunes. It's bullshit seats all the time trying to increase the cost of reporting on trump. Yeah yeah that could be it. I mean the New York Times I I mean. What could they do like just retract? The peas or be like from what I've seen. I have not looked at in great doubt. But it doesn't seem like there's anything actually Tori in the opinion section. Yeah I mean I think I think probably the goal here is. They're just trying to put on alert. Hey guess what you report on. Trump will see you and cause a lot of cost to you all the time to the curious choice because they definitely have the resources to back that up whereas chose smaller reporter like a smaller outlet. That might quickly destroy them. The lawyer's fees I think trump is in this kind of like a hate everything New York face though. He is definitely that. Yeah so

Donald Trump The New York Times Max Frankel New York Devin Nunes Russia Lados Reporter Tori
Tori Spelling says her kids have been bullied

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:25 sec | 4 months ago

Tori Spelling says her kids have been bullied

"Actress tori spelling is sitting back at her kids bullies on social media former Beverly hills nine oh two one oh star took to Instagram over the weekend saying that her eleven year old has entered enough bullying to last a lifetime and now associates our education with boys that have been horrific tour meanwhile spelling says the school that stood up for her daughter has not helped her son as he was bullied to the point that he developed severe emotional based headaches and stomach

Tori Spelling Beverly Hills Instagram
Tori Spelling says her kids have been bullied

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:34 sec | 4 months ago

Tori Spelling says her kids have been bullied

"Actress tori spelling is hitting back at our kids bullies on social media the former Beverly hills nine OO to one OO start taking to Instagram Saturday saying her eleven year old has indoor den of bullying to last a lifetime she says her daughter Stella now associates her education with boys that have been so horrific to order meanwhile spelling says the school that stood up for Stella has not helped her son Liam as he was bullied to the point that she says he developed severe emotional based headaches and stomach aches as

Tori Spelling Instagram Stella Liam Beverly Hills
Top Day Trip Destinations from Tokyo

Pure Life Podcast

08:39 min | 5 months ago

Top Day Trip Destinations from Tokyo

"We spoke we were talking about getting in and out of Tokyo some of the things to do and Tokyo and we kinda hinted at other areas that we could explore the which are either day-trips outside of Tokyo or areas. That are arranged getaways. Exactly exactly so usually Tokyo is a good hub to start from. It's accessible you can get in and out of IT EASY. Great hotels lots of stuff to do. But if you're adventurous and you WANNA head on outside of Tokyo. There's some really cool places at Tokyo when you go to Japan right well. Yeah I mean there's there's plenty to do and to do in Tokyo but if time allows exactly so we wanted to share with your couple of short trips that you can easily take you in and out of a Tokyo and we're GonNa hit you know several of those cities so last we talked we were talking about getting around via Jr. the Japanese rail and within Tokyo even from all the major airports you can get into Tokyo central really really easily. And when you hit stations like Tokyo station or even Shinjuku or Yokohama. There are Shinkon San or the the bullet trains that can take you to all other parts of Japan. And so we're gonNA talk about you. Know How you cruise around from Tokyo to other places using the railroad jerry. Easy probably the most convenient way to do it. Is Well well. I've always taken a car over my grandpa drove or my dad. Or however you remember Susan when we've traveled as family that we've always kind of jumped on. We have a car as well but Wisconsin took the Shinkansen to bigger family right so anyway so the first one that we WANNA hit. This is the city call. Hakuna I'm sure a lot of people have seen this word on a guidebooks more from friends or people who's been there. It's a very popular destination. It's an easy weekend getaway in Japan when we talk about Hakuna. Japanese people have to hit hot spring over very well known area. It's a it's a hot spring resort area it right and then you can see a beautiful Mount Fuji. Oh my gosh now. In good reason why. That's the center. Excuse me hot. Spring areas because Mount Fuji is there and IT'S A. It's still a dorm but it's an active volcano if you will. It's the tallest in Japan that is correct. Fuji IS THE HIGHEST VOLCANO IN JAPAN. At over three thousand seven hundred meters or twelve thousand feet and is the second highest volcano in an oven island in all of Asia. I'm an international treasury. Yes absolutely in. It is one of the more prominent symbols of Japan. Yes Yup it's so pretty and it's worth going. Who's the Hukou on Easel National Park Now? I sound very Japanese. It's west of Tokyo. If you look at the map of Japan right right and it takes about eighty five minutes an hour and a half or two hours if you take a probably the easiest way you WanNa take a train is by Docu or Docu. Od A K Y you railway docu railway operates. It runs between Tokyo Shinjuku Station to GonNa Yumoto station. Okay and one way journey. I think there are a couple of different types of nanny. It's a limited express right right and then the other one is a little bit slower Express trains coupon right. But I think it's like a little bit over my two thousand. Three hundred men check the rate. You know the latest one but It's it's a very reasonable and you can also take a bus in like I said I when I was younger. We always just drove. Takes a while on the traffic begins. We always travel during the holiday seasons. Four hours you know five hours Roy Moore. I know so. We highly recommend that. It's this whole amount area. The Hukou owner area in capacity hakuna shrine. Which is a Shinto shrine. And it's just a there are tons of hot springs. The food is great is easy access from Tokyo. I really really highly recommended such a pretty area to visit and there's such a variety of things to do over there as well. I mean not only do you have this magnificent view of famous Mount Fuji? I mean on a clear day. Perhaps you can see Mount Fuji and the distance from Tokyo. It is southwest of Tokyo. Roughly about one hundred kilometers southwest to Tokyo and again it dominates the western Side of the prefecture there. But when you get up towards it and you can see it in all its majestic beauty. It's quite breathtaking. Very lovely so just a few things. You know that I can point out the fun things to do the top attractions in Hukou Hukou hot springs. Oh my gosh is there are a lot of them so you like hot springs. I think it's like a must do and in from our talks about The shoe were big fans of average super clean. It's the scenery that surrounds hot springs and the hospitality. And it's multi course. Meal comes within. It's nothing like you know our Western style. Spa It's a very different immersive experiences. Definitely some you should check out. Troy experienced one hundred percent and other attractions. The other one is a good unease very very famous e you can also smell the so far though soul. I but it's the it's a crater created by the last major eruption of Mount Hakuna and one of the interesting thing is they sell these eggs as you see them everywhere throw in. It's called healthy eggs and and they believe it adds seven years to your life if you eat eggs about if you want to give a shot. Hey who can? Who can't use another seven years right? Come on yeah but but Walker done is actually quite a site. The big crater. It's interesting yeah. It's really quite something and when the weather is nice spring summertime fall is beautiful with leaves changing color one about lake. Ashi no go A. S. H. I. N. O. K. O. R. She no-go it's a lake. It's it's a Caldera Lake. It's just a picturesque. You get a beautiful view of Mount Fuji. You when you go there. There are a lot of like a boat trips that you can take. That's another run on. Luger attraction there that if you go to coney area I I really recommend that as one of the attractions you can go and check it out. Oh I haven't mentioned the the very famous Hakone Shrine Omega. Gosh Yes oh my God. This is so famous you need to go check it out right. It's it said it's located at the end of the lake. Ashi NOCCO that I just talked about It's in a forested area. You see lanterns and Tori literally you gauge. The regular dance right. Yeah it marks the entrance to the shrine And it's pretty impressive. That's really pretty absolutely and just to see those those gates as you know because I don't know something about that. It just reminds me of Japan. We've seen them in different shrines and stuff like that. Oh my God. Spectacular blends in with the scenery in a bill. Leads you to the entrance of the shrines. And it's just it's absolutely spectacular to

Tokyo Mount Fuji Japan Tokyo Shinjuku Station Hakuna Fuji Mount Hakuna Hakuna Shrine Wisconsin Asia Hukou Hukou Shinjuku Hakone Shrine Omega Susan Easel National Park JR. Tori Roy Moore Caldera Lake Yokohama
Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

Jewish History Matters

10:11 min | 5 months ago

Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

"Hope that you'll enjoy our conversation as we dive into the connection between scarlet work and the social justice issues of Israel and Palestine. A major major way in which history matters because through history we can better understand pressing issues of the day and as I think it'll come through clearly in our a conversation that as historians and experts we have something to contribute to these conversations to thanks for listening. I'm your hi Erin. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you Jason Thank you. I'm really glad that you guys are here to talk about this book which I was really excited to see and to read through I wanna I wanNA start off by asking. What do you mean by Social Justice and Israel-palestine when you look at the title itself? What is the connection there? And why do you think that it's important to integrate. These two realms in the discussion of social justice on the one hand and the broad set of issues around Israel and Palestine part of our idea was that Israel Palestine conflict is taught as is an informational explanatory lands right through prescriptive questions in what happened in terms of what we mean. By a lens of social justice we we mean an inter our disciplinary perspective places concepts like rights justice and oppression at the forefront and that aims to Dick sexualize Israel-palestine Israel-palestine especially for those who think of this as some sort of Auger. That's been going on forever and we'll go on forever but it it's a conflict that will end. I just like the troubles in Northern Ireland and the horrific stuff in Rwanda in apartheid in South Africa and other conflicts in the world the people in Israel Palestinian or not onto logically different In terms of their humanness than other people conflict. That will end also our goal in terms of approaching this was social justice. Justice is this notion of introducing power to the conversation if we had only included voices of people with particular social identities and now other voices. I don't think that necessarily would have been just. But our attempt is to bring in a variety of voices and introduced concepts jobs related to power dynamics which is goes down the rabbit hole of privileged status access oppression etcetera so it also means bringing in the grassroots spotlighting hot-listing minority identities as rusty Israelis essay. Anat there's an essay on Bedouin. BS courses a grassroots in many ways a grassroots treats movement and really. Were trying to broaden the discussion from what is typically explanatory questions to more prescriptive questions saying what should happen in order for. Israeli people have Palestinian people in the region to experience a sense of justice and the social part is just that we wanted to flag that. It isn't simply a book about illegal intricacies. I have a little bit of a vested interest in the term because during the twenty eleven ten protests in Israel that started on Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Levine. Is released were protesting high cost of living biceps cottage cheese of the price of housing. And they were talking in terms of social justice. Senate Clinical Lt and it became very clear early on that to maintain a broad based movement. It would be bracketing. The question of Palestinians and social justice in purely early economic terms. And we know that here when social justice movements more broadly progressive movement's about social justice thinking not only economically editor of racial justice ethnic justice religious justice justice for every individual and collective. And so we're really trying lick the conversation back towards saying how. How can Israel and the Palestinians live their lives and we as editors have a singular answer to that but we brought together scholars and activists that have very specific the the actors for that very important question and they're engaging with one another on that question? We just had the episode Rachel Harris where we talked about her book about teaching about Israel and Palestine. And there it's very clearly a book about pedagogy a book that is directed at professors teachers. Thinking about how they can teach about the subject and here you're dealing much much more conceptually much more about getting into the issues themselves as opposed to how we teach them when you think about a book like this. Who Do you see as the person who you want to pick it up what you want them to get out of it? I think we intended this book per use in classrooms where the Israel Palestinian dynamic is being taught whether it's Israeli Israeli Palestinian conflict glasser history class or the social dynamics of how Israelis and Palestinians relate with one another so it's really meant for students and the professors who teach awesome. We also seems to make it as readable as possible as accessible as possible to a wide audience. Who aren't necessarily subject specialists and to that end really took care to write very concise intro pieces to each of the eight conceptual chapters showing the reader? What's at stake? AAC each of these major debates. I have an essay that appears Rachel's Book as well in the essay that I wrote in her book is really a precursor to this project which I engaged with Aaron and really. It's a short essay about my own personal struggle of how I had been seeking to keep politics out of the classroom and had been even feeling a little bit frightened of students. What if they brought the a word? I would say appears the night before a particularly contentious topic topic where I was worried. That apartheid come. What do I do in my the the foil for the students do? I need to debate the students that they see the other side. Whatever the other side is depending on what perspective is student is raising and I realized it wasn't really very healthier constructive approach so I think what we really wanted to? The book was to enable a wave for politics it should be able to seep into the classroom in a way that doesn't put the professor on the hot seat but enables the professor to shepherd students through the debates enabling students succeed as many perspectives as they can in contrast to mirror. I was coming up this project from perhaps not in context given that was a precursor newark yet that stage but in any event for about ten years I was part of a not for profit educational organization where we worked with muscles views Israelis Palestinians and everything we did was co taught. CO-DEVELOPED CO design. So I ran the organization with the Muslim Palestinian woman are high school programs with Jews. Muslims awesome were run developed design fifty fifty by twos Muslims etcetera. And so I was coming at this project from a number of years back back so to speak from the vantage point that regardless of attempts by some people to engage in objectivity or neutrality perhaps closer to objectivity than they might otherwise present. Things that it's impossible. I think to teach each about things in the humanities frankly without offering perspectives. Even if you said all right. Here's our issue. And here's three vantage vantage points on the issue. Great probably ten others twenty thirty others so I was already at that place because that was is how I been socialized in. That's my experiences regardless. Yeah I mean I think that what you both have brought up really is a critical issue. You look at this book wishes to say as I read it and as I was thinking about it. It seems to me that the central issue that you're engaging with this fundamental idea and and the way I think about this is that even though this is a book with many authors many contributors are pushing this fundamental central thesis that the politics the issues should be a part of how we engage with Israel and Palestine scholars in a way that some people say I want to avoid the politics I want to avoid the touchy issues and try to achieve some kind of noble dream of objectivity of neutrality etc.. I think part of what. This book is arguing in this ties into to mirror. What you were saying in your essay and Rachel Harris Book as well you have to do with the idea about what is the role of the scholar and how we interact with these issues? Yeah to that. I would add one more specific thing especially in the case the way I've been teaching the courses in my field. Political Science and international relations and in many areas of social science. Generally professors tend to focus on. Why questions or we could call explanatory questions? So why did Israel extended extended olive branch to the PLO nineteen ninety-three. Why did Camp David Two thousand fail and instead of keeping prescriptive questions the questions what should be what shall be? Why should it be this way? Instead of keeping those questions that Bay we wanted to invite space for students to see how scholars activists make those prescriptive arguments particularly as the book has become available for use in my own courses finding consigning op. Ed Science for students to write much more frequently and I'm encouraging students to take the various topics that we covered in the course I which is really pretty united eight until present day and make a prescriptive argument should be. DSP Out Lodge should be various political parties depending on what case they're looking at encountered the US embrace a different view of Palestine within their platforms. I should trump have proved the the embassy to Jerusalem or not and make an argument that necessitates taking into account the arguments of another point of view and really taking those arguments seriously in making a good case whereas in some years I might have read a student paper like that. Oh this is too ideological. This is too opinionated. I no longer separate informed. Well argued opinion. That is derived from a scholarly understanding of the situation. I no longer divorce that argumentation from a more detached explanatory Brian Tori type of

Israel Palestine Professor Rachel Harris Erin Rachel United States Newark Anat Rwanda Senate Ed Science Editor Brian Tori Dick Sexualize Jerusalem BAY
Want a Job in Crypto? Firms are Hiring

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

08:42 min | 5 months ago

Want a Job in Crypto? Firms are Hiring

"The Block and the blockchain association recently released a report on digital asset human capital trends which I'll just put in a plain English by saying it's about employment trends in Crypto. What are the main takeaways of the report? Well I think the most surprising takeaway from the report is the fact that this market is is pretty sizable right. We're talking about over twenty thousand jobs. Dozens of firms with more than one hundred employs always. This isn't an industry of basement-dwelling coders anymore. This is a real market with with major firms. Making good amount of revenue and a lot of that activity is happening here in the United States and abroad and over the past year. We've seen the number for of job. ADS increase and the investment trends over the past. Five years are also increasing right so total venture funding money in dollars. has increase overall since two thousand seventeen right Two thousand eighteen. We saw a major pickup And then a sixty percent declined between two thousand eighteen and twenty nineteen but the job market is still healthy and in growing and when you analyze the different firms for your report what kinds of firms did you include like. Did you include any of the decentralised projects foundations. Because I did see a few but then I didn't see the in theory and foundation which surprised me So I wasn't sure you know what the methodology was while we try to include as many different types absa firms nonprofits To profit seeking firms and foundations for the report reached out to over two hundred seventeen. Obviously it's not a complete league. You know overview of everything but we try to get as many firms as we could included but it does range and it runs the gamut from You know exchanges trading firms to Foundations like maker foundation and many different other types of companies service providers like China has another example and so who are the biggest employers in the space and what kinds of companies are they. Great question and it. It shouldn't come as a surprise that the major employers in this market are the companies that are are making money and that have found product market fit. We're still in. A speculative speculative stage of this market of the crypto market so exchanges and trading firms and service providers to exchanges. Make up the lion's share the of jobs just given the fact that that's where we are right that's where the market is growing so welby global has over a thousand employees coin joint base has close to a thousand employees okay X. is around a thousand employees and Mining firms also make a good chunk of the market from a job perspective So bit main is one of the largest employers as well about forty six percent of the largest largest employers are digital asset exchanges followed by development firms at around twenty nine percent and then mining firms at around ten percent. This is fascinating because I would actually like if you were to kind of put. All of those in their own category very broadly. You could say. They're sort of like picks and shovels type types of businesses. which in a way make sense? I think for the early stage that we're at and there was another way that you analyze these companies which is geographically. Ah where are they based. You know when you do the breakdown that way while there's a few ways we can look at this for some of your listeners. Who might hearken back on the token days of your And they might associate this market. Solely or exclusively with ICO's or token launches at this point in time. Singapore has really become the go-to jurisdiction for those types of companies making up around thirty seven percent To the US is thirteen percent. So I find that interesting. Just because it illustrates how Skittish folks here in the states are about operating those types of businesses given the regulatory reprisal. We've seen over the past two years overall. Obviously the United States is the leader in terms of in where the jobs are making up about thirty three percent to Asia Pacific's sixteen point seven percent and then the EU follows all is closely at eight percent. So the the whole point just the back up a little bit of this report was to illustrate for lawmakers legislators and policy-makers policymakers in DC. How big this market is where the jobs are growing and to sort of pick the brains of industry insiders about the impediments? They face in terms of either expanding their businesses launching new businesses and hiring in terms of job. Growth Right your ear and this is fascinating giving the backdrop of a price action. The United States saw digital asset jobs listening Rothe Year over your increase ninety three percent in two thousand nine thousand nine hundred and I mean so when I saw that versus what was thirty seven percent and the rest of the world world. That surprised me because of as you mentioned you know a lot of these companies are saying that the. US Isn't providing. Good regulatory clarity. So why do you think I right. We are still seeing quite robust growth here especially compared to the rest of the world one hundred percent. That's a really good question and it does it. It is an interesting juxtaposition right. Because you and I both know how much anxiety there is about the regulatory environment in the United States and all the. CEO's you talked to all the CEO's. I talked to list that as being one of the larger impediments. But if you think about the companies that are here here in the United States they are the you know quote Unquote Regulated Compliant Exchanges Coin based crack in Gemini. And at the end of the day. Those are the companies that are hiring so even though firms like let's say labral for instance might face some regulatory Tori headwinds a company like coin. Base pretty you know. They've got their stuff together in terms of their regulated by New York Department of Financial Services. They have their money transmitter license across many different states and they can expand pretty on abated. They have the venture capital to do it. They raised three hundred million in their most recent round. So I think that's why there's that that sort of that's how shaping out and one other thing that you mentioned briefly was The investment in this space. How were we sing? That breakout geographically. That's an interesting question so again. Obviously venture funding has fallen off since twenty Eighteen I mean in total. We saw that go down. Sixty percent percent The way the value is accruing geographically. Obviously the United States is is leading the way the US has two point seven x as many investors sisters with offices as Asia Pacific so the US is still king in that regard but but then again what's interesting racing as many investors have headquarters in the United States but then have offshore entities to gain exposure to investments that they otherwise wouldn't be able to here in the US. Okay yeah in a way that sort of almost like a theme that I see throughout where you you know despite some of the regulatory I guess lack of clarity your uncertainty that we are still seeing quite strong Quite a strong industry here in the US like you know. Many of the most active of companies that are hiring our us-based and even the place where the the employer is domiciled the. US is still the largest. It's thirty three percent so you you know it's it's almost like yeah I I guess it's just sort of saying you know this is the biggest market it's the most desired market. And so even despite the regulatory lack of clarity there's interest in being based here in hiring here

United States Asia Pacific Blockchain Association ICO Singapore CEO China DC EU New York Department Of Financi
Sweet Victory

Let's Talk Game with Tiffani Lewis

09:56 min | 5 months ago

Sweet Victory

"Welcome to another episode of. Let's talk game. I'm your host. Tiffany Louis thank you so much for tuning in. I am recording in my bedroom which China normally do When I don't have a guest on the podcast but bringing you live video if you WanNa watch it on YouTube But thank you for my listeners and subscribers on I tunes and spotify for listening and I try to show gratitude in an expression of thanks with each show. Oh because any moment that you invest in listening to this show Some of the things that I share and giving feedback and taking time out to really listen I appreciate you. Thank you so much that means a lot And I say that more emphatically now because we know with sensitive time so much going on in the world that life definitely is precious and definitely reflective as we all think about the loss the tragic loss of the late late. Great Kobe Bryant Today I had a zone in is zoned in by putting on our God first family than basketball t I never sold any of these with SEM. Sports but I Did give some away and one of the guys who inspired this colour way huge Laker Fan. He does a lot with the Lakers. He's good friends with Kobe. Bryant but he's a Hampton University alumni. Just like me. And so when he got married. Say you know what I respect this dude and what he's doing in L. A.. And how he likes to give back. I'm going to make These for family basketball TS IN THE LAKERS. Color way so gifted it To him and I said you know what I'm going to record today's podcast in that T- because that's the mob mentality go all the way. Don't just go partially go all the way and so. My hope is that today's podcast is really used to to help us. Understand the sweet victory victory of what this life really entails and hopefully shine some light on that courageous faith that he demonstrated day in and day. Out You know like often when we think of championships in the champion from the vantage point of winning. That's all we think about valleys from the vantage point of winning celebrations Excitement popping bottles parades And you even have the hats and the teas where shows who who who the champs are right. Seldom does it warrant any expression of solemn or tears unless his tears of joy of course reflective elective tears at express accomplishment. That feeling that you did it like you and your teammates worked so hard on and off season to make it happen so oh you know the question as so. Many people have common have been in earshot of people talking about The tragic loss of all the the lives that were on the helicopter but especially Kobe Just trying to reconcile how something like that can happen to someone so great and I say you know title this podcast Sweet victory because that's what came to me Sweet victory so how can't can't victory calls one to feel something so bad a sense of grief or anguish if you've won and Victory by definition is defined as defeating an enemy or an opponent in battle or game and as we all know the super bowl is coming up within a matter of days and there will be crowned crown another NFL Champion the winning team. And you know just like in life competition sports business school In various other aspects grants bragging rights to champion the one who's victorious over the other but and as we all know reflect on the loss of Kobe one of the most competitive champions five times over that ever walked this earth. How do we we reconcile his death with victory Kobe he so passionate in expressive in dominant in every aspect of basketball ball. On and off the court I believe he had like little to no weaknesses. Offensively defensively you know. Oh no none right. he was a playmaker. Your Go-to your score I was watching this episode of blackish and the dead et got a haircut in you. Know he was so supportive if he of his barber over the long term you know he was his go to for many years right and I don't know of the Barbara's hands. Just kinda got a little shaky but needless to say he he messed race. He's here lineup and so he said. Hey my Barbara's like Kobe you know he makes the plays and so he messed this one up but you know what I'm going to pass him the ball again because I believe in him that much and so needless to say he's back to his barber he got jacked up even more. The episode was funny. But what I love it because everybody knows that Kobe was the playmaker he was trusted. You passed him the ball. He was a score his infamous leap in the air. Celebrate Tori jump accompanied by an aggressive fist. Pump was just like one of the ways he celebrated and just demonstrated his championship demeanor He he expressed in walked. DOC does champion He. He carried himself as a champion. He spoke as a champion As a champion he fueled others to raise their bar to raise their gang To compete at levels they may not have been able to reach without his priming. And that's best mark of a true champion not when you're just dominating but when when you are able to bring others up to a level that they may not even know that they could play at or achieve. That's a champion. That's that's the type of person. Kobe was Because his victory was contagious and we all know Kobe was studios during his time in the NBA. He studied the playbook he probably could have. You know drew up plays in his sleep right so I wondered how that aggressive faith and tenacity. He carried over into his personal life in this into short clip. The true power of his faith was revealed. Take a listen. What did you learn from that whole experience? Just having a goal through what you went to God is Great. Is it that simple God is great. Don't get no simpler. Never did you know that I mean everybody knows that with the way you know it now. Did you know what before that incident took. You know it all you want but until you got to pick up their cross that you can't carry he picks it up for you and carries you and across then you go bill to him. We are strongest in our weakest most fragile moments Before God which transcends any talent any gift any skill I'm GonNa say that again. We are our strongest in our weakest moments before God This is not just coming from some quote. This is something that I've experienced myself Weakness before got is strengthening is strengthening so I imagine that As Kobe would have in any critical hulled huddle where time is winding down and everything is on the line. Kobe us the pressure in those last moments to lead this time not as a player but as a coach I imagine he he pulled everyone in for huddle locking thing is not to strategize any game. Winning plays before final game winning prayer I imagine he let out a courageous roar. You know the back Bending Koby roar with fists clenched commanding those around him to focus on the sweet victory of being in God's presence as believers levers may we be assured by studying the playbook of the greatest playmaker our Creator for this game of life that our greatest victory rest in him and I know for many it looks like they lost but I tell you they won. They won. They won no more man to man. No more zone defense no more fouls nor back court press no more out of bounds. Wants no more sweating no more tears. No more pain of coming up short. They won they won because they found total victory and total rest in our creator. They rest in him. Being one who has a child lost a parent suddenly and tragically the depths of healing and overcoming trauma can take years or even a lifetime to unpack so as we all grow through this game of life of stressing trying to make plays putting points on the board getting the bag and aspiring for greater. May We not lose sight of lifting those who are hurting who are grieving up And being sensitive to one another being more loving more or hope field but also most importantly being assured that with God. We are victorious.

Kobe Bryant Basketball Lakers China Youtube Barbara Tiffany Louis Hampton University NFL NBA
Does killing Soleimani really change anything in the Middle East?

Between The Lines

13:38 min | 5 months ago

Does killing Soleimani really change anything in the Middle East?

"For a generation Iran's May General Sulejmani he was a consequential Fica League in the Persian Gulf for the Americans in the region Sunnis? He was a terrorist mastermind for the Iranians the Assad regime in Syria Hezbollah in Lebanon. Sulejmani was a hero who protected the Shia cresent in the region. So it's no wonder the Iranian generals death via a drone attack attack in Baghdad. That was a huge news story. Earlier this month cast into the money rainy and military commander assassinated in the US drone strike on mm struggling marks a huge escalation coming just days at was revered by Iran supporters in proxies being blamed for the deaths of hundreds of Americans in the Middle East over the we took took action last night to stop a war. What comes next? What's the broader strategy? Here we did not take action to start a war. Your since the American killing of Sulejmani Tehran launched a missile strike on your spices in Iraq and in the process mistakenly shot down a Ukrainian Ilana carrying one hundred seventy six passengers something. The Mullah's had initially denied responsibility but crucially the Iranians signings avoided killing Americans. which was the red line? The president trump has drawn. US military response. So we'll this episode. Leave Iran Ryan stronger or is tyron now more isolated than ever and what is the showdown between Tehran and Washington Maine for Iraq the US military Tori prisons there and Iran's nuclear ambitions. Danny Applica- is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington and Co host of the AAAGH. Ah podcast what the Hell is going on. Making sense of the world get identity. Hey Tom and I'm in. Sokoll is author of Iran Rausing the survival and and future of the Islamic Republic and CO author of Islam beyond borders the Oma in world politics. Welcome back to Iran. How good morning now? Also Amani abetted genocide in Syria to keep the Assad regime in power. He's responsible for the deaths of many American troops. He armed Hezbollah in. Lebanon with rockets is to attack. Innocent Israelis killed many innocent Sunnis in Iraq. So I mean isn't the world better off without Sulejmani. Were president trump. I think so. And also quite a number of American allies in the region Probably I think the same way but at the same time demand was a national hero and in fact that he was the one of the top strategic brains behind Iran's overseas operations and expansion of eight onion influence in the region. I will just support related to the fair that it only leadership has about the possibility of an American attack or an Israeli attack on a combined and attack. But let me see this Tom that nobody is commendable. dimitris full of commanders. Top commanders into the Nobel Prize winners and so on General money is being replaced And I think e to the debt is a widespread view in the West. That if you bump one or two individuals isn't the situation is going to get better We duty cold in history that take for example a Prime Minister Anthony Eden go around the nineteen fifties and calling for the elimination of Jamaa Nasser as the national president of Egypt and has was that this man is removed from a then. Everything will be fine. Nothing died in nine hundred. Seventy and a situation has not improved a cold and and at the same thing was said to be so I mean the point though. Is that knocking off Salomon. He's not going to make a great deal of difference. But also can I just add to this Dani salamone and these Iranian backed Shia proxies. They did help inadvertently into why help. America Islamic state. So does it worry you that people cheering the loudest about this. Guy's death other suny jihadists in there are slighted areas in the desert and the mountains of Iraq and Syria. I don't think they're the ones who are cheering the loudest I. I think you heard pretty loud cheering from here. I think you heard some plenty of loud cheering in In Iraq and Lebanon and and elsewhere throughout throughout the region. Look you know. I think it's important to acknowledge that. That as the head of the cuts force Qassem Soleimani was a very powerful folks very influential very strategic and very effective leader and he brought that effectiveness to things. That would terrible And the arming of Hezbollah. The murderer of half million Syrians. The arming of mass. The arming of in Yemen. We could go on for a while here but but But he did all of those things but when when the challenge was from Sundays you had is. He helped set up and guide ride. The hoste. Shabby the popular mobilization units in Iraq that That that ended up being part of the battle to to defeat Isis. The problem here is that every situation in the region is is more complicated than the enemy of my enemy is my friend. Just because Stalin Fort with us to defeat Nazi Germany did not make stolen a good guy. And if you look at these anti-regime protests some and. I've been breaking out in Iran since Tehran admitted that its military military shot down. A Ukrainian passenger Ilana have the Iranians overreached because despite the Iranian successes in Iraq Syria and Lebanon on on their rule out officials sites there on stable they print across he so have the Iranians overreached. There's no doubt that many Iranians feel about the Ashim and today have protested over the last few months in order to bring about A structural reforms today as a system of governance and economy which is setting enormously under represent- trump's sanctions but has the Iran overreached. What are I pointed out earlier I mean Iran does fear a a very strongly as possible American that much Israeli combined attack and therefore what update on your the humans done his belt reasonable security and press such for itself which would really want? Shepherdess Arafat at all costs but that does not necessarily Saudi mean that Iran is only Aggressive power in the region aggressive actor in the region. I mean. Let's not forget that that that the destabilization Iraq really started the two thousand three. US invasion of that country. Okay so the. The American invasion of Iraq helped Iran on because it overturned the suny state and it created a Shia majority Stein. I saw a natural law with the Shia brethren in Tehran following following on from that Danny shortly a problem about striking at pro Iranian sheeham paramilitary groups as trump has done is the now part of the Iraqi state. So is it any wonder. Washington's increasingly modulation is part of the world. First of all. I think it's offensive talk about Shiites. As if they're all some sort of monolith. The share of Iraq are Arabs. The Shia of Iran are Persians. These these are different people this. These two countries Shia versus Shia fought a bloody war for eight years in which there were one million casualties casualties in the nineteen eighties. The notion that somehow Iraq is a natural satellite or or or or slave to Iran is wrong Iran has chosen to try to dominate that country and demonstrations throughout the central and southern part of Iraq. Over the last month have been against Iranian domination the Iranian consulate in Jeff was burned to the ground at the end of last year not by Sonny's he's not by Sunni jihadis not by Isis not by Kurds but by Shiites carrying placards yelling out to out for Iran. Get Out of our country and I think that that is absolutely right to suggest that Iran has gained more influence in Iraq since the demise of Saddam Hussein. I I guess I I'm just not that big a fan of Saddam Hussein and the and the stability that he brought to Iraq. I wish that the United States had done more in the aftermath of the wall. I think thinks that we I think that we failed miserably. In many instances I think it was absolutely fatal in two thousand eleven when at a time of genuine stability in Iraq Iraq. President Obama withdrew troops and really provided the opportunity for Isis. To rise up again. My guest Daniel Placate from the American Enterprise Institute. And I'm in Sokoll. He's the author of Iran rausing and Islam beyond borders. I mean how would you respond to all of this. Because we've got these tensions here between Tehran Iran and Washington and the Iranian backed Shia politicians released most of them in Baghdad. I support if not closer ties with Tehran. They want the the Americans out of Iraq. But don't the sooners and the Kurds fee for the Iranian intrusion in Iraqi sovereignty. I absolutely and of course sir. The APP is not only the president of the American so who'd be which are being the opposed to in Iraq but also the presence of eight onions there. No question Ah about that but at the same time if we know that the majority of the Iraqi population is made up of the Shiites and some powerful elements among the Shiites have got the value equals relationship and relationship. What they don't know in the meantime ago? The Iraqi parliament release the iranian-backed Majority Shia legislators I support the withdrawal of US troops Danny now given trump's ambivalence about the region and the fact that he was elected impact to get the US out of the so-called forever awards isn't a US military withdrawal from Iraq. Just what trump and many war-weary Americans want. Well it's kind of funny. Isn't it because we start off talking about the you know the Iranians and what they want and and of course. The number one goal is to get the Americans out of the region and that is in fact the instruction is that has gone out to all of their proxy groups. All around the region. Is You need to step up activities to get the Americans out. Then we've got the president of the United States. It's who dearest and fondest goal is to get American troops out of the region so so a couple weeks after killing Kassim Sulaimaniyah. We have this unbelievably in coherent bizarre response. Where we where we're doing exactly what the around him one let? This is what Donald Trump has to sort out. He has to sort out whether he's the president. He's the kind minded president who who leads in a forthright fashion against men like costume ceremony. Who Seek to destabilize the region and extend Iran's hegemony Germany or he is going to be the kind of president that like Bernie Sanders like Barack Obama wants to turn around and high tail fin is to the Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump's uh-huh Washington energy independent America Stein fought these endless wars danny well A? They aren't endless wars. We have lost fewer people in these. This was than than than we lost a single day in World War Two so while they are conflicts that have continued on and off to a certain extent. You know the notion Shen that we've been sold that somehow we've still got one hundred and fifty thousand troops on the ground and losing them at a rapid pace is just wrong. We lost six in Syria. I I mourn every single one of them but the Kurds lost eleven thousand in their fight against Isis. So what what. What is the reason? We'll tell you very straightforwardly woodley because every time we turn tail every time someone says let's get out of that bloody Middle East. Let's pay attention to something fun. Like Asia and you'd like that. Tom Would now but hang on your way but every time we say that we end up being dragged back because the dynamics in the region of the ones that bring us back we need. We need a long-term solution that lets us. Stay away for good rather than one where we run away. Anita did it come back every single decade I mean the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal Provided tyron with as much as apparently one hundred fifty billion dollar windfall. Aw and certainly many people who are skeptical of the deal side that the Iranian spent lavishly arming the Shia militias across the region. So what it was trump right to pull the US out of the deal and instead impose maximum Prussia built around these economic sanctions on Iran. I think he was totally wrong and and I can care. There has been a backlash president. Trump's would would you withdrawal has a basically a provoked said that on Not to really go for the for police. Speed to in order to rebuild that they have nuclear program and. I think you're going to really do that. And of course that also carries the risk of a possible confrontation from tation between the United States and Iran possibly Israeli attacks on Iran and that could easily dissolved in a regional warfare. That at the end nobody may may be able to control it Danny. Any I mean a lively debate. Thanks so much for being back on. ABC

Iran Iraq President Trump United States Donald Trump Syria Lebanon Danny Applica Hezbollah Washington TOM Tehran Baghdad Sulejmani Tehran Shia Cresent Middle East Saddam Hussein American Enterprise Institute
Cloud Log Analysis with Jack Naglieri

Software Engineering Daily

08:10 min | 5 months ago

Cloud Log Analysis with Jack Naglieri

"So you're building tools around not just log management or log log analysis but also compliance dance. So if I want to be compliant for sock to or PCI. There are a number of things that I need to do to achieve Steve that compliance and a lot of this has to do with configuration. Kicks plane the connection between compliance compliance and having the right resource configuration essentially for a resource to be compliant. It follows a lot of these checklists that the compliance standards outlined so for example there would be a standard for encryption. Is a really common one right and make sure that your data is encrypted at rest. So we can do with our product is we can scan of bucket. We can enumerate all the attributes on it and then we can compare it against policy in a policy defines desired secure state in a way. And then you know we just develop a set of policies to cover all these different checks across all these different standards. And that's how we build the case for gang compliance certification in those things are not built natively into aws like eight. You can't you can't say hey hey. Aws I want sock to compliance across all my infrastructure. No you have to do some work to get there. So it'll be us does have the tool called configured that will help you with this but it's the same type of premises with Panther right except with Panther. You get more customization flexibility and it's more central than configure panther. You can actually scan like any number of accounts and it goes into one view you which is really helpful and then as a byproduct to that you also get asset inventory too so you can kind of like go through all of your buckets all of your accounts you can say like okay like who are. We failing any checks for CIS across any of our accounts or do we have any buckets named XYZ. You know it's it's really helpful for that but out of the box. Yeah I mean this is game better at this like they introduced a feature on us. Three that we'll just block all public access and I'm not sure that public access block aligns to compliance check per se. But yeah they give some tooling. But it's still really on the engineer to do it. That cloud asset indexing that you just described so there's a problem that I've seen in a couple of companies called cloud sprawl basically where they have all these resources that they don't even know where they are where they exist that you know people throughout organization of spun up databases and spun up servers in like these things are just not centralized in one place. There's no place you can go to see what what are all my assets that users across my organization of spun up on AWS. Can you describe that problem. Why is there a problem of indexing? All of a company's cloud resources like shouldn't there be a place I go on. Aws where like click. And like. Here's everything I have. Yeah I mean there should be. But there's it's not and I think it's because the counselor all very segmented and away and aws is super powerful. You can do a ton within the confines of a single account and I think that's just an area. They would need to invest in at some point and they probably well. I can't see it going on forever like this where you have. Have you know this explosion of accounts happening in you need tooling around it. Just it hasn't really happened yet. From native themselves and that just ended up being a byproduct of panther like we didn't really design the compliance to say. Oh we're going to build Nassim Tori just kind of happened as a side effect but it's a really good inside effect. Because now I can say like I can write a policy that says I only expect our users have existed in one of these accounts in. Because you have that context all the accounts accounts I think it provides a you a better security control as well. You don't have to deploy your rules in a single account you can look at the look at all of them influence it okay. So that MRS basically the on boarding process is well. I guess in order to actually know whether you're compliant or not you you would have to wire the panther compliance tool to all of your aws accounts therefore panthers going to have a view into all those aws W. counter. Know where all your resources are view. Panthers it's a single platform so we combine the compliance and log analysis into one and we actually use the same data for both in a way we have like I was saying before the beauty of land as you can create all these really fun complex pipelines. And that's exactly exactly what we did. So for example giving clutch data which is all the API calls that are happening in your account. We can use effort log analysis. We can also use that to say did some resource change and we have a separate pipeline. That gets the data essentially forks into that says okay. This log file shows that user created. Let's kick off a scan on that user and get more information and then let's compare the output of that into our policies which map to compliance standards and then that can tell us if this user has too many permissions for example because a another common compliance check is that you don't just have an admin attached to a user directly you'd have it within a group or you wouldn't have it at all. I mean having an administrator in aws like an administrator users actually kind of seen as anti pattern and you should useless privilege engine. That's a more common security best practice right. So that's really like the beauty with integrating and then when you integrate you get the context across both to so if that happens that says like Jack did this thing now I can actually see what permissions Jack actually have. What can you really do and combine them into one platform almost something else? That was kind of new and you see sometimes sims but we really want to invest into that integration. Let's switch I conversation to focusing on the business aspect of this the good market. Are you trying to sell entirely to cloud native startups. You do you feel like you can also sell to enterprises that have a mix of on prem infrastructure and are getting started with the a cloud or a year or two into their cloud product journey. The I think it's summer unrealistic. If I was to say only Claude native companies. Because I I think any company of a significant scale will have both will have on prem systems and we'll have cloud based systems and they might be multi cloud. That's a common thing to you. Know some people started dabbling. GP because they like Big Table or they can get benefit out of using different clouds for different purposes. So it's like Big Table G K or ten yeah pretty much and then with aws. I mean we try to focus on people have large amounts of aws infrastructure but but the beauty with logging tools is that they all natively support sending data bs anyway so someone in a hybrid environment or someone in a purely yes. Environment Environment really wouldn't make a difference to me this is long as they have some. Aws Infrastructure where they can run this application where they can run panther itself. That's really all that matters. They they can even have on. Prem systems to like laptops is a good example right like laptops really. Don't have anything to do with cloud and we can configure laptops to aggregate data into the cloud some way and then we can you know. Use the context outside of aws so for example like Pathak firewalls or Cisco firewalls. You know those who don't live in the cloud and Each of those companies were can away to bridge into the cloud. But Yeah I think the the scenario of having on Prem appliances and data is so common that we have to support it

AWS Panthers Aws Infrastructure Prem Systems Prem Steve Nassim Tori Engineer Administrator Jack Pathak Claude
The predatory publishers sucking science's blood (Summer Season)

Science Friction

06:42 min | 6 months ago

The predatory publishers sucking science's blood (Summer Season)

"The confusion between the open active publishing movement and predatory journals eased perhaps for another edition of the show it controversial you both charge authors to publish their pipers. Instead of plugging raiders subscribe with phase. So the open access document for that. Is that opened up on knowledge like never before afraid that up from behind traditional general pie walls but come believe the orthopedic model creates an inherent conflict of interest and that prey traded tree publishes of taking advantage of that in order to build prophet and the taking advantage of gone to who are desperate to get published in the publish. This you'll perish culture at dying. Some of them are taking up the offer because they're being tricked by the predatory publishers. And that's why I use the term predatory because they're preying on them. They're they're preying on their weaknesses that people need to get published so people are earning degrees. People are getting promotions at universities. People people are earning tenure. In some cases based on a publications in low quality fake predatory journals that don't conduct any peer review and have almost no settling at all they accept everything and we've also learned that Pharmaceutical companies are publishing their research to justify the the efficacy of their new medicines are using predatory journals to do that as well. What do you think the K.? Drive is of the predatory journal Sane has been. It's easy easy money. Jeffrey Built Blackley to all of predatory journals grew in influence as did his reputation. Publish publishes the now the push back angrily at him at criteria for inclusion on the lease at Lone ranger approach at he denora antagonism them of open active publishing some went straight to he'd universities Ladyship to attack your credibility and he became a kind of hybrid of hero in. I'm Tara how did he university respond for the most part for the first few years they were supportive of me and the legal office did help me. Could I have some tricky situations you know that. I had gotten in because of the threats from the publishers but towards the end I think they grew weary of me A.. And the support decreased. Dav receive pressure to shut Daniel blog from your university. I received the pressure but it wasn't pressure to shut shut down the blog. Things became increasingly uncomfortable towards the end before I retired I retired a year ago. Did it become uncomfortable. The university he did that some things I used to have an office and they took me out of an office and put me into a cubicle. They hired a new person to work in the library. He had two years of library experience and they made him be my supervisor. And you know part of Predatory publishing there's a broader context to it. There's a social movement behind open access publishing. A lot of people want to kill off the traditional publishers and had them all replaced with open access journals so that everybody throughout the world connects us all published research and it's a very Left wing social movement. And so the person that came in as my supervisor was among among those people and so we had strikingly kingly different ideologies about scholarly publishing. So that was way a pressured. Me Why did you. Shutdown bills leaked in in two thousand seventeen taint it has reincarnated with anonymous editors income since to protect themselves from what you went through. But why did you decide to shut it down. Well in January array of that year. I learned that the university was working with one of the publishers on my list and the results of that was that the university initiated a research. I misconduct investigation against me and I knew I hadn't engaged any research. Misconduct myself because research misconduct means means of falsification fabrication or plagiarism. By definition and I knew I hadn't done any of that yet they started this case against me and I felt very stigmatized passed by it and that kind of sealed it for me with the university. I you know take another action against me and now here was something major research misconduct case. And that's why I decided to stop the list. What was the outcome of that case the outcome in July of twenty seventeen was snow? Research misconduct found at that. Make you feel it made me feel horrible. I felt like my own university that I worked at for seventeen years. I was turning against me and I felt stigmatized and I felt like I really can continue the work. And that's why I shut down the blog and the lists you you think that builds leaked with attributes of that action. Sure it was a publisher that they worked with was a big one and the predatory Tori publishers. The ones that are doing really well are rich. They have lots and lots of money. They can hire lawyers to go after people and they can organiz well. And there are several very large very successful predatory publishers out there and and they have a lot of power and they we'll go after anybody who threatens their income publisher the publisher was frontiers. So you just ask them to be predatory publisher. Yeah Yeah and I had lots of evidence from stuff that they had published. They published an article about Chem trails in the Sky Cam conspiracy theory yeah. They published an article about that which they quickly retracted. After I wrote a blog post about it. They they published an article saying that. HIV doesn't cause AIDS. So I had lots of lots of solid evidence that they weren't really conducting Valla Peer Review Diet. It's not necessarily making them a predatory publish plenty of crap lanes up in good journals But it gets gets retracted and publishing junk. Science is one of the criteria that I use to evaluate publishers if you submit in an article to a publisher thinking it's good publisher when they're publishing crap science poor science that is a type of predation against on researchers. They don't want to be associated shared with junk science. And for the University of Colorado Dame Vera. Where Jeffrey held a tenured faculty position would not comment on any research? Misconduct misconduct investigation but told not friction that the university quote defended and supported perfect to build academic freedom to do predatory publishing part of scholarship.

Publisher Jeffrey Built Blackley Supervisor University Of Colorado Daniel Tori
"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

06:59 min | 11 months ago

"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"Will you actually what are one of my favorite people go to save money and i will actually might have to say rama noodles okay. It's so funny because i feel like i've been really dropping the ball my instagram game lately. I mean you've gotta. Give me some tips because i'm not ready for this whole like surgery and yet they're going to do you just fine. I feel like just you first of all. You're very well. Spoken and i feel like you have a lot of encouraging things to say so you're going to be people want to hear them. But of course they do cares they. They don't have choice. They're going to favorite date night activity with tony. That's a good one. Can you think on it for a second second course thinking about what he would say. I'm trying to think about what my favorite date night. Activity would be minds. Just like mine would be going with jason. We live on a golf course so just going to like like hit. A couple balls at the driving range have a drink and then come home like play cards. I love that yeah yeah. I would say we're actually doing this next weekend. I'm so excited lighted but tony's family has a house on the coast of oregon and there's this one spot like right outside his house. It's a park bench might just sitting on the park bench in the blanket with a glass of wine the best like my favorite thing in the whole time heaven and we go in. We'd same thing play games of the leeann. It's so fun we go crabbing. I love crabbiness ascribing and clamming and then we make all fresh fish and having a whole fish jenner yeah so we're we're going crappy next week. That's so fun so fun fun. Okay that's awesome. That's a good one of oregon yeah no kidding. That's i'm this jason living in seattle because i loved going out to to that side lived in seattle no no he's from buffalo brand buffalo but lived in seattle for a couple of years <hes> favourite trip you've ever taken croatia dubrovnik kershaw how i studied in london for five weeks and then that was our next stop. You've done so much for your age. Yeah it's amazing. It's so cool though it is. I feel like i'm so blessed guy seriously. I'm so blessed. I've gotten to do so many amazing things. I have mazing life yeah. There's there's definitely been hard moments but you know it makes the better moments better yeah. I hear you so favourite t._v. Show at the moment. I think on that too well. I'm rewatching gary's anatomy for the fifth time with diarrhea. Do i need to watch it yeah ever seen it. You need to watch it just like power our through. It's like i'm working on my laptop and like don't really need to pay attention show wednesday. That's my favorite show. <hes> i think my favorite rich show would probably be big allies right now is i'm abso- good and reese witherspoon as my spare animal she you should try meteoroid here. I forgot she's here. I was gonna go to draper james james yes but i didn't have time so maybe today i've heard i've many friends national. That've either done her makeup or done something with her that she is even better in person like she is literally in my in my idol her in big little lies is going to be a mom one hundred one. I love that. I love that jane lightly blonde is like yes everything and last favourite piece of advice you've ever received. I was gonna say one but it kind of contradicts the second best advice that i've ever gone well. Well okay so go with me on this. Okay okay. We'll one beside this. I don't know if it's gonna make sense. Kill 'em with kindness. I think that's just the number one always like if you stay kind of people and know that people have their own story in their own life happening and you just go into this world kindness you know people. May maybe mean to you back but as long as kind good karma is everything. I need to learn from this. I try. I'm a big factors. I really liked backing the classic mac wow well beyond yeah. Don't cross me. I will come out you but i try to kill him with. I'm gonna i'm gonna try and then i was gonna say which i think is really important integrates as chief actor even in our twenties especially in college and beyond we say everything and my advice i got was to say everything like don't move miss out on opportunities and that's why i've experienced so much in my life is i've said yes. There's so many things but at the same time the older i get like safer no yeah i know like do what you want. Don't do things that you make you feel uncomfortable or like aren't going to benefit you and life experience the world experience life the way you want to don't let other people here pressure you into doing stuff. You don't wanna do 'cause. There's some things you should do that that make you uncomfortable but not in a bad way you know there's there's uncomfortable uncomfortable but there's uncomfortable like taking a stepping outside the box and something new i don't. I like that all right. Well that's it. Oh no you had to confess to me. We're going to end it with a confession. Come on you. Were were you like head of your sorority. Oh yeah i mean there's stories there but illegal. Did i mean i've definitely done some illegal stuff in my day. Okay well share mike. How are we talking here well. I'm only going to be broadcasted to thousands of people. The cops come after me. No i've had some pretty crazy conversions versions. I'm trying to think of something that my mom wouldn't kill me for saying okay yeah all right. She's probably gonna listen hundred percent listen yeah literally from when i was fifth grade in fifth grade girl and <hes> so sad i was the new girl just moved from california and we had field day and and my teacher had to do like this relay where you'd put on his clothes. He's like seven foot tall like super bag and put on the clothes did fine and then i went to take them. I'm off and i took off my pants with it and i was wearing these like bright blue elmo underwear. No i was fifth grade. I was like ten or eleven so aside makes you want to go hug you. I know i like i like was mortified. I didn't want to go to school for like a whole year but it turned out okay. I don't talk to any of those people anymore so it doesn't really matter her of course like private catholic school and like difficulties you. I a little bit to preface. There is twenty five people in my class. Yeah and there's only like five or six guys. All the guys were so just like evil and manipulating super fifth grade. Yeah sounds about right yeah. Oh my gosh. I remember fifth grade boys. They're telling me like if i didn't kiss then like that. I wouldn't be on their top three liz. My space ubt doc fees fifth grade. Okay how old i know yes middle school for me. Probably like six or seven takes crazy yeah well anyways. Thank you so much for being on my podcast this highly going to resonate with my listeners and i really appreciate it and now we get to do yours yours..

seattle oregon jason tony reese witherspoon james james gary jane private catholic school mike california london five weeks seven foot
"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

03:50 min | 11 months ago

"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"You're so nine that too. I find that too. I i can't remember somebody. Set it on the podcast but somebody said or maybe it was me as you. You said you said it like i think at the launch party because you're talking about the bachelorette and the bachelor and how like you you he joined together and you're like twenty five women living in a house but like everyone says they'll be supportive and then it falls apart right. It's one thing to say you're an empowering person and to says say that women's support win but it's another thing to actually do it right and and i think that's what people are. There's a disconnect there especially in the workplace yes on so that's what's kind of a side part of she factor is we're working with companies to help them identify how well they're doing hiring women retaining woman and and advancing women into leadership so that's the other side of she factor that isn't as public right but it's so important and women in these companies just harry each other down like all the time and they don't support each other it actually men are more supportive of each other and professional environment than ruler which it's just because we get petty jealous and not just in our nature and then there's hormones involved not to mention. We're so it's just messy see yeah. So how do we push that aside. Get authentic with each other. Get real about our issues. Okay gelson my promotion like telling more about that like flips again then like yeah. That's what these conversations during these. She factor vita is they're going to be about. I bet you could figure out so much from just having such an authentic conversation like that like it might make you feel small all in the moment but to figure out why i i mean i save that conversation for my therapist like this way and then i can figure it out at the end by the end of like that's where it's coming from. We call that in sales care frontier. Oh i wanna use that good. Is there anything else you wanted to touch on what she factor or do you think we covered it all because i have a game play with you know. I think just how thankful we've been. You've been a part of a you've just gone above and beyond on for us and we're so happy because you are so unbranded. It's crazy well. I just really really really believe and i think you can hear it. Genuinely believe what you guys are doing anything. It's so important written and i want to spread the word and i think i just love. It and i wish i had something like that. I mean i i turned out just fine but i do wish i had something like that in my twenties and just when i felt lost and a united a couple of close friends but i don't feel like there was a community behind it. I i just really believe in what you guys are doing. We'll see so it's the she factor dot com the she factor dot com and get demean full frank. That's okay though the she factor dot com the that she factor and then i'll be running our podcast which i'm super excited about launching in august at torrey an all you can follow me to get more updates on that too perfect and tell me again the is the podcast called chief actor cast yet breezy since i'd that's great that's like me. I'm like people working at kaylynn bristow on twitter and instagram kalem roseau dot com just killing bristow. Okay yeah just cable breath okay so we're going to play just so people get to know you a little better as as the person <hes> we're just gonna play favorites okay. It's funny because well. Maybe i shouldn't tell you. Have you play hotseat during my father. I love that eh switching. That's great. I love any games. I'm like this is a really tough game. Just tell me your favorite way to spend a weekend. Ooh on the water <hes> beach beach lake river on the biggest lake guy in the world like i just love being on the lake. Yes it's amazing came favorite person to follow or account to follow on instagram..

beach beach lake river twitter
"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

04:27 min | 11 months ago

"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"It's pretty incredible and if you're wondering how they make money by the way it's from commission. They're not selling any of your personal data which which is really good to know personally. I love having honey for whenever i'm shopping but i tend to buy a ton of things on amazon especially for rahman right now just because it's so much easier than actually i putting on clothes leaving the house doing whatever i need to do. I was blind. Rahman treats toys 'cause obviously he's such a good boy. I saved fifteen dollars four cents at checkout out which i will now use to buy rahman. Even more treats toys okay. I wanted to circle back to the silhouettes because i want. I just think it's a cool idea and i wanted to know some of the questions that people need to the answer to determine their personal silhouette. Yes do some deep diving no and honestly like i would be my vice. I it is fine and you kinda just have to be impulsive. Yeah you have to go with the same that comes to your mind. You can't like go super deep well in this situation like this would. How do you just have to be super impulsive not how you're going to get the best result types of questions and gosh. It's been forever since i've taken it. What the type of work environment do you like more of a creative person or are you more of a data analytics person <hes>. Do you enjoy spending time outdoors from working out. It's super easy x five minutes. We've done so much research and like it seems like we may be created it overnight but like we did. A ton of research into this and simple is better. I wasn't personality quiz. I i love taking anything like that and i enjoyed it because i i just think it's fun to get to know yourself. A little better to be like that is me yes in like sometimes. You don't know something about yourself until you know something about yourself. I know that sounds so weird but i totally get. Did you discover so much about yourself in this process and that's what i love about the book and love about she factors. It's all about self discovery. Yeah like which learning about which it's such a good thing for for that time in people's lives to write like people in their twenties. Even i mean it doesn't matter what age you are but especially that seems to be you know. Probably the the age chapel really use that in benefit yeah 'cause you're twentieth or so important yeah. I don't know if you've ever read the defining decade if you haven't you should but is it too late for me. I'm thirty four. You're not thirty four. Oh my gosh. I didn't know that i know didn't look it hangs. No it's a great book and especially if you ever plan on having kids. I think it's really important to like understand like how your twenty s affected your life where it's going into that yeah. It's just called again. The defining decade the defining okay tell me more and it's all about how your twenty s to find the rest of your life. I mean like the relationships you have like. If you're in a six picture relationship that's more than half your twenties and then if it doesn't work out where those six years ago or you are in a relationship and then you have kids right in your twenties the rest of your life or you get a bad job and you're in that career for ten years and you look back and maybe that wasn't the job you wanted and then you have to circle back and find a new career in your thirties or forties forties and that is so hard to do so that book actually really sparked my passion about just like helping young women in their twenties like i think this age group specifically is so important <hes> and and i think from myself being in that position with the job that i was so not passionate about now doing something that absolutely love it so funny tony's like you seem more more less stress but you work so much more my i love like what i'm doing. I want to stay changer. You know do all the stuff that's planning to change. People's lives yeah and it must be so rewarding at the same time right like you're doing something that you see benefiting younger girls that you probably wish you had from the things you're going through you know and i see all of my friends struggling with all of these women that i talked to all across the country during this tour. Everyone is going through the same thing. It's so true i get. There's so many messages from girls being like i'm twenty four and i just broke up with my boyfriend and i don't know what i'm gonna do with my life and i do and i just want and i really just dot com but it's crazy because it's always girls in detroit but i'm like women go through that in their thirties and forties went through it in her forties. She didn't get remarried until she was forty. So it's and people just you know an. I laugh now thinking back on my time in my twenties unease thinking i.

rahman amazon detroit fifteen dollars five minutes six years ten years
"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

12:38 min | 11 months ago

"tori" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"That inspires young women to live life with greater authenticity empowerment and joy and movement personally close to my heart. I don't know if you guys saw but i did an event with them. She is here to answer all of your questions about. She factor their mission. What you can do to become part of the movement you can find her personally on instagram at tori gamal t. o. r. I g. a. n. H. l. south and you can learn more about she factor by following them at the she factor or visiting their website website the she factor dot com. Please welcome to the podcast story. Thank you very much so excited. I said that really sexually those weird. I love it. I i really comfortable when i'm in my own home when rahman sitting here with a boehner. I'm so sorry about that earlier. Flattered i do feel flatter. They really do is really hoping hoping i get to meet him and now he's asleep on my show. I love medicine in the whole entire law out. He's such a little nugget of golden retrievers. Yeah you need to get one. I'm he's buddy is just that again for my boyfriend on the other end. Oh does your boyfriend not. Is it not the right time. We're buying house. We close next week so it's not the right time. Thanks jack yeah the backyard. It's like a little patio. Oh it's perfect some grass back there as well as long as you can just pop them in the car and take them to a fielder earlier good exactly i lived in an apartment with a golden retriever a few years ago. We did it and a hundred and two pounds. He's huge shield job so you could do it. I believe what's is your boyfriend's name. His name's tony tony tony tori toying tori wait. That's so kenya telling. Have you guys been together three and a half years yeah. That's really cute. How old are you twenty three twenty four next month. Oh that's serious style well meaning. What are you most nervous about living with him. We'll we're living in right now and he's just one hundred square foot apartment and we're splitting closet. So why would she have necessarily nervous about anything. I'm just security to have another close. That's amazing. I don't know how i'm doing it to be honest seven hundred square feet. How long have you been doing that for. We've been living together for six months and then i've been living in it for two years. Holy yeah already already yeah. You need some more space. I can't even imagine i used to live in a four hundred twenty square foot but by myself oh my god yeah and that was a studio yes. It was a studio like i always say my. My bed was in my kitchen. I was just about to say i could never eat and sleep in the same room. No i have family over for thanksgiving which was hilarious and unlike my she was my niece was three at the time and we literally just like all sat on the floor around this little tiny coffee table and it was actually one of my favorite memories sounds about right. Yeah yeah there. You go you you do with the space. You're giving you definitely do okay so excited. Your hair your in nashville. Where did you just buy house portland oregon. Oh aw what i've always wanted to go there. It's you have to it's the i've been in an hour for like a day but i've wanted to spend time because i absolutely love the vibe. It's such is such a weird vibe yeah. I totally dig it. I went to school in oregon and then i stayed there yeah. It's such a fun city. Gosh my some of my good friends live in eugene you gene that's gene yeah soaring aaron peter and evan holland's. Do you know them. They like sing musical theater. They're really cute little family. Oh my gosh i should though because i'm a musical theater nerd what you need to be friends with like the she is musical theater after after meeting okay all i will do dry love it so we actually met before the she factor event like i said earlier i was part of that. I was that was just so on brand for me. It was so so cool to be a part of that in that you guys are doing that discussed to me like kind of how you became involved as she factor where it came from your name everything tells about it. I'm <hes> so it started when i was in college. Actually i graduated two years ago and i was like the poster child of college like i did every leadership position position. I had a four point. Oh mazing mom successful entrepreneur. Everyone was kind of looking to me to be the one who had it figured out after college and then eh rolled around and everyone getting into grad school finding jobs and figure out where they were going to move and i had absolutely no clue what i wanted to do i hey did forty-five informational interviews. Spring break of my senior year hated every single one. I felt like i wanted to do it in p._r. Broadcast journalism or something like that and i just didn't feel l. like a spark or passionate connection with anything which is great that you didn't just settle for something that you were waiting for that. You know i did just kidding kidding so i got so nervous because i did decide to move to portland new city. Luckily my my boyfriend was from there. So i kind of a community of res- i wanna have my own <hes> <hes> so i settled for a sales job at an i._t. Staffing company <hes> the people amazing like so incredible and they are my people. They still are my people. They're my family in portland but the job was just not what i was passionate about making you happy at all it would only in your soul no and i was working like probably sixty to eighty hours a week every week and to do that when you're not doing something you love is strangling go draining so and my mom had kind of started thinking about the book idea when i had come to her in college and saying i don't know what i want to do and then when i came back turn you know a year later and said i'm not doing something. I'm passionate about. I hate my job. I voss complete touch with my relationship myself resolve. I was eating healthy drinking all the time like i was just miserable <hes> she's like. We need to find a way to fix this problem so she wrote the book. It's called she factor xi factor. The neen comes from actually the score that you give yourself in the app for how you do it hitting your goals so the apps another tool that you i used to basically set priorities fears nine spheres <hes> we want you to take a holistic approach to your lives. There's folk flame fitness fuel and fashion faith favor. There's nine hundred spheres prioritize which ones are most important to you and then you set goals for yourself and your she factor is how you do it hitting those. Let's go out yeah. It's awesome that alone just feels empowering. You know like you just can't like motivated. Just hearing that i know and it's all just like self responsibility is so important but we lose touch of it so easily yeah. 'cause we get busy like you're you travel. You work netflix loyd disobey guan because you need that time tuna on time you know to unwind and kind of shut off and unplug yes you it. I've been doing so much. I don't think it is but it's like i throw up and i'm just like a kid and my mom. I just want to stay in bed for like a week it. It takes a lot of ideas so yeah. It's all about finding a holistic approach share life and the next step of it which we're launching in september is the squads so it's all about live interaction and finding your your core group of girls that will really support you and help live that authentic life and you'll meet once a month and talk about your goals and how will your doing winging then we'll have a social event and facebook live event to that. You can join in if you're subscribed. It'll be with countries most notable women and then social events will be he likes free bar class or a hike or happy hour something to tell me. It's this so with the book. It's kind of like a guide. I'd like like a roadmap yeah <hes> which is so nice because you know people come out of school or they don't go to school and they just who doesn't think what you do. What do you do. What am i gonna do with my life. What do i want to do and a lot of people are well. I don't know how many but some people are motivated by money and some people are motivated by passion and you have to find the in between and i think it's so important to just find something that you love doing and find a way to make money doing that because you will be such a happier person and so i think it's so cool what you guys are doing because the book can guide you and show you that everybody's on their unique path and then it can also help you see that you're not alone and i i love the app idea because you can have this community of other people who are in the same boat as you and you can talk and i love that you're doing these social events. I just think that's so important in in this time in this world and i think people are going to really benefit from that i hope they of course they will. I mean now is the time like the world is focused on women right now on everything they're doing and that was kind of what sparked us to just like full-fledged go forward. Yeah now is the time to do it. Can you just dive into a little more what the different silhouettes are and how they are formed. Yes i'm so there. Are i believe five different silhouettes so i myself i am a guardian so i like to to serve other people. I basically the silhouettes help you figure out who you are and this is from the app is a book of the book and it's from emma like you can do a little little i did. I did it online didn't i. You probably did it in the opera online. So the book describes all of this alerts you and then you take the tests tests in the app and it kind of compiled like every notable personality quiz quiz mix together <unk> out there yeah so like the strength finders of the world the disc of the world we made it more fun and targeted towards women so we have dreamer guardian queen storyteller. I felt really where you're right up there with queanbeyan oh as a queen to of course why are we not surprise is. I think my mom is a dreamer. She sees big picture q._a. Them again dreamer queen guardian storyteller and and explore explorer okay. I think i might have to double check and so so you can do this figure out which one you are and then what do you do from from there so really the point of the silhouettes we've found in all the focus groups they've done in the women we've talked to when you find out something about yourself and the way you function it helps you capitalize on your strengths rather than your e your weaknesses so you can now no okay mcqueen like i demand attention. I know what i want. I know my journey. I'm confident a and i'm passionate and that's who i am so i'm in capitalize on that instead of trying to bring myself down to match other people. That's a weakness you know so instead of always constantly trying to bring yourself down. You're never going to be successful but if you run with who you are authentic yes and you are you yeah then you can and do you change silhouettes throughout your journey a one hundred percent yeah because i'm i'm thinking about it. I'm like i don't think i was a queen ten years ago yeah but you work your way up to change as you go they say in the other on like with the disks and the strength finders and all those types of personality tests. They say that you typically change every two years really yes. I believe that yeah and you can also be like a mix of the two. I'm not full guardian like i. It's funny. My best friend is a nurse and she's like four one hundred percent guard. That is what she does. I could never do that job right but i like to serve people like i don't. I don't necessarily like to have the big ideas. I like to do the work yeah. It's a little bit. I that's i'm the opposite i like to have big ideas and i did not know how to execute like i'm like i need a team to execute but i will come up with the big ideas. It's so perfect because my mom is full full and dreamer and then i'm so she does all of you guys are like okay. Let's be realistic. Think about how we can execute. That's so awesome though that you guys are that then so fun working together. It's so cool that you guys have that relationship between a mother and daughter. Let's just actually touch on your mom for a second again because i she is such a boss. I know like it's kind of annoying even just her presence. I'm like she is just like you know you can tell she says but also so soft yes and i. I don't know the is the biggest heart like okay hell. She was sitting here with rahman right now. She'd be incomplete. Tears like really she. We went on a trip to greece when she had smuggled twenty five dogs across country right okay wait. Tell it so. This is why touch on your mom she is. She's so inspiring hiring. She's been named one of what was it fortune magazine. She was in forbes recently and fortune magazine's ten.

rahman portland fortune magazine oregon tori gamal t. o. r tony tony kenya nashville netflix facebook forbes jack p._r greece l. aaron peter mcqueen evan holland
"tori" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"tori" Discussed on AP News

"Tori, McFarland was a field level analyst for most of last season before moving upstairs for the final two games. Jason Witten is out he lasted only one season after deciding to end his retirement and rejoin the Dallas Cowboys, however last season three men commentary team didn't really gel and struggled as Witton tried to make the transition from the field to the booth. The ratings didn't suffer though, they were up eight percent from twenty seventeen before deciding to stick with the two man team ESPN reportedly reached out to Peyton Manning. Earning but informal discussions went nowhere. Also back for her eighth season sideline. Reporter Lisa salters who signed a multi year deal. Wikileaks founder Julian Assange says he won't agree to extradition to the us where he's accused of conspiring to hack into a Pentagon computer is AP correspondent serious shaklee reports of British judge says an extradition case against Assange will take many months at the court hearing Assange said he will not surrender to exit dish in for doing what he called John and the has won many awards. Assange a pit at Westminister magistrates court by video link from London's Belmarsh prison where he's serving fifty weeks sentence for skipping banning two thousand twelve and taking refuge in the embassy of Ecuador at the time. He was facing extradition to Sweden for questioning over rape and sexual assault. Made by two women seven shaklee London. A Star Wars. Character has died. I'm Jacky Quin with an AP news minute. Peter Mayhew, the actor who portrayed the gentle giant to buck in the Star Wars series with seventy four years old. He says that they dubbed in the sound of a bear for his line. The noisy own federal..

Julian Assange Jason Witten Lisa salters Peyton Manning London Westminister magistrates court Dallas Cowboys ESPN Tori Peter Mayhew Jacky Quin Witton analyst AP Wikileaks McFarland Reporter Ecuador Pentagon Character
"tori" Discussed on WINS 1010

WINS 1010

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"tori" Discussed on WINS 1010

"Tori yes june june four here's which struggle the warring slightly hurt of sports betting casinos across asia lorde what what is suing real stay tuned in other words were thunderstorm possibly through the sheep england clear and cool the belgian lows 60s your admit adrift bs in the sauber with his personal birthday the medicine and early three two one hole against the marlins over threegame series data miami yankees and white sox getting set for game two of their four set in chicago supplied jeff publisher of luke burt stocks lost ground today beach agreed during ducts is closed lower price of oil rebounded which do drive made old trafford shudder here's garret velgo and we just cleared away an accident on the northbound side of the deegan a right near the crowds bronze damage is done you've got delays the go all the way back down to the bruckner on the northbound side of the deal on the eastbound side of the qe things are going to be heavy from the williamsburg bridge too meager abbott westbound be qe for me grab two white bab on the eastbound side of the life you're all jammed up from woodhaven boulevard out to the cross island and then on the northbound then wake you're going to hit the brakes from nasa expressway the hillside avenue southbound van wyk heavy from whereas harding expressway out to liberty ab here's what you need to know about your bridges and tunnels george washington bridge ten minutes into town the thirty minutes out by with delays on the westbound side of the cross bronx the lincoln tunnels your best bet ten minutes in or out of town holland tunnel ten minutes inbound forty minutes on the outbound side traffic and transit every ten minutes on the ones and breaking traffic alerts when they happen i'm covered the falco on ten ten wins a new.

Tori marlins chicago publisher garret velgo deegan bruckner the deal williamsburg bridge cross island holland tunnel asia lorde miami luke burt harding expressway george washington bridge ten minutes thirty minutes forty minutes
"tori" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"tori" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Tori does thanks man okay good evening as normal this world plans madam bon iver oh my god no tomorrow so a couple elle fanning hello as a yeah defending battles as a oh i want you to agree with you sudden dovey rabbi wait a minute i'll just a week ago crew at my house and we party every week as on the radio death my favorites all me bounce around like i don't know like i won't be enough now the golf got no patients back go so why is alive or why the yemeni suka guys got so how does not apply la with alive from beiber either aww oh my god you pay for your france i'll take that as a compliment hezbollah homes will the opposite kaba aye it added it is where young lavishly on the ground the cabinet i'm sorry the future two thousand five by your back we can do this alone no that was jews the rabbi la la.

golf beiber france Tori madam bon iver hezbollah