19 Episode results for "Topi"

James Gurney

Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

15:19 min | 8 months ago

James Gurney

"Tavern vintage conversation with James Gurney. Who's responsible for creating the world of Dinatale Topa? Let's reflect and look inside the mind of this creator of this fantastic dino world. The first question I think to ask you is. Did you think back in one thousand, nine, hundred, eighty two Tokyo would become what it is today. No, I had no idea at all. In fact when I was doing the paintings for Dino Topa I was doing pictures that I was intentionally doing to make impossible to make a live action. I knew that in the Star Wars era was hard to do the water. Water effects and to do people riding creatures, those are always the toughest thing to do so I, deliberately planned these big epic scenes of Waterfall City and parade dinosaurs, because this will never be made into live action, and just about then of course, the digital revolution was starting to happen, and and I realized that maybe it would be possible took a long time, but I think that hallmark entertainment is really. Gone all out to make Dina Topi translate to the screen. As very exciting and actually to kind of go back to your work, and we'll definitely cover the miniseries as well but I. Think what impressed me to the amount of research that you do on on diagnosing it looking at fossils and things to get the dinosaurs at the correct scale. You know I spoken to Actually Dean Foster one time and I know he's travelled a bit, and you do as well to kind of get that look of the city, the city of Dining Topi as well. Yeah it kind of specializes in artist in painting. Realistic scenes of things that can't be photographed whether it's a historical scene from National Geographic. Or fantasy scene of something that we know must exist out there, but no one has ever seen I end to do that means getting a lot of models and elements and people in Costume, and whatever it takes to essentially do almost like a single frame from a from a cease obt, male movie, and the fun thing about being an artist. Is that working away in your studio? You can do? All those things can be the writer and the director and the lighting person, and and put the whole thing together. Which one is your favorite dinosaur to draw? I'm. Like stegosaurus because it's the most outlandish dinosaur, and when you spend a lot of time coming up with alien design, and the thing about nature, is it? There are things in the fossil record that have far weirder than anything you could imagine and Stegosaurus one, although it's a bear to dry, stegosaurus is tough, because all those different plates are in different angles, and you have to just keep racing it and redrawing it to get it right, but nevertheless that's one of my favorite dinosaurs. Was this a boyhood something that you liked as a boy? The dinosaurs right for me I got into because of a gentleman named Harry Housing. I did love dinosaurs as a kid, and of course in those days they were seen as cold, blooded reptiles who lived in the swamp and I remember the picture in the time life book had the brackish source with the whole body underwater, because and just ahead sticking out because they said well, we can't hold up its own weight. It could never do that and it wasn't. Until I became an adult that the new theories came along presenting dinosaurs as dynamic and warm blooded and intelligent, and just recently in the last few years. The bird dinosaur connection has really solidified so that we realized that dinosaurs. Behaviors and mannerisms, and even looked a lot like birds, instead of like reptiles, that science dinosaurs is very very much a part of dining Topi. and. Talking to paleontologists about the wave of popular interest very often, they follow these renaissance periods of discoveries, which word still in and Topi is just one way of playing without idea. What if dinosaurs are bird like dynamic and intelligent? What if we? If. They were smart if they were wise and could. Benefit, US, somehow speaking of that, I'm sure you've seen the famous. I think even the Museum of Natural History New York area here with the T. Rex, standing up almost fully erect, and obviously we've found out that hey might not be that way. Part of what I love about. Dinosaurs is what we don't know about them. We know what this structure of their bones looks like. We know we have a few skin impressions, but we don't know how. They sounded a really how they moved or what color they were for a while. People were saying the. The Tarantula could run forty miles an hour, and now article comes out a couple of weeks ago. They'd say now they could just walk about ten miles an hour at the most and and who knows but being artist you talk to all the scientists and let them make their case to you and then paint what what seems to feel right, and what what fits with the latest discoveries, so that aspect of them as creatures of fantasy as it were, I love because we know they were real, but they require are match to bring them into. into being again and win the digital revolution happening nearly ninety, nine, hundred, ninety, one, for example, I guess Terminator Two is the one that kind of blew it all out of the box and then geographic park was that when you first started the suspected? Maybe Dina. Topi can make a big screen or small screen transition. Yeah, I saw a few test footage. Experiments even before Jurassic Park and made friends with some of the guys who are working on. That had a chance to see the full size animatronic for really impressive, beautifully sculpted great mechanics, but But they were all standing around. I remember in the sound stage after a day shooting in the jungle Andrew Park, and they said you know all these animatronic are going to become obsolete in five years, because digital will do everything, and we'll still have work, but it'll be a different world in in in a way they're right. There's still is there's room for animatronic and great work being done in those, but in the case of the dining topiary film we had two animatronic for the smaller creatures. You're actually holding. What is a tremendous amount of physical? Between, the the actors and the dinosaurs, there's no substitute for that, but for almost everything else. The the digital revolution makes it seamless chance to to create creatures that are closely interacting in the case of Dan. Topi production, even playing Ping Pong with the human character. I was really amazed by that scene. Just really all the amount of work that went into this shot at one of my favorite studios in England being James Bond Fan Pinewood studios which. The Superman film there years ago. great place to to build the city, and they actually build one of the key cities and dinatale waterfall city. Yet they built on the back of the Pinewood lot of five Acre full-size set of waterfall city with the canals and the boats and sixty foot high archways. I had a chance to visit out there driving by all the James Bond sets. and. Walking through the archway. They had tremendous rain storms the most rain they'd had in England in about sixty years and puddles everywhere, and they were supposed to be shooting all these scenes with hundreds of extras, and they had to wait for a clear spot, and now as they're finishing up to production in London, doing the digital effects. They're dealing with played photography where. In one scene it might be sunny in the next scene. Cloudy and to try to tile together is is a nightmare, but. It'll. It'll having a real set really. Makes a difference because you can tell when you're watching it that you're actually looking real walls and real surfaces rather than a model or a digital background. And actually this takes place in modern time where they find Dina Topi. If I recall from the books, actually takes place I. Think in the eighteen. I'd almost like Jules Verne type of time periods correct. Yes, things don't change in Topi that much, but we can enter it in different points on the shoreline geographically or in different points in history and one of the books, that I did is a prequel. It goes back a couple thousand years in the expands the the concept backward in time and the hallmark miniseries. With some characters from the present day, so as you can imagine for it for a TV, script writers, we're looking for a way to to bring a somewhat more contemporary perspective to the story in it and I think it's. A NEAT way to to develop diner Topi into the modern day, but it's still it's still the same kind of dining topa with. One kid told me everyone wears baggy clothes, right? That's the idea. The dinosaurs are. Not all of them talk some of them. Communicate in different ways, but there is. A six foot tall dinosaur named ZIPPO WHO's A. Standard Ikea source or a Atro- Don is basically the one of the most intelligent dinosaurs who follows the characters on their adventures. He's awesome. I mean some of the things that we mentioned the Ping Pong game. I think he's the one playing ping pong, and not only that just you know, I think in the in the library of dining topa and I was just amazed how well he interacted with the human characters I can imagine wouldn't challenge. It must have been for them. That was pretty awesome and I was very impressed that people make doing the affects. Walking with dinosaurs as well doing the dyno's yes, the same team that did walking with dinosaurs, and when you look at scenes like that the dinosaurs walking through the library, and all of the scales are shimmering right as as he turns around, and not only the movement of the creature himself, but the shadows that are cast on all the bookcases. Had to be carefully planned and plotted so that they they looked really three dimensional, so it was. It was a real job for them to sell some of those shots into. For the actors to act these scenes where the dinosaurs didn't exist. Of course they were just talking to blank space or to a ping pong ball the end of a pole. That so it's. Was a fine job of acting there, too, and you mentioned. The ONYX and there's one characteristic becoming a favorite of mine, because I've seen him today number twenty six. I think he's a cute little. I and I know that was done by the Jim Henson creature shop, which fans will know from other hallmark productions, but also farscape which I. do a great job on there, too. And I was really amazed all the work that went into him. You know, but you said you held him and you kind of so how he worked. What was that experience like to see a creation of yours like that kind of come to life and do all these things that. Independent of you sort of speak. Well I, visiting the waterfall city set was something like waking and a dream waking up in a dream, because I have been working for many years imagining all of this and draw pictures on paper, but to actually go through the archway, and out suddenly be indicted. Topi was really thrilling to see I watched a little bit of principal photography and then. went to the edge of a sound stage where these guys handed me this hatchlings dinosaur, and they said don't drop it cost one hundred thousand dollars in, and I'm holding this creature about the size and weight of watermelon or so and a baby Sarah Thompson Dinosaur. She turns her head and looks up at me and moves or pause, and wags her tail, and blinks and licks her lips, and are selects the Beacon I. Could swear as holding a living creature. And, then I looked up and there these two guys in the shadows with Radio Control Setsu wiggling these all these dials and controls, and I realized they were doing the whole thing, but it was. When you take the skin off of that creature and look what's inside. Being the son of a mechanical engineer, and building a of gadgets as a kid I have great admiration for what it took to to make all the subtle movements on the surface, and you have a great cast David twelfths from. Dr Real One of my favorite actresses Alice, Krieger who was fans remember from the Board Queen from Star Trek. The next generation and she's terrific and some great young actors twos. I think they'll. People will have characters. They can relate to yeah I think so, and I think it's A. Pretty big team because you've got all the principal characters and a huge cast of extras that are that are moving around in the background, not just humans, but also dinosaurs that are thrown in as texture. You know in the background. A QUEST STORY THAT Follows the two brothers one is kind of a rabble, rouser and troublemaker. He's not. He doesn't like that and toby too much at first, and he doesn't have much of a sensitive side. And of course he gets assigned to the hatchery to raise. hatchlings, the other guy has a fear of heights, and he's kind of bookish fellow, and he gets assigned to be a sky box writer. He's not sure he likes heights at all. But? They go through their course of their adventures, looking for their father who's lost and both of them fall in love with a diner. Topi and girly Marian, so it's it's quite an epic. Can develop characters for the full six hours of the miniseries. You one thing I do want to add is Karl Marx, such great series. I've loved Gulliver's travels. Rabian nights and I was very thrilled and even Jason and the argonauts that was thrilled that they were behind this. They did they approach you about this? Or how did this come about in that sense? Data Topi a was optioned with a major motion picture company in Hollywood for several years in a great team was put together behind it with Ken Ralston, of Lamb and image works, which was really formed around. Doing the dining topiary effects, and they did tremendous amount of work, storyboarding and screenplay. It's been about four million on it, but the plug got pulled at the from the executives with the change of Administration at Columbia, and at that point, the rights came back to us, and we were looking around at other studios at hallmark entertainment came in and I never really thought of them because I don't own a TV and so I had never seen any of the production, so we rented a TV VCR, set us all the tapes and I I watched the whole the whole hallmark series. And was really impressed with. Not only the fact that they were faithful to stories, but when they did make changes they. Had some creative ideas to bring to the material and I knew that men risk for Dino Topa because I knew that changes had to be made to make it work on the screen, but they were concerned about keeping it faithful to the spirit of the original story. And also to to doing something on television that really is intended for family audiences, and and doesn't introduce something in a diner. That doesn't belong no I think. It's GonNa be awesome and I wanted to ask you to. What's what you have I? Know you during a great slide presentation. You gave here Luna Con- you previewed some new Dina Topi that you're working about a new city. Can you kind of tease your fans about that a little bit? The new book that I'm starting on all I, really say about it as it involves an adventure story from Arthur dennison's journals based on a new journal that was just recently discovered about his. Adventures to the eastern coast into the fabled city of Dara. Something like the story of Marco Polo's journeys across the continent to China. And the first couple of paintings, the big ones for for this one will be featured in Washington at a show of dining Topi art. They will be at the Smithsonian. Starting in late April and going all the way through till September, so if anyone wants to see the art from the first three books that I've done and some of the models that went into it as well as some of the material from the hallmark miniseries lobby down there. started the end of April I've been to that museum there. They do great job presenting things like this. So that's going to be awesome I have families. I think I'll go down there. Definitely. Check that out well. I, really WANNA. Thank you for taking the time to speak to me I think I'd been long. Admire of your work since I saw the first book and just little boy me just went cool. Take Care Tony Tomato until next time.

Dina Topi Topi Waterfall City Dino Topa Dining Topi James Bond Dinatale Topa James Gurney England writer principal National Geographic Tokyo Dean Foster ONYX Jules Verne Dara Jim Henson Washington Harry Housing
Instagram Says It Does Not Grant A Copyright License on Embedded Images  DTH

Daily Tech News Show

05:22 min | 9 months ago

Instagram Says It Does Not Grant A Copyright License on Embedded Images DTH

"These are the daily Tech Headlines for Friday June fifth twenty twenty shuffling. In emailed, ars Technica instagram stated that does not provide a copyright license to display embedded images on third party websites to users of its embedding API. The company says that while they're terms, allow them to grant sub licenses. Our Platform Policies require third parties to have the necessary rights from applicable rightsholders. Instagram says it's exploring the possibility of giving users more control over photograph and bedding. Currently users can only block bedding by taking their accounts private. According to data from both APP Topi AH and censor tower twitter's mobile APP had its most ever global downloads and installs in the past week numbers between the two, and was very with sensor tower, seeing twitter, receiving over a million downloads on Monday and Tuesday before a slowdown later in the week while APP Topi saw twitter, hitting a record number of installs on Wednesday with six, hundred, seventy, seven, thousand, worldwide, including over five hundred thousand outside of the US App Topa also reported that twitter peaked at forty million daily active users this week in the US, compared to their last earnings report, which was thirty, one million monetize, daily active users in the US their own metric. FACEBOOK is rolling out labels that identify media that is state, controlled or owned. These outlets will no longer be allowed to buy advertisements on facebook in the US. Starting with summer, facebook used outside experts to classify state controlled media based on multiple factors. Outlets appeal the liberal. If they feel, it was applied by mistake. The facebook photo transferred tool that launch an at the end of two thousand nineteen is now available globally. The feature lets users directly copy facebook photos to Google photos with an encrypted transfer, rather than having to download them and upload them again. The option transfer a copy of your photos and videos is found in the settings menu under the your facebook information facebook support for other services beyond Google photos is being built the features part of the open source data transfer project. Google Threat Analysis Group announced it has recently identified phishing attacks against personal email accounts for staffers on both president trump and former vice president biden's campaigns, who will sent a warning to the targeted campaign staffers and alerted federal law enforcement officials about the attempted cyber attack the attacks against the bind campaign staffers appear to originate from China and the attacks against the trump campaign. Staffers appear to originate in Iran. Amazon it's slack, announced a new partnership under the deal. Amazon will offer all employees access to slacks. Workplace Collaboration Tools and slack will migrate. It's voice and video calling features to use Amazon's chime platform on the back end. In addition, aws will work to better integrate services like aws chat, Bot and Amazon APP flow into? Slack By dance announced it shut down the news, aggregate or top buzz. The service launched back at Twenty fifteen as an. Version of the popular news aggregate, or generally tau, and recommended personalized news articles to users based on an AI algorithm. EA launched over twenty five games on steam, previously, only available on e as origin storefront games include titles from the Dragon, age crisis and need for speed franchises as well as the newly launched command and conquer remastered collection. Valve also plans to offer benefits for EA subscribers on steam expected to be available later this summer. Drop launch a private Beta for a new password manager on android called dropbox passwords. The APP lets users create unique passwords store them online and sick them across devices using. Encryption giving only users distort passwords. Motorola released to budget phones, the Motorola E, and the Moto g fast the G., fast seven twenty P, nineteen by nine hole punch, display a snapdragon six sixty five system on a chip, three gigabytes of Ram thirty two gigabytes of storage and four thousand million power battery, as well as be seaport, fingerprint scanner, and an IP fifty two water, repellent rating, the fastest three cameras, a sixteen Megapixel, main camera, an eight Megapixel, ultra-wide, and a two megapixel macro, camera, and cost one hundred ninety nine dollars. The Motorola e meanwhile offers a six point two inch, seven twenty p display with a notch for the Front Camera, a snapdragon six thirty two S O C two gigabytes of Ram, thirty two gigabytes of storage and a three thousand five hundred fifty million hour battery, the phone also offers to rear cameras, a sixteen Megapixel, main camera and depth sensor with a starting price of one hundred forty nine dollars. Both phones run android ten and are available on June twelve. And finally well Gha, plus was shut down in April Twenty nineteen for consumers, the G. Suite version for businesses remained online. Google also announced that version of Google, plus would be rebranded at some point as Google currents over the past several months a Beta Google currents with a redesigned look has been available to some administrators Goule now says that Google currents will launch for all customers on July sixth all Google plus content and users will be automatically moved over with plus dot Google Dot com links still working. For more discussion of detectives, News, of the day subscribe, Tech, New Show D- New show dot com, and remember to rate and review of the tech headlines for every pitcher podcasts. Thanks for listening. We'll talk next time and for all of us here at daily. Tech headlines Remember. Have a super sparkly day.

FACEBOOK Google Amazon twitter US Motorola ars Technica Instagram EA aws Iran Topi Gha biden
Byte James Gurney

Sci-Fi Talk

05:23 min | 9 months ago

Byte James Gurney

"Hi Welcome to season two of bite. This is Tony Tiller. Parenting apocalypse it's it's not the same way that. You know how it works any views usually two to four minutes long, but sometimes they can be a little longer only when you when you live long enough, all kinds of strange things happen. Very right in saying that the Greek heroes the original superheroes. In part because of the hopeful nature of genes vision, but also because of its message of diversity inclusion. I love world, building and someone who did an amazing job of. It was illustrator and writer James Gurney. Did you think back in nineteen? ninety-two two Dinah Tokyo would become what it is today. I had no idea at all. In fact when I was doing the paintings for Diner Topa I was doing pictures that I was intentionally doing to make impossible to make in a live action I knew that in the Star Wars era, it was hard to do the water effects, and to do people writing creatures are always the toughest thing to do so I deliberately plan these big epic scenes of Waterfall City and a parade with dinosaurs, because this will never be made into live action, and just about then of course, the digital revolution was starting to happen and. I realized that maybe it would be possible took a long time, but. I think that hallmark entertainment is really gone all out to make dining topi translate to the screen. As very exciting and actually to kind of go back to your work, and we'll definitely cover the miniseries as well, but I think what impressed me, too is the amount of research that you do on on diagnosing looking at fossil's. Doors at the correct scale. Spokane actually Allah Dean Foster at one time and I know he's travelled a bit, and you do as well to kind of get that look of the city. The city is of Diner Topi as well. Yeah kind of specializes an artist in painting, realistic scenes of things that can't be photographed whether it's a historical scene from National Geographic. Or fantasy of something that we know must exist out there, but no one has ever seen I end to do that means getting a lot of of models and elements and people in Costume, and whatever it takes to essentially do almost like a single frame from from A. Movie and the fun thing about being an artist. Is that working away in your studio? You can do? All those things can be the writer and the director and the lighting person, and and put the whole thing together. Which one is your favorite dinosaur to draw? I really like Stegosaurus, because it's the most outlandish dinosaur, and when you spent a Lotta time coming up with alien design and the thing about nature. There are things in the fossil record weirder than anything. You could imagine stegosauruses one although it's a bear. Dry stegosaurus is tough because all those different plates are in different angles, and you have to just keep racing redrawing it till you get it right, but. Nevertheless I. that's one of my favorite dinosaurs. Was this a boyhood something that you liked as a boy? The dinosaurs right for me. I got into him because of a gentleman named Harry Housing Yeah I did love dinosaurs as a kid, and of course in those days they were seen as cold, blooded reptiles who lived in the swamp and I remember the picture in the time life book had the brackish source with the whole body underwater, because just the head sticking out because they said. Said well can't hold up its own weight. It could never do that and it wasn't. Until I became an adult that the new theories came along presenting dinosaurs as dynamic and warm blooded and intelligent, and just recently in the last few years. The bird dinosaur connection has really solidified so that we realize that dinosaurs had a lot of behaviors and mannerisms, and even looked a lot like birds, instead of like reptiles, that science of dinosaurs is very very much a part of Diana Topi. And Talking to paleontologists about the waves of popular interest very often, they follow these renaissance periods of discoveries which were were still in. And Dining Topa is just one way of playing without idea. What if dinosaurs are bird like dynamic and intelligent? What if we? If they were smart. What if they were wise and kind of benefit us? Somehow speaking of that I'm sure you've seen the famous I think even the Museum of Natural History in New York area here where the t rex is like standing up almost fully erect, and obviously we've found out that hey might not be that way. Part of what I love about dinosaurs is what we don't know about them. We know what the structure of their bones looks like we. We have a few skin impressions, but we don't know how. They sounded really how they moved or what color they were for a while. People were saying that Toronto could run forty miles an hour, and now an article comes out a couple of weeks ago. They'd say now they could just walk about ten miles an hour at the most, and who knows but being an artist. You talked to all the scientists and let them make their case to you and then. What seems to feel right. And what what fits with the latest discoveries, so that aspect of them as creatures of fantasy, as it were I love because we know they were real, but they require our imagination to bring them into being again. Dina Topa is available, and even spawned a series of movies and TV special. For Bite, this is Tony Talada.

writer Tony Tiller Diner Topi Dina Topa James Gurney Waterfall City Dinah Tokyo Spokane Tony Talada Diana Topi Toronto Museum of Natural History National Geographic A. Movie Harry Housing Dean Foster New York director four minutes
Byte James Gurney

Sci-Fi Talk Byte

05:23 min | 9 months ago

Byte James Gurney

"Hi Welcome to season two of bite. This is Tony Tiller. Parenting apocalypse it's it's not the same way that. You know how it works any views usually two to four minutes long, but sometimes they can be a little longer only when you when you live long enough, all kinds of strange things happen. Very right in saying that the Greek heroes the original superheroes. In part because of the hopeful nature of genes vision, but also because of its message of diversity inclusion. I love world, building and someone who did an amazing job of it was illustrator and writer James Gurney. Did you think back in nineteen? ninety-two to Dina Tokyo would become what it is today. I had no idea at all. In fact when I was doing the paintings for Diner Topa I was doing pictures that I was intentionally doing to make impossible to make in a live action. I knew that in the Star Wars era, it was hard to do the water effects, and to do people writing creatures are always the toughest thing to do so I. Deliberately Plan these big epic scenes of waterfall, city and a parade with dinosaurs, because this will never be made into live action, and just about then of course, the digital revolution was starting to happen and. I realized that maybe it would be possible took a long time, but. I think that hallmark entertainment is really gone all out to make dining. topi translate to the screen. As very exciting, and actually to kind of go back to your work, and we'll definitely cover the miniseries as well, but I think what impressed me, too. Is the amount of research that you do on on diagnosing looking at fossil's. Doors at the correct scale. Spokane actually, Dean Foster at one time and I know he's travelled a bit, and you do as well to kind of get that look of the city. The city is of diner, Topi, as well. Yeah kind of specializes an artist in painting, realistic scenes of things that can't be photographed whether it's a historical scene from National Geographic. Or fantasy scene of something that we know must exist out there, but no one has ever seen I. End to do that means getting a lot of of models and elements and people in Costume, and whatever it takes to essentially do almost like a single frame from from A. Movie and the fun thing about being an artist. Is that working away in your studio? You can do? All those things can be the writer and the director and the lighting person, and and the whole thing together. Which one is your favorite dinosaur to draw? I really like Stegosaurus, because it's the most outlandish dinosaur, and when you spent a Lotta time coming up with alien design and the thing about nature. There are things in the fossil record weirder than anything. You could imagine stegosauruses one although it's a bear. Dry stegosaurus is tough because all those different plates are in different angles, and you have to just keep racing redrawing it till you get it right, but. Nevertheless I that's one of my favorite dinosaurs. Was this a boyhood something that you liked as a boy? The dinosaurs right for me I got into him because of a gentleman named Harry. Housing Yeah. I did love dinosaurs as a kid, and of course in those days they were seen as cold, blooded reptiles who lived in the swamp, and I remember the picture in the time life book had the brackish source with the whole body underwater, because just the head sticking out because they said. Said well can't hold up its own weight. It could never do that and it wasn't. Until I became an adult that the new theories came along presenting dinosaurs as dynamic and warm blooded and intelligent, and just recently in the last few years. The bird dinosaur connection has really solidified so that we realize that dinosaurs had a lot of behaviors and mannerisms, and even looked a lot like birds, instead of like reptiles that science of dinosaurs is very very much a part of Diana Topi. and talking to paleontologists about the waves of popular interest very often, they follow these renaissance periods of discoveries, which were were still in and dining. Topa is just one way of playing without idea. What if dinosaurs are bird like dynamic and intelligent? What if we? If. They were smart. What if they were wise and kind of benefit? US Somehow speaking of that I'm sure you've seen the famous I. Think even the Museum of Natural History in new. York area here where the T rex is like standing up almost fully erect, and obviously we found out that hey might not be that way part of what I love about. Dinosaurs is what we don't know about them. We know what the structure of their bones looks like. We have a few skin impressions, but we don't know how they sounded. How they moved or what color they were for a while, people were saying that Toronto could run forty miles an hour, and now an article comes out a couple of weeks ago. They'd say now they could just walk about ten miles an hour at the most, and who knows but being an artist. You talked to all the scientists and. Let them make their case to you and then. What seems to feel right? And what what fits with the latest discoveries, so that aspect of them as creatures of fantasy as it were I, love because we know they were real, but they require our imagination to bring them into being again. Diana Topa is available and even spawned a series of movies and TV special. For Bite this is Tony Talada.

Diana Topa writer Tony Tiller Topi James Gurney Dina Tokyo Spokane Tony Talada US National Geographic Diana Topi. A. Movie Dean Foster Toronto York Harry Museum of Natural History director four minutes
129 - Martin Scorsese  Try Anything

The Kitchen Sisters Present

28:23 min | 1 year ago

129 - Martin Scorsese Try Anything

"Welcome to the kitchen sisters present six where the kitchen sisters Dave Nelson N.. Nikki Silva before we get started with today's episode. Some radio TOPI news. We've just launched our annual fundraiser. The one time of the year we ask our loyal listeners to support the kitchen sisters present and the network that helps make it possible. This year our goal is to reach thirty five thousand donors and we need your donation. Oh nation to get their donation of any amount will make a big difference. Radio topiary supports independent. podcasts like this one that bring the stories is that you just can't stop thinking about and talking about at the dinner table the stories that stick with you over time think Radio Topa forever and now we're asking you to make your mark on radio topiary. Your monthly donation will help us continue to support the important deep and profound content. You can rely on. I'm from US and for an extra little incentive if you make a recurring donation today in the amount of seven dollars a month you'll be entered to win a ticket to tope best next. It's January our annual meeting. Radio Tokens where you'll find yourself sitting at dinner table with all of your favorite Radio Topi producers head to radio TOPA DOT FM to learn more and to donate right now. That's Radio Topiary DOT FM donate today at Radio Tokyo that FM. Thanks so much for listening. This episode of the Kitchen Sisters present is brought to you by Sun soil since soil mix full oh spectrum whole plant. CBD that's organically grown naturally extracted an accessibly priced. They are ganic farm all their own hemp in Vermont. They naturally extract CBD from him using organic coconut oil and they test their products at three I s credited laps to ensure potency and purity garrity today listeners of the kitchen sisters can try son soil. CBD At twenty percent off head to send Soil Dot Com and save twenty percents off your order by entering code kitchen sisters at checkout that Sun Soil Dot Com Promo Code Kitchen Sisters for twenty percents off your order raging bull taxi driver Goodfellas. Alice doesn't live here anymore. The films of Martin Scorsese are astounding as are his efforts to preserve the history and heritage of American cinema through his groundbreaking film foundation. Martin Artan score says he is a keeper a steward of American and global cinema one of our heroes. The sound mix of raging bull was one of are great. Inspirations and had a big impact on the kind of mixes we thought were possible for a fledgling kitchen sister stories in the soundtracks. The way the man waves music into a stories or doesn't leave it just shocks you with Pierce's with it clubs with his scores is an soundtracks are like new orders and then there are his documentaries his nonfiction films starting with Italian American portrait of his own parents and family the last waltz rolling stones shine a light and his most recent documentary but not quite documentary. Three Bob Dylan's rolling Thunder Revue The San Francisco Film Society invited Mr Scorsese here to honor his nonfiction film. Work and premieres latest feature took the Irishman about the teamster union. Boss Jimmy Hoffa. We were so taken by his own state conversation that we begged the film society to give us a copy the recording. So we can make podcasts of it for you. Were kind enough to say yes today. The kitchen sisters present. Martin Scorsese testing. Hey thank you so much. Thank you that the Castro why you've talked about how formative film was for you and I'm wondering if you could talk a little bit about the nonfiction aspect act of that early documentary films that you saw either in the movie theater on your sixteen inch. RCA television at home. That's interesting because most of the early years that I was viewing films. They took me a movie theater. All the time where narrative films of supposedly supposedly narrative fiction films and the sense of non-fiction sort of slipped in slowly. I think by the late forties early fifties. I I think really something happened again. It's a whole thing about me. Having Asthma Nineteen forty-six I wasn't allowed to play sports or war. Run around or be near animals of any kind and trees and I was allergic to everything no laughing because kids would get into a spasmodic laughter laughter and then turn blue and it was very bad until always taken to the movie theaters. I think the closest thing I could think of that was overlapping a little bit into nonfiction with the film. Wars and this is slightly be misunderstood. Because as the whole thing that goes back to the forties and fifties and early sixties if it's black and white and grainy that means it's real and that comes from newsreels now with the younger people today of course. The perception is Cameron on a iphone. So it's a whole different perception of what reality could be. In any event event we had a television in nineteen forty eight and they were. These Italian film shown once a week on Friday night but Italian American community in New York and and we saw the neorealist films I five or six for me. Look at the film's Grainy Black and white. TV and subtitled ELT. I know who is still cinema but it had another immediacy to adding to that was the fact that the people in the film particularly pies. Aw Cellini found. That begins insisted that my grandparents came to the apartment and watching it when my family and how they were speaking in the film was the way they were speaking speaking. Thank you and I guess that state line that way but ultimately I couldn't really see a difference difference between the two and then of course we became very very aware of the nonfiction film in the fifties particularly films from the WPA. A Leo Hurwitz Parallel Ryan's and all of that so that became something we could see them. A theater in New York called the value in the theater was very small and the screen was tiny and it was a no nonsense every day in the summer. They got double bill every day. They changed it and so many documentaries their first episode Eisenstein film just walked in the middle and so this led to the awareness of this kind of film making when I started taking film courses at Nyu in one thousand nine hundred sixty by that time. There's Penny Baker. There's Lecoq there's the maizels surely Clark and John Kesse these shadows and shadows. And Shirley Clark's a cool world. There was no difference between what what I saw on television. And what I saw and we'll be zoll one and it could be done is. He's so in a sense they're interrelated so much that once I saw shadow's even window it's another world for me culturally. I was very very much Coming from a little Kinda Sicilian village in a way But when I saw shadows I told my friends at night. I said there's no more excuses we can do. It depends on what you have to say. You know so we started doing everything we could even if we didn't have anything to say just but we knew that the pictures could be made and the documentary. Element was there all all the time. Our Teacher The Hague Manooghian. It wasn't school the arts that was a couple of classes it was not like Nyu now but he was only intent. Untung showing US or inspiring us to make documentaries anybody who made narrative films one thousand nine hundred eighty nine sixty. That was out here in the West Coast. There was very little to New York Independent. Were you resistant to that idea. Or because I think you also said that you were more interested in making more stylized narrative films at the time. We're absolutely. Yeah but the thing was that it seemed that how should I put. It should be a film. It shouldn't be a documentary or fiction. Film should be a film. There should be no difference. I mean that is happening now to not really shouldn't be pigeonholed into saying well. The documentary should be this way. And that's nonfiction. And what if it's altogether. What if you could pull from everything and experiment with it? And that was the idea that ultimately became mean streets. Really how do you choose your documentary subjects subjects. How do you decide what is worthy of spending the time and effort? I think the key one was Italian American when I made eighty my mother and father that was nineteen seventy six was the bicentennial maybe doing the PBS series. The storm of strangers was called and they had for each ethnic group a half hour film and they asked me to the Italian when I suggested that instead of doing be traditional or colonel logical obvious. Way of going about explaining the immigration battalions. So why don't we just go to my mother and father's apartment on Elizabeth Street. We'll have dinner okay but like really. You're sitting down there okay. Why why are you down there? What he wants from me? We got in there her myself from the kitchen memoir you and Martic and I started shooting my doing so far. It's about to ask a question but I saw that. My mother took over the scene. You what should I say you know. You want me to tell you how how how learn how to make. Why don't ask me the question? Don't you hear that. Then I mean if you would ask me a question I would answer GonNa. I'm GONNA save now. I WANNA know how you learn how to make sauce. We'll talk to you. How long I mean how many two years I'm going to use it and doing it and I want to see you do it? Well you know. My father was greg resistant. And she started arguing with him can mean Charlie Book. The way you're talking to we know that's what I mean. I'm an actress. I'm not putting on any as you want to fight or something. Talk Talk to me when you talk to your son. My mother and father by that point it was that they were never went to school. There were working in the garment district but kit started make these movies. They thought I was completely crazy but they participated data because their son is doing and I know I wanted to start you. You're going to tell us about the sauce. You'RE GONNA show us how to do the source. By the time I finished. which was the next day three hours three hours? The next eating with them at the table by that time I realized that they had a whole life before me. Wow I didn't realize what really like in the tenements in nineteen twenty two. You know I remember as a little boy we used to have Wallis. I mean people loved us. We see the kitchen. He used to be a bedroom. These to pay. Oh yeah mom cook for them wash. Their clothes needs to pay how many people on the rooms. It was two bores me my father this rosy Mo- Mikey Joey Faye seven and two was night forearms over more on. You got no furniture at bed. Time you pick them up when you had the room and time before them down and then you want to sleep all the questions we had didn't really matter anymore. They just took off and went and went and went onto Kellyanne. Yeah I was right. What were you about? My father's smashed a great thing but no they can't your mesh once. Oh my God. Yeah father didn't have. The machine by father had jokes. You know hit body. We'll come work exactly beside scaffolding apple. Being what kind of things happen was it was a lot of things you know. Another time. He came home. He hurt his then. He was out of work so long. And you know in the master of the House within market. It was hard on us. My mother used to paint to keep the family going. My mother was a very fine Hanso. The older people will remember when I mentioned his name. My mother made pants for Daddy Browning a millionaire. He married young girl. Her name was peaches right. This is I'm serious and my mother was such a fine so whatever and he used to go here on our ninth street to have his clothes made and they used to give the pants to my mother because her celine was beautiful. My mother used to take the call. Listen to me. My mother used to finish the pan. Hold up night. Then I began to realize as much fascinated by for leniency hopefuls. Kubrick Eisenstein all of the editing when a person person is in the frame directly talking to you or directly to the camera. That's the movie that then affected everything I did in the fiction films too including the film. The Irishman I know that if the actor hold it and if it's interesting enough you stay on them. We'll be right back. The kitchen sisters present is sponsored by better help better help offers. Licensed professional counselors who are specialized in issues such as depression stress anxiety anger family conflicts. LGBT matters and more connect with your professional counselor in a safe safe and private online environment. Anything you share is confidential and it's convenient you can now get help at your own time and at your own pace you can schedule secure cure video or phone sessions plus chat and text with your therapist kitchen sisters present listeners. Get Ten percent off your first month with Discount Code Kitchen in sisters so why not get started today go to better help dot com slash kitchen sisters simply fill out a questionnaire to help them. Assess your needs and get matched with a counselor slur. He'll love better help dot com slash kitchen. Sisters I then. I started making documentaries for every film I made like a companion thing than taxi. Driver was a film made. Call American boy on a friend of mine. Steve Prince New York New York. The work was Last Waltz by that point the music of course music was something that again. The family wasn't in the habit of reading and everything was visual but there was music all the time all kinds of music opera but primarily jazz and swing and popular music but probably the most important music I remember was Jangle Reinhardt. And the hot club of France and I had Antonio was five years old. I don't know what that sound was but I played those seventy eight thousand Stephan Berg Pelley. The I didn't know what it was. But that impulse music always creates for me the impulse to shoot. Oh to compose and design a scene. Always music was just a major part of my life. It's always influenced Irish minutes minutes five seconds in the still of the night at the movie soon as I read the book as that's it it's the saw it's like it can mean streets be my baby. It's the Rhonette it's Phil Spector's wall sound. Music has always been the great inspiration. Something was turned. Eventually I did something for nothing but the blues with the Eric Clapton upped. And there's about twenty years ago I was cutting to some of the Great Blues Musicians Muddy waters and Sonny Boy Williamson. That's what I thank and Eric Clapton felt that was really a problem. Because he says I can't be equal to them but at that point I I understand what he means that people say. Oh your master master is I've seen all the pictures so I understood them what he meant so we decided to go ahead and do something on the blues and make a the whole series on the blues. That's the whole thing. Started with making be documentaries or films on music the next then we're doing gangs in New York and my a friend Jaycox Bro Jeff Rosen. Who is the archivist? I think. Producer for Bob Dylan. Jeff said to me I have this footage edge some of the interviews. I've done we wonder if you look at it. If you think you could do something with it so I looked about an hour of footage including a lot of beautiful interviews of Allen Ginsberg Bergen and so all these wonderful characters and the whole idea that any had this you see jeff had done an interview with Dylan for about four or five days. I saw that interview. I was intrigued by where it could go particularly by the look in his eyes and that took about four four years or three or four years that bolt together no direction home no direction. I wish point than a Libya Harrison came into the picture and she loved that film a lot and then she proposed me doing something with George Harrison. I really love George. Harrison's music and and I was fascinated by how Harrison having everything seemingly to me aside and went for the spiritual matters. I thought that was really fascinating especially at the time when someone who's being ridiculed as well. Yeah the hell would do it you know. Where's IT GONNA take us and at became Living in the material world right around the same time Jefferson came back and showed me some footage from the rolling thunder tour. And you said You'd think you'd do something with this. I sent her. I sorta Kinda beaten up everything but I saw this performance that was really fantastic and they had hundreds of hours of film but I WANNA do. I couldn't care about a conventional documentary on a tour. So what the hell is it about that. I mean it's one thousand nine hundred seventy six the bicentennial the sixties rover Tailwind. Maybe this is the last of its kind. The Committee Adele are going through the going through America. You're helping America's saying there's a and an idea. I think what we're talking about interviewing people as we can into as a people but then Jeff said he was talking to Dylan Dylan. So what if you weren't there. I said Yeah Okay now. That was a challenge. All right Oh yeah like what. If we get like the two manager Jour- and he represents goal to represents all the businessmen Jim Jim Jim nobelists ahead of paramount pictures and he was great. What what did you say to those people about what you were asking them? You Know I. I don't know I don't really know I said in a way as Jim come on. You're like whenever you speak your very Mediterranean of different things. You can talk in a certain way money embarrassment. I didn't make money. What's the matter with them? It didn't make money right exactly and so we went. We took that attack but the best was the best. Was that Dylan suggested Sharon stall sharing right. I work with Sean on on Casino. Sharon I said. Check Dan this so we made up the story now. The point is it says conjuring the rolling thunder to. What do you want to watch something? That's great so why don't we get a spirit of a circus atmosphere. It was a feeling of being alive. We didn't they have enough masks on tour betsy. How bad if you come on the road with us? He hasn't done an interview in twenty years. Joan Baez and necas together in a sleep. Take a lot of people talk about combining things that are true in untrue to reach a sort of breeder truth with that at all part of the idea of this or was it just about being could be clear actually but I a I don't think so I don't think so I gotta say for me always because of listening to music and then seen people perform the truth is for me in the music it is in the music and you could say or do anything you want even describe it you could say this means this that doesn't it it's I think something could be written one way but it can mean something else entirely to you at the age of twenty one at the age of forty means something different and so what's that elusive major art you know he's like that's why it's the joker with the mask asking a sense the waving the idea of a masks and parole Liz hundred parodied a d John. We'll be there but that white face. A real feeling of a traveling committed alert which was very joyce I do remember in Laurie. Site in one thousand nine hundred fifty. I remember hearing a guy playing guitar. Somebody singing we look out the window and they were still traveling strolling musicians and my grandmother throw money down and that's New York it's just wonderful all to Experience with that and so for me. I don't know about a great truth. I just went to the heart of the music and so I'm just wondering wondering if this country at hassle approach help you get at something with him because he's hard to pin down. I mean wiping them down. First of all as the A why. Why do you want to know we listen to music go with it? You know something. He did forty years. AGO is still here. Still hearing your heart too so go with that. Want to know just experience. Abbas the idea and I have masks expand the masks for something. He did those masks and then he says in the interview. They weren't enough masks. We have written some stuff into say just to get him started. And Jeff is very good at these interviews and you see what happens there because one point. He's talking he's talking about the rolling thunder things started and he goes this all and it got so let's use them also opens it up to a kind of improper Tori intuitive intuitive way of moving with with this structure of the piece Mike a piece of music rather than a narrative structure does say something interesting towards the end. We said what's left of it. Nothing ashes and really you know. And I mean he's basically all those factors that create seventies at that point will never happen again and that is ashes thanked honest but from the ashes. It's like the Phoenix of rises again. And we found footage of that beautiful speech Ginsburg. It's wonderful full addiction. The end go out and make it for your with knock on his door really as younger people see this. I hope that's just what he says. They are flashes. Bits and pieces. You saw it all or saw flashes and fragments take from US some example trying to get yourselves together. Clean up your Iraq find your community pick up on some kind of redemption of your own consciousness. Become more mindful of your own friends. Your own work your own proper meditation your own proper art your own beauty go out and make it for your own terminal. You haven't great tress stress in your audience that you're GonNa get what's going on risk. I didn't know if they were going to know what's going on and honestly people will get mad at some time but you gotta let people know something I mean. Come on what did we do the country and then David came up again putting the as the beginning the disappearing woman. Hey something's off it's the truth wrapped in. ooh That's the idea Martin Scorsese try. Anything thanks to the San Francisco Film Home Society to Rachel Rosen director of programming and most of all to Martin Scorsese Film Master Film Keeper. You've you've been listening to the kitchen sisters present produced by the kitchen sisters with Nathan Dalton and Brandy how the kitchen sisters present is part of radio. Tovia appear from P. R. X. A curated network of extraordinary cutting edge podcast created by independent producers. You can find kitchen kitchen sisters on twitter facebook instagram and you can check out all of our stories and workshops. Public events are t-shirt and more at kitchen sisters dot org thanks for listening before we go one. More reminder that we've just launched our annual Radio Radio Topi a fundraiser. And we really hope you'll show your support for the kitchen sisters present and the network that makes this show possible Radio Topa you can and donate at any level to help us reach our goal of thirty five thousand donors just go to radio topiary dot. FM to learn more and donate right now to make your mark that's Radio Topa Dot f. m.. Thanks for listening talk radio.

New York Martin Scorsese Jeff Rosen Bob Dylan US Kubrick Eisenstein San Francisco Film Society Dylan Dylan Radio Topi Jim Jim Jim nobelists Nikki Silva Jimmy Hoffa Radio Tokyo Vermont TOPI US Martin Artan CBD Eric Clapton Dave Nelson N
The Long Haul of Fame

Over the Road

59:07 min | 10 months ago

The Long Haul of Fame

"Hey listeners Paul here packing up to take a load of food down to Florida. I just want to offer personal content warning for this one you know the world we as truckers is not always G. rated and frankly the way we talk about that world among ourselves can get pretty course. We do our best here at over the road to present these stories in an unvarnished manner while still being sensitive to both our listeners and the people were talking about to be truthful though. That hasn't always been easy. There have been some pretty tough calls along the way especially in this episode. We'll be hearing accounts of drug use homelessness and sex work just know we thought a lot about it and feel like there's meaning and merit every story you're about to hear. Here's the episode. When we were mapping out this podcast. Somehow this idea came up. Just who are your personal heroes and who are people that just mean a lot to you and somebody at that Radio. Topi headquarters said you know. We just need to make an episode about these people. That's why we came up with this title So ball I have a question. Yeah go ahead Tom. Are we really going to do the titled Trucking magazine Pun thing with the the Word Hall for this well. Here's the thing time that we're broadcasting this to the outside world and you're an editor for a trucking magazine so it might be tired and moth eaten to you but to our radio TOPI listeners. It could be fresh and new Lacy can can you announce the title? Because I don't completely remember sure well hit the music. We're about to enter the world of long haul polls long hall of fame these people. They're not owners of truckstop. Sure not like leaders of movements. These are people that I I met by chance out on the road. It was like Halloween down there. I didn't dream. It was a god given planning and I had like this one rule. If you're going to be like my trucking friend they have to be highly entertaining. Paint on when the going get trucking. I'm a nurse stories after stories back in the day all five of these people are great entertainers in their own special way. No no no. You don't throw cheese away. Wait a minute I am an old. She's like a trucking legend. You know baby can. I use your radio and entertainment from PR? Xs Radio A- and overdrive magazine. This is long haul. Paul's hall of fame on over. The road was low. Too Strong on the over. The road was that just a little too strong. Okay okay okay. If you like over the road give sound opinions. Try Each Week. Noted music critics. Jim De regattas and Greg Kat Review New Releases. Discuss Classic albums in conduct exclusive interviews with artists across musical genres sound. Opinions is a space for music. Lovers fans critics alike to share in the conversation sound opinions. Listen critically download sound opinions. Wherever you get your podcasts. Should we get into the episode? Absolutely okay so the first hero and mentor? Infringe I della Murray Hanson. Ooh My name is Idel Maria Hanson. And I'm sixty nine years old. What was that other thing? Oh wait a minute fifty. Two years. I've been driving fifty two years. Can't you tail my memories gone? She's an interesting interesting lady. I get up in the morning and again that see. I'd give that little legal and I'm ready for my day. Is the at ass trucker chick She she hauls money for a living and she wears gun. Always empowering who in the hell gives a sixty four year old woman a gun that never shot a gun before in her life You know are you nuts or something you know and and and I I just make it a habit when they when they asked me what. Y'All I just I just tell them you know better than ask that and you need to step away from the truth. Can you give me your step away from the truck thing? You need to step away from the truck fair God right now ask me again what do you need? You don't need to ask me that question sir. You're going to need to step away from the truck what's going on here is none of your business. You need to move on and you need to move on now so just imagine that sixty four years old. I think I'll just start hoeing money and carrying a gun around the ever if I if I if I were a gun. I I'm afraid I like stand in front of the Mirror. And the flying J and say fleas free. Do you ever do that. Never liked parliament. We do have to do that. Stop Halt Security Officer okay. There is a little power in there. You know there's people that start hanging up sixty four but she. She's just like she loves to truck. There isn't anything else. There just isn't anything I couldn't have been anything else but a on ever want to quit driving I really don't. She grew up in a middle-class business family in but she she had this thing in her from the very beginning. My I had a pedal-car mom never let me have a bicycle but I had a little boo. I was a spade demon everywhere. Just love I loved it and my dad said she's going to be a drive. Dad Wasn't real keen on it. He thought I should be a bookkeeper mother. Should I wanted to send me to school in Ohio for music and I wanted to drive in for a long time. Dead didn't talk to me. He walked crush street. Wouldn't have anything to do with me. Then he became proud of me at small out. There you see that she owns that trump. She runs a business. And we've been a family. We were always a family owning our own businesses so Having him be proud of me with something shoes by yourself. Most of the time I'll work locally ships rock and then she got married with Russell. She was hauling with her husband. Right yes they were they were in separate trucks but they were always on the same gig but then her husband gets injured and she has to go out over the road. What was I going to do? I had a truck payment. I had house payments to kids. Was I gonNa go home and cry? It was time to go to work. That's when we really see like the the feistiness of her personality come through on these stories. Bj McAdams poll flatbed form. While I was being pushed around was being taken. So you know when she first started out I think is an owner operator. She she had this boss. That must have been the seventies or eighties when when were like wearing their shirts open to like. The fourth button always walked around with his shirt. Unbuttoned like a like a manly man with the hairy chest and everything and Real Manley and he had a habit of always something being wrong with your check. You always short now. I remember thinking to myself. This ain't happening. This just ain't happening and I don't remember where I got the little heat gun to take the signs off the truck you know. She had those Stickers that she'd taken off the truck which are you know highly adhesive. They're you know they're made to withstand wind rain snow and heated him up in pulled him off and I went in there and cook them signs and of course now. You know they're sticky. I wanted them all up and I walked in and he says you're not going to quit and I said Oh yes I am and I stuck them right to his hairy chest. Well she she really sounds like a legend. She is she. She's one of these few people who've actually had a truckstop named after her and the Idell Hanson North Little Rock Petro and todd. Can you remember the exact distinction? It's called this the Ta Petro Citizen Driver Award and they've been doing for several years now can you? Can you tell me the whole house? That whole thing worked out where truckstop got named after you. How does that work? I don't know how to Hell Up. I think the nominations from anybody in the trucking community. And it's always it's always a driver. She says I would like to nominate you for Ta Petro Citizen of the year. And I says you've got to be kidding me. Did you ask her what it feels like to pull into a truck stop? That has her name on it. Oh Yeah Yeah I did but now I got shot down. I got shot down on that Course my name's on the top of the fuel receipt and my pictures right there. You know so I go in. I was full. Michelle and I said the GAL getting national. You know who I am. Don't you you've got to be kidding? I couldn't believe I said that. And she says well no and she's looking right at the receipt and she's looking at my name and never the Twain shall meet and I was very polite. I says I thought to myself. I deserved that. Who the hell do you think you are? It taught me a lesson. I go in there if they if they hug my neck and say anything. That's great if they don't I'm not anybody special. I'm just the next truck driver in line. But you don't really. I think they need to make me parking spot a reserved parking spot with my name on this mine alone. Don't you and K Paul? Yeah tell me about shoestring. My Name's Ken Wall and I've been trucking for approximately thirty eight years now shoestring shoestring law. Is this guy such a storyteller? There was this old hotel across the street. Dare and that's where all the hookers and the cross dressers. It was all happening right there. Historians are silly evocative and I got this drink and what kind of drink it was. I was so Milena Trish in from running over the road but it had all of this was a great big ball had all shoestring to me like towers towers over my stories. I mean because he had to go out and live that to get that story. I figured it up. One time you had to average about seventy mile an hour to get there I mean just just. Judging from the stories he told in that interview did with him he strikes me as a guy who had a tendency to get himself into trouble. Oh Yeah Yeah. That's just a tip of the iceberg. I mean you know you don't get stories like that by being the pillar of the community. You know you get stories like that. And now he became the pillar of the community like He's a stellar standup. Salt of the Earth Guy. But I think there's this part of them that he he loves to tell stories about the wilder days because he's resurrecting these memories in these characters and he just he just gives it all to you he gives you the good the bad and the ugly one time I was in Columbia South Carolina. There's this one story in particular and and this is vintage sue string. He's laid over the weekend at this truckstop in South Carolina and things really do take a bizarre and ultimately disturbing turn. I back my large car in you know and the parking place to my left was easel. Bed buggers I got to talk into. We all pitched in on some booze and everything. The party got of control. Got Out of control. These were household movers and they started bringing the furniture out the drunker and higher. They got so I bring over bag a weed not though it down while I was her best friend. Then I get along chair. Offered the truck well setting over from me. Was the chicken hall that night. The barrels came out. Busted up pilots got too far gone and emo boys was hungry. They cut the seal on that wagon and got in there and they've is bringing out whole chickens and they just the night win on more furniture came off of that they bring out the couch. They had in tables and that next morning. When I woke up there was truck. Drivers stretch down on these couches and chairs and a far was smoldering and the party kind of died down year no but they were stuck there for the weekend and we all got together. We we refreshed. Got More Booze at forty seven thousand bounds of chickens. The man in these old boys they weren't afraid to go in there and get them and everybody started pitching in Boyle by Saturday night. It was really kick one of the bed. Buggers had a boom box and this guy came on the radio and he was hollering this. Somebody could help a young lady APP to get the floor. Well she came over to the Party. He brought it over there and she was just a young girl. She was something like eight months pregnant and she wanted to get back to Florida in order to have her child. Everybody's like yeah. Give me a dollar. You know but she needed some money and one of these guys came up with a great idea. He had a dry man. He opens up his trailer and he had empty truck. He said that boombox of prayer and put her on the back out on the radio in charge truck drivers five dollars to come back to see the pregnant girl dance because she had worked as a stripper at one time. And I'm thinking while just when you thank you seen it all in this poor young lady pregnant just wanting to get home now. You know sat in a way. It's sad it's funny but it's it's funny but it's sad here. She is up Bare Strip. Naked dancing on a tailgate of empty trailer to an old boom box. You-know-who a cassette tape in it. And Hey she had a handful of money and there was a greyhound bus station at that truck stop. She got her a ticket and got on there and often wonder about her wonder. Whatever happened to her that my goodness for the kid would be what thirty five years old or more by now and That's been years ago. This wouldn't go on today out there. My wonder any chance that person's out there. And here's this in those this story. Yeah wouldn't that be something as a result of this podcast lady gets a hold of US and says that wasn't me well? I'd love to talk to her. I love her All right so Paul. You interviewed Someone who's very important to you who is not attract driver but plays a pretty big role and a lot of truckers lives. Yeah that that's more Shia Campbell. Okay Well Marseilles. We are doing a podcast. And we decided to episode called long-haul Paul's Hall of fame and people who are heroes of mine and on our little old farmhouse. There's a picture of view that hangs on our wall off. Because you're the one who kinda feeling about what are you feeling teary eyed and emotions are running and its role in it's real. Let's talk about that. Let's talk about the real nece. Well I'm actually supposed to be interviewing hair pollen shine. Nobody in any big radio outlet ever reached out and said I wanNA play your songs. You were the one who I'm going through. Cincinnati with a load of orange juice and I. I've message you and re requested song. I don't remember what song it was. And you play the song I request that and then you go. And here's one from long-haul Paul himself as Bessemer to Birmingham. I don't know if I should say this on over the radio I had to pull over and I literally lost control of my clapper. 'cause I'm being played on W. S. m. The flagship station of the grand old opry. And and and nobody did that for me. But you so so. Thank you test kind of consider just the importance of all night. Radio to a trucker. Find yourself on the night shift. Maybe your load was late. Getting getting out of the dock. And you've gotTA get north of Cincinnati before traffic hits in. Its three in the morning and and you just need something to engage you something to keep you awake and and and so you turn to Marsha lie for Music City. Usa This is the all nighter. I'm a cable on six fifty two headed Marzia and being the angel of truck drivers in the middle of the night wanting to hear or the human voice on the radio. But she's got this really interesting backstory. I was a stay home. Mom after my second son was born I was looking in. My walls are covered with CDs and albums so I called my local radio station and I said do you by chance. Have any time to meet with me. A about a programming idea and I went down and next week. I was on the air doing to our bluegrass show free. Wd Cayenne twelve sixty am. That was my hometown radio station where the foundation was laid. Of course I played the legends of Bluegrass Music. Bill Monroe Lester flatt roles but I would make tapes and record the show and I would take this tape to my radio mentor Keith. Bill Brey. She would send tapes to Keith. Bilberry was professional. Dj WCM. And I think he also helped announced the opry and I said listen to this and tell me what I need to do. I suppose I followed his guidance. He was in need of an a radio host syndicated across the country over twenty five different stations. Brooking America is listening to the interstate radio network interstate radio networks catered to the truckers and my first night on the air. The phone lines lit up. She just kept growing her craft and she winds up on the Interstate Radio. And then she longevity. Ws WS at that time did not have an overnight personality and I went straight to the general manager at that time and I said can we talk is America's trucking Sweetheart Marcie. Campbell pitched another program. This is the all nighter on six fifty playing music. We're doing this day in history. We're doing trivia. Well a number one song on this day in. Tell me when your birthday is. I keep a calendar. It's like I wanNA wish everybody heavy birthday talking joy. Peace celebration to everyone. Please slow down and drive with caution overnight clear skies what means so much to me about Marchesi after two thousand one after nine eleven in particular like night. Trucking radio just turned into constant talk about you. Know all the yanks that was going on in the country the United States military has begun to believe. There's another men through that. A lot of trucking four-match just dropped music altogether. And I personally I I kind of checked out after that I'm not hardwired For constant angst constant umbrage and data. Didn't keep me awake. What kept me awake was hearing Jimmy. Rogers Blue Yodel at three in the morning She it took her a few years but she resurrected that format. Dixie chicks with asleep at the wheel Johnny Campbell Christain Party millionaire and for that reason if she had never spun one of my songs I I would still consider her a Harem Nighttime brings out more sensitivity and you're joyful it mag it's magnified if you're lonesome if you're sad if you're hurting when that sun goes down it's magnified but when you know someone cares about you at the other end of the line whether it's the radio line telephone line because my phone lines are open. Call me if you're struggling. Then let's play a game or let's play some music. Let's get you going. You know it may be that twenty miles or two hundred miles so I learned to be a friend at the other. End of the line and So my callers are Honky Tonk irs. There truckers their gypsies their nighttime workers or it may be Miss Mary. That lives down the road who can't sleep at night. She's widowed and she loves country music so I have the audience that God wants me to have and I pray that I can be a beacon and the middle of the night whoever needs my light or my shine or My heart my attention. I pray that I can deliver long haul. I wish you happiness in good health peace and love and I wish you Enough Godspeed. My friend Next poll well. I'm going to tell you about my friend. Big Jim this is about as old school of a friendship and trucking as as you can come by we we met on a CB in Georgia north Georgia. I think I passed him somewhere right. Around the skill you know turned his lights off and on to let me know it was safe to come back in. And he was in a company track then. I was an owner operator. I think you saw who I worked for. And I talked to one of their drivers like the week before. Who said he was doing about a quarter million a year on his ten ninety nine and you made some kind of common over the CB how you like working there and we ratchet jarred all the way through Georgia. Then I decided I was going to give his company try and we celebrated that decision with a with a piece of cheese free cheese as it may be free cheese. These guys were like running pure outlaw. It was a thrill aid. Really will like the principles of this company. We work for were like all wearing ankle bracelets literally wearing ankle bracelets because of flagrant logged violations and back then this was my mindset. I was like cool. Where DO I sign up? One of these chance meetings on the road which became a lifetime friendship and through analysis span of decades. We've we've seen the highest of highs together and really the lowest of lows my name is Jim Selker and I'm from a little town called Juno Alaska. The other one in Wisconsin. You know the thing about Jim was he was just such a unique character because he grew up on this farm in Wisconsin and almost like this Christine Norman Rockwell town in Wisconsin. If you're if it has a church a bar and a garage it's a town. I mean there is Polka music on the radios at his family's farm we would acquire everybody's favourite alcohol and it would go in a big milk can with ice and fruit juice and that would like ferment. Then anybody walking through the barn would help themselves to cup of the two years we called. It had some walk man. Oh man his family had like some of the top dairy cattle in Wisconsin. But he didn't want any part of that and trucking was a way out for him and I went working for a buddy of mine who hauled exotic cars. They just found like this the bipolar opposite of his upbringing. I picked up a Lamborghini in Kentucky convertible black and nobody cared about the mileage. I had that car with me for a good month and I got my use out of it. And here's the thing I live vicariously through these people that that's a site they lived a life. I could not dare to live and I've told Jim that so many times. I just wanted to hear his stories. Because these weren't really stories I was ever going to offer. You said big. Jim Was Company driver when when you guys I met on the CB on I seventy five in Georgia there but he he did eventually By trucks right. Yeah yeah no he. He wound up buying a truck and he did well with it and then he bought a newer truck fellow down in Georgia had a decal shop down there and he made me under dollar bills floating up the the entire side of the truck and I call myself easy money trucking and he was really pop in there for a while back then we get paid by the Nine L. T. L. So the more you could stuff in your trailer. Though more you got eight. So He'd go book say Eighteen Pallets cantaloupes coming out of and then he call her aid finds a guy who's got a few few pallets of watermelons or something. You know he he. He was just a working machine. It was new partially for the money but also partially just to see if you could get a dengue what we did was. We would put on more freight than we were supposed to dodge skills so away to flirt. We go stuff the trailer fool and Mata it was almost like addictive was a cat and mouse game. And you're kind of culture where everyone was doing it. Yeah that's that's pretty much true as I look back at that I don't. I'm not trying to valorize what we did resist. It's just seemed like the only way to make at the time so we were just trying to make every dollar we could and I guess Gen. All of our outlaw always caught up with us and in fact you were the first one to the host. My hospital bed which I'll never forget. Can you talk a little bit about that solemn duty that you were somehow saddled with that you had to do for me that day? I was actually at home when I got the call from the company we worked for that you had been in Iraq. We haven't really talked about this directly before in it but I was wondering if you could just kind of pay me pitcher. What happened that day of the wreck ball? You know you're doing multiple drop loads. If you just had one person hold you up. You could really get in behind the eight ball so I was behind the eight ball turning and burning going from Florida to his consular. Produce and Wisconsin Florida with refrigerated product. And just just pushed it way too hard and I just I not off so I found where they had told your truck down there and man I was all. I was surprised that you were alive. That truck was in that much of of a of a wreck. I was really surprised that you made it through it. I was an ICU. And and I broke my neck. You Know I. It just meant a lot that he was there and And I don't remember if we could even speak at that point because I had to write for awhile I they had me up all hooked up and all that stuff and And and and you know it wasn't till that interview He was like almost scolded me for all the cheese that I ruined racking out just so you know. I had to throw a lot of cheese that week to everything at slid forward just kind of exploded in inside you know really I guess. I never knew that we never talked about. Did you have to take a lot of cheese to the dump? You never take cheese to the Dome you can use. That's that's like sacrilege for somebody from Wisconsin. I could just imagine the tragedy of the cheese. Okay Yeah yes you get it in of injuries but you should have seen the cheese so now. You're down in Miami Florida at a chunk. Aaron what did you have to do then? I look to see you know what I could recover for you from your truck and quite frankly there wasn't much and if I remember correctly the only thing that I really got for you is maybe a couple of close in your guitar. You know you and I and I don't think about this on a daily basis but you and I have been through a lot. Yeah it's Y'all life hands you things in got two choices either deal with it and go on or you let it get to you. How your career as a trucker ended about a year ago? Now Yeah just a little over a year. My kidneys finally gave out. So I'm on dialysis now and and Apparently the The feds won't let your drive a truck when you're on dialysis. I don't know why but apparently not the medical staff was very nice. They let us go interview right there when he was actually in dialysis. How has your life been since you got of trucking? I really don't Miss It. You're a slave to that truck and if you know at some point in time maybe it's their you figured out. There's more to life than eventually the machine often we were rousted out by the nurse. We've been asked to step out and will be record role out okay So our last honoree in long-haul Paul's hall of fame is a fellow by the name of Fast Ready. Yeah I I wrote a little essay about this because I just wanted to. I write better than I speak and I just wanted to put this in writing. So this is called the Pope of pomp and met in the phone room of the Florida State. Farmer's market in Palm Beach the room itself is best I can remember was about two hundred square feet with worn out carpet. A few dog eared chairs and a wall with two. Maybe three payphones. When things were really popping back in the ninety s you might have to wait five ten minutes until your turn for. The phone came up. For that reason. Brevity was appreciated and expected. That said there was no guarantee wouldn't get stuck behind some truckstop. Romeo who would throw etiquette to the wind while trying to work out. Some intractable relational snag with the second shift cashier from the Shreveport. Petro that kind of call with illicit intentional cough clearing of the throat and after yet more time the five minute cheetahs this particular day. There was a haggard. Looking Man. Feeding quarters into a seven minute apology to New York judge. Yes your honor. I fully understand. Sir I give you my word. It will never happen again. Yes Sir I fully own. It was a damn stupid thing to do thank you. You won't regret this sir. And then best I can recall. He started running out of quarters and began gesticulating to me smiling a bit just needing someone to break a couple ones fast. I just happened to have the right. Change Truth be told. I was so engrossed by what sort of trouble this guy must have gotten themselves into. I was enjoying the show and the call finally concluded his contrition evaporated abruptly concurrent with slamming down the receiver. Jesus was always say turns out. He went by Fast Freddie and when my own call was done Freddie was lingering by the door what are you Polish. He asked German. I replied and we wound up at a table together. So what did he do? What was the apologizing for? I don't know if there's a traffic thing like he. He was a guy that stayed in trouble constantly. It's like trouble. Trouble was like his daily staple. So here's this chance meeting in this phone room and the I'd join him and seems like every other guy that's walking into. This market is scanning the room seeing Freddie and walking up to our table and like like he's reporting for duty or something and I'm insinuated into his circle without even trying because I just happened to be sitting there and everyone that came up. Freddie wants you to meet my Polish friend from Chicago. And I'd say German. Freddie from Indiana German from Indiana could not peel him away from that screaming and kicking. I was always a Polish guy from Chicago to him. So so Paul I. I understand that fast. Freddie is no longer with us but you had an opportunity to talk to his daughter. Evelyn my name is Evelyn runs and I am from Cincinnati New York. He was so interesting about Evelyn was like she was embracing the whole thing. I admired the shit out of that man you know. I was his number one mechanic when he was home. I was the flashlight holder. I was the one you know dodging the tools when he was getting frustrated. She was driving a semi at the age of eleven. I was calling to reach the pedals and see plenty above the steering wheel so he would put it on cruise and she would go in the bunk and hold the steering wheel and I would sneak up around him and jump in the sea and dry for hours and hours left So Paul do you remember seeing Evelyn out on the road when she was a little girl? Oh absolutely all the time I whenever shot in the summertime when you saw Freddie you saw Evelyn and he was just a guy that always had to have those kids with any would always teach US sometimes to go around the Scales and sometimes how to be good way he'd be like. Oh well we're going to go the scenic route tonight. You know I'd be like Oh you know you got logbook filled out dad. Oh Yeah Yeah. Yeah Yeah I was like okay. Let's go yeah. There was no such thing as running out of hours. There was trucking in trucking and trucking. And then you take very short quick nap and trucking some more. After I came back from Iraq I was I was Kinda disfigured and Facially and my posture had changed. And the first thing he said when he saw me as what the hell happened to you. I told him goes. You're using drugs. I go no well. There's your first problem hard that exactly. I could see. Yeah if you were doing drugs that have been awake not sleeping. And he was ex- golding may for not using drugs so that was classic fast Freddie right there but you know Freddie the thing about Freddie was he I saw him as sort of like this outlaw trucker dude but he he he had this complete other side to him that I would have never seen had. I not been stuck in the POMPANO market. One thanksgiving I think might have been a Oh seven but it's the Wednesday before Thanksgiving and like Freddie like stands in front of everybody like like he's giving this commission he goes. We're going to have a fish tomorrow. Call every crack Horn every homeless bum. I even want you to invite the flat betters. We're going to have a Thanksgiving feast fellas. Wow you know the funny thing to say but it's it almost sounds like a Bible story. Yeah it was like know. We're having a feast. Invite the greatest to least and there was a there was a guy there who was known as Alonzo. The broom boy Lonzo had a drug problem and he made his living by sweeping people's trailers out and And Lonzo sat away from everyone because he he didn't bathe much and and Freddie made him a plate in there on the curb right next to him they ate together and they talk like old friends and then one narrow done eating. He came over to me and told me. Alonzo's whole story is just unbelievable. Everything he knew about Alonzo and I realized in that moment you know were Ralph Waldo. Emerson says every man is my superior in some regard That this guy who you know was always a mess. Always in trouble was also just this wonderful human being too. You know the the the guy who's a most down and out and I that always stuck with me. Does Evelyn remember that night? She absolutely does. That was the coolest thing I was like. You Know Dad. I really wish you were here for Thanksgiving and none of our family events wherever peaceful ever. So he's like you know I would much rather be down here with these people making sure all these crack whores and all these bums are fed. Been dealing with the nonsense home today and I was like you know that. That's that's Kinda cool. I'm not even mad about it and the crazy thing. This wasn't ice. I I didn't know this at the time but this was not isolated to pompey. No no no. He was like that every there were certain truck stops from home to Florida that he would stop at and in each of those truck stops. It was the same type of thing that you've seen in Pompilio so up up at hunts point you know. Evelyn tells the story where everybody even knew him up. There and hunts point is a big place. It's not Po. The pop no market. It's ten times as big as pompey. No mark it's in the Bronx. I remember I was like nine ten. Maybe and he'd be like well. You can go down to Mike's to the Chinese placing get. Get yourself something. They're not closed yet. I'm like but dad it's dark I'm little mom. Says we should be scared. He's like oh I know all of these people here. You're fine and sure enough. I could walk down to Mike and my sister was with us and you know we had to use the bathroom and this tiny little Chinese lady pulls out. The machete biggest. She is and my dad. You know started to go up and she go. No you stay here. I take them Venos- and up the stairs dragging your machete. She went things like that. Have stuck with me for these years. Just things that you never. You don't experience any way else. Besides in a truck Truck Gentil three days. Before he passed away he'd kept. You know sickness a secret and We knew things bad but he tried to avoid coming home as much as possible and he called me and he was in New Jersey. And he's like I'm at this exit. I can't I can't go anymore. You have to come get me off in the middle of Nineteen New Jersey. We want and that's when he took his last step side of his truck apparently After Freddie died the truck was parked somewhere had to be moved away from. And it'd been sitting for probably six or seven months. It just refuse to start. We had three or four guys. Come out and try to help us and it just did not want to start one of the guys like you know what I'm sick of this. Evelyn you get up there you do this. I had my youngest daughter with me at the time. She was like a year old through her. Up In there and I just sat there turning the key and hitting the gas going. Come on please. Start to start. Please please start come on Dad. Please Start and then all of a sudden black smoke everywhere. I instantly tears running down my face and I was like all right guys like I don't have a CD L. I can't drive. Even they're like what do you mean can't drive? I was like why can't drive do and they're like well. This is no different so One of my dad's friends jumped up in the passenger seat. And he said come on. Let's go It was the most wonderful thing though. I got to know Evelyn. I wrote a song called good hand and the character in that Song live by simple ethic you put the load I and let us take care of itself. One day a man wrote to me out of the blue and he told me how much that song reminded him of a driver. He knew who used to run out of the PUMPIDO market a guy who went by fast Freddie. I said you're not going to believe this but I knew Fred. He was part of the inspiration for that song as it turns out this man. Also new Freddie's daughter Evelyn. Someone I hadn't seen since he was just a little girl next thing. I know I get a message from Evelyn herself. I mean what are the chances of that Evelyn would later? Tell me that her dad's heart had simply exploded days after his last run. It literally run himself to death. Like a Racehorse. Always looking after the load. It's one thing to write songs about this kind of thing. But Freddie Freddie was the song now you dark a drawl hard pound Hannah keys you to your face for the U. and Santa and squanded and code and how y'All ran Trad Wall Big Play Hello Longman Solas and fall the Pash man standing. Say a good hand. Pay Run on Tandy's Just turn Australia Man There. And it was for ma. It was all too twin turbos hound and cross the clear Santa Rosa Sky Brown Bob. And how it this was to be fat or an John. Do over the road. Pit crew includes producer and sound designer and costs and contributing producers Lacy Roberts. At transmitter media are editor from overdrive magazine is Todd. Dell's our digital producer is Erin Wade. Our project manager is Audrey mortgage and our executive producer for radio TOPI Is Julia Shapiro? I'm long-haul Paul. All the music on the show is by in caution myself featuring performances by Michael Gilbert. Ronstadt Travis the snake man. Ramic Terry to socks. Richardson Titian Lingo. Jim Whitehead Jan Grant. Golic the late Great Roger Clark and Mr Andrew Marshall out additional engineering by Jeff Templeton at Milk House studios and dining in muscle shoals Alabama and a very special you to Damon skull for connecting me with Evelyn over. The road is made possible by support from the folks. I've worked for for a really long time. Muller trucking now celebrating over thirty years of safe and reliable transportation for the food industry for more information. Check out molar. Trucking DOT com over. The road is a collaboration between overdrive magazine and Pierre XS Radio Tokyo a collection of the best independent podcasts around look for overdrive magazine and overdrive online dot com where you can read. Todd's Channel Nineteen blog here. The overdrive radio podcast an explorer news business and lifestyle reporting about trucking. You can find over the road on line at over-the-road dot. Fm shared to follow us on all those usual platforms to facebook twitter and Instagram at over the road pot. You can see some of my videos on Youtube by looking for Lonzo Hall Music. Thanks for listening and hanging in to the end of the run. I'll be back soon with one. More episode of over the road in the league they lost in it was money was in palm some trash drain just to see the glass and the Black Shylock. See him down a you string. There's a road called A. B. Land have fifty four out an hour the narrow fashion where the flatlands they start to roll their the nats road deadly quiet till you blast the win. Don't be travel assists Grover raising to the hall here never see again radio X.

K Paul Freddie Freddie Radio Evelyn Florida truckstop Cincinnati Wisconsin overdrive magazine editor Lacy Roberts Trucking magazine Shia Campbell United States Iraq Todd Topi Petro Idel Maria Hanson
66: Dane Bjorklund on tech cultures

Technotopia

19:48 min | 7 months ago

66: Dane Bjorklund on tech cultures

"Welcome back to the top of the podcast about a better future I'm John Biggs. Dame Bjorklund. This is technophobia. This episode of Topi is sponsored by cheap transcription dot IO. Cheap transcription offers ten cents per minute. Transcription using are happy robots for eighty five cents per minute using our human assistance. Cheap transcription io is cheaper and faster than everyone else. Chief transcription dot ISO. This episode technophobia brought to you by typewriter dot plus typewriter dot pluses, a full-service editorial agency that brings amazing editor's from places like the times and techcrunch to work on your writing a blog post, a white paper of presentation, the typewriter team can write or edit anything on nearly any topic. VISIT THEM TYPEWRITER DOT COM for a free quote. That's typewriter, dot plus typewriter dot plus. Welcome back to technophobia the podcast about a better future I'm John Biggs tennis show. We have gained Bjorklund ease. Your senior creative over at be real. You used to be a New Yorker. MOVED OUT TO LA about a year and a half ago. You abandon us. You abandon us. Everybody does that doesn't get to come back. You realize that I do I know I and I hit the about the eight year marks I didn't even make it to the official ten year. Status got just in time. Just in time I. Don't know, did you? Did you by any real estate while you're out here? No, no, sir. You actually made you made many choices. In the past year all right, so tell us what you're what you're working on over at the euro. Yes absolutely. Be Reels. It's a really interesting company especially right now. We are in. International independent creative agency. We operate five offices. Around the globe, each a bit of a different focus in La, we specialize in product, development, product, design, and experience design. At the moment, that's meant a lot of experimenting and working in touch, list, design or gesture. Jess Gerald as a design. Probably have to say touch this design just because it's an easy to say. But we've got a lot of exciting projects going on right now. Obviously, the the pandemic shook up everything. I think the probably the best example we were developing a lot of. Demos for for different tech conferences obviously with all of those conferences getting canceled the we had to change course in and bring those demos online, so that's been a big chunk of our work load lately. It's just been the the digital conference experience in in thinking about. How the. Of course garbage collection time. I apologize for that. I live in downtown. LA, so it's A. No shortage of noise. But, yeah, we. We've been thinking a lot about. Touch this design and how the pandemic? Obviously is impacting how we interact with our devices. interact with people. And we're developing a lot of products to hopefully solve some problems for people. Let's talk? Let's talk about touch. This design. I think that's that seems like something that we weren't thinking outright. Just. I don't know. Gosh five months ago and now it's vitally important, right? Yes. in your, you know you're seeing kind of pop up more and more. There's obviously things like. Touch Menus that the restaurants are starting to incorporate? Obviously you know apple pay mobile pays has been a thing for a while, but you certainly GonNa see a lot more of it I always I think about it. I have a family friend. He used to joke about certain airport bathrooms as being perfect. You could go through the full. Bathroom without touching any surfaces. And I think you're GONNA. See a lot more of that kind of perfect experience. Whether it's restaurants, offices or Retail stores Eliminating doors. Bobo pay Trying on clothes in augmented reality, you know using your hands in motion to dictate HOW ITEMS AROUND YOU INTERACT! I think we're GONNA. See more and more of that. What some of the some of the coolest technologies that you've seen in that space. That's a good question I a couple of projects that we've been working on V. Real specifically We have a deep relationship with the pixel team over at Google and We've been a partner with them to develop They're living wallpapers of live wallpapers With the Pixel for you know the big challenge. There was how we could incorporate They're motion sense. Rissoli into some of our wallpapers which was in an incredible. And we, we had a lot of fun messing around with hand. Gestures kind of turning your phone on as you're reaching for your phone. Or as simple as you know, waving clouds or or tree limbs, as you Kinda, wave your hand over the device to just. Give a sense of the phone being a bit more president. in your surroundings I think that. The rumor is now that that the Pixel for as potentially. Giving up on radar tech for the time being I think. That's up. They think Google might be thinking of it more about now as A touch less is becoming more and more present in our lives. I think that'll be an interesting project to keep an eye on. Another another. Touch this design space. That I think is really interesting that we're. We're spending a lotta time in. Is just conversation design I think in a strange way. That quarantine almost kind of saved the home computer. In a lot of. Obviously a big generalization, but a lot of you know homes that the kid has a tablet and there's a smart tv that's streaming and there's a smart home. That's Serving up recipes and that's how you're. You're kind of. Getting all of your temperature, these more ambience, devices versus the home computer, but. Certainly with. Everyone, working from home now you're seeing a lot more of of. The computer kind of taking presence and everyone's makeshift home offices But specifically around. The the conversation is the the smart home One project we've been working on. Is basically around Gabe, defying the passive. Smart Home Experience. So we think about this. As something that can give us. Reminders can turn on music and. Changed the volume. And we, we basically took that technology and thought about you know. How can we game a FI- and so we're working with a partner in their their voice assistant to developed. Really Fun Games That allow for kind of a more passive Experience that I think we'll. We'll see a lot more. So is that is that a is the idea that the that the home? So gamification obviously kind of a kind of A. It was a bad word in mobile because it turned into, it turned into. I guess you could say like micro micro transactions and things show, but but this is this. Is this an idea that would help you to? Turn off the lights properly or practice good sleep hygiene. That kind of thing or what's what's the situation? Yes, certainly could and. You know I think there are. There's some some cool kind of bettering your life. Games that are out there I. Think what we're trying to develop were some of our gamification of of? Sparked homes is is just kind of providing these moments to spark imagination and provide a bit of joy so some of the Games that were that were working on our Games that you are able to converse with the tech in a very natural way to. Cause different responses in different reactions, so it's a one game is about growing a garden, and there's a a playful garden gnome that. Asks you these kind of simple questions throughout the day? As at your will as you as you want to speak with it, in each of the answers that you give result in a different kind of plant flower or a garden item growing, so you get this sort of. Passive Ambien experience of. Seeing something result from a simple playful conversation that she can have another game that we're working on is is kind of more of a a group Parlor Party game. brought into the contemporary world. You can imagine playing with a group of Friends a charade style game. Where all of the The. The driving force behind it is kind of this passive screen. That's in the in the space, but isn't disrupting from your interactions with your with your friends. So there's a lot of it's almost like almost like Ray Bradbury, and what you're what you're describing here is that is that kind of the mission is that the is the goal to change the house into? A place where everything is done. I don't think our goal is to Tennessee -sarily Tell us a bit like a computer from Star Trek this kind of always present being that's there. We see we see the the smart screen is is the kind of a companion who's who's in the house? You know where it is It's not some am like not some hidden. Tech that you don't know. Another another character in the house. Right exactly exactly you have your the sister brother, and then you have the the computer friend right right right I understand. What do you think the world looks like in twenty years when you guys are done with a? Twenty years. I was I. I listened to your your episode with faith. Popcorn and I think he's better suited to give a twenty year outlook in well hurt her. If you remember she was she was probably one of the biggest donors I've had on. She was great. It was amazing to talk to her, but she was she she saw us all like scrounging for for scraps out of dumpsters. And Twenty twenty five, so it's going to be a whole different story right right, right? Yeah I mean! Twenty years is is really. Interesting to think about I, I'm. My current mindset is thinking you know how. In a couple of years, how is this the the pandemic and affect what what our homes look like and what our jobs look like in in what are our experiences with technology? Look like I I'd like to have A. Hopeful outlook for for twenty years. I think? One inspiring pieces is just seeing how how a lot of young people are embracing technology to raise awareness and to. Insight charitable. Projects I. Think the the best. Use case was from last week with. It is what it is gate or the the. The mouth I'd FM, which was just kind of lighthearted fun story that that ended up raising a lot of money and poking fun at at Silicon, Valley But I think you're seeing instagram live. Introduce a donation feature into You know their platform or On on twitter, you know it used to be. If you you had like a viral tweet, you would add your your soundcloud Lincoln. You're seeing a lot of people Include Lakes to make donations. that. That charitable initiative that a lot of people are. Grabbing onto is a is a good sign it. It gives me some hope for the long the long future. That sounds that sounds hopeful. How do you? How do you compare the cultures? You worked in New York. You worked in L. A.. How do you compare the? Creativity cultures the the tendencies. Places I know it's obvious it's kind of a cheap shot, but it's like. you worked at the Atlantic and you also worked over here working on like I. Don't know some kind of crazy funhouse, so how how? How do you? How do you see the the two? The two coasts Competing comparing yeah totally. It's been really fun transition. you know my background? My experience has been in publishing and media world in New York. I started working at scholastic in children's Publishing and product development in licensed publishing, and and spent four years at buzzfeed on the great team. And, so I was a bit more an ingrained in in the media world in New York. on the creative side of the media world. And then when I made the move to La, was my first kind of experience in the in the agency side of things. So there's A. I've experienced a ton of changes and I think a big part of it is certainly the new. York I L A shift. There's also the publisher agency shift that I've gone through As well as just the physical move of relocating. So, there's in terms of The tech culture. I would say It's surprisingly similar. There's you know there's a similar amount of meet UPS in conferences in gatherings there's. Tons of different. Companies doing tons of different things There's a willingness to to share ideas into collaborate. We've been able to to host a couple of events at be real. Were you know inviting the industry to come over and check out some of the work? We're doing to bring some guest speakers and that was certainly something you see a lot of in new. York is this kind of meet up culture in this outreach culture. I think in. One of the benefits of La's. Just, having more space, physical spaced to Cather. People I. Think in New York. There's probably more kind of smaller get togethers smaller gatherings of meeting after work, a bar to share ideas and to talk about you know work in projects in L.. A. Those can kind of take place in bigger environments with more people If as long as you can. Drive to those locations and get around. A lot of subway action right exactly exactly that that's been a big shift the car life. Is Interesting. Guy But in terms of in terms of the way, people think about technology what the uses are. It's all basically you think there. It's basically the same kind of thing because I the way I imagine it does over there that everybody's thinking about I. Don't know. Like more creative endeavors, whereas here, it's other media where it's completely like where it's almost old school to a degree, you basically have to fill in to fill in the blanks for people who who may or may not know what kind of media that you're talking talking about. What kind of tools that you're talking about if that makes any sense? There it's a little bit more imaginary imagineering style sort of stuff, but. Yeah, I think that's a fair comparison. It's it's interesting. Be Real we have. We have a team in New York and they focused more on traditional communications versus our La Office where we're a bit more product. Focused, but but we certainly you know collaborate on a ton of projects and they're doing a ton of really interesting things So I, wouldn't. I wouldn't necessarily. Generalized new. York quit specifically. I'm just trying to I'm just trying to start a starter for. Go here absolutely very cool. Working, people see some of the stuff that you're working on especially if we're. Where will they be able to see these? These amazing rooms that you guys are building. Yeah, absolutely. Worlds. There you know we're launching a few products coming up seeing if you keep an eye on our our website be Dasril R.. E.. L., DOT, com, or anywhere anywhere you follow. Things were were. Twitter instagram medium We've got some some big projects coming out so yeah, definitely, keep an eye on what we're up to. Dane Bjorklund senior creative over at be real. Reporting from La. Over there. There's no there's no no Cobra, not not a huge covert activity in your in downtown. LA I. We'll see we'll. See. We're all GONNA have to see. Thank you for joining us? This has been on. It's been pretty cool. Create a good one. Thanks Been Topa. I'm John Biggs. We will see you next week. technophobe brought to you by happy. Fun Corp Happy Fun Corpus Design Driven Technology Company in Brooklyn New York that specializes building, mobile and web applications for startups and fortune five hundred companies. Whether. It's a new mobile web application that will help people experience the Internet in a fun new way or software that will interface with a new piece of top secret hardware. Happy Fun Corp is always after the challenge. Bigger small happy fun for Love Building Software and loves working with great people. Come bill with them. Happy Fun for Dot Com.

LA New York John Biggs twitter instagram partner York Dame Bjorklund Google New York. THEM Topi Happy Fun Corp official apple editor Tennessee
Bonus Episode: The Magic 8 Ball

Everything is Alive

08:05 min | 1 year ago

Bonus Episode: The Magic 8 Ball

"Hey There Ian here we've missed you. We are hard at work on season. Three and we're very excited for you to hear it. That'll be coming out in the spring for so now. What you're listening to is a little bonus episode for radio to- Pius fundraiser? More about that at the end of the show. But if you like you could pause this listen make a donation right now based solely on the strength of this rambling intro You do that by going to radio TOPA DOT FM. We'll get on with the show now. Can you introduce yourself for us. Yes okay what's your name. Concentrate and ask again. I'll introduce you your magic eight ball. It is certainly And I think what I'm getting here as you can only say the things a magic eight ball says it is decidedly so so you have a name but no one can ever know it because you can't ever say Yes I'm curious. It's maybe a weird question but what should I be thinking of you. Ads Tom Would you call yourself. A Toy. Higher applies no. So you don't you don't like being called the toy without a doubt Shall we just call you spiritual adviser yes definitely Let me ask you some questions that I know you can answer What's your favorite corporate email? Software Outlook. Good angry great. Would you describe yourself as a procrastinator. Ask again later. What's your advice for dealing with a broken abacus? Don't count on it. What's your advice for dealing with a broken heart reply? Hazy try again chur try again get back out there. Good Advice Paul. What's your favorite prog rock band? Yes great band and because I have to ask are are you the owner of a lonely heart. Yes yeah I guess it would be hard to tell somebody how you feel if you can only say exactly twenty things it is certain. Let me ask you this. What still worst type of orange juice made made from concentrate and ask again? What's the worst of orange juice made from? Concentrate and ask again. This would just keep going on forever if I let it. Wouldn't it so I see it. Yes what's it like when people ask you more serious questions like when someone asks you about death what do you say to them. New May may rely on it. Like you're saying death is inevitable as I see it. Yes yeah like. Sometimes we think we'll live forever but look not so good talking about this. I think the time when I most understand what it's like to be you. Who is when someone dies? Yes because I you know I have so much that I want to communicate to the the people they left behind but I always end up saying the same three things you know. Burn my condolences. I'm thinking of you. I'm sorry for your loss and it's never really what I'm thinking and it's never really really sufficient. Is that what it's like for you all the time it is decidedly. So I realize you know we can edit this sound and we have all these things you've said yes so I could just take everything and break break apart your phrases and pull out the words and we could rearrange it to say whatever you WanNa say to your someone signs point to. Yes well okay. So what if what if I took this and move do this here. Yes and then. Should we keep this. My reply is known. Okay so I'm GonNa take this and cut off this yes and then we can move this over here and then we just do that. Is that what you want to say. As as I see it yes okay mall. I'll just play it. You may rely on my a certain reply without a doubt it is certain it is you signs point to you by sources point to you. I point to you as I see it as I say it it. Is You I without you you without. I not better not better not better I with you you with I very better very better very better. This is is everything is alive. Thanks to Jennifer Mills Donna Lopiano tra- Suzanne mcfaul and Emily Spivak the magic eight ball whose name we shall never know was played by bill. Kurtis music in this episode from Blue Dot sessions. Everything is alive is a proud out. Member of Radio Topi from Pierre X. Jewish Shapiro executive producer and about that Radio Tokia is fundraising right. Now the one and only time of year we ask you to support the shows you love financially but more than that. I think of it as a chance. It's to tell the world what you want. Do you want to someday soon put on your headphones. And here's something that is unlike anything you've ever heard before. Radio Topa is looking for that feeling. They have been looking for that feeling since the beginning and they've been finding finding it and with your help they will continue to look for it and to find it in the future. It is certain you can rely on it is decidedly so go to radio TOPI A- dot. FM Right now to be a part of it radio TOPI DOT FM. Your help means a lot to all of us thank you aw.

Ian Radio Topa Tom Radio Topi Radio Tokia Jennifer Mills Donna Lopiano Kurtis music Pierre X. Jewish Shapiro executive producer Emily Spivak Suzanne mcfaul
Special Report: Cinetopia 2019

The Projection Booth Podcast

29:11 min | 1 year ago

Special Report: Cinetopia 2019

"Lows knows you'll do spring writes by saving on what you need to get your lawn and garden in shape, we do it right to with deals to help you save every day like four bags of premium mulch now for just ten dollars and buy one one and a half cubic foot bag of miracle, grow vegetable and herb garden soil, get Bonnie basics plan for free whatever's on your spring to do list, do it right for less. Start with Lowe's. Offers valid through five one while supplies last. Offer valid on select eleven point eight ounce pox ballot in store only. See store for details. US only excludes Alaska Hawaii. Right now, you can get both sprints unlimited plan and the new L G G thinking with crystal sound all that included for just thirty five dollars per month per line for five lines. All you need is approved credit and eighteen month. Lease no trade in required. Visit sprint stores. Sprint dot com slash L G or call eight hundred sprint one cone fifty dollars a month for twenty dollars month predator vibe into Bill to cancel remain balanced. Willing to face a six thirty twenty thirty dollars per month for line with auto pay DVD Burs Asian during congestions maximums. Usual restrictions apply. Hey, Phil choking projection booth. I'm your host Mike white on the special episode. I'm talking to area one who is the director of marketing and programming for the Senate Opie film festival happens over an an Arbor Detroit. Dearborn Bloomfield Township Royal Oak from may tenth to nineteenth twenty thousand nine we're going to be talked about some of the films that we're going to be. Talking about some of the films that are going to be shown during the festival. I hope you enjoy. Area. One every year. I tried to talk to somebody behind the scenes at the Senate Topi film festival, and I'm very curious. Is there a theme to this year's festival in any different theme than what we'd do normally which is showing the bus stumps for the best doubles the themes that kinda come across all of the films that we end up choosing high not line height? We're hosting spring picnic on the weather looks great. But don't we need stylish new genes? Now gets old eighty old navy. Yup, right now, jeans shirts and teaser up to fifty percent off to fifty percent off our fashion forecast is looking up. Sure is refresher with you. Distress dials lighter washes, there's one hundred and six to choose from dean started just fifteen bucks for adults ten bucks for kids. But the picnics this weekend, we need them. Now just by line and pick up in store for free today. Free pickup and time for picnic get up to fifty percent off since he's now, it'll maybe it'll maybe I'll come four twenty seven to five five thousand four organically. So maybe one of the things that we think about the most one we were programming. Are the fear is. We wanted them to be the life. All you know, we wanted people to leave the film's happy enjoy what they saw and not to overly depress. The festival runs from may tenth to nineteenth this year is that earlier than usual. It is it's about three weeks earlier. Although sometimes we just say a month earlier, but it's actually three weeks earlier. And you know, the main reasoning behind that is there's just so many other events happening in June. And we have a lot of people that all I wish I could go to help you. But you know, it's the same time as, you know, the grand prix or like a big grilling fundraiser, the happens in Arbor, or you know, it up to the summer festival or a venues are just book through that time. And also the auto show is moving to June in twenty twenty. So we were going to move it anyway, and we just decided. To move it. This year of kind of you know, the way for us get used to what it's like to run a festival in may. So far most people that we've talked to are relieved that we are doing it in may because they're like Finally I can go to Senator via and what was your role with the festival this year? I am one of the directors of Senator Pia Kotorak gang with their Ascalon Tei and Seren I bring two halves to the director role. My expertise is in the marketing and programming side. And her expertise is an operation, although she also have experienced doing the marketing program inside because she worked at many different types of festivals all over the country. What were some of the films that you saw throughout the year that you said I have to make sure that this gets into sanatoria for me. Personally. I have a programming lead on staff he does programming for the Michigan theater. So Nick altering he's actually. In every single movie that we've shown and he goes to Sundance and other dump of all the one that I saw through my limited festival attendances would be one that made it into the program this year, and it was called time trial, and it's really intriguing documentary about professional cycling and how people go through these time trials to qualify for the torture fons. And this documentary follows Miller who was caught doping and he got one of the title surfed because he was doping and this follow him and his kind of like last chance to get into Twitter. Font clean. And so you kind of go behind the scenes, you're you're on his bike or Ewing next to him. And you kind of see that there's the whole community between the racers. And you know, they'll be fighting next to each other trying to get their time. They're also kind of heavy fight conversations asking, you know, like, oh, where did you summer? Okay. Well. See you later. Bye. You know, it's just really really different look into the world of cycling, and I don't I don't like myself, I suppose, really fascinating. And I think there's a huge community of people that do cycle that would be really interested in this documentary. I notice you're showing a lot of movies with Lili Taylor in them, the university of Michigan screen Arkan cultures. They do an annual oppose him called the makers and Mavericks, and they honor a filmmaker every single year. And so last year, they honored our off, and we show three of his film and this year, they're honoring Nancy's, the voca and Nancy focus there. The director of dog by an household saints. And we're also showing thirt- are you kind of partnering up with the Jewish film festivals. Well, yes, every single year the Jewish comfortable rent out our theaters, and they put on their Jewish film festival this year. It just so happened that their full also coincides with when our some Fussell, and we talked about whether. We should keep it separate or if it would be beneficial to both some people to kind of join forces similar to how we partner with the Arab some festival because we moved there festival up three weeks, the Arab film festival couldn't change their dates because of Ramadan. So they're keeping their June dates, and so we kind of are now also partnering with the Jewish from us. Well, we decided it would be great to be able to combine our resources, and our audiences will have more opportunities to watch really great films. So it was a really great process working with Karen the in Arbor Jewish community center, and you know, the films that she programmed to be included are also filmed that we would have also enjoyed to include infants and a Tokyo. And actually, we have one film that is a Jewish Centric foam that did not make it into their programming, but we'd really love to. So we included in the phone Tokyo program. And so people who sponsor the Jewish phone festival. They also get access to the Tokyo dome and vice versa. Well, tell me about your venues. I know, of course, that you play at the Michigan theater in the state theatre where also you playing films this year, one of our other larger venues where we're gonna show a lot of films is the imagine theatre Royal Oak. We have a really great new partnership with them, but we're actually have four screams for four days at the second half of Senate Tokia, so we're really excited to be able to show, you know, one hundred twenty screenings of foams there the other venues we are also continuing to be at cinema traits which have been downtown to try and the spending theater we're going to use them for two days. And that's kind of like they're doing a lot of renovation to kind of bring back the facade of the Senate theater. The inside of the theater is really pretty they've already done a lot of work inside. They have a world organ inside. And you know, they're trying to bring back that area that neighborhood in the trade back to glory. We. Decided that it would make a lot of sense to put our Detroit Boyce this short film competition to exhibit at the Senate theater. And we're also doing a panel for filmmakers of free channel about DIY distribution and other distribution stories. It's really exciting for us to be able to try voices at the Senate theater, and we have this new venue that lot of our audiences haven't been to before very exciting for us. And then besides the Senate theater often gonna be back at the maple Peter. So we've worked with them before the venue. We weren't able to do them last year. But this year were able to work with them. And so we're going to be showing three films three days may thirteen to make fifteen and they're really excited to work on five some the foam that were putting there are going to probably be really big hit. So that's also going to be really awesome. And we're also back at university of Michigan's Angell hall. They have their auditorium. They have one that is. DC P capable which is the format that a lot of new films are on nowadays. When when you say things that are going to be big hits. I mentioned something like a framing John DeLorean is gonna play at the maple has actually already on standby. We're going to be showing in the maple theaters largest screen and already it's on standby, which means that we have half of the capacity held for Pasalar. And then we sell the other half for advanced pickets, the all the events tickets have already been sold. And so what that means is people who want to see this movie will show up if they don't have a path Bill wait in the standby line. And after the pass holders are seated at fifteen minutes before screening, whatever sheets are remaining we're going to start selling for one will definitely saw out that is one of two screening framing John DeLorean gonna happen during Topi the other one that's going to happen at the Michigan theater on. I think. Eleven and a worksite is because Wanda producers to MIR Arden he's going to be an attendant do the QNA, and he's also known as the DeLorean historian, and he is helping us get some delorean's park around the theater's. So people will get a chance to pick pictures with real DeLorean who else to have coming to the festival this year. A lot of exciting people who may really great not a lot of them are super famous like last year. We had Beaubourg him who has pre-payments around certain circle this year. We have probably I think about thirty people pendant some really cool people that I'm really looking forward to meeting our Alex Horowitz. He directed the documentary called upon me, which actually are closing my film. I'm really interested in being him. And also Eddie Alterman who is currently that she brand officer at Hearst auto. He used to be the editor in chief. Of car, and driver magazine. And so he actually works locally. I'm not actually sure if he goes locally, the two of them are coming for the film autonomy. And I I thought the screener for autonomy. A knife bought the documentary was just really well made and really touched upon all of the tough things that you can think about with a communist vehicles, and you know, the history where we are currently, and you know, where it's going, including the ethical implications of autonomous vehicles. Like, it was just a really well made story, and I think it's amazing that Alex was able to kind of put all of that together in a way that easily understandable by the general public. My husband works in autonomous vehicle control. And I watched it with him and afterwards, he said, yeah. I mean, I know all of this stuff. No. But so does that mean you like the movie or you don't like the movie, and he said, no good because I think it's a movie that would be really great for my parents. To watch to get them to kind of understand what an autonomous vehicle means. Okay. I think that's a good thing. What you're right. So you don't get this awkward questions at holidays. What is it that you do exactly? Or you know, what people have been caught on in this beautiful like that will never happen. You know and kind of documentary sort of explained, but like it's kind of already happening in your vehicle, you just don't know and one of the things, and I think the documentary really give you these different perspective. But for example, right now, you think about Tom this vehicle, you're like, I would never watch. You know, I would always drive forever. Never let a machine control my driving. And then you know in the documentary, they say, no long time ago a person operated. The elevator got into an elevator. And someone manually cook you up and down. And then when they switched to automatic elevators for a long time. They still hired an attendant to stand in the elevator with you pressing the buttons because it made people feel safe. And then nowadays you freak out. If you got into elevator were somewhat with manually control elevator. I. I am very excited to see making Montgomery Clift that fell Martin Van Dyke. It's also very excited about it. Because he was also very huge Montgomery Clift fan than very excited for both of the directors to come to one of the screenings Hillary and bobber cliff though, he's Montgomery Clift. I'm not even back in high, Hugh, but band, son or son, or now, you have to look that up for me. But both of them will be an attendance. Did you see Fono tune? I do not keep on tune. But I heard that it is very quirky. The director of the film. I think he's in Thint. He was not able to come. But he made a really cute introductory video for us that it'll be a message for people that are seeing this gome. But I know that the programmers who did see the film. They are. They're very excited to show this to everyone I tend to enjoy the more quirky midnight movie esque kind of stuff. Do you have any recommendations for those teams a really good one killing God is is a black comedy horror film? It's in Spanish, it's made by two Spanish directors. And they're also coming for one under screening, I think it's on the second weekend. I think how it's to be really interesting. There's another one them to follow. I heard a lot of really good things. I think that Soames probably going to get a wider release later on. It has a really great cast. And it's just done really well and about a cult that worships snakes. So if you have make phobia do not like the pentecostals are lead programmer, and he says, the favourite film is the documentary called Mr. Jimmy and about this Japanese guy that credit embodies the performing soul of Jimmy page. He kinda dragged up like him, and he acts like him, and he performs all his live concerts. Exactly the way that Jimmy page will perform. That we tried really hard to see if we can get him to come and it almost happened. And then the and it didn't work out. We talked a little bit about some of the live events, the panels. Those kind of things are there any other events going on that people should be aware of we normally have. For parties are parties, usually have filmmakers that will come our opening night party is going to be before the opening night film, which is before you know, it, and I'm actually really excited about our opening night film because it is just a it is it just embodies the word delightful it talks about the conflict between these two sisters, weird, family dynamics. But then it just really leave feeling really great. And the main actresses the two people that say the sisters they're coming. They're also the co writer and Hannah, the main actress, she's the director of the film, and and you know, I saw her and her film when I went to Cleveland and just hearing her talk and Acuna that she did there. I just thought like this is going to make work great panel after the film because I think a lot of people are going to have similar questions, and, you know, ask her because it's very rare where when you can ask. Ask a director about an actress experience to but because she's the director, and she's been main actress, and because this was her first feature length film, but she made in acted in a she can answer a lot of questions and give you a lot of insight on this reason for the choice, or that reason for this, you know, seem setup because she she has done it all the other big event that we're doing our clothing nights are closing is I I mentioned the film autonomy. And it's actually not really at night if at two pm, but after the film and the QNA with the director and the producer. We're going to have our closing that Cardi at and city, which is the first autonomous vehicle test track proving grounds in the world and the university of Michigan along with partnered with other companies to build this facility. It's close off to the public. It's mainly use for companies. And for the university to pass the vehicle that they've been working on. And it's very rarely open to the public. I was able to go to MCI when they first opened because I mentioned my husband's in the field. So we went to the special events. But really not often you get to check out what I'm all about 'em city is this it's a it's a fake town has a fake downtown. But may took kind of look like Ann Arbor. And then it has a section it looks like a highway and has a section that kind of different weather conditions. There's lights their stock signs. There's cakes fire hydrants trash the just looks like a pound, but it's there and just enclosed. And so we were like, let's you of block party at 'em city. So we're sort of divining the party like a in Arbor street party, like the violin monster confirmed that he can be there, and we're going to have to trucks, and there's gonna be a live entertainment. And then we're also going to provide a self guided tours around. M city from companies that were working with are going to bring a vehicle to the spray, and then they can like talk to people about, you know, the autonomous features that they've been working on and kind of answer any general public's questions about what's going on. How big is that place? I wanna say it's twenty two acres twenty two twenty two acres and it's completely enclosed. And it's right below the water tower on unlike Plymouth road, the has the clouds on it. But right next to that you mentioned before you know, it and also that you'll be having the symposium about Nancy Sevaka. Did you try to make a real effort to get more female filmmakers into the spotlight? This year when we open our profits, the programming we always look at the some I and when we start narrowing things down because there's just so many great home out there when we start narrowing down. We do make a conscious effort to who different voices voices of women of L. Cheapie Q humpbacks just to make sure that it's a well rounded program and this year, we do have a lot of female directors. I believe there are eight films that are LGBTQ Centric one of them that were really excited about is called manmade, and it's a documentary about prince sexual bodybuilding and two of the onscreen subject are going to be an attendance to one or the other screening. So you'll have a different Q inexperience depending on which screen though to and that's just the really fascinating documentary. And I'm sure people are just gonna love the documentary. And then just have a lot of questions than just in the okay, hand, the ability and the actions, but talk to people who like this is their life that you're watching out screen. Do you think they will do like body presses and stuff if you request that I don't know? Maybe I think I watched them of the documentaries of when those nigger used to do it. And I think they do. Awada prep before they actually for people. You gotta like fast, and then a bunch of push ups and do the tanning and the baby or yeah. Where's the best place for people to go to find out? More information and pick up a pass for this year's festival, you can find our schedule and fullest, the film, I going to finito PF festival dot org, and you can bypass online as well. Or even come to the Michigan theater. We will start telling passes thirty next week in person during the festival you can purchase a pass at the imagine theatre when we are at imagine. And also at the Michigan theater over in Ann Arbor, but you can always going to hope you festival about orca by path and this year one thing that we're doing new is that we have a concierge phone line, and you can call the phone number two bypasses buy tickets, repeating four packs that you purchase or just ask for recommendations. Which one should I see I wanna see this one or this one which one would you recommend? So it's really great new thing that we're doing this year that will help navigate stuff. Bull because what we've found is. There's a lot of film sec-, and sometimes you need a little help. And we are here to help you and the phone number for that is some in three four six eight eight three nine seven and ask for extensions thirty five aerial. Thank you so much for your time tonight. I appreciate this. Thank you for having me. Not. Directly at the city of Annaba. Extra to Reggie over. Snow? Why? You to an auto. Into your Lowell redundant. Bringing you the screen. From another time of another galaxy oven the SoHo system. Eric. Interplanetary? We watch. Seventy six seven. Projected. City. Trough him. Wasn't notified. Musicals? On this. The first time. This. The screen if you. Breakout James, even when you don't give. Wow. You will be under radio. I will now begin my final. Not fly. Can you off? Cool. Lows knows you'll do spring right by saving on what you need to get your lawn and garden in shape, we do it right to with deals to help you save every day like four bags of premium mulch now for just ten dollars and by one one and a half cubic foot bag of miracle, grow vegetable and herb garden soil get a basics plan for free whatever's on your spring to do list do it right for less star with Lowe's offers valid through five one while supplies last. Offer valid on select eleven point eight ounce. Pox, valid in-store only. See store for details. US only excludes Alaska Hawaii. Lows knows you'll do spring right by saving on what you need to get your lawn and garden and shape. We do it right to with deals to help you save every day like four bags of premium mulch now for just ten dollars and by one one and a half cubic foot bag of miracle, grow vegetable and herb garden soil, Bonnie basics plan for free whatever's on your spring to do list, do it right for less. 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133 - Theaster Gates  Keeping the South Side

The Kitchen Sisters Present

16:46 min | 1 year ago

133 - Theaster Gates Keeping the South Side

"Radio welcome to the kitchen sisters present where the kitchen sisters Dave Nelson N. Nikki Silva before we start. Start the show. We want to thank you for supporting the kitchen. Sisters Present and Radio Topi in twenty nineteen. We're looking forward to big things into twenty and we're glad to have you along along for the ride a special. Thank you to everyone who donated to the radio. TOPI forever campaign. Your support means so much to the kitchen. Sisters present an all of the radio topiary shows be on the lookout for more information about your rewards in your email box in the next few weeks. Thanks again and happy New Year from all here at the kitchen itching sisters now you can get enhanced security for your home wifi network with Xfinity Xfi if it's connected it's protected. Now that's simple easy. Awesome go to xfinity DOT COM. Call one eight hundred xfinity or visit store today to learn more restrictions. Apply this episode. Kosovo the kitchen sisters present is brought to you by Sun soil since soil mix full spectrum whole plant. CBD that's organically grown naturally extracted and accessibly priced. They are ganic farm all their own hemp in Vermont. They naturally extract. CBD from him using organic coconut oil and they test their products next at three I s credited laps to ensure potency and puree today listeners of the kitchen sisters can try son soil. CBD At twenty twenty percent off head to send Soil Dot Com and save twenty percents off your order by entering code kitchen sisters at checkout that Sun Soil Dot Com Promo Code Kitchen Sisters for twenty percents off your order her today. The kitchen sisters present the Astra Gates keeping keeping the south side when we want to revisit the past and immerse ourselves in a time long gone you can bed or probably at the museum on discount Wednesday Wednesday waiting through each and every exhibit aimlessly but those curator moments are chosen intend not to reflect the person who admires it let alone alone the place. It resides but Potter Visual Artists Archivists and neighborhood visionary the Astor Gates believes that there are different different ways culture keep it. Why can't the neighborhood that raised me be kept and preserved by me using abandoned buildings and found objects the asser gates and his team of artists? Show US what it takes to keep Chicago history in Dorchester projects. Oh who am I my name. Name is Leah Renee Gates in collaboration with the kitchen sisters and I will be your reporter for today so sit back. Relax and enjoy the smooth move. Sounds of the south side. I'm a potter. which seems like a fairly humble vocation I spent about fifteen years making them one of the things that really excites me artistic practice? Is that as you are very quickly. Learn how to make great things out of nothing. I was been kind of turned on to lots of different kinds of materials and buy studio grew a lot because I thought yeah. Well it's not really about the material. It's about our capacity to shape the neighborhood that I live in Grand Crossing neighborhood that has seen better days. There's lots of abandonment. And so I thought. Is there a way that I can start to think about these buildings as an extension when expansion of bioterroristic practice that if I was thinking along with other creatives architects engineers real estate finance people that US together might be able. It's kind of think in more complicated ways about the reshaping of cities and so I bought a building them off and band and we are on the south side of Chicago in the Grand Crossing neighborhood on the corner of sixty nine night then Dorchester Avenue Fan back back back back. I'm actually originally from Detroit Michigan once I left Detroit to go to empower university and then I ended up getting a job in marketing and then after about seven or eight years of doing that but at the same time I was kind of if you will as an artist and and I decided I didn't want to have that five to nine anymore. Quit my job. Bedlam owned visited different art schools around the country and it brought him back to Chicago now. The acid gates was a professor of mine when I was in Grad school and we hit it off right away and I've always been around thinking about the program the program thinking about the kind of connections that could happen between one house and another between one neighbor in another and we always tried suggest that not only is creating a beautiful vessel important but the contents of what happens in those buildings also very important. This building became what we call the listening house now. The Listening House looks very much like a corner store that kind of sits in the middle of a residential block where we are now as currently acting as an extension of the studio used to be a space where we all kinds of gathering. Listen to music and you can see plenty of records here to our right to my right. Your left and these records have been source of many different places so one of the spaces being Dr Wax which was a very well known vinyl record store. He's in high park. No thank you kind of step in and said Hey wall if you're stores closing. I think there's a lot of good things that are happening here. Could I purchase some of these records or the remaining stock. As you can't that you cannot sell it. Move lift so the as kind kind of ended up acquiring the kind of remaining records that were there was also record here from his own personal collection purchase over time and then be. I thought it was important that just kind of choir just some of the tax the object of the sounds of what was kind of filling those spaces also being kind of an important part to gooding library kind of understanding space. I was actually just wanting to activate these buildings as much as I could with whatever and whoever would join me. Think the answers ideas not to just be the only person that owns uh-huh and is operating and has division. His his hope is that maybe people see that I can own and I can't operate and I can't imagine that you can do the same as well you know. I think the project visual fail if he's the only one that's doing the visionary uh we've also started to collect memorabilia from American history from people who who live or have lived in that neighborhood where better than a neighborhood with young people who are constantly asking themselves about their identity to talk about some of the complexities of race and class. That one of the archives that will have their Johnson Publishing Corporation. The other side of the wall of records of the wall of Vinyl is kind of collection of books. A lot of them are overstock of parts of the Johnson Publishing Companies Library that were given to the astor as well so a lot of the red red leather bound books in the blue. The bound books are bound copies of jet life. Negro Digress Hugh Magazine Tan magazine Ebony Ebony Ebony I would like to thank you personally for your article. Mother's daughter over the years Ebony magazine has. JPC did an amazing job of kind of creating a space for black people to understand themselves. You know they they kind of create a sense of normalcy around what it might be like. It is opened up a book or look at a movie on the radio and kind of see hear and understand images or sounds that we all breath. When you're with for a long time I think the very much interested in Johnson publishing company kind of visit as another demonstration world building all one eight hundred five ninety five hundred today and give your family advantage? I am really looking forward to try that brown sugar pound cake. Thanks fun rich and our lives in in so many ways you want to open up one of these. We should definitely open so right now. The says Ebony Tame five November nineteen forty nine to October one thousand nine hundred fifty. It's a pitcher Joe. Louis says why I quit jump. Marvin's marvelous was the wife. And Joe. Lewis Dan you end up like everybody else devoted and affectionate the Marvin Lewis kisses passive husband chills. One is return to Chicago from fight. Victory three trips to divorce court march fourteen in years a bit. Topsy Turvy Romance for the heavyweight champ and ex stenographer. Domestic trouble stemmed from Joe's long absences from the house and lack like a private life for me and my head. Everybody has always been there and I thought it. We'll be and so that then the idea that it might not be there didn't really cross my mind but then I remember my pops tried to do his part by buying lying. Everybody subscription SOGETI magazine. He bought the entire family. Like you've been inside the same house so he made sure everybody has magazines. ooh Now during the asser trying to do my part you know as well and maybe didn't have the same relationship to gender Ebony POPs theater theater that my grandparents did but maybe this is my part in hoping to continue that tradition of caretaking that. I think that I was introduced to remember my parents when people see this. They always ask you know why doesn't another larger institution kind of have their hands on these things. How an artist properly? I don't care for them and I think the beauty of an artist is that we don't have the same sort of like rules and obligations to the objects and so we understand objects differently because important that so you kind of come inside the listening housing these books and sit with the books kind of smell the age or the history of the Wilderness on these pages. We were slowly starting to reshape. How people imagined the south side of the city? One House turned into a few houses and we found that building on my block. We now referred to the block Dorchester projects that in a way. That building became a kind of gathering site for lots of different kinds of activity. We turn the building into what we call now. The Archive Archive House is actually a single family home. That has been kind of converted into this workspace or this will sack overstock library. I'm also kind of imagine the importance of this are kind living existing in this neighborhood. A certain kind of library institutional library like this exists. I have to go to the library of Congress kind of see these things but then you're assuming again we're talking about this idea of worlds in the world of Lebron Congress's not my world. This is my world in this banks that we call the bank. It was in pretty bad shape. It was a difficult project to finance because banks weren't interested in the neighborhood because people weren't interested in the neighborhood because nothing nothing had happened. Bare dirt was nothing. It was nowhere. The Arts thing was built as a bank in one thousand nine hundred twenty two and at that a time. This neighborhood was primarily Irish Jewish was a thriving fairly affluent neighborhood in the bank. Was the cornerstone of Commercial Block of hotels tells in restaurants in twenty twelve. The terra cotta on the outside of the building started falling down and the city decided at that time they would demolish and you can see. This building building has marble three stories. High its neoclassical revival designed. It's a big imposing structure and it would cost a lot of money to demolish so that's white stood vacant for so long. The astor lives around the corner at Sixty Eighth Dorchester. He went to the city and asked if he could buy the bank and they said sure you can buy right for a dollar however you have to saving on week my name is Julie Joost. I'm the director of public programming. Rebuild Foundation in we are at our cultural cultural institution called the Stony Island Arts Bank here on the south side of Chicago at sixty eighth in Stony Island. Now that the rumor of my block has spread and lots of people are starting to visit. We've found that the bank can now be a center for Exhibition Archives Music Performance. And it's all about about providing free arts and cultural programming to the community and the fact that space is in this neighborhood the fact that is so beautiful it can be the source of pride in the fact that everything we do. It's free. There's no entry fee. There's no there's no barriers for people coming in here and participating in what we have to offer something that's very unique and important one thing the astor says a lot is that beauty is a service. Why can't neighborhood like this beautiful things? there's probably two big ideas governing me. One is like my Momma's Christianity which words like Salvation and redemption. They were very important. Words very important metaphors for what happens. Happens when a person dies. Can they be redeemed. Could they be resurrected. And if resurrected what does that do for people around right and I think that when you take spaces that have been abandoned for a long time. You don't tear the building down. You Redeem the building you demonstrate in plain view. That thing could be something better than it had. And that when people witnessed that redemption people feel like a small miracle may have just happened. I realized that somebody had to kind of protect in order for me to kind of guess have access to it if somebody wasn't in the business of being a keeper deeper than all might have been lost and I may not have had the opportunity to say. Well now. It's my turn. Now be the keeper. But I think it's important that that kind of work continues so that hopefully hopefully once my time is then as a keeper that there's somebody else maybe it's maybe it's my neighbor. Maybe it's the the ten year old boy that Remembers Devon. You know from being in the arts banker walking into the the arts banker listening to the dollar store that he then understands that I wanna be keeper to and so now it becomes his job their job to to protect and be thoughtful of the things that protect. Aw The astor gates. Keeping the south side was produced by Leeann Renee. Yates in collaboration with the kitchen. Sisters David Nelson and Nikki Silva with Nathan Dalton and Brandy Hill special. Thanks to the extra gates Devon May Julie Joost and the Rebuild Foundation and a shoutout to Ted talk for providing archival tape of the kitchen. Sisters present is part of Radio Tovia from P. R. X. A curated network of extraordinary cutting edge podcast casts created by independent producers. Find out about all of our radio. Tokyo shows at Radio Tokyo Dot. FM and find out more about the kitchen. Sisters are stories workshops internship possibilities and are fantastic t-shirt visit kitchen sisters dot org. Thanks for listening you too ex.

Chicago Joe astor Marvin Lewis Julie Joost Dorchester Dave Nelson N. Nikki Silva Radio Topi Rebuild Foundation Ebony magazine Detroit Astor Gates Leah Renee Gates Astra Gates Kosovo Johnson publishing CBD JPC Potter Visual Artists Archivis
Neon Touch

The Heart

29:24 min | 7 months ago

Neon Touch

"Good. Hey. Hey. Hey, it's okay. And a half a little favor to ask you every year on this time radio TOPI does its annual listener survey. The favor is taking just a few minutes to fill out the questionnaire. If. You go to survey dot Pierre X dot org slash heart. You can tell us what you think of the heart squeezed. Helps, learn a little bit more about you who you are what you like and don't like, and if you actually listen to any of our ads that will help us out and also you answer any questions about all the other radio copious shows you listen to, and that'll help radio TOPA. To take the survey, go to survey DOT PR x DOT ORG slash heart. exhale. From Mermaid Palace and Radio Topi. Welcome. To the heart. I'm Caitlyn. Pressed. I don't know if you've been feeling. The absence of physical touch. In Your Life. If you have been missing. The way that it feels. To have contact. On your skin. Sensation. Physical. Pleasure For this episode. I recommend. You. SNUGGLE in. Lie Down. Close Your eyes. And Let the sensual experience. Of the world that you're about to enter wash over you. Before the core and K went to erotic party hosted by her friends me and mercury. It's called neon touch. And it's essential tonic space where a group of women and Non Binary Queer people of color and some select allies explore pleasure together with the help a special. Toy. On One says. This is the most John Tall, all the tools it just versus the electricity across all the different songs. So I'm GonNa do is on both of your arms and GonNa, show you what all the tools alike. And not going do it anywhere else to in a little? Behrman. Begins to notice this. Even just your are there are all these different. And everyone has a different. Feel good and don't. Think the difference between the palm of your hand in the back of your hand. One of my favorite is actually like under the fingernails. And then the really crazy thing is that you can actually touch me and shot me. So even though I'm the one who's connected I have the power. Were it's a switch situation right like. I don't necessarily always have to be giving and I have the power. And then if we were to hold hands, you could shock the next person. Claps can. Conduct electricity. Flower. You can just pluck one out I only meet one. It's like it's almost like the difference between making your own food. Ordering. Really. Good poke. Somehow. Coming from making your salary is like a little bit. This is really this all. That other stuff is like. Beginner. The neon has become a really important object to me because it allows me to. Have the these kinds of discussions around touch and play. That I want have. Suddenly. There's an object that close. Shock you with the little blue lightning bolts between my finger and your finger and. Like we all kind of have preconceived notions about what pleasure should look and feel like about what Saxony erotic are like and. This tool most people have never felt this sensation before an it just kind of sets us all back two zero. trysofi yes So we're kind of sitting in this lovely little circle all. Keefer tichenor time when my misselling. Feeling, the effort and the time. The one that's become the sake barometer basically for the type of person and that type of play an interested in and it doesn't. You don't need the electricity to do it. It's just a really great. Like, entry way for people to understand like Oh. If you like this kind of touch like this patient, John Tall you know kind of can be silly like it can be so many different things. If you like this, you're one of my people we should spend time together because it's hard to find people who actually enjoy these things and have the patience to do them back to other people. The acknowledgement that pleasure isn't a complete thing. It's always in flux. Also I think the neon one really helps people understand that. leaving. Tonight is the first time that I'm hosting this gathering I- intention was really to create a space to explore the erotic intellectually and creatively, and with our bodies, a space that would be sustainable for me, and it finally dawned on me that that would be within friendships. Is I invited people I've collaborated with the past when I used to make more artwork. People that I've met in. Dungeons spoiler. Somewhere. Lush name. Once a year is alive while mercury. We met at an appear pse play party. We're both Philippine ex we're both very creative people were both healing. Cool. This looks lovely. You brought in the Dream House. Got Kicked. You're really good passage. Okay. It just gives me so much pleasure when we're like doing little dance around consent basically. And attitude. We all Kinda sat down amongst these large potted plants in the middle of the floor. The windows are open, the breezes blowing and were all kneeling down on this this beautiful rug there blankets all around and there are jars of different cut flowers. FEELS REALLY husks the most successful events to me were the ones where. We all gathered together talk valet foundries in attention like desires and like played for a long time at like. Begin to really like their guard tone. Requesting. An might have scared to request for one ever. Oh. Yes. Oh. You know someone ceasing that they like they're like I would like to try not to. Enter the space just with people. Something Be. I have been. As Palm. The kind of they that. Emily. Required as like a lot of time like you have to create trust with the people that you now. Really intended to do today was introduce everyone to each other like let's get comfortable talk about like where we're. You know we're interested in it looks like the real, front. Instead. feels. Good. Oh. That acknowledged that wear like giving pleasure to your body. Requires US or someday. You're receiving the pleasure. To give. Like The whole negotiation on the dance around the. Knowledge that we're doing it feels really good. Yeah Many hands and hello. WOULDN'T BELIEVE All these. Inside. Sometimes, when I was like in the most pain doing the most healing work like I would spend a lot of time helping others he'll. As like a way to kind of you know show myself that I know how to do the US like how? Cynthia feels really make. Shirts. The back of my head for now. Oh. So. Then you have to spend time figuring out what feels good for you and then you have to be able to communicate. What. Like what would that good thing is to somebody else can do it. Love. Undoing okay. So. Right now? No really. Oh. Won't. Shock. Doing meeting on my friends. Oh You. Think. We wind down. How Thank you everyone. Grain. Burger that. Who wants to nine? Anyone. Please forgive this brief interruption. For a word from our sponsors. I'll. Be Right back. The heart is supported by better help online counseling. I. Think. A lot of us were already struggling with stress anxiety and depression. and. Now, we are definitely not alone. Better help offers licensed professional counselors who are trained to listen and to help. All you have to do is fill out a questionnaire to help assess your needs and you'll get matched with a counselor under forty eight hours. Better help is really affordable. And as a listener of the heart, you get ten percent off your first month with the Discount Code Heart. Join the over one, million people taking charge of their mental health with the help of an experience professional. Get started today at better help. Dot Com slash heart. That's better. H. E. LPN DOT com slash heart. Talks with therapist online and get help. Sometimes, it's hard to prepare healthy meals that also tastes good. Sikora is a nutrition company that focuses on overall wellness. They're organic ready to eat meals are made with powerful plant based ingredients and the menu of creative chef crafted breakfasts, lunches, and dinners changes weekly. So you'll never get bored to boost results tried the best-selling metabolism super powder. An all natural remedy for bloating weight gain and fatigue. And Right now suqare is offering our listeners twenty percent off their first order when they go to Kara Dot com slash heart. Or Enter Code Heart at checkout. That's Kara S. A. K. A. R. A. dot com slash heart. To, get twenty percent off your first order. Play creativity. The studios is all the same type of lake. There's a balance of like being stimulated the right amount of stimulated of the right amount of distracted and then like something gets triggered. was. May and then basically when I play with people, I liked to be called mich-. Of the performance of like personas that I have. Basically like me, she needs to be cared for it's like it's like my way of telling people like I'm now in a space where like I've you know I need to be cared for it can happen and all these different ways. But. I can read something that I probably. WOULD BE, lovely Something that I've written. Yes. But. Maybe like once I've liked receiving for a little bit. You'll know. Thinking about my synodic now. Oh I was struggling to figure out how to heal myself from some really old deep trauma us. You know I don't know they're all these like nine games that were always playing with yourself for. Trying to understand things like you name naming something recognizing something you know the first stuff and then you try to spend time with it. It's so uncomfortable sometimes. Start with just the handle the Rosen's. Kinda chartreuse. And he just keep spending more time with all these different ways from all the different angles and eventually. You, know you just have a much better understanding of yourself in the need enough to eventually all become second nature through I. also particularly love hearing the sound of the puddles ripped off the style that served up to me to decide. Do I want to present myself to others Halloween interact with others what am I looking for right now? I am sensitive in like, yeah. The same the same places every time where I don't like it in certain places. I mean Jeremy Anticipation Monroe. See Gray important to me. Your fingertips being i. That's amazing. And then we have to work together taking the building blocks about ourselves and each other put them together to build something new I mean I, it's. To me that's quite revolutionary, but that's also just how sex should be. Try something. This may be hard or impossible but. I want to see if it's possible for everyone to start at the top of my body. Make a ring A. Data. We do. I am trying to create wholeness or myself, and I would rather like surreal with people will be intimate with people share these journeys like not everyone needs to know everything about what I'm struggling with the we all know we're struggling and working on. And that's kind of you know the acknowledgement of that within erotic space is super important today. Yeah those things you're really connected in terms of my vulnerability creating wholeness. How? Does bringing up. Connected with your body, you're always the. Sharing. and not necessarily like going deep into like what the trauma is it just like his release and kind of witnessing witnessing everyone sharing the zing support release. kind of coming down and after care? La. Pleasure to do that. I come back a to Pleasure activism. And there's like a quote in their. Pleasure. As the pats revolution and it's like really only from understanding like in a fundamental way. What's Okay and what's not okay for your own body, which is pleasure he now like. It's only when you understand that can you really apply it to the rest of your life because if you don't know what's right with you or what's not with you and that's different for everyone you now and like there's no rights and wrongs it's like you're the only one who can do that work to figure out what's okay. What's not okay. I realized that, yeah understanding. My pleasure map was actually the most radical thing that I could spend time doing because they couldn't couldn't like reach out words again until that was right inside of me. You? Seinfeld, so good. Thank you. Just ask you if you come back. Thank you so much. Phil Really. I feel like you really understand what? When did What I was asking for. Thank you. The definition of love that I have been obsessed with. Comes from. fell cooks is although. Doing such a good job receiving. Oh. Love is the will to nurture once owner another spiritual wellbeing. Obviously four hands with people while they're like receiving and doing their activities or tell like tell them like I'm here with you like it's so beautiful When you guys are doing invoke coming down it was. Like you're gas meg. And then. You come back up I was just like. Just, totally, like foot to switch into into. These Even though it was the exact same thing. Was Crazy. Like he give me permission to feel something different. And Jason were. Like an extension of the first Mike, the feeling like bodily. Sensation that I've been like how to channel. How, to access us? Good. History. This episode was produced by Nicole Kelly. With Megan Gordon and Angela Penn Jarido. I was just thinking. NPS getting to know lean real quick grade out. Editorial support from me CAITLIN PRESSED BB enter and Sharon machine. So beautiful. Golf. All the heart is phoebe under Nicole Kelly Sharon MSCI. He to Pasco M me Caitlyn pressed. You can follow us on Instagram at the heart radio twitter. Same thing you can go to the heart radio DOT ORG. If you WANNA donate money to support the art were making. And you can go to Mermaid Palace dot org to find other shows produced by Marin Palace this magic art company where we make Weirdo Shit for your listening pleasure. You can follow meet at Caitlin pressed. Mostly, I just post picks of my court teen life. And we thank Meka Bali. And we think just grosman to people who helped put down the bricks that this show stands upon creatively. And, all of the other people who have helped the show become what it is. and. Thank you to you. Listening Person Person Who is listening? For. Following along with our curiosities. And our questions. Creative explorations. Okay. Heart is a proud member of Radio Tokyo You've probably heard us say that the heart is a proud member of Radio Topa a collection of unique and creative podcasts. But you might not know that Radio Tovia has a newsletter that features all the shows in our network. It's called the citizen and it's a monthly collection of episodes, upcoming offense and podcast news from radio shows plus pop. Culture. And personal messages from all of us that you can only find in the newsletter. The citizen is the best way to keep up with everything happening at Radio Tokyo. Subscribe Right now at Radio Topa Dot FM slash newsletter that's radio topiary dot. FM. Slash newsletter. Radio.

Mermaid Palace John Tall Palm Caitlin Radio Topi Kara Dot US Radio Tovia Golf Radio Tokyo Radio Tokyo Nicole Kelly Sharon MSCI Radio Topa Saxony Behrman Phil Really Keefer Pasco Meka Bali
A Message from Ear Hustle

Ear Hustle

06:00 min | 1 year ago

A Message from Ear Hustle

"I'm earl woods. I'm Nigel poor and our beloved network. Radio Topa has just launched annual fundraiser. The one time of the year when we ask our loyal listeners owners to support your hustle by supporting the network that makes everything that we do on the show and this year our goal is to reach thirty. Five Thousand Radio Topi donor and if we do everybody Dicker Dicker pay. You'll get sick joke now right you gotTa Hustle Sticker We have some bomb ass listening as you know we definitely support our show through donations. Be It straight up. Money buying t shirts mugs or sticker packs to help us navigate through the challenges we face producing this podcast ear hustle. Yeah and radio. Topa is a network that gives producers the resources to dream big and we know how big dream can be. Oh definitely because when radio topiary held their first podcast competition against all odds we were able to enter we dream beak. Ah We one big. The Radio Tokyo network came together and launched us into outer space. Got and remember at the end of season. One what we said to each other and I'm GonNa to cry again. The reality is bigger than a jury and it still is. Thank you Radio Topa so my a question to you now. If you can make your dream podcast show for ear hustle listeners. What would it be OK? Well first let me say this. We are already doing it because your house is my dream but if I could make another dream podcast we definitely involve this Hoda. The what is this shit can call on my beautiful treasures here. Shit okay. You know I love things that are left behind and this is my collection of stuff that I've found in the San Parking lot so let me just say what's here. So one. Is this huge collection of Bra under wires. Here's a little drying That a kid made We've got a notebook that probably belonged to a CEO. That's been all weathered and it. Looks like a little nest Here's a baby spoon. You know there's gotTa be a story behind bright red lipstick right And here is a ruler. It says Tuberculin Queue Line Skin test ruler. All I know is that everything found in the parking lot has to have something to do with San Quentin so for example. I would take this. WHO's tuberculosis skin test ruler and I would go talk to one of the nurses about? When was the last time they saw someone with TB looking at you like he's supposed to have gloves on hold and then I would take up this old glove? That's been run over a thousand times completely flat and I've tried to put my hand into that and I know you're interested in the BRA under wires different sizes. Yes they go from. I think they go from a to a triple asked half. Maybe women literally be mad because they you know they go through the metal detector and they're told they've got a take metal out they brush so. I assume they go back to the the parking lot in frustration. They rip it out of their Bra and throw it on the ground. Well my mother used to always complain about this to tear my expensive as bro to come in here you see you see right there. That's right start my story with your Mama. Okay what about you. What would you do? Well my dream would be. I was got a graveyard not too long ago and I saw people that were there and they had like cheers out there. Just sit there with people right and it just made me think like what's the story about the person as a grant. That's what I would like to hear so you'd go up to those people and ask him axiom for gang of people that new person interview interview everybody about the person that idea indie there would definitely be hundreds of stories to tell definitely hundreds says. Oh my gosh you are right. There are so many many stories out there and so many ways to tell the stories radio. Tokyo supports creators. Who Keep Dreaming Up new ways to tell stories so listeners? Are you Radio Talpiot forever notch. Why don't you tell them why they should be with radio tovia forever? Well Radio Topi bring stories that you just can't stop thinking about and doesn't your hustle. We'll bring you stories that just stick with you. Don't they make a lasting impression. Well now we're asking you to make a lasting impression on US using twenty dollars. Houston seven one dollars thirty dollars and you in two thousand dollars. Your monthly donations help us produce stories. That make you do the ugly cry for uh-huh contemplate on deep profound real life shit. Exactly what I've seen comments on instagram. Say That we should are stories by Kleenex. DISAPPEARED SBA disclaimer. You Need Kleenex but are awesome. Make people laugh definitely definitely we some funny cats so if you want to support that work that makes you cry. Ugly Laugh hard. What can you do tune into ear hustle? And guess what if you make a rea- current donation today in amount of seven dollars or more your name will be entered to win a ticket to Topaz where you can find yourself sitting at a dinner table with all your favorite radio Tokyo producers. Like me and Oldboy Bruce Willis and now it's time for you to make your mark head to Radio Topi Adot. FM to learn more and to donate. Now that's Radio Topi dot. FM You can donate at any level to help us reach our goal of thirty five. Thousand donors just go to Radio Tokyo Dot. FM to learn more and donate right now. That's Radio Toby Dot. FM Radio Tovia for everyone everywhere forever. Thanks so much radio

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Phoebe, Judge Me

Criminal

08:21 min | 1 year ago

Phoebe, Judge Me

"Hi It's phoebe. Radio Topi asked us to try an experiment. They asked us to try our hands. It making a mini episode sewed of a show. That was very different from the shows. We already make. We decided to try a call in advice. Show we're calling it Phoebe. Judge me you're listening to another edition of judge me a call in advice show where I do. My best has to help. Let's go to end in New York. Hello TV Ian. You're on the air. Thanks for calling. How can I help I realized I never know what to do when I'm having my picture taken. I don't have a consistent picture face and Maybe one time out of twenty. I'll get it right but usually when I see pictures of myself that have been taken. I'm making a face that I think looks nothing like me and certainly looks Less good than I imagined myself to look in real life. I would just love to be able to take a good picture. Well I think the first thing to realize is that there are so few people in the world who take a good picture okay. Usually the people who take really good pictures or lacking and other major areas of their life is also what I've determined but you've never met anyone who's been told phoebe smile as much as I have been told I mean in every picture that has taken phoebe smile. phoebe is not smiling. my whole life. I've heard that and I've just given into the fact that when someone is going to force you to one of those big smiles you're always going to kind of nuts and just just resign yourself to that okay and so I just have learned to just do a small sincere look forward and not try too hard and then when I get the picture back I don't look at it too much ever again. You know. That's the key is never spend too much time looking at pictures of yourself and you won't have much trouble at all. Okay sounds good Don't really need to change the Sergei Trade. I just never tried. Never see it. You just never search it out and and in the same wait you know you could also remove all the mirrors in your house and then you can just be living in your in your in your own fantasy world. Well I hope I could help. Thank you very much for calling in our next caller is a Smith from Birmingham Smith. How can I help Hardy Heidi Age as that country that you don't want to eat that's great well. I think you've just asked me. How do you eat something crunchy? Crunchy that you don't want to eat the green. Now I'm guessing that something kind of like Broccoli And you know. That is a hard dilemma. I think when I was a little girl we were allowed to leave the table in until we finished our plates until he drank our whole cup of milk and I spent so many hours of my life sitting at the table with my sister chloe. We put ice cubes in our milk. He's getting hot but we couldn't leave and I'll tell you I'm a lot older now and I think back about about all that time that I wasted a realize now that if I'd only just held my nose and gotten through it I would have so much more time to play and so my advice to you is eat it quick and don't breathe through your nose. You're welcome Smith Anytime At our next caller is Teresa in Nashville Theresa. How can I help? Maybe my question for you is about the concept of re gifting and my question is kind of a two part I'm interested as to whether do you think re gifting is okay. And if you received a gift and found out later that it had been re gifted to you how would you feel about it. Well you know. I'm all in favor of regifter. I don't think we should actually call it re gifting. I think we should call it something. Something like passing it on. I say this knowing full well that I'm about the hardest person to buy a gift for out there primarily because I like really very practical things that people would often overlook is a gift for me. A good pair of well-made socks does the trick any day. I also like really odd things like fossils. One Year my father gave me a an fossilized owl head and I thought that was just perfect So while I appreciate and we should all appreciate any gift that we receive. It doesn't mean that we necessarily have to keep the scented candle. We can appreciate the gesture and the effort and pass that scented candle along with a clear clear conscience and I think if I found out that somewhat had passed something along to me. Let's say a sensible wooden-spoon spoon. Well I'd be flattered. I I really appreciate that viewpoint and I agree with you too. I hope that helps re gift. But in good conscience and thanks very much for calling thank you. Maybe have a great day by our next caller. Is Vanessa in Demourin Vanessa. How can I help? Hi Phoebe I had a question My roommate has taken to walking around our apartment new and I'm wondering wondering What you think is the best way to handle this? Is this something that just started or has she always yes. We thought me. She's been walking around in the full nude dude in the buff in front of my boyfriend and other company that we have because she says It sure home and she'll do as she pleases this. This is just this. Well this just sounds like a real problem Kind of sounds like my nightmare also kind kind of a tricky situation. But I think there's only one thing to do here and that is to be very direct. You need to tell her she's got a knock it off. I mean she never has to put clothes on again if she's in her own room but in shared spaces in the house. The clothes have to be on. But you don't want to take away someone's happiness and if this is really giving her joy if she really is getting a thrill from being naked you you could always talk to her about the power of not wearing socks talk to her about how nice and infre- It might be to let her feet be naked arms. What about a tank? Top a pair of shorts. I think you have to be very directed that fully nude ooh is not for you or your guests and I think starting there and being very straight about it. That might be your best bet. Good luck to you you for thank you I will Take a great. Thank you very much phoebe. That's it for this edition of phoebe. Judge me tune in next time. And if you have a question I'm from me you can call in and leave it on our voicemail. The number is nine one nine six nine seven eight two three one. That's nine one nine six nine seven eight two three one. We're in the homestretch of our annual radio. Tovia fundraiser the one time of year. When we ask you to support US please go to Radio Toby DOT FM and make a donation today? Thanks very much talk radio.

Phoebe phoebe smile Birmingham Smith phoebe Phoebe I Radio Topi Sergei Trade Vanessa US Heidi Age New York chloe regifter Demourin Vanessa Toby DOT Teresa Nashville milk One Year
19: Space architect (!!) Leszek Orzechowski talks about moon colonies

Technotopia

21:20 min | 1 year ago

19: Space architect (!!) Leszek Orzechowski talks about moon colonies

"Hi and welcome back to tech. The topi- the podcast better future. I'm John big finish show. We have less goes, husky. He is a space architect. This is tech. Data tech Topi has also sponsored by cheap transcription dot IO. Keep transcription offers ten cents per minute transcription using our happy robots or eighty five cents per minute. Using our human assistance, cheap transcription. I o is cheaper. And faster than everyone else. Cheap transcription dot CO. Welcome back to Toby the podcast about a better future. I'm John Biggs today. The should we have less off ski easy space architects. Welcome lush ex high. So so what is what's a space conduct? What are are you in space right now while I'm not in space only seeks people in space at internationals bay station. What I do I do research problem types. And how am I tried to design future emotional remarks settlement than so-called habitats? And his what I am doing in my work and during my studies because basically, I'm a researcher. Okay. So this is fascinating. So what's what's it gonna take put us into space or do we want to be in space? Oh, we certainly do for of we should start by saying that. Well, now, we all know that there are some aging going on on earth. Wind comes through our climates change, Israel, and it only there's only some discussions who's responsible for or. But either way we need to be prepared. We need to create ways to well do to mitigated. Exactly. And what you when we when you think about living on noon, or on Mars, you need to create technologies that will allow you to survive in this hostile environments where you need to chill your from low pressure from as radiation. Unseen time you need these your own food you need to. Assistant sustain yourself on very small amount of water. Still those kind of acknowledges will create this well zero waste society. If we create the first base on the moon or Mars, we can very easily use those technologies to create away society here on earth. And it will buy extent will help us survive. This new time or even well repeat verse some damage was already done. So the. Correct. You heard that? So I guess the key for Kice for space architecture is zero wave. That's that's kind of like the the primary goal. Ability and zero as definitely. And. All this. What's while? Investing in space technologies is all about when you think about Trinite h in space industry, you're thinking about I dunno south lights, our communication or GPS. Those are things that we're using daily, and we cannot imagine life without it. But also, thanks to something like dick -nology. We know exactly what is happening currently our planets. So we gained some data. And if we developed this, and we go further create this. We put humans in space while we create acknowledges to to do something about this new. Union reality that we will live in. And when you're investing in space. All jeez. It is said that every single every little dollar will return to you eightfold. So it is quite lucrative. Way to invest your money. So not everyone needs to be ill Musk's that will say, okay, I will call nice Mars. But there's all the small startup that are working on putting humans on the moon only, for example, by creating ways to a to grow your own crops there. So for example, hydroponics our opponent solution that that does not require soil to to grow your own food and cutting those kinds of waste to grow your own crops could be very useful now here on earth because it is you can grow your food vertically using only ten percent of water that you're spending now on on growing your own crops. So so this this could also like that kind of idea also many problems that we are having here on earth when comes to. All food shortages, and what are sort shortages? What does a what does the environment? Look like is it a is. It are the things that you're designing are they like domes or are they underground or made out of concrete? What's the what's the general consensus on how these things are going to look? We can go. While you can go different ways. And. Well, when you watching science fiction, you you can see all the domes and again enclose biggest of volume because space under knee and create some kind of small living area or like biggest possible living area incomes due to the volume but normally. It's like these Aigner's easy way. Like, okay. We have we have this is this play. We will just put a dome there. My job is done when you're reading Akademik, you you really need to understand where are you trying to build in what our weather's the environment that you're building in. So for example, when we're talking about the moon. While moon is are always. Smaller than earth. So gravity's. Is only ninety percent of earth's gravity and its constantly exposed to Sonnen costume through the Asian. So you need to find your radiation shielding, and do do that you either bring your habitat from the is already equipped with thick radiation shielding, but it's not very cost effective. You can only bring that's that much stuff of they're using our our current launching system. So you either bring robots that will through the print your your outer shell from lunar regularly. As of this is one way to do it like just just us through the bringers Greenland center regulates using microwave on it will work very well on the moon, and it will create this thick shell. That will be your. Relation shielding and you're much right shield. Botts could also just look a little bit harder for your place to put your habitat. For example. You can find lava tubes on the moon. Giving that we have and at lower. Labs could be could have really enormous sizes on earth. They they can span like a couple of meters wide high go for hundreds of meters could be hundred meters long but on the moon. They could be kilometers wide hundreds of Flinders long. And so he could probably put an enormous CD or even a small state inside that laboratory, and you will have your relationship already there. So maybe this is the way to call nice, the moon only using in Jilin structure that we could find there also. So basically, those the things you can also probably use ice do Cratia radiation. Shielding water is a very good. Shield wouldn't comes through the -ation. But but well, but if you just get your what is from somewhere, it will just evaporates in in vacuum. So it's always a trade-off you need water. You don't want to waste it. So, but but at the same time, you, okay? So you need to find solutions that will cover as many problems us as possible. So simple you need water. That's when you have water, you either you have drinking water, you can grow your crops, but also have oxygen you have hydrogen. So you have record field. You have your atmosphere debris into breathing. And you could also use again as a relationship. And so if you invest in infrastructure to a mind water to get a water to replenish resources of water in just at another loops like normally now on. The space station. You are drinking water than astronauts are in giving back in sweat or or normally being and then it's renewed in back to the loop. But. Another loops like us this water for your fort one. We were crops or you or put it in a longer road to create shooting around the habitats, you can use the same resource in many many ways. So this is one way to think about creating space habitats. So you could make you can make a space shield you can make a shielding out of the water that you for the crops occasionally or like, I guess that's a storage method. And then I suppose there's also. Even you could even use the rocket fuel as shielding. 'cause I mean, you don't need it all the time. So if you if you put it in stasis of some sort, that's that's interesting while you have water than you can make out of generate look, and then you have your Roku. I recommend to have. And. Yeah. Okay. So when are you going up, I mean, it sounds like it sounds like you've gotten this all these together? When when do you think it's going to be fairly commonplace for us to go up like that? Very coming play. Will we heard a couple of weeks ago, Mike Benz, and he said that he would like another the next man? And the first woman that go to the moon to land near two thousand twenty fourth. And it's in the this people are to be American arrogance. Obviously. Baldwin comes more sustainable way. Like, this is only the state of the most like Cold War statement that we only need to go. There. We need to put our foot there. It was it didn't involve any kind of sustainable development, and like the more the more sustainable way. Is to create what is is to go with the plan to create a moon village, something that was proposed by European Space Agency a couple years ago, and because well in couple of years international space station. Only abandoned and Europe said that it's it's it's very it would be nice to continue this great cooperation between nations create something new something Fedor so idea or moon village emerged and they invited run to participate in this venture. And the through the years one by one older states. Join this this idea that is this this sound. Ternent moon base should become a reality. What we learn later is that probably before two thousand thirty so around two thousand twenty eight there will be all ready a space station in lunar orbit. It will be called the space gateway, and it will be like this place where you can send your supplies center. Austronautics before. Before. In the London them on the moon. So this will be place to probably gather your resources before he will on Shirley MacLaine, thirty eight you said or went winning it. It's twenty. Twenty twenty eight twenty eight. Yes. So it's not nine years. We can start building something on the moon. And so that's that's really not far away. Normally when we heard the plans to go to the moon or Mars. It was only it was always like, okay. In twenty years. We'll be there. And we heard that for fifty years already. There was it was always twenty years and now and it's nine years. So so it's really. So there's a really development in this area. We have new. Lange vehicles that are capable of well of putting enough payload. On sizzler orbit. We're developing crew. Crew capsules for deep space like NASA Orion capsule. So technology is is coming together and probably like this international mission to the moon will become a reality around two thousand thirty and creation of this first furnace lunar base could from before the long after but with this deep-space gateway insists orbit it will be also possible to assemble a Mars mission. But it will be probably something like. Nation just to lender would your flag and. Return to earth and with with moon. We're talking about something permanent. Something sustainable that will change crews in in constant like. Manner. So people will leave on the noon in two thousand thirty. This is very exciting. That's why a lot of architects are doing the research. And it's not about only about technology is also about isolation and people because people are like this weakest element of this puzzle. And what we are doing Poland. I am I'm director of lunar research station. It's unload habitat. It's a facility where we are conducting studies. On six people crew in isolation, we are closing their. So they're close in our facility for couple of weeks and psychologists are trying to tell if they're suited for for like this long isolation. This is all. Dull we are basically simulating moon the Mars mission. So if they want to go side any do where pressure sued they're going inside his? Well, nuclear hangar, in fact, where we have two hundred fifty square meters of simulated lunar surface where they get strong around end USA Rovers due to do. Some Jill Jaekle exercise in research. They go back to this agility, or they have level threes in their places to sleep that kitchen their office in their in their two thousand two twenty four seven for couple of weeks, and that gives us a lot of data how to design good space for people that will be closed in hostile environment. The on the earth for extended periods of times, and I might say that it's quite challenging to to. Find right solution. When you have really limited amount of volume in space when you're thinking about space habitats, really. This is fascinating. I'm excited about this. This is a so you think the you think we're going to be able to fix the things that we need to fix and start moving. Besides sunday. Start going to space. Right. Well, yeah. A lot of people are saying that says like why do we spend a lot of so much money on space exploration. We have a lot of problems of from my point of view. This exactly why we need to invest and spice expressions because it could help us. Resolve all problems that we have here on earth. So that's definitely it. Thanks, basic rations. We learned about our problems and by going we also learn how to fix them. And and and it covers a lot of. Out of different topics. Not only. What do you do with your water or what you do with your oxygen? What you do with your food? But also what about energy what about? Yeah. What about dealing with your wastes and one logical issues as well. Right. All people don't go crazy out there that this is wonderful. So lush I wanna I want you to tell me as soon as you start flying into space before you leave. 'cause I wanna send you send. You only space program is not the space program. Very for for the first polish astronaut what we had cosmonauts in. Yeah. But you know, I know the there's plenty, unfortunately, there's plenty of polish jokes about the fuller space program. So. Leszek? Thank you for joining us on technophobia this Bill incredible. I'm really I'm really excited. I literally nine years we're all going to sprawl going to have a little a jumping off point like a like a Stargate kind of thing right help. So. All right wonderful. I'll hold you. We're gonna we're gonna check back in nine years. Okay. Sure. This has been technophobia. I'm John digs. We'll see you next week. Checking Topi is brought to you happy fun for happy fund. Visit designed driven technology company in Brooklyn, New York. That specializes building mobile and web applications for startups and fortune five hundred companies, whether it's a new mobile web application that will help people experience the internet in a fun new way or software that will interface with a new piece of top secret hardware. Happy fund Corp is always up to the challenge. Bigger small. Happy fun Corp loves building software and loves working with great people come build with them. Happy fun Corp dot com.

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Home is Where You Park Your Mini Van

Radio Diaries

12:26 min | 9 months ago

Home is Where You Park Your Mini Van

"Hi Joe, here with a quick note when the pandemic it back in March the team here at Radio, diaries put everything on hold, and we started a new series for the show is called down. Diaries in our goal is to bring you intimate and surprising stories about ordinary life in these extraordinary times. As a nonprofit organization, we rely on grants and listener donations to support our work, but in this case we've had moved fast, and we're producing without a net. So, if you appreciate our show, please consider making a tax deductible donation to support what we do. We recognize this is a tough time for many people. Your donation, no matter how small will help us keep the series going. You can hear all the stories and donate by going to our website. Radio Diaries Dot Org, thanks. Radio is brought to you by progressive. Saving money on your car. Insurance is easy with progressive. An average savings of seven hundred ninety six dollars for customers who switch and save in fact customers can qualify for an average of six discounts on their auto policy with progressive discounts spur starting to quote online or having multiple vehicles on their policy. Get your quote online at progressive. Dot, com and see how much you could be saving national average annual car insurance savings by new customers surveyed who saved with progressive in two thousand nineteen discounts, Berry and are not available in all states and situations. Radio? X from Pierre XS. Radio Topi at this is radio diaries. I'm Joe Richmond. This is episode. Four of our new series hunkered down diaries stories about ordinary life in extraordinary times. Today the show home is where you park your many. NATO von Sixty seven years old. She's a retired school bus driver into recently furloughed from her part time job at a rental car company back in March. As the pandemic it native found herself without a home and without a job for the past few months, while most people have been sheltering in their homes. She's been living in her car on the streets Portland Oregon. Knit has been keeping an audio diary of experience being newly homeless. This is her story. Good Morning. This is Neda. It's Wednesday at eight forty five. And I'm sitting in my minivan. I have. Everything but the driver and passenger window in the front wind chill. Blacked out with insulating material that. Gives me a lot of privacy. I'm pulling out my in plastic jurors finding clean clothes. Can openly ban door. Let the sunlight and. So the third week of March, I think it was the governor of Oregon. started talking about lockdown. Warnings on the news, but the social distancing, but to be honest. My mind just wasn't there. My mind was on where to park for the night and feel safe. My first night sleeping in my car. By drove around I, did find a road in the industrial area and. This is one of the places I spend a lot of my time. It's a two lane street that's completely lined both sides with people living in their cars and their views and trailers. We? Really haven't interacted or talked or anything, but we kind of. Not Our acknowledgement of each other. There is one man that I feel really sorry for because. Sometimes, he just starts yelling and screaming. As if there's someone in the car with them, but I can see that. There's no one in the car. I just hate to. See someone struggling like that. I usually just leave early in the morning. To, stop the bank and get some cash. I used to work for Avis. Rent a car in Portland, but because of the corona virus. They put everyone on furlough. I feel like I. Don't look like a homeless person. I have a nicer car and. I always make sure I'm clean in nicely dressed. Because of the pandemic, almost solid, the public restrooms close so I go to a grocery store and use the restrooms. Try to wash up. Okay. I'm going to do a U-TURN. The street. It's one forty four PM. I, am at the place called every day. Deal for Digest. Call it the green, fair. It's just the. Big. Green building. This is the hard part mask makes my glasses cloud over. Giving you? I don't let myself panic about the possibility of getting the virus, but I take the necessary precautions. You know they want people to wear masks, but People on the street. They're not likely to have any money to buy them and hand sanitizer. Impossible to find for at least a month. I. Don't know how. are expected to stay clean. Who Live on the streets? I always look for foods that don't need to be refrigerated for very long. I thought I would be able to do. More? Cooking for myself, but sometimes it's such an ordeal to set up. Just easier to to drive through Burger King or something. Just one of those people that is constantly you moving to a new place. not necessarily willingly, but. It's just the way my life has gone. My grew up in poverty single mom. I, remember. We were always on the move always. Moving to a new place. At I feel like I'm still doing that now. I had been living with my adult son in his house, and he's always had a temper, but. He has become increasingly. Violent towards. Me and. I knew I had to get out. May, only other option was to try to live with my daughter, but she doesn't have a spare room and it would mean I would be living in the kitchen nook. And I'm not comfortable with that. It's hard for me to feel like a burden. Yeah, mccurdy. I'm sitting next to my daughter, Laura. We are sitting in the starbucks parking lot. We've been talking about. My situation. Still. How long do you think you can keep living in your car? I can probably last through September. After that I don't know if my car would be insulated enough for me to really live in it through the winter. Yeah. my concerns are just for your safety. I don't WanNa. See you get taken advantage of. Eating broken into in your car in. Our, just like to have you stay in our house. I guess. One of the things I worry about that. I. have. Problems between you and John. Well I. Guess the whole situation with my husband. We have our own issues in our marriage. You know we're not on the brink of devotion, nothing but. I don't want you to be. Yeah me any more attention to right. I can understand that. But I guess. The hard part was seeing how your car was. Set up in the bed in your I. Just really that's when it hit me like. What kind of daughter am I? I'm. Letting, you live in your car. May intention is that we can find a place where you can feel like you have your own home. I won't be able to help you find that. Yeah, ME, too. Thank you know when you get a w? Eight fifty four PM. Returned to my. Overnight spot where I parked most nights. The Sun has gone down and it's raining. I'm about ready to go to bed. I just realized. I forget to take my. Vitamins earlier. It was hard the first few days. Just living in my van worrying what's going to happen? What am I going to do? But I remind myself that. Is probably not going to be that bad. I have social security and a small pension. 'cause I drove a school bus. And so. I have money saved a few thousand dollars. I've been looking at finding an apartment or something. Or even. Mobile home. Nearby. I know that my situation is going to be temporary. I just take it one day at a time. My last vitamin. Okay! Good night. Nov.. We know. saw. Oo. Thanks to NATO von in Portland Oregon for recording her audio diary. The story is produced by Nelly Gillis with help from Sarah Kate. Kramer and me or editors are George Ben Shapiro. Radio dyers radio, Topa a listener supported network Pierre wrecks. In the coming weeks we'll be bringing you stories about funeral directors on the frontline. What it's like to be in lockdown when you're locked up and the toll of the pandemic on a pizzeria. These stories will be airing on NPR and here on the podcast. I'm Joe. Richman. We'll be back soon with another. Hunker down diary. Probably know radio dyers is a proud member of Radio Tokyo from Pierre Rex. A collection of the best podcasts around in Radio Toby has a newsletter that features all of the shows in our network. It's called the citizen, a monthly collection of episodes upcoming events and podcasts news from radio topiary shows. Keep up with all things radio topiary and subscribe at Radio Toby. Dot FM slash newsletter. That's Radio Tokyo Dot FM. New Letter. Radio. Acts.

Portland Radio Toby Oregon Radio Topi Joe Richmond Radio Tokyo Dot FM Radio dyers Radio Tokyo Pierre Rex Dot NATO Avis Berry starbucks Neda George Ben Shapiro Knit WanNa Oregon.
A Message from Showcase

Showcase from Radiotopia

05:46 min | 1 year ago

A Message from Showcase

"You're listening to showcase from PR. XS Radio Tovia. He there. I'm Audrey mirvish managing producer Sir of radio. Tovia as you probably know. We're in the middle of the annual Radio Tokyo fundraiser. Right now. We really need your help to get the thirty five thousand donations nations. Now is the time to show your support for Radio Tovia at Radio Topi dot. FM as you probably also know by now radio. Topi is a curated rated network of extraordinary. Cutting edge podcasts. We bring you amazing shows like your hustle and ninety nine percent invisible criminal and everything is alive breath via looseness. And this one that you're listening to right now showcase. If you listen across the showcase feed you'll find stories about the shift from analog to digital digital culture and video game conspiracy theory the intersection of creativity and depression stories about being black in America and so much more here. Buds are like a dream of the South radio. Cities designers were after they are auditorium without walls and our digital devices are not only portable. They tap into a seemingly limitless cloud of sound. Mr Courtney needs ten luxury sedan Dan. I'm Terry Gross can do. There's a game in the Pacific northwest. That was really popular. A lot of people had adverse reactions to every kid played it. Go crazy or control of their thoughts or feel like they're being controls. Some people talked about the connection between police and trump replacing it somewhere where everybody thinks everything. Religion Begin with kind of smart company claims. He was abducted. No way could possibly be real. I've despite my whole life people not believe me. I'm to the point where I don't care anymore icon sale. Why I did it for the first time we all have one lie become? I'm a second Li- we live with them. The third lie is coming just to camouflage the two other allies secrets I. I really genuinely enjoyed the art of deception. I enjoyed the elementary school. He went to all the parents and teachers teaches new me because I pick them up every day and the dreadlocked black man picking up a little blonde blue eyed white kid who runs around and screams. Daddy was well memorable whenever anyone stared at his I could feel that fear bubbling in my heart. But I would just look at my son and concentrate on him because in my son and his dead in nineteen ninety eight a brain scientist named Alice flared. He developed a mysterious mental until illness. She couldn't stop writing. She scribbled on walls and even covered her own skin with words as she tried to figure out what was wrong with her mind. She turned to a memoir by the world. Famous author William Styron. He had battled suicidal depression. And Writer's I block and it suddenly hit me that what he had was the opposite of what I had. There's this assumption that we're all the same kind of black. Before leaving home. I would check the mirror to make sure my head wasn't teasing. Okay so get this. He said he would tell our son not to wear and not to go out late at night but now I checked to make sure is peasy enough. He's e- I don't even know that one same experiences same reactions to stuff. We'll guess what you just want to be. The person who you know can't figure out who you are. You just WanNa be the tragic Mulatto. We're going to stoop this out. We on this side. Leave that you on that side or a bunch of mother. Same thing about the United Nations demanding the Security Council aalto condemn Moscow. We do not have a picture yet. Showcase Production Gear Axis Tapia. Okay Rider Houston we do have a TV picker. We're even even know voice. This is space bridge partner. Now is the time when you can help us. Keep all all of the many parts of Radio Topa thriving and here's yet another reason to donate now. Have you heard of radio. Plus it's our donors donors only podcast. That goes deep with all of the radio. Toby producers through questions about life culture and really important things like favorite Britt snacks. What their moms think about their shows and what they wanted to be when they were little? It's our special stash of audio that no one else hears and so you get access to radio. Toby News late show trailers and other network secrets before we announced them publicly if you make a donation by December twentieth you'll receive Steve Info about Radio Topa plus as well as a secret hotline number to call. And ask your burning questions about whatever's on your mind your questions might might be featured on a future episode of plus and just a heads up there's a special episode of Plus dropping on December twentieth. That you will not want to miss go to Radio Topa uh-huh dot FM to donate now. That's Radio Topa Dot. FM thanks so much radio to the X..

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Tue. 05/05  UKs Contact Tracing App Wont Work In the Background

Techmeme Ride Home

21:56 min | 10 months ago

Tue. 05/05 UKs Contact Tracing App Wont Work In the Background

"Welcome to the technetium Ryan. Home for Tuesday may fifth twenty twenty. I'm Brian McCullough today the UK has played by Google and apple's rules and it seems like they're contact. Tracing APP is failing because of that and yet are Google and apple making decisions above their station. Uber might be bailing out. Lime Microsoft is reconsidering its Windows X. Strategy and sensor tower is the interesting rays of the day. Here's what you missed today in the world of Tech Apple has announced ww DC dates which it does every year is news every year. Just not always the biggest news every year. This year is different. Of course though so details around this are sort of interesting. Ww DC will kick off June twenty. Second it will be virtual. You will be able to participate and follow along inside the apple developer APP as well as on the EPA website and it will be free for anyone quoting nine to five Mac. Apple doesn't share specifics. About how exactly the virtual ww DC will work beyond accessing it through its developer APP and website. Fortunately the company still has a month and a half to figure out the logistics of converting everything to a digital format while preserving key elements of the WW DC experience an quote so to sum up virtual free for anyone which I should underline anyone. It's worth mentioning that. This means you can participate to Larry's no cap on developers and it's going to happen a bit later in June than usual. But that's no big deal now. The only thing left be seen how they will actually do things like demos while still social distancing onstage because you know demos are Demos. They sometimes require some real up close time. According to the register the contact tracing APP that the National Health Service of the United Kingdom has been developing on its own as a centralized APP. Because it didn't want to use the decentralized framework provided by Google Apple does not appear to work unless the APP in question is running in the foreground and the phone is kept awake and unlocked. Oh and it will also ask users for locations something that the Google and apple systems specifically will not allow APPs to do quoting from the register. The apple not as it stands work all the time on IOS nor android since version eight the operating systems won't allow the tracing application to Broadcast ID via Bluetooth to surrounding devices when it's running in the background and not inactive use apple's IOS forbids it and newer Google android versions limited to a few minutes after the APP falls into the background. That means that unless people have the NHL APP running in the foreground and their phones awake most of the time the fundamental principle underpinning the entire system that phones detect. Each Other won't work. It will work if people open the APP and leave it open and the phone unlocked but if you close it and forgets reopen it or the phone falls asleep the apple not broadcast it's ide- and no other phones around. You will register that you've been close by. There's a handy video of someone in Australia's showing this Australia by the way has gone for a similar system with its covert safe. App and quote so that all seems pretty sub optimal right. The whole point of using phones is that you don't have to actively do anything. The phone just does the proximity sensing for you. And as for the location issue this comes from vice quote in Levy Technical Director of the National Cyber Security Center which developed the APP tried to reassure. Those worried about privacy concerns on Monday saying the APP quote doesn't have any personal information about you. It doesn't collect your location. And the design works hard to ensure that you can't work out who has become symptomatic and that quote it holds only anonymous data and communicate out to other systems through privacy preserving gateways and quote but the first thing the APP asks users to do is enter their zipcode before giving them a unique ide- that's directly linked to their phones. It also logs the exact make and model of the phone. If a user reports symptoms of covered nineteen they will also be asked to upload their contacts to a centralized server controlled by the government. The government has regularly been saying that the server only holds anonymous data veal said this is legally untrue. The data in the server is unambiguously not under UK law and indeed every single broadcast. Every phone makes can be easily decrypted to link back uniquely to a single device and quote on Monday the NC Chief Executive Matthew Gold was forced to admit to lawmakers that data will not be deleted and UK citizens will not have the right to demand. It is deleted. It can also be used for research in the future and quote so excellent right as Rupert goodwins tweeted as far as I can tell the. Sx APP can't work well enough to provide useful data and only well enough to break the law and quote by the by apple and Google just released some sample code as well as you. I screen shots. Also detailed policies for contact tracing APPs looking to use these particular. Api's and yes indeed. The system prohibits the collection of user location data. And not to zag on you intentionally here but that is sort of opening up a whole different slew of questions. This is quoting Reuters. Both companies said privacy and preventing governments from using the system to compile. Data on citizens was a primary goal. The system uses Bluetooth signals from phones to detect encounters and does not use or store. Gps location data but the developers of official Corona Virus Related APPs in several U S states told Reuters. Last month. It was vital they be allowed to use. Gps location data in conjunction with the new contact tracing system to track how outbreaks move and identify hotspots the Google Apple decision to not allow. Gps data collection with they're contact tracing system will require public health authorities that want to access. Gps location to rely on. What apple and Google have described as unstable battery draining? Work arounds alternatives. Likely would miss some encounters because I phones an android devices turn off Bluetooth connections after some time for battery saving and other reasons unless users remember to reactivate them but some upset they plan to stick to their own approaches software company twenty which developed the State of Utah's health together contact tracing with both Jess and Bluetooth said on Monday. The APP operates effectively without the new apple. Google tool and quote so now what is the point of having a contact tracing APP if it doesn't allow health officials to identify where new hotspots might be springing up that defeats the entire purpose? So I'm GonNa some up with the counter argument here. Beginning with Dr Abbas fangio quote apple and Google are imposing American values on the world by limiting the usefulness of contact tracing APPs. The values aren't privacy. There distressing government and the individual is more important than the health of society. See Gun violence healthcare and quote and here's benedict summation quote. There is a very careful discussion to be had around. How apple and Google are imposing policy decisions as opposed to technical decisions with their contact project as it stands you need test verified by a thirty to notify but the health authority will have no visibility on what contact matches come back nor on where they are location. Data is not allowed unclear if they even get anonymous stats on the matches as far as I can see. None of these are engineering decisions. This is not the same as Silicon Valley saying we are not able to make a secure backdoor. This is Silicon Valley. Saying we do not want you to be able to do X. There are lots of ethical considerations about this and one could argue that these choices are necessary to get adoption. But aren't these policy questions for policy. People apples plan entirely bans public health APP from collecting location from the phone automatically. It does let you ask for registration so you could ask people who get an exposure notification to let you know but you're not allowed to require it. There are very sound engineering reasons for Apple Google to control how APPS can access location and bt L. E. but the decision that public health apps cannot see any data about contact matches. Even where they are is not an engineering decision. A decision and quote data is the transformative energy of the modern enterprise. Tipco HELPS CUSTOMERS. Unlock the value of that real time. Data to create a competitive asset for customers like Panera bread that meant unifying their data so they could quickly launch panera bread grocery and diversify their business during the quarantine for T. mobile working with TIPCO. Meant being able to handle ten times. The usual traffic to their website for iphone pre orders with a micro services architecture that was up and running in just six months for the University of Iowa hospitals and clinics meant reducing their surgical site infections by seventy four percent using advanced analytics. These are all examples of what typical means when they say made possible by TIPCO TIPCO SOLVES. Tomorrow's impossible business problems. Today by seamlessly connecting any application device or data source by intelligently unifying data for better access trust in control and by confidently predicting business outcomes with real time data driven intelligence. Tipco gives businesses. What they need to succeed. Learn more about how tiptoe can unlock the value of your company's real time data at TIPCO DOT com slash ride. That's T. I B. C. O. dot com slash ride. And tell them Brian sent you. Subscription revenue is all the rage. These days right. We've talked about that. On this show extensively a our our annual recurring revenue subscription revenue is less time consuming and crucially way more predictable and reliable as a business model than relying on ads or strip mining. Used FOR DATA. Double Up is the agency that helps businesses contact creators and influencers get into the subscription business model sponsors and advertisers can come and go like the wind but subscription revenue is reliable like the seasons and creating a Freeman model tied to up selling subscriptions. Sure has worked for the likes of spotify dropbox. Slack your audience. Your customers want you to do this. Nobody likes that. No one wants you to surveilled them and make money by selling their data. Let double up show you how to create a business based on a solid foundation of subscription revenue. That will also let you sleep well at night. Check THEM OUT AT double up agency. That's double up dot agency on the web and when you get in touch with them. Tell them Brian sent you quick. Follow up it did indeed happened. Intel says it is officially buying urban mobility platform. Move it for approximately nine hundred million dollars. This is the story about the rumors I told you about yesterday and quoting tech crunch. This is all happening for the reasons that we discussed yesterday. Quote Intel has confirmed to me that all existing services will continue but additionally plans to use move its technology to expand the services. It offers via mobile. I the autonomous car company that Intel acquired for fifteen point. Three billion dollars in two thousand seventeen. Which is the anchor of its efforts. In the automotive sector specifically move it's tech will be used to expand and enhance mobilize mobility as a service offering Intel said. Mobilize driver assist. Technology is in some sixty million vehicles today and while atomic services robot taxes are still in their most nascent phase. The opportunities are big. Intel believes that robot taxis alone will be a one hundred sixty billion dollar market by twenty thirty and quote. The information is reporting. That Uber is in talks to lead a one hundred and seventy million dollar investment in East cooter startup lime and five hundred and ten million dollar valuation that valuation would be down a seventy nine percent from the last time lime realized the way. I'm reading this. This is an emergency infusion of much needed cash to keep Lima live but it also seems like Uber will sell its bike slash scooter. Division jump to lime in exchange for stock this will also allow uber the option of acquiring lime outright sometime between twenty twenty two and twenty twenty four quoting the information uber already owns a minority stake in line but the deal would significantly increase. Its share as part of the proposed deal. Uber would transferred to lime the bike and scooter business. That the Ride Hailing Company purchased twenty eighteen. Called jump. Uber would get the option to buy lime between two thousand twenty two twenty twenty four at a specific price and in the meantime Uber would feature lime scooters more prominently in the Uber App. The deal discussions could still fall apart or go in a different direction to people. Close to Lime said Lime speaking with some existing investors about participating in the financing but hasn't yet gathered commitments from them. Guber would invest about eighty five million dollars the financing would give Lima enough cash to get through a period when few people are leaving their homes. The San Francisco based startup has laid off about two hundred people. Since the beginning of the year or about thirty percent of staff it has slowly started reintroducing scooters into cities after pulling vehicles from nearly all its markets in March in general Uber's own scooter and bike rental efforts have struggled financially more than limes and all prominent businesses in the micro mobility field had significant difficulties in the pre cove in nineteen era. The move save Uber. Several hundred million dollars annually in operating costs and tens of millions of dollars more. If the lion's share of jumps four hundred employees moved to lime or leave the company and quote Microsoft says there has been a seventy five percent year over year. Jump in the amount of time spent by users inside windows ten and windows ten x which is interesting but I guess it makes a Lotta Sense. Less mobile usage since a lot of us are not mobile at the moment and more people are now tied to their laptops or desktops to do work remotely but the most interesting new details shared by Microsoft. Is that windows. Ten X which was originally pitched as being for dual screen devices is actually gonNA COME TO LAPTOPS I. This is Tom. Warren at the verge quote Microsoft is confirming today that it's planning to refocus windows. Ten X on single screen devices quote. The world is a very different place than it was last October when we shared our vision for a new category of dual screen windows devices explained. Panos panay Microsoft's windows and devices chief with windows. Ten X we designed for flexibility and that flexibility has enabled us to pivot are focused towards single screen windows ten x devices that leverage the power of the cloud to help our customers work. Learn and play in new ways. Pani said and quote. Microsoft isn't saying exactly when single screen devices like laptops will support windows ten x nor win dual screen devices will launch with the OS however windows ten x will launch on single screen devices. I quote we will continue to look for the right moment in conjunction with our oem partners to bring dual screen devices to market says. Panay and quote sources are telling Mark Gherman facebook's OCULUS division is developing a smaller lighter version of the quest VR headset. But that the device is still facing significant. Potential Delays Dacoven nineteen quote these social networking giant is working on multiple potential successors to the quest. Some models in advanced testing are smaller lighter and have a faster refresh rate for more realistic content. According to people familiar with the matter. These headsets also have redesigned controllers. Said the people who asked not to be identified discussing unannounced products. The company hasn't finalized which new version of the quest will release and the final product may have different features facebook originally planned to launch the new model at the end of two thousand twenty around its annual Oculus conference but the corona virus pandemic could delay headset from shipping until twenty twenty one. The people said some versions and testing are ten percent to fifteen percent smaller than the current quest that in addition to being lighter makes them more comfortable to wear one of the people said the existing model weighs about one point two five pounds which is too heavy for some users. Wearing the device for extended periods the models and testing are closer to a pound. The person said and quote. I know I've already seen it in my inbox this morning. Apple is integrating its meat. Teleconferencing product into g mail for non G. Suite customers. And if you're one of the lucky duckie's like I've been you might already see a link to launch meat inside your g mail sidebar. Quoting the verge putting meat front and center is Google's latest attempt to go head to head with zoom the ubiquitous videoconferencing APP. That has so far. Ruled the stay at home. Era Meet will have some privacy controls that zoom has lacked resulting in instances of zoom bombing. You can't just click a link to join a meat. You'll have to log into your google account to do so if the meeting host or meet host has not invited you. You'll be sent to a waiting area. Until the host approves you and unlike zoom the free version of meat won't have dial in landline numbers for meetings and quote. Which again right there do not like for reasons. I've already mentioned finally today an interesting raise but unlike as usual. This isn't some company that he likely had never heard of before. In fact it's a company that I mentioned on this show. All the time sensor tower the mobile APP Market Research Company is raising forty. Five million dollars from river would capital. And what's interesting? Is that sensor? Tara says it has been profitable from basically day one and had only previously raised a one million dollar seed round quoting techcrunch APP intelligence firms like Senator Tower and rivals including APP. Annie APP Topi and others aim to become one stop shops. For Data and insights censor towers current offerings include insights into US Acquisition Strategies Aso or APP store optimization competitive analysis and APP specific data like daily ranks installs review analysis and more its customers can also get a view of the APP economy. Globally with top charts publisher breakdowns quarterly reports at Intelligence and other data among center towers client base are a number of enterprise level customers including Morgan Stanley and tencent in total the company has more than three hundred and fifty enterprise users sensor tower has been profitable since launch and reports. That two thousand nineteen saw record annual recurring revenue and sixty five percent growth year over year. It's employee headcounts. Also increased fifty percent over the past year as sensor tower has expanded internationally including with the opening of a new London. Office aimed and quote find. Might regret this but I put up a post in the show sub read it. Which is our slash ride home by the way asking. Y'All for some listener feedback. It's been over two years doing this. Podcast now so. I thought I'd just take the temperature of the audience in a really really general way. I'm looking for any and all feedback really so just posted a threat with whatever you'd like to tell me but I'd be especially interested in feedback framed in one of these buckets. First of all. What has most annoyed you about the show recently second what has been the best thing about the show recently. What would you like to have more of on the show and also what have I never done or maybe never even thought of doing that? You would like me to do on the show. Thanks in advance for any and all contributions again you can find that at our slash ride home on talk to you tomorrow.

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21: Intel's Jim Clarke talks quantum computing

Technotopia

21:07 min | 2 years ago

21: Intel's Jim Clarke talks quantum computing

"Welcome back to tech to Topi the podcasts by better future John Biggs shall we have Jim Clark works at Intel's quantum computing lab. This is tech topa. Hey, guys, John Biggs here, it's not smart to ignore changes and technology that will eventually change our lives better or worse thing that's not smart, but you know, what is smart going to ZipRecruiter dot com slash techno to hire the right person. ZipRecruiter doesn't depend on candidates finding you. It finds them for you. It's a powerful matching technology. That scans, thousands of resumes identifies people with the right skills, education and experience for your job at actively invites them to lie. You get qualified candidates fast, ZipRecruiter's rated. Number one by employers in the US is writing comes from hiring sites, trust pilot, with over one thousand reviews. And right now, my listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at this exclusive web address ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash techno at ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash techno ZipRecruiter dot com. Slash techno ZipRecruiter. It is the smartest way to hire. Welcome back to Topi of the podcast about a better future. I'm John Biggs today. We have James Clark director of quantum hardware Intel. Okay. So quantum hardware is probably so my favorite kind of hardware, Jim, why don't you tell me a little, but what you guys are doing there. So if you're familiar with conventional computing, you're familiar with the central processing unit or CPU migra, but Intel were developing the quantum processing unit for bottom computers. Are a quantum computers are an emerging technology on that. The should bring about exponentially vast compute technology compared to to the technology we use today. So what does that? So this is a this is it's important that we get, I guess, are are definitions right as we begin. So what's the primary difference between a quantum computer and a regular computer. So a quantum computer uses to principles of quantum mechanics to access, but an exponentially large space for compute in comparison to classical computer on the way to think about it is is often do with coins. If you have a coin in your hand, it's either heads or tails. If you have a transistor, it's encoded as either a one or zero, the transistor is on or off, but with a Quant of information where cubit will call it a quantum device. It's better to think of that choline is spinning on a table where that coin can simultaneously represent. Both heads and tails list some probability. If you then bring in second bit of information to bit, you can represent a total of four states, three cubits. So imagine three spinning coins. You would have a total of eight states at the same time. What's interesting about this as you keep getting larger and larger number of Cubans, you can represent. Very quickly more states that are acceptable with a classical computer. Or with fifty cubits. You reach a point where you're essentially a bit more powerful than a any supercomputer on us. And the and forty cubits. What's the, I guess is their size difference in terms of in terms of Bill to to generate this stuff is is, is it as big as a regular supercomputer, that kind of thing? Because I think it's, I think it's. Is it my own? You know what I mean? I'm sorry. Can you repeat that? Would I ever Bill to put this in my phone when I have a a? So here's the since two computer. Yes. So here's the comment that I would make in the nineteen sixties when you had just a few different supercomputers on earth or arch computers. They weren't even called supercomputers at the time. That's about the stage that we are in development with the quantum computer. So at first they're really only a few of them, the relatively simple. In the sixties. You could just about check your work. Through a human calculation. That's where we are today. With Christy gonna get to a point where we can do things that no conventional computer on earth to do, but the point at which she would have it in your back pocket. Let's assume that just like a regular computer, let's assume that that's still another forty years away. Okay, interesting. Okay. So the, I'm I'm a big fan of quantum computing and the thing that I'm looking forward to the most is essentially a general access to a quantum computer. I think there's a couple of companies that are working on right now, and I'm sure Intel's doing some more there is that is that something I should be excited about? Is it important for a regular programmers to have access to two machines that can use cubits and things? Yeah, it's all part of an ecosystem that will have to evolve to bring quantum computing to reality programming. Quantum computer is unlike classical computer in the way you manipulate the. Algorithms or the cubits is fundamentally different. So by having these accessible either to small groups at I or eventually to the public, I think you're going to see acceleration of of the quantum computing technology. Now we're in a stage where a we have our our two-bit ships, and we're still continuing with internal testing erica's -ation up prior to putting anything on the cloud. But I think the cloud is probably a good model for early on years in would be perhaps variety of whether it's from companies from national labs. I think you'll see a access through the cloud. And what are we gonna have one. We're gonna have generally available quantum compute. When is it? When is it gonna replace of the regular supercomputers that we have now? Yeah. So a couple of comments there. The first comment is on computers exponentially faster for only certain algorithms at the moment I'm Doug rhythms would be taught. Tiger Affi. Some could be in portfolio optimization. We feel that the first applications will be in chemistry in chemical modeling, which of course, chemistry as a segue into medicine and biology. So in that sense, they won't replace, but they will augments a supercomputer for certain algorithms. So we would expect quantum computer to be stationed next to a supercomputer in a data center. As an example. Now when we will have them, we think that a quantum computer that will say, change your life or mine is still about ten years away up until there will be a lot of learning of it will happen, but it won't be commercially relevant to a company like Intel and probably you won't be able to implement something in your in your life and say, that's because of a year. Okay. Interesting. So what's the in terms of augmenting supercomputer Witter some of the. So you said Jussi portfolio management, I guess network network. Management, that sort of thing is there, is there the idea would be to offload a lot of those functionalities to to to a quantum computer as necessary or or how would that? That's a great point. So for certain types of algorithms are certain tasks a, you would offload them as offload them to a quantum computer as an accelerator. For example, now I expect the number of applications to increase as we have initial systems on, but with the way to think about this as an accelerator in data center. So they so the quantum computer work side by side with the with the other machines it does now. One of the things I wanna point out as part of this discussion is while my team is making a the on processing unit. Other is a host of classical electron IX that would be used for the control system for hosting the the architecture on or a basically that the overall in overall on computer will have on a processing unit than a host of classical compute components. So really any system build is going to be a hybrid system. And then any application we run is likely going to be a hybrid application where parts of it run on a supercomputer or host computer and parts are offloaded to on. Interesting. Yeah, I never never thought about the that you wouldn't be able to use the quantum computer the way it used the generally available supercomputer. Are there any other any current implementations that you think that are fairly cool. Well, cool can be interpreted as a as all of these systems today operated a fraction of a degree above absolute zero. So to that extent, they're all pretty cool. Now, this is an exciting space and. You know, while while Intel is focused on to. Cuba technologies, we certainly it's engine to the field and the people on my team or just excited about any new development myspace. Because collectively with the research all over the world, every big development is one step closer that the overall immunity gets to realizing system. So so it's it's a pretty fun time. Big advancements just about every month. Is there anything particularly interesting that happened recently. So I think I think it until what's what's certainly been interesting is an exciting this year is up until now a lot of the quantum. Processing units or Cuba chips have been built in university settings and university laps. This is where the expertise says. Now, while this is still a fundamental science project. Our view at Intel is if we can take a healthy dose of Intel, engineering and process control something. We're very good at an apply it to. To Cuban technologies than we can help the field exhilarate to that extent. This year we have been running. A specialized quantum fabrication process in our three hundred millimeter fabs in Oregon. So we're seeing. Yield and uniformity on device to device that we feel has exceeded anything that's currently out there. So that's certainly been something that that this ongoing that's exciting here until in. Is this mass production or is this I don't know a couple dozen chips per run? Yes. Great question. So this runs this runs in the same fabrication facility where we do our late stage are in d. So this is where in a in a facility where we run thousands of waivers a week. Now here we're running a few wafers at a time where optimum process when we have a good waiver for that, waiver will have a tens of thousands of two bits allbeit not interconnected. So we have a huge real estate with which to test and play with these devices. And that's pretty exciting. We're producing these on a scale of the hasn't been done before, and one of the challenges is characterizing in in getting as much information as possible from one of these large waivers and feeding it back into our feedback. So they so the expectation now isn't isn't to actively run anything on these things for you guys. It's more just figure out what the what the physical plant is, what the what the physical manufacture of these things looks like in the future. Right. When you say run, I mean, that would be, let's say, for this technology, which this technology is a newer technology. All at the moment is not to create out, say in online system in the cloud attest types of two bits here. What we're trying to do is characterizing some of the fundamental variability of one Cuba type to another. This is a mung, the one of the tasks that we're doing that we're doing now. If I want to become a quantum computer programmer, if I wanna start exploring this this space, which would I start doing right now? And that's a great question. We get asked this question a lot. How do I get into Guam computing? In fact, this topic came up last week. I at the White House, the White House had a quantum information summit in workforce. Came up as is a topic for discussion. The answer is you don't have to be a quantum physicist to work on quantum computers on my team. The team at until we have people that are materials experts. We have people that are transistor experts. We have people that are f microwave engineers with the signaling, and then we have people that are architects who are trying to apply Intel architecture more to the quantum space. So certainly there is a component of of. Knowing. I'll say, quantum mechanics that would help, but it's far from the case that you have to be a quantum physicist to to work in space. So you don't have to be on business, but you would what it does. Is there any sort of specific programming language as I should be looking at as a as a student or whatever, or is there or is the, I guess the question is, do you have to be super deep into quantum computing to be in quantum computing? Yeah, that's that's our point. I'll answer two ways. One is I think most of us would say, you don't have to, but that that there are a lot of areas of expertise, which when applied to quantum computing help exceleron field. The second is I think that universities now are grappling with what would a quantum information systems degree look like. It's probably a does of Bonham physics and computer engineering, classical computer engineering. So I think this is an area is an area of particular importance because there simply isn't enough, aren't enough quantum engineers around today to fill the openings both in academe Lia in industry. So we need to develop more of them. Very cool. All right. So at what point is a quantum computer gonna be able to run every single car in a an a self-driving city. Yeah. Under great question. An area of of of work with quantum computers now is optimizations. Imagine if you have a self driving parts looking for the optimal route. There's also a strong on machine learning component which we're seeing. Abors with with quantum computers. So. Let's see. I'm not an expert on when the first self driving cars will come. We were to say that each of those is still in their infancy than I would expect a still, at least on the ten year timeframe before on computer are influencing the self-driving our space, but it's certainly an active area of vision if not already in the research. Okay. So about about a decade before we before we see it really take off that sounds far to you sounds far off. It really isn't. If we take a look at the inflection technology, the first transistor was in the late forties. The first integrated circuit was in the late fifties, and the first micro processor was around nineteen seventy. And so you really fundamental changes in technology about every ten or eleven years. So when I say ten years away, that's not so far away that we shouldn't be excited about it or art boards. I think the the frustrating thing when I do this podcast, I talked to a lot of folks who are thinking about the future, and I always say that we're sort of an interstitial period right now. We're not. It's not neither here nor there. We don't have. We don't have a mobile giant. We don't have a mobile explosion right now. Everything's kind of flat over there. We don't have any microprocessors. It can't get much the traditional microprocessor can't get much better from what it is right now, which is why I'm particularly excited about generally available quantum. But let's see. Let's see how that, how that all plays out. So one of the misconceptions that I hear off to your point is here's someone at a conference or even at the White House event last week who will say Moore's laws ending, therefore, we need to work on quantum computing. Ability and you wouldn't. You wouldn't expect a different response from Intel. We think Moore's law is healthy and in fact, at on computing person here, I would say that we need the technical advances of a few more generations of Moore's law and order to even bring quantum computing to reality. So if Moore's law were dead today, it isn't a than I was the prospects for quantum computers with also. Interesting. Very exciting. All right. So sue people wanna try some try some cubits. Can they just call you and you can send them a cubit processors, something we're working on that we're getting. We're getting to that point. We don't until we don't make the refrigeration units. So that would be something that they would have to provide getting. I gotta I gotta. I gotta I gotta Amanda downstairs. We just put it in the freezer, right? Not the right temperature. Now those believe it or not, though that's not the hardest part people will say, have the getting to a fraction of a degree above absolute zero as prohibitive there. Many companies around the world that built these refrigeration units they're about is of a fifty five gallon drum. Okay. So. All right. Well, fascinating. This is this is great stuff. I'm excited to see. Next, Jim Clark Intel's quantum computing. This has been great stuff. Thank you. Technophobe is brought to you by happy, fun Corp, happy, fun. Corpuz designed driven technology company in Brooklyn, New York that specializes building mobile and web applications for startups and fortune five hundred companies, whether it's a new mobile web application that will help people experienced the internet in fun new way or software that will interface with a new piece of top secret hardware. Happy fund for is always up to the challenge. Bigger small, have you loves building software and loves working with great people come build with them, happy fund for dot com. Topi is also sponsored by jaywalk. Jaywalk is a new app that pays you to walk. You can try it out at jaywalk. Dot me. It's created by me, John Biggs and a few of my friends. Jaywalk dot me. Please check it out. The.

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23: Talking the future of influence with Tamara McCleary

Technotopia

16:59 min | 2 years ago

23: Talking the future of influence with Tamara McCleary

"Welcome back to Topi the podcast. But a better future. I'm John Biggs and the Timor mccleary. She's a business futurist. This is technical Pia. Topi has also sponsored by jaywalking. Jaywalk is a new app that pays you to walk. You can try it out at jaywalk dot me. It's created by me, John Biggs and a few of my friends, jaywalk dot me. Please check it out this episode. Technically is brought to you by typewriter, plus typewriter dot pluses, a full-service editorial agency that brings amazing editors from places like the New York Times and tech crunch to work on your writing a blog post. A white paper of presentation the typewriter team can write or edit anything on nearly any topic visit them at typewriter plus for free, quote, that's typewriter dot plus typewriter dot plus. Welcome back to the podcast of big to the timber mccleary. She CEO of Julia dot co volume sounds fascinating. It's what would what do you guys up to? Yeah. I mean, it's pretty exciting. We are a social media analytics and strategy company, and we're all about driving smart, social, so so social media for our BAAs it business out phones in growth using analytics and award winning storytelling. Okay. So in terms of in terms of what you guys are looking at in terms of the future. How would you define your scope? I guess or what are you guys looking at specifically? What we're looking at is we work in the BB enterprise space. And so these are a little bit more talent Jane to meet a target audience than say beat ac-. Right. So be deceived being with the retail or the consumer and do a lot of different things that say enterprise in the financial services or healthcare industry restricted in how they can message and what they can message about. So what we do is we apply storytelling that harnesses the power of analytics to know and find out where their target audience is what kind of conversations are having. And so we're creating thought leadership or brands by helping them to enter into those important conversations with their target audience. But also than measuring the actions that their target audience take so we're able to measure, click throughs on to say, white papers or website. And find out where those folks went are, they consuming the content, and you know, as you know, and I know, but a lot of organizations don't know is it's less about broadcasting how great your product or services, and it's more about entering the conversation around the challenges and problems, and then offering creative solutions without, you know, being really pitchy. So storytelling really is alive, and well all of us are attracted to stories whether or not we working in enterprise or not because we're human beings. And so it's a flying the right kind of messaging the right kind of stories to the exquisite analytics in the background to be able to track and measure your spend because you know, marketing dollars are precious. So when you have a budget, you wanna be able to track how that budget not. Only lead gen pieces of that business. But also what portion of those close sales had nothing to do with your social media campaign. So tracking. Okay. That's interesting. So how does how do we how do we tell stories in the future? How do we tell especially complex stories? I mean, you're dealing with enterprise, you're dealing with to be kind of stuff. How do you? Tell those stories to people who may not understand what it means that Facebook leaked fifty thousand of fifty million account credentials or that your company is doing something cool. But nobody knows about it. How do you tell that story in a world, that's basically sect saturated? Great question. John that is the question. And you know, you do is we apply something, that's I say Beng around since ancient times. Right. So reusing old wisdom with a new twist. And that is we're applying the storytelling method of the hero's journey. So, you know, everything starred worse is a great example of a movie that was written around how tell this type of story. And so the hero's journey is a about cast saying that target audience as the hero. And so we have a methodology us in using the key restaurant because every single movie that's been a blockbuster or a timeless classic hit has used as formula. So we transformed using this formula into the b- being enterprise space, the storytelling. In short bits on social media because you know, social media is short quick in incidents, an ongoing store, and what most organizations do on unknowingly is they cast themselves as the hero in the story rate are great product are great service. Here's how we can solve your problems. But that's that's the wrong approach. In fact, that approach will get no one to pay attention. And what you wanna do you wanna gauge? We'll have you engaged you've flip. It you cast your target audience as your hero. And you begin talking with them. Not to them you beginning gauging in these two way dialogue, you begin engaging. Those that are involved in the conversation could be journalists could be influencers that could be you know, depending on who your target is if it's safe, it's the the CIO you're you're engaging where they happen to be in. What they're invested in. And you're talking about their problems. Not your great solution. And so if you're focusing on their problems, and you talking about the challenge sets, and then once you're talking about the challenge, then you're also talking about solutions in laurel. And what name by that is in today's world with technology. Anyone you, and I John we both know that any company that tells us they are in the end all be all they can solve every problem immediately. What you do you roll your eyes like pets? So not a true story rate because today's were all there isn't a one one stop shop. In fact, it's usually more realistic to say we have solutions to difficult challenges through working with an ecosystem of partners. And for me. The the the way do hear his journey appropriately is not only casting target market as the hero. But you began pulling in your ecosystem partners as many. Enters leaders and guides, and you start talking about the great things that other people are doing as well because there is power in not being are cystic brand or company, you know, the old way doesn't work anymore. What people want to see what they're really to engage with willing to listen to is the truth is the unvarnished truth. It's authenticity. Volmer ability. It saying you know, what we don't have all the answers. But here's some really cool solutions beef come up with and by the way. So and so is doing this someone's doing that you're pulling in what others are doing as well on your pulling in those other voices, those other organizations those other influencers those other journalists who are really doing a good job path allies ING on talking about not only the challenges this Lucians. You're pulling in those analysts and highlighting them. So it's really this. Emolument Shen of. Storytelling through the lens of various perspectives. So that the light isn't just passed on your brand. The rather the life is passed upon your target audience in you or positioning, your brand as the thought leader the driver of the conversation whose failing to talk about all the challenges that are not yet salt as well. As some of the creative solutions what it's all about the target audience instead of all about the brand. So I mean, I think the I don't wanna get too deep into into marketing talk. But I think this is something interesting especially for like a startup a startup company and all that other good stuff. So I mean, one of the things when I talked to folks of building stuff they say that they don't have any time to tell these stories. So aside from basically hiring you what's the what are some of the best practices that that if I'm making some kind of cool new robot, and I don't want to deal with PR. I don't wanna deal with marketing, what are some best practices to us just can get at least a modicum of the story out there because stories change products as they as they grow. Right. So that's a that's one way to think about it. Yeah. He's a great question. I mean, it's epi all of us for John recap for climb. Right. Then the one resource we don't have enough of though, I think all of us can relate to be strapped for time. And you know to one solution if you know, if you're startup company, you've got this great robotic botox, the thing to remember is, you know, it's not about how great your robot product is. It's about how many people know about it. So is it too expensive for you? Not to take the time to focus on marketing, storytelling or inlet Ferber own line services. Audibles offering are the from the audience trial membership. Just go to audible dot com slash text. Five hundred five hundred to get started superior to my book, and we internet's watch on audible, get it full free. Download and start lifting immediately easy. It's not about -able dot com slash out. You know about the war texts Tino five hundred five hundred to get started. I'm wild about technology steeped into the tech field. However, I have to cross over into marketing because there's no way we're going to launch any of these great products and services without people knowing about it. So to tap into the look at how are we letting people know about this? How what are we doing currently so take an audit of what you're currently doing? So that you know, where star and then to your point how do you make it simplistic from the gecko is go back to your ridgeville route of the why why did you create this robot? Why did you create the the service and get passionate about it? And then find out. Okay. Here's our. Why what challenges or problem are we solving and for whom are we solving it? Now, you at least know where go with your limited. I'm to tell your stories because instead of blasting it out to the world, you're going to become very strategic about reaching the folks that are really wrestling with the challenge that your robot or your service makes easier for that to how you making their life easier. Start their focus there, and you know, drill down to a level of specificity with who you're communicating your message to so that you're not a deluding humor getting dollars or be spending precious time becoming very popular. But with no conversions because you see for positive business outcome on social media. It's never about popularity. It's about are. You reaching your certain target segment, which is why it's important for the analytics, but Arthur conversions for us. It's always about driving positive business. Outcomes and not about popularity. Good. So let's go a little bit more. What do you think the future looks like in twenty years, not specifically in terms of B to B marketing, but in terms of just your life? I guess. You know, I think everything has changed in twenty years at you know, we are already emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence new paired with machine learning robotics redeem printing blockchain technologies all of these things are emerging and soon to really disrupt the world as we knew. So it's kinda like, you know, the end of the world. Ms. Totally that all that third off twenty years Alaskan happened twenty years just think about it. It wasn't that long ago that we didn't have an iphone, and that's not even twenty years. Right. So think about how much is gonna change and how much is going to change with the five G coming on board and decreasing those latency periods that are holding us back with immobility in Thomas vehicles and with augmented reality really being infused into our everyday experience. I think in twenty years so so media for us for being augmented experience. I don't think we're going to be looking at computer Spain's. I don't think we're going to have mobile phones, we won't need them. We won't have to have a physical device because we will have the technology to support more mixed reality setting within our lives. So that you're not gonna have to worry about dropping your phone losing your phone or replacing your computer. It's these are going to be obsolete in twenty years. I think that we will definitely have. Rela will bosses we will have colleagues who are a we will have a different kind of workforce. I believe in twenty years. It will be a huge displacement of workers do artificial intelligence as well as yes, there will be jobs created, but the reality is what is the level of job being created and are all citizens able to rise to that level. I don't think so I think they'll be a greater delineation between classes, I think they'll be those that have the intellectual property and the dry and the desire and the willingness to upskill themselves into available positions. But I also believe that they are going to be a lot of positions that are better served by artificial intelligence that will leave some without without jobs, and that's the truth. I don't wanna sugar coat it because. I think if we only talk about the high side, we're not based in reality. We know were there is dark. There's light where there's up there is down as above sub below. There is always duality to everything. So it is impossible in defies all universe. For us to say that only all good will come out of technology. It's not possible. There will be shadow Topi is also sponsored by j wall rather be Jay walk because they knew the into walk. You can try it out jaywalk dot meal. It's created by money. John Biggs, a three of my friends jaywalk. Please check it out every single one of us. And if we're not becoming a part of this conversation, I say we cannot complain later when we wake up we don't like the world that we are walking into. That's interesting point. That's the like the generation now. So the baby boomers they they made this. They made the world that we're walking into right now. But they still don't like it to a degree, right? On isn't the human condition complainers by nature. I mean, how many of us and you to listeners whoever's listening in how many of us have ever been in a relationship. I mean does relationship exists without complaining. Oh, I think it's human nature to walk. What we want? And then not realize that what we wanted isn't really what we truly desire rate. So part of the conundrum is it's murky vision. We don't know the consequences.

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