19 Burst results for "Tony Shay"

"tony shay" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

05:00 min | 10 months ago

"tony shay" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"Tony shay was a rarity a business. Executive who was almost universally beloved shade died november twenty seventh at the age of forty six following injuries sustained in a house. Fire connecticut home. His death prompted outpourings of stories about shay's unusual and unusually successful approach to business for twenty years. he was. ceo zappa dot com the online shoe and clothing retailer. He let it with philosophy summed up in the two word title of his best selling book delivering happiness in two thousand ten. He told cbs news. He believed it was possible to make customers. Employees and investors happy while still turning a profit which he did in spades amazon acquired zappa's dot com in two thousand nine for one point two billion dollars shea invested in the online shoe cite zappa's dot com. Then call shoe site dot com in nineteen ninety nine a young entrepreneur. He had already founded in grown and online. Advertising site called link exchange a year earlier at the age of twenty four. He sold link exchange to microsoft for two hundred sixty five million dollars shortly after investing in shusei dot com. He became ceo and the company changed. Its name to zappa's taken from the spanish word for shoes ocado when she was initially pitched on investing in shoe site dot com. He was skeptical in nineteen ninety nine. The beginning of the internet bubble ecommerce was still young and untested. conventional wisdom. Was that you couldn't sell shoes online. Because customers were used to try on shoes before buying them but then she learned that five percent of shoe buyers already purchase shoes from catalogs. That's five percent of what was then a forty billion dollar market that persuaded shea to take a crack at online shoe sales even though he later told cbs news. I'm not a shoe person at all. Rather he would wear one pair for two years until they wore out and then by another to conquer the hurdle that customers needed to try on shoes shape pioneer to custom. We take for granted today. Zappa's would ship for free and allow returns for a year. It was not uncommon for customers to order five pairs of shoes in return for. That was okay with shay. He wanted customers for life to that end. He invested in domestic call center workforce rather than outsourcing to countries with cheaper labour famously. He empowered those customer support employees to do whatever they needed to make customers happy. There are no time limits on phone calls one. Possibly apocryphal story was that a worker stayed on the phone with one customer. For more than five hours. Critics wondered how zappa's could make money by investing so much in the people who answered the phones after all only about five percent of customers ordered on the phone the rest purchased online shea. Believe however that the phone was branding opportunity customer service by workers who bent over backwards to help them would be customers forever and of course they tell others about their experiences in addition he wanted his employees to be so happy that they would consider working at zappa's a calling not a career. He went so far as to offer to pay new employees to quit. The offer received a few weeks into a new job. Ranged from about one thousand to three thousand dollars the idea. He didn't want employees to stay if they weren't passionate about the job and the culture his quirky management technique became widely known simply as the offer growth was swift in two thousand revenues. Were about one point. Six million dollars by the time of the sale nine years later revenues had reached a billion dollars after the amazon acquisition shea. Stayed on as ceo. He retired last summer. Devoting himself to an economic development project in las vegas where he lived under shays. Leadership amazon is said to have allowed zappa's to remain as independent as an amazon acquisition. Could be recently. However the company's begun integrating it more fully offering prime rewards to zappa's customers the idea to help it. Maintain competitiveness against chains like dsw owned by conglomerate designer brands with several hundred warehouse stores. Nationwide dsw's one of the largest shoe retailers in america it consistently plies customers with loyalty discounts and coupons in an effort to get them to return to its brick and mortar stores again and again but cova closures hit designer brands. Hard in the second quarter which offers first sales fell. Almost in half third quarter results will be released next week. Twenty years after a young tony shay became convinced that yes you could sell shoes online. He turned out to be not only unconventional but prescient in a pandemic. it may be about the only place to sell them in a statement following shays death zappa. Ceo kadosh dish. Pandey said the world has lost a tremendous visionary and an incredible human being

zappa amazon shays Nationwide dsw dsw las vegas tony shay america
Business Community Mourns the Loss of Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh

Business Wars Daily

05:00 min | 10 months ago

Business Community Mourns the Loss of Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh

"Tony shay was a rarity a business. Executive who was almost universally beloved shade died november twenty seventh at the age of forty six following injuries sustained in a house. Fire connecticut home. His death prompted outpourings of stories about shay's unusual and unusually successful approach to business for twenty years. he was. ceo zappa dot com the online shoe and clothing retailer. He let it with philosophy summed up in the two word title of his best selling book delivering happiness in two thousand ten. He told cbs news. He believed it was possible to make customers. Employees and investors happy while still turning a profit which he did in spades amazon acquired zappa's dot com in two thousand nine for one point two billion dollars shea invested in the online shoe cite zappa's dot com. Then call shoe site dot com in nineteen ninety nine a young entrepreneur. He had already founded in grown and online. Advertising site called link exchange a year earlier at the age of twenty four. He sold link exchange to microsoft for two hundred sixty five million dollars shortly after investing in shusei dot com. He became ceo and the company changed. Its name to zappa's taken from the spanish word for shoes ocado when she was initially pitched on investing in shoe site dot com. He was skeptical in nineteen ninety nine. The beginning of the internet bubble ecommerce was still young and untested. conventional wisdom. Was that you couldn't sell shoes online. Because customers were used to try on shoes before buying them but then she learned that five percent of shoe buyers already purchase shoes from catalogs. That's five percent of what was then a forty billion dollar market that persuaded shea to take a crack at online shoe sales even though he later told cbs news. I'm not a shoe person at all. Rather he would wear one pair for two years until they wore out and then by another to conquer the hurdle that customers needed to try on shoes shape pioneer to custom. We take for granted today. Zappa's would ship for free and allow returns for a year. It was not uncommon for customers to order five pairs of shoes in return for. That was okay with shay. He wanted customers for life to that end. He invested in domestic call center workforce rather than outsourcing to countries with cheaper labour famously. He empowered those customer support employees to do whatever they needed to make customers happy. There are no time limits on phone calls one. Possibly apocryphal story was that a worker stayed on the phone with one customer. For more than five hours. Critics wondered how zappa's could make money by investing so much in the people who answered the phones after all only about five percent of customers ordered on the phone the rest purchased online shea. Believe however that the phone was branding opportunity customer service by workers who bent over backwards to help them would be customers forever and of course they tell others about their experiences in addition he wanted his employees to be so happy that they would consider working at zappa's a calling not a career. He went so far as to offer to pay new employees to quit. The offer received a few weeks into a new job. Ranged from about one thousand to three thousand dollars the idea. He didn't want employees to stay if they weren't passionate about the job and the culture his quirky management technique became widely known simply as the offer growth was swift in two thousand revenues. Were about one point. Six million dollars by the time of the sale nine years later revenues had reached a billion dollars after the amazon acquisition shea. Stayed on as ceo. He retired last summer. Devoting himself to an economic development project in las vegas where he lived under shays. Leadership amazon is said to have allowed zappa's to remain as independent as an amazon acquisition. Could be recently. However the company's begun integrating it more fully offering prime rewards to zappa's customers the idea to help it. Maintain competitiveness against chains like dsw owned by conglomerate designer brands with several hundred warehouse stores. Nationwide dsw's one of the largest shoe retailers in america it consistently plies customers with loyalty discounts and coupons in an effort to get them to return to its brick and mortar stores again and again but cova closures hit designer brands. Hard in the second quarter which offers first sales fell. Almost in half third quarter results will be released next week. Twenty years after a young tony shay became convinced that yes you could sell shoes online. He turned out to be not only unconventional but prescient in a pandemic. it may be about the only place to sell them in a statement following shays death zappa. Ceo kadosh dish. Pandey said the world has lost a tremendous visionary and an incredible human being

Tony Shay Zappa Ceo Zappa Shay Shea Amazon Cbs News Shade Connecticut CBS Microsoft
"tony shay" Discussed on Talkhouse Podcast

Talkhouse Podcast

07:21 min | 2 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on Talkhouse Podcast

"Ideas panel we pair Joseph Gordon led Ah Tony Shay CEO Zepos and on the Sunday we recorded the talk your about to hear Kaitlyn Bristowe of the Bachelor and Bachelorette in Congress station with Comedians Nikki glaser now listeners I'm a big fan of Nikki's she is absolutely hilarious legit one of the funniest people in the world but what don't know very much about is something called the bachelor nation so to give us some insight I brought in the big guns as my co host today t be guide associate editor Liam Matthews Liam is co host of a beautiful podcast to fall in love that's TV guides unofficial bachelor nation. podcast is co host on the show is Jacqueline Trumbull from season twenty two of the bachelor as well as Bachelor in Paradise Liam Matthews Welcome to the talk house man what is up hey hey I'm so glad you could join us I need your expertise good sir well I am so glad that my expertise in this finally comes in handy so tell us tell us a little bit about the show and tell us a little bit about Kaitlyn Bristowe audiences met Kaitlyn Bristowe in two thousand fifteen on crystals a season of bachelor so then the next season of the Bachelorette she and another woman were chosen as co Bachelorettes and that was the first time they did that ran the lab last time they did that it was a disaster okay so she was the one that the men chose and she ended up having a very important season and she kind of changed the franchise and a lot of ways in what ways so her season was one of the first times that the show ever talked about sex there was also I have to say I watched a few clips before for Kaylin joined us live at license beautiful we don't see much but we hear some stuff from behind closed doors I met season yeah absolutely yeah but because she hooks up with this Guy Nick v all so he's he's another important guy but before the end of the show before the fantasy suites the fantasy suites when the final three the final three contests let's get you have an overnight date okay okay that's good steam much they hooked up before which you know it was like very controversial and then he brought it up during their reunion and he said if you weren't in love with me why did you make love to me Oh it was a very very controversial moment because she didn't pick him she picked another guy so he was accused of slut shaming her I can see why right and bringing this thing out into the open but it was a great thing bring it out into the open I think because it made the show more honest and as we know Kaitlyn Bristowe is very honest and very you know forthcoming talking about sex on the Bachelorette led to the conversation with Nikki Glaser you're about to hear definitely here's what's interesting about Caitlyn as well to me after her time on the bachelor and the Bachelorette she's launched a couple of pretty successful businesses there's a scrunchy line called do edit do you know about this if I don't okay just sounds crazy she started this she does limited runs of scrunchy that she designs right they sell for seventeen folks online but on Ebay these are going for literally anywhere from sixty five to one hundred fifty bucks a pop for one scrunchy do these like the ease of scrunchy -solutely it's nuts and then she also just launched her own line of wines called spayed and Sparrow Oh Caitlyn is an entrepreneur yeah putting their own brand together that's good I mean seventeen dollars for a scrunchy seems like a lot on its own it does to me I mean don't you buy those three for a buck or two right I haven't worn scrunchy so many years I don't know Caitlyn's also started her own podcast don't let compete with yours hers is called off the signed with Kaitlyn Bristowe now the other guest on today's show has actually appeared on off the vine and it was so fun to get Kaitlyn Bristowe and Nikki glaser together you're on the talk house podcast Nikki's hosted three hit podcasts to acclaim TV shows she's appeared on late night far too many times to count multi bill specials and toured the World Liam intersecting with your work over TV guide she's also famously appeared on dancing with the stars yes Kaitlyn bristowe famously did not and they talk about that on the show she was on dancing with the stars I think last year and she was the first person eliminated. which is it's honor Asandra for sure that's a rough one well back to doing what she does best her new net flicks special banging just dropped October I I watched it yesterday the day came out you just washed it this morning yeah we both found it to be fucking hilarious really really funny I watched it on the subway here in New York I and I was that guy like the one who was like laughing out loud and trying not to betray now of course with this being Kaitlyn Bristowe and Nikki glaser this is a hilarious talk yes it's very funny very no fucks given filtered Raunchy sexual podcasts home we certainly hear a lot about both of their sex lives again I refer to my bachelor nation expert tell us about Caitlin yes so if you are a bachelor fan you're listening to this podcast and you want to hear about her relationship with Jason you're going to hear a lot you're going to hear a lot about Jason Tar ticks penis if you want to know if you want to know what it's like she'll tell you all about it and she does but she addresses another kind of on this show Liam the creator of the Bachelor yes so the creator of the Bachelors this Guy Mike Fleiss who she blames for not letting her go on dancing with the stars and who recently was arrested for abusing his wife well charges were dropped but he's just a notorious figure just like none of well liked guy he's he'll he's a real he'll and on this show they openly call him a piece of shit which you almost ever hear the former lead of a show call the show's creator so unfiltered raw this conversation definitely is all of those things kate also spill some tea on her complicated relationship with Jj Lane yes who she saw at Ashley and Jared's wedding which we get some Sinus and we hear a lot about Ben Higgins yes Nikki Love Ben Higgins as we all do which season was Ben he was on Caitlyn season okay and then he was the bachelor Gotcha listeners? Cya You bring in an expert Oh my God you don't know this absolutely hilarious talk also takes in the benefits of getting tied up in bed why men should explore they're assholes dating bisexuals and Nikki Changes Caitlyn's life teaching your head a fart silently Sri rotate spread them cheeks give me a big license beautiful welcome Nikki Glaser Kaitlyn Bristowe I'm usually used.

Nikki Glaser Kaitlyn Bristowe Kaitlyn Bristowe Nikki glaser Nikki Caitlyn Tony Shay CEO Zepos Joseph Gordon Congress seventeen dollars
Innovative Solutions for a Happy, Healthy, Connected Workplace

The LEADx Show

09:30 min | 2 years ago

Innovative Solutions for a Happy, Healthy, Connected Workplace

"Lot of people have perceptions about what funding the workplaces some of you may have been traumatized by creepy team building stuff. It's not that it's really really not so. I think you'll be surprised and pleased that there's there's alternatives to that and establish fun as a process. Ask Not an event and that was one of my moments years ago when I was doing this in the workplace. We'll we'll talk a little bit about that. that God wouldn't it be better if you took those euphoric but fleeting feelings that you get from an event once or twice a year and break those up consistently throughout the course of the year wouldn't that yield better revette better results and in fact it did and that's that's how we really got started with this model and then finally teach you how to easy effective affordable programming again. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised tries so let's get into it so the agenda terms you will not recognize that's because we made them up. The first is easy. We're going to talk a little bit about the evolution of fun the work place the why and the Roi So so why is fun your competitive advantage thankfully. There's a lot of people out there today. A lot of brilliant mind Sean Acre Simon Sinek Tony Shay others who have done a lot of the the research and have the experience about the Y. Fund and we're going to talk about that it. It's usually frames frames up a conversation about the health too but know that our expertise really GonNa talk about today is how to successfully implement fund or place place so after we do the the the evolution of wine or why the laws of fun in these are the things that we learned over the course of a more than a decade of delivering of funding workplace in every conceivable vertical market that you could imagine any is companies doesn't matter these laws or universal truth. I WANNA call them our our standard within any application and then the shared experience agreeance and this is where the model really gets different. We talk about what's fun for you. Your culture your environment not inflicted fun on on you as some people may have experienced in the past and then how to develop your creative inventory. This is literally how to put it together and create brief but organic in fun activities in the workplace that really will get you moving on your way to establishing a culture of funded happiness at work and then finally finely design activate and sustain so you know it's all words and talk unless you actually make the commitment to do it and put it on the calendar even make it happen so that's the agenda. Let's let's get started so the first peers the Lucien end of the why are are alive fun at work. I'm going to spend a little bit of time just credentialing if you will so what makes us the experts and you know why is this information meaningful and what I want you to take away in this piece of it is that this is all based on practice and experience right so it's not a theoretical this is based on practice and experience it all started many many years ago at a company. United Electric Supply or there for many years and they had a work hard play hard ethic act before culture was even a term that was used in business but work hard play hard ethic ethic and I just naturally gravitated towards the play hard. I already knew how to work hard so but my my hunters suspicion was that that was was this companies competitive advantage that play and fun. I'm led to all these wonderful results. This company had on high productivity high retention high profitability on paper. They shouldn't have even been in business because there's a lot bigger competitors that could take them out from a pricing standpoint but wonderful customer service great place still is today but we formed the circuit club and many of you may be on on committees at at work trying to fund plan fun activities in the workplace or engagement committees culture committees so we had the circuit club we met every two weeks ten people and we learned a lot through that process but I started to see that it wasn't just appropriate to have fun after work work while we did those events in Annual Holiday Party and summer picnic as many of you made may still do what I noticed over the period of years as they became Louis and less popular as people's demands for the personal time just became more and more evidence. There was less attendance at at those events so I thought Jeez. Let's plan things brief but consistently throughout the course of the year and we did in that model really seemed to work so my fascination continued. You'd I started to research fun workplace and this guy came up so if anybody can guess who that is and you can type it in Dan. I'll give you send you two dollar bill or a book or something. I don't know but that is Dr Paul McGee and he's one of the foremost authorities is on fun and humor laughter and very well published and just really awesome guide. He happened to live in my home town or when house research in it. I thought what the heck this guy's from my neighborhood so we met and you know he he really thought that this theory theory I had about starting a company called the fun department to to change the model of of traditional team building you know was was a good one but he he said be prepared for a long haul. there's a lot of nonbelievers out there and then before. I got started. I thought wow jeeze. Maybe I should get some professional help. Somebody who really cleaners deliver fun so I got this guy so Dave Raymond is the guy who who created the best mascot of all all time he lived as the philly fanatic for many many years and it was a friend of mine and I thought Jeeze if anybody knows how to have fun at stave so God together with Dave and and we created this this company fun department back in five did this team building events for many many years until today and we still do lots of team building events and then wrote a book documented or process. We wanted to teach people this model in process that you're GONNA learn today so we started a training consulting part of the business and then we got out into the product business in two thousand seventeen actually shipping subscription a services as of boxes of fun and then finally in very proud to be partners with delivering happiness twenty eighteen we started a partnership with the age age and if anybody knows that company born out of Tony Shays experience with ZAPPA's starting a company based on culture the happiness and fun and taking a very tradition no boring business online shoes and making it mega successful so one of many examples of companies today that are disruptors in the marketplace that are starting with culture starting with happiness happiness and fun and and building a company from there so much like the experience at United Electric where nothing fancy or glamorous about electric electrical supplies allies but they had this amazing culture that was based on funded happiness at work so that's enough credentialing sorry if it seemed like a commercial just wanted to give you a little history and background and and why you know why it's important to recognize that this again is based on practice and experience so the more data and we're going to again talk about the how to but I I want to cover the why because most conversations about funded happiness happiness at work. Somebody's gotTa be convinced. It's leader you know. CEO CFO somebody's gotta say Jeez. Why do we WANNA do this. What makes it important so this. Is You just one statistic and it's one of my favorites because it says eighty one percent of employees not this is not from leaders. It's not for management. eighty-one birth sign of employees in companies denoted as great in fortunes one hundred best companies to work for say they work in a fun workplace. Environment Arment so that's significant because from an employee standpoint fun has the highest correlation of any other thing that makes up a the culture and what people think denotes a great company so it's important to know that from your employees perspective that fun ranks very vary hi it's sixty to seventy percent correlation to a great company so important to notice if you're GONNA start with culture why not start with you know with fun

Dave Raymond United Electric Supply Sean Acre Simon Sinek Dr Paul Mcgee Louis CEO Tony Shay United Electric Tony Shays Philly Jeeze CFO Zappa Eighty One Percent Seventy Percent Two Dollar Two Weeks
"tony shay" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Mary, Walter. Yes, it's, it's sad when you have to have someone off because their voice, I think events I don't wanna say this on the air but I think she's she's been off doing auctions on the side. I think calling us auctions really takes. Right. Can you imagine Barrett? I'd like I'd pay money, I go to auction for that her voices. It's crazy to make it. I didn't think that it was really I didn't realize how possible was completely lose your voice, but it happened to me. I would say about a year ago, I can't come in and fill in for you did. And it was like it was Christmas time thing, and I remember we had a company Christmas party, and that morning, I'd on the show, and I went to, and I was feeling you know, it's just like a cold sore throat that, that night I was like I'm gonna go to the Christmas party. You know, I remember when the Christmas party, but you being invited. Complain about that. But I get there and, and I run into my boss and everybody else. And I'm trying to talk, and I like this talking at everybody's everybody's allowed environment. They're having a good time like lean in the listen to me, and I was like, oh, this means I can't do radio tomorrow. So that that's Tony Shay gun vault. But if possible. No party just radio. That's right. No party for us, go work. But Mary's recorded voice right now. Very get. Well, Mary, all right. Let me talk about what's going on in Washington as usual. Now, we've got all this pressure on congress and lawmakers nationwide for that matter to be pro abortion. So you've got you've got a gigantic letter. Meaning when I say that it's a letter with one hundred eighty more than one hundred and eighty companies that it was their business leaders endorsed this, it appears a full page.

Mary us Barrett Tony Shay congress Walter Washington
"tony shay" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on Mixergy

"And I'll tell you when when I first interview Tony Shay years ago. He said, even if we don't have shoes are people are sales people on the phone will then go look online for another story that has those shoes. And so I tested it. I said, Tony I'm putting you on mute. I'm calling up customer service. And I did it and anyone can go back and listen to interview women on the phone told me how I could buy shoes somewhere else that they didn't have juvenile sample. Like that something that you do that goes out of your way to take care of your clients that other people wouldn't do. Well, I'll tell you what here's the fundamental difference just at formation. So if you go to some of the other folks that do do formation we. We all of our customer support people are formation experts. So their promotion experts in the industry. So when someone calls up and has questions has, hey, how do you do this? How do you do that? We don't say, hey, go to the website in figure it out yourself. Look at the FAQ's. We know the answer no matter how complicated the question is in. We can we can handle that. So just from a Unimat point of view like in the case of this last review people are fearful, they don't know what they're, you know, they don't know what they don't go. And we help them through that we do it fast, effectively high level communication, if there's any problem just in general, if there's any problem with your formation in will bend over backwards to make it to make it right with you, John. We have five thousand customers, you know, we talked to all try to talk to our customers. You saw the Chad expanse you had I mean, we're almost I don't wanna say this. But it's almost in some case romo's creepy in the way, we really wanna reach out and get get customers, and and engage them because that's what this is all about. It's not about. You'd said when you were talking you said, hey, if you guys have trouble with any of my sponsors. Let me know I wanna know mean this thing this is fundamental to the business. I see a lot of entrepreneurs that somehow want to out think it or think it I mean, you'd really gotta get in touch get on the ground talk to customers figure out what they want all these services that we sell we went out and surveyed our customers, and we said, hey, do you like or service? They said, yes, what else do you want and they came back, and they said, well, we won't banking insurance accounting, tax prep. And that's what we offered them. So it's not like, you know, I cook this up myself. It's a now we're really want to be engaged with the customer. And I think that pays I know it pays off in the long haul. We were very engaged with our customers. Alway I mean, I was a customer at home away. And I'm Custer my own service. I eight my dog too. I'm surprised by the way, that you mentioned how many customers you have one of the big notes that I had was he is not willing to say how many customers he has. And I'm glad that you've you feel comfortable sharing that number with March started March of this year twenty eighteen that's phenomenal revenue. I do have the revenue number, but I promised by wooden say unless you felt comfortable saying. We're over past Moore's in and growing very not gonna say would you say the revenue number now? No, all right. I've got that here in front of me, but it is recurring revenue largely moved most career evidence. So we talked about paid advertising. Being the biggest source you've also done some affiliate programs. Have you done is that working for you? I think Philly's if you from digital marketing point of view, I think Philly it's our. You know, it's one big basket. So you need to do everything. So I think affiliates can can drive some traffic, of course, prior to going into with an affiliate you need to know what you can drive traffic at because that kind of sets the bar, and then anything south of that from a CAC point of view is is money whilst fan. So I think affiliates. You know, can play found do go after Phillies individually, or are you partnering up with a company that gets you Philly..

John Tony Shay Philly romo Phillies Moore
"tony shay" Discussed on Amazing Business Radio with Shep Hyken

Amazing Business Radio with Shep Hyken

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on Amazing Business Radio with Shep Hyken

"We help tell me what you know? What's what you need to know? How can you know, make you'll expense better? You know, his anything else that we can do for you. Can we generally? Careful what customers waltz instead of trying to sell them everything and anything just to make the figures at the end of the months, right? I get that. So I I mean what you just shared to me. That's common sense. And do you know how hard it is to get commonsense to become common? It's like, how do you scale? Commonsense people. I mean, it's simple. You know? It's it's I I saw great t shirt now here in the United States John F Kennedy president who back in the early nineteen sixties. He had a saying ask not what you can s not what your country can do for you. But what you can do for your country. And then I was hanging out a really incredible night. I'm going to name drop, and that's like name dropping celebrities. But in our world, Tony Shay CEO's apples is a celebrity, and I had a great time to I got to hang out with him. And he wore a t shirt and on the T shirt. It says do not ask. What your customer can do for you? But what you can do for your customer, and he was wearing that t shirts. I love it. He was wearing t shirts. That's exactly what we're talking about here. Exactly. Yep. Yeah. So in the book, you have ten business leadership principles that focus on this this whole thing. And I know I we've talked about three main areas folks, here's something that there's a bullet point. I want to ask you about this one of the things we do is. And this is exactly what you've written here sent us developing unforgettable customer experiences. Every time they walk through your doors, by the way, walking to the doors is a metaphor for any way, your customer decides she'll do business with you picking up the phone. You know, whatever it is. So unforgettable customer experiences. Boy, that's a.

Tony Shay CEO t John F Kennedy United States president
"tony shay" Discussed on The Art of Charm

The Art of Charm

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on The Art of Charm

"Flashing lights, and oh, we also have this mobile add machine in our phones, that's constantly fighting for attention. So in all of this noise. How do we stand out as someone that people should pay attention to well, again, I go back to this. And I'll just cover your current thing. First of all, it's one of the the lies in the book. You see I think a lot of business owners see these built like look where we are right now. You know, billboards all over the place right off Sunset Boulevard. Right. And so they see this and they go, oh, I need to brand my business before I convert the customer and that works for big companies. I don't have a problem with that. But ninety nine percent of small businesses, and I'd say a hundred million or less, you know, they have to convert I and brand second Impala. Ticks, so listen, I think it's infinitely harder to convert someone to vote for an unknown or unsavory candidate than it is to get someone to buy toothpaste. Right. So I have to go do everything I can to have the candidate Bill personal relationships, and convert a voter, and once we know that voter is converted then we reinforce with branding. We reinforce with the digital marketing, we reinforce whatever traditional marketing we need to do. But it all goes back to the fact that you have to build a personal relationship, if the customer sees you as a commodity you will be out of business with that customer soon enough. So great example, Tony Shay Zappa. He built a billion dollar company that sold to Amazon on one premise Bill personal relationships the customers, they're call, you know, about their call centers their call center has a nine percent turnover rate the average turnover rate for a call center in this country one hundred and fifty percent, they they don't use anybody overseas. They don't automate they don't. Put rules like you need to be off in two minutes or they don't prioritize who calls because they're a big customer. Everybody is equal and there is and their operators have one mission build a relationship. That's it. Doesn't matter. It starts with valuing their attention in the first place, right? And a lot of business owners a lot of people don't do that. We talk about this a lot on the show active listening business owners aren't doing it. Politicians have their message that they want to get across. They're not listening as well as they could be. And then you see these upstarts come in who just focus solely on listening. And they disrupt the whole thing. That's right. Oh, I can I can tell you that. I honestly get upset of having the think about calling, and it is companies about a product that I have or any issues them having because I know that I'm gonna putting the phone on speaker just sit there, and then there's the, you know, here's all your options at everything's automated, like cut just get a human being. That's I would love to talk to one per. Ersan really quickly because I have one small question. I've always done is that every time that I need to call anybody for anything. The question is not going to be answered in the options. I I need a person you to your point with all these billboards and ads were were paying for people's attention. We're not valuing when we actually get it the human being, and that's what we lack. It's the personal connection. Everybody's on their phone. Everybody's on their tablet. Everybody Zoellick's said, you know, we're going to bring everybody together on Facebook. And that's really not what happened, and so you can use that platform as a positive, but it has to be authentic relationships. It has to be presence people have to feel empathy invulnerability from you as a business owner or partner, or whatever it is. Yeah, we're talking about building trust. Hopefully, and the other thing that people don't understand is. You know, I'm not trying to build trust to be friends with you for five minutes. I'm not trying to build trust at the to get the one. Purchase. I'm not trying to build trust to get the one vote. I want to build a lifelong trust that leads to deeper relationship friendship multiple purchases as a customer,.

Bill Tony Shay Zappa business owner Facebook Ersan Amazon Zoellick partner ninety nine percent billion dollar fifty percent five minutes nine percent two minutes
"tony shay" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Your extra bedroom or a garage and just write some code. You're talking about breaking ground. And right finding spaces is going to be very hard. And one of the ways that I think is. You know, effective when you're doing that is to find a customer find somebody who needs to build some housing. It has an experimental budget. And do it like, Tony Shay was the perfect example. He built that containership or that. Public space that he made in downtown Las Vegas out of containers. But I haven't seen another person do that. Why not is the question? I would ask you. Why haven't we seen these things pop up? If he did that seven eight years ago. Well, what we're finding an extra question will is a lot of it has to do with local governance. And the acceptance of even though the the problem is that we have a housing crisis. But accepting new ways new RND of building it has been complicated. The permitting process, we found that here, and and it landed and also having access to manufacturing space, greatly even depreciate your cost even more. So it's one of those things where you really have to build it and test it and going through the permitting process. Unfortunately, will if you're telling that, you can build these things and half the time for the cost, but the permanent process and much back to your project and costs back to your project where you start at. So for a lot of guy wires, it turns out to be something that is more. In is a is a bigger problem than just doping structure Peress. Those are the things that we've seen. Yeah. You may want to narrow the vision and try to find some excellence in a certain piece of it. I'll just give you an example. Maybe you start a consultancy where you consult with real estate developers and project manage the, you know, purchase procurement building of AD use accessory dwelling units for them. Right. So you basically sell them on ham an expert on this. I'll help you navigate it. And you could just make money as a consultant doing that for a little bit intil. You see, you know. And it keeps you above water. You got some revenue coming in. And you're just the consultant in the world who charges an hourly rate on accessory dwelling units and tiny homes, and you're just an expert on it. You learn all the regulations and had a project management. So that you can stay in the game. Until you figure out where the magic is where the real solution is because I do think that this problem is going to be solved. It has to be solved and. That's why I made that big bat unblock -able so much discussed, but I like the idea of narrowing your vision and maybe doing services based business since you're not clearing market yet with venture capitalists and with investors. Maybe you go to block -able and say, hey, can I sell into you know, a couple of developers in Atlanta. Can I bring your product to a couple of people in maybe get paid to do that? Right. So you can punt it another part of the ecosystem where you can operate and learn while you figure out what is the master plan here. Because who knows where the money actually is it might be in block -able in making it, it might be an developer and managing these and letting block bombing them it might be in making the h vac unit that especially designed for these tiny homes right because I looked at that. And I was like why isn't there like one little thing, you could roll into a small home, and it just gives you your entire stack heating, cooling, whatever. And it turns out there is a company that is considering working on it. So. You start pulling the strings you find all the different opportunities there. But the service based business is a great way to stay afloat and a great way to learn on other people's Nichols. Which sounds like you would do. Excellent. Great question Winona. And I wish you great success. Okay. Cheers. Cheers. Hey, everybody. I want to show you how we market this very podcast on Lincoln. Here we go. This is a beautiful video that my CMO pressure made. And he's on linked in making a campaign and he's targeting people who work at Google, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, Facebook, and he saying let's get people who have a certain age maybe above twenty five years old..

Tony Shay Lincoln developer consultant Las Vegas Nichols Google Facebook Atlanta Twitter Instagram seven eight years twenty five years
"tony shay" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"He's gonna be on our show here. So yes, we're super excited interview guy Kawasaki. No, not Robert. Kiyosaki, stop doing that. Don't do guy. Kawasaki and Robert Kawasaki are different. Bad guy. Kawasaki in Robert kiyosaki are different people. They're not the same person, so yesterday's rhyme. But that's not the that this is not the guy Kawasaki is the marketing specialist. These silicone valley venture capitalist. He's one of the people responsible for marketing, the MacIntosh he was. He worked closely with Steve. Jobs, Steve Wozniak. He worked for apple once when Steve left the company he moved on. And then when Steve came back, he came back one of the few people to work with Steve Jobs over a long period of time, a guy Kella sake, reasonable, quotable wartime. He says, Steve Jobs has a saying that a player's higher apes players be players, higher sif layers and see players, higher deep layers. It doesn't take long to get to z. players this trickle down effect causes bozo explosions in companies. So what happens? A lot of times is that companies will hire b. and c. players. And those people start referring their friends and they started accepting the minimum standards. I mean, Felicia is so good that it was probably. While back, it's happened multiple times throughout her career working with me, but she'll say to me, hey, you know, when we when she worked epoch photography, she'll say, hey, just, you know, at this wedding I went to this week. I was the lead photographer in my assistant photographer because the bride and groom hired two photographers, we were told to be there, let's say five o'clock to get there to take photos for the ceremony, and I got there at four thirty and that person got there at five, ten, ten minutes. After what we told the customer, the customer did not know. They never complained because they weren't there yet either the bride never knew the groom. Never knew the mother of the bride never knew, but I did. And I wanted you to know that the person who is the second photographer showed up late and she'll tell me those kind of things consistently. And because she is a player, she does not want to work around BNC players, but she's again comfortable having an uncomfortable conversation. She is in a player and because she isn't a player, she points out whenever a c. player is present check. And she also when. Never. I. I started working with you Klay. She taught me some photo and video when I was learning those skills, and you could tell just from the way that she does her job and her crafting teaches people and trains people that she isn't a player. And so that's awesome that you don't have to worry about her training people in ways that aren't best practices that make sense. Absolutely. If you're out there right now, you said, what am I looking for from a player? Principle one. You wanna look for somebody who's comfortable having uncomfortable conversations principle to you went to look for a person who looks at every single task that they do as a part of their resume was move onto the next notable Cordoba, okay. We've got Tony Shay with Zappa's. He says, Tony Shay, has it completely rejected me yet? I, I've asked him to be on the thrive time shop reach out to his team multiple times. Most times I get an immediate rejection. I've now moved up to the next level and the next level, so very strong possibility. We may have Tony Shay, the former CEO the current CEO of Zappa. Now Zappa was famously sold to Amazon, but then Jeff Bezos the owner bama's on thought that Xanthos does such a great job he wanted to continue operating as they are. So Tony shea is the CEO of Zappa Steve famous online shoe company. He says what we believe it's really important to come up with core values that you can commit to in by commit. We mean that you're willing to hire and fire based on them. If you're willing to do that, then you're well on your way to building a company culture that is in line with the brand you want to build. And for sake of time, I don't have time on today's show to to go into each and every a portion of the values we have at the thrive time show..

Robert Kawasaki Steve guy Kawasaki Tony Shay Zappa Steve Jobs Steve Wozniak Robert kiyosaki Klay Zappa Steve CEO Tony shea Robert Felicia BNC Xanthos Jeff Bezos apple marketing specialist
"tony shay" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"That's almost ten x return off the traditional model. So the companies that you love, love us. It's companies like PayPal, Salesforce linked in Strada all us us for either memberships or corporate buy outs. We currently have four times as many inquiries as we can fill. We believe that being in one hundred cities is a two point, five billion dollar opportunity, and we're the exact team to to get us. There were basically building parking lots and making them back into paradise. Okay. Well, let's give her a golf club mostly. That's wonderful. Reason, tation, fabulously creative idea. Thank you. My good friend, Tony Shay, it's apples has a trailer park container trailers actually. And I stayed there two or three times when I go to Vegas, you know, I typically get comfortable room or get a highly discounted room because of playing for being a gambler. And I choose to stay with Tony most times as opposed to staying at the aria or the Mandarin, Oriental or whatever. And I stay in an airstream and the reason I do is because I do like this idea of coming out of the stream sitting by the campfire having coffee and collisions that happen. So it's a wonderful idea. It's super creative. I think the way you present it was exceptional. In that everything that a VC would ask or an investor would ask, you cut them off at the pass in very deft fashion with a single slide. And so this is one of the high arts of building a deck is one message purse lied and you had like your logos. Lied. People love us and that's why I was a little bit dicey because wasn't sure exactly how you were framing it like, so be careful there. If like I work for Uber and I bought a thirty nine dollar membership, I'm not sure that counts as Uber being your customer, not. So just be wary of that that people are gonna dig into those logos. Maybe these people have used us for corporate events at our members work at companies like this, be more explicit because when you use the logo as a strategy in your deck and it's valid strategy shore, they quote lighthouse customers. They shine a light that other people follow through the darkness. People are going to dig into it and it's got to be intellectually honest. So I just thought that's sly was little problematic and you're like, people love us. Define it, make it too slides. People who are members come from companies like this people who've rented it include people like this. It'd be more impactful because it's more factual and they build your credibility and I like how you've gotten it down to, hey, here's how much these. Parking lots make per dollar amount, etc. So I guess the two questions that I think downstream investors will have an I would have is one what happens when it rains like, and what's the limitation of this? And do you have a plan for that in terms of heat? And you know, it's cold in San Francisco, a sit outside and then etc. And then number two regulation, is it legal to do this? How do you and this is something I think urban us in the urban x. Accelerator must address is how do you navigate? What did the city of San Francisco? Think of you doing this? Did they come and give you a fine, or do they come and give you high? Five, we're both. Yeah. Great question. So the first question about whether November and December were two of our biggest months and that is because we do provide a certain amount of infrastructure when it's rainy and people still want to spend time outside if they're comfortable when you say infrastructure Jamuna tent. So we do additional like sale shades in worke. Lamps, dot. Okay. Do those sell shades helping the rain or not? They do. They do. So they are. And I guess if this works out, you could put an awning over the entire space and if it was drizzling and be okay, I mean thunderstorm it wouldn't be. Okay. Now, let's get your regulations. San Francisco is notorious for having multiple organizations give multiple opinions..

San Francisco Tony Shay PayPal Strada Vegas worke five billion dollar thirty nine dollar
"tony shay" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"And from there I was like, all right, there's a lot of opportunity online because you can scale almost infinitely in time and space. So you don't have to be tied to any location and it did fine. But I was like, I want to do something different. I helping cook, but I wanna help people actually get closer with culture for me. I'm half Korean, Mexican. I feel more Korean, but I want to get in touch with the other side too. So what By better the way way to to do do it it. then to stickers. Right. So. Went to Japan. I saw that sticker of that really weird looking sticky on stick. It's really weird. I don't know how we're gonna post on. We're not gonna post on our Instagram page, but we'll show them. We'll put it in our story. Yeah, so that's ticker was really interesting. I was like, why people buy this doesn't click to anybody. It's just really strange. I heard about that. I bought it. Maybe you should recreate it. I totally would. Yeah. Said, no. Doing so we're walking Juku. We walked into the store and my mind was like like blown because there's basically been to stores ever that actually went the second chain in my life and how I perceive business businesses in like you just sell something to somebody, you want to help them, help them fill some need, right. That's how you really grow business. So when I won there and they immediately struck quarterly because these people, customer service was amazing, walked in, we don't speak Japanese English. They handed us a little basket and they just showed us how to put a sticker in and somebody was like more relevant to us like the sticker that little relevant animals. Not something super Japanese. Yeah. And so it was absolutely amazing. That's why I feel like go to our pop events. We have a little basket for people, their stickers and shout out to Markelle Hitomi type thing. Geyser three times. It's a cool van for people to go out to anyone's interest in. Yes. So the big aha moment was when we left the store and we were inherited Ukraine, it was like a really popular street where almost all tourists to that has to be real expensive in in order to sustain that, you need to sell a lot of stickers or you're parked has to be really good or your average order values. We just incredibly high. So I thought doing something really good now, how can we try something that relates to us in the US and something that's like I can grow online kinda last business. So it's online. It's scalable and it relates culture? Yes. So I got stickers were actually perfect for this. At the same time. We're on the bus going back to the airport from Korea, listening to another podcast, and they're talking about this guy that was selling stickers to middle school something and he was doing great. I was like, there's something sticker is how come there's nothing in the US that I think of stickers and this company. Yeah, right. You'd think soda Coca Cola, things like that. There are some more are synonymous because you think of thicker and everybody do their own. He's not like I, you guys were the first company that I can think about that you can have us election because everybody that is doing something is coming out with their own stickers. Yeah, that's exactly it. We couldn't find any company so she thought of stickers. He thought of that company, somebody wanted to brand herself immediately. But the other point was it has to be scalable. It has to be like culture driven, but we wanna be like the best in terms of stickers. So another little thing is on the flight to Japan. I read a book, it's called delivering happiness. So it's by Tony Shay, the founders apples. Oh yeah, we're familiar. We are. Gentrify. Right? So the thing. That book was there not a shoe company, a happiness company that just happens to sell shoes. So we thought the same thing, let's be happiness company. We deliver customer happiness happens all stickers that same time. So that was our model and still our model actually to this day, and it's going to be for me. Yeah. And you guys are together? We are together full. How long have you guys been together?.

Tony Shay US Japan Markelle Hitomi Juku Korea Ukraine
"tony shay" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on Mixergy

"I thought everyone. Had one that was my bias from working with large companies out. Most people don't instill don't have not have to say I had no idea how powerful an applicant tracking process was. If system was until I started hiring, you can't keep track of where people are. Who did you interview? Who just answered the questions who needs to go first second, you there's no way to keep track of it and at the heart of it, it's just a Kanban board, right? Just observers columns with the names and contact information of each person on a card yonder each art. Let me take a moment. Talk about my first and then I'm gonna come back and ask you about before you made this change how you got the first set of customers just to jog your memory. I'm looking at it again in early version of her site. Three of the first customers were popcorn palace home scout realty and black men Kalyk. If that jogs your memory, will you do know them. So the first bouncer is a company called hostgator. I thought ADEMA was interesting about you is that you did something that I've seen many entrepreneurs. Do you said, you know, there's something that I do really well. I keep my own internal documentation. This is what helps guide me to do really well and allows me to run a company while I'm gonna sell it and a smaller scale friend of mine, Brian harassed. It's something similar. He has this job scoring process for smaller businesses in the ones that you are working with companies of one to five. People said, we're company of one to five people. We have this process that we've developed for hiring people and more importantly for managing them and for running our group calls. You know what I'm gonna do. I'm gonna take our process a series of of Google docs and all seldom and include with that. Our company weekly meetings and he sold it on a standard website. I was one of the people who I think I bought it or I tried to buy any just said, Andrew here, don't keep your money. I'll give it to you, but it was phenomenally helpful for me when I was trying to figure out how to hire. One, how does he think about hiring? What is his job description look like? What is weekly calls? Like? The reason I'm bringing this up is because everyone who's listening to me has some part of their business. Did they do exceptionally well do it? Well, because it systemized, I urge you if you're doing that to set up a website and sell that sell it as a PDF zealots video celebrates checklist l. it somehow. I think you're gonna have to benefits number one yesterday going to generate some sales. Number two. You're gonna get something that one of the early hires of Tony Shay told me, I said, why did you guys keep bringing people into Zappa's? Is it because you wanna show off? He said, yeah, we do wanna show off and it gives people a sense of pride in what they do. The more they teach the more they learn what they're doing, better internalize it. So if there's something like hiring the you out there doing well, or if there's something like managing, if there's something like placing ads like using Zappia or to organize your company, whatever it is, if you documented and you sell that you're going to instill in your company that this is what you guys are great at which are known for, and if you need. Easy way to set that up and sell it, frankly, setup any website and sell it. I urge you go to hostgator this company that's been around since two thousand two, how many businesses of been around since two thousand two and they keep on going strong, getting bigger and bigger. And if you go to hostgator not only gonna have a company that's gonna stay around, but also one that will offer you a good low price and will scale with you as you get bigger, you're going to be able to call them up. I want the better package at Andrews advertisement only give you the cheaper option as a way.

Andrew Brian Zappa Kalyk Tony Shay
"tony shay" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on Mixergy

"Dot com slash mixer surgery. Really. You guys are gonna love him. All right. You know what? Let me take a second here before we get into. I want to talk about this one transformative moment in your in your life that led you to go on this path. Someone saw you two thousand three. You had five employees five years into your business, you're doing well, he flies in and he says, what? What did he fly in? And what did he say to that? I think helped change the way that you're looking at your business. Well, at that time company Slough in and offer on jets. Jet, like a private jet, they flew into. And I knowing on private jets at that time. So that was pretty cool in communists us and wanted to buy real truck for a million dollars and I adapt time. I just thought. We're not done. We there we need, there's more for us to do, and I didn't think that I, yeah, I just wasn't interested in offer. I was flattered by it, but. It's it wasn't that no others more for us to do. I feel like that kind of kicked your ass to you. Also realize you need to get aggressive. You told our producer at that point I needed to be more aggressive or die. Why did you feel like you had to be more aggressive in order to survive while I've, you know that time there's probably two or three hundred companies selling pickup trucks. Excess result liner either go deep or the other. You cannot be stagnant and it's going to be, you know, five or ten years from now, it's going to be two or three or four players that dominate and it. So we either need to grow or go in. So it was kinda at that time all in and let's get sing rock. And let's do it better than we ever ever have. I. So then you told a producer too. I bet everything on company culture. Why Ben? I'm company culture. Why not bet everything on great marketing, why not bet everything on. I I don't don't know. know why company culture of all things. I think some of it was probably a legacy thing. I didn't want my legacy to be redone, lock internet company, got rich. I wanted to kind of have more impact be useful. The people and my buddy Jeff also was the president real gave me told me about Zappa sent that. How will here's this guy cells, Tony Shay billion dollars for the shoes is not the cheapest. Never really on work culture. Of course, then you get the disconnect is an Ivy leaguers got a bunch of money to start with, you know, solar company for two hundred forty million Bob where like, okay, and then I had this blank, you know, with inspiration, people think like sometimes people make meet me in their disappointed because I think they're expecting this someone more dynamic, a hundred percent of the time. But inspiration is a limit. It'd bandwith thing you've got to act on it when you got it. In hindsight, that's what I would say when you get inspired go at it because it's not gonna you're not gonna stay inspired your whole life. You might not even say inspired longer than wait. So if you inspired capital but rock and roll, Tony Shay at the time was not yet. We're talking about two thousand three, two thousand four, two thousand five. He did not become famous for culture until two thousand eight or so. And so here you are even later. Will you weren't guided by him. You were guided by an understanding that your company needed this somehow. Well, yes, we were trying to like, hey, can we run the company by principles? We didn't know how and because we're following ecommerce companies that were doing well, that's how became for Miller's apples away. So this was before even Zappa's made it big with this whole culture. You said I want a guide the company by something. It should be a set of principles. Then I could take an hand over to the next generation runs my company. This is how we're gonna live. It was like programming accompany for you? My right. Well, yeah, a little bit like that and just learn. Yeah, I was reading articles on apples in that kind of thing. Flew down there and found out. They had tours. We are just going to school or end by you're just going to stay away. Just seeing how they're running their business..

president Tony Shay producer Zappa Ben Bob Jeff Miller billion dollars hundred percent million dollars five years ten years
"tony shay" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"I realized that it was like by worked hard at something that i liked offered something that was positive to the world my wife always says you find your purpose at the intersection of what it is you love to do what you're good at and something that you're offering to the world is posited and in that little break dancing moment it was something that i loved to do i was decent add it and people reacting positively and i got awarded work it felt amazing and at the marquis jet experience yeah me i got this amazing you know changed my life but the passion like i never really love selling time on airplanes i stand i didn't feel like i was put on earth to sell time on private jets to people that can afford it and i just never loved it and even though the end result was way different like i was evince swing need this windfall all the way in the other direction love it yo it's just like a quick thing is just really reminds me of the story that tony shay talks about in his book delivering happiness whenever his soul his first company to microsoft yeah it was like eating this burger with my roommate business partner and we sold it for head remember like it was two hundred million whatever it was a lot of money like okay let's do something fun now who's coming like the or you're saying it's not about the money i guess it was just the thrill anymore i recently took my son is eight to climb mount washington which is freezing we camped outside in the winter in the snow and it was minus five degrees in crazy sleeping bags to keep us warm blah blah blah and i went with my friend cabinet is police officer in suffolk county new york and his daughter the four of us went and when we get to the top of the mountain in the way we were camping out i mean it is so cold i can't even explain it so we're all on our sleeping bags bumbled up you know and kevin is a blue collar guy he's a police officer he's been doing this forever isn't come across a guy that's focused on money or accumulating money but he's one of the happiest guys ever.

partner mount washington officer suffolk county new york tony shay microsoft kevin five degrees
"tony shay" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"You're listening to t i p so one of the things that stick and i have noticed about billionaire founders and operators is that they typically put a lot of emphasis on their corporate culture we could use tony shay surgey brin larry page or even warren buffett is examples of this and since this is so important we've gone out and found the leading expert daniel coyle to talk about some of the groundbreaking research he's done on this topic dan is a new york times bestselling author and we're going to be talking about his new book called the culture code not only is dan a great storyteller bit some of his insights about culture a really unique and while he was writing this book he had the awesome opportunity to interview people like billionaire tony shay he's interviewed picks ours ed cap mole and so many more that he incorporated into the book and so i think you're really going to enjoy some of these firsthand accounts in these incredible stories from such thought leaders so without further delay here's our interview with the thoughtful daniel coyle you're listening to the investors podcast while we study the financial markets and read the books that influenced self made billionaires the most we keep you informed and prepared for the unexpected let's take a quick break and hear from today sponsor one of the most difficult things to overcome when investing is to have control over your emotions that's why stig and i recommend a service called trade stops trade stops provides a service that calculates a stocks unique volatility and provides buy and sell recommendations based on the stocks momentum trade stops uses the ticks to calculate the most opportune times the buy and sell while reducing your exposure to the overall risk so here's the best part since your listener of the investors podcast you can get twenty percent off the service when you visit trade stops dot com forward slash t i p that's trade stops dot com forward slash t ip there's even a thirty day money back guarantee if you're not satisfied with the results so what do you have the lose go to trade stops dot com ford slash t ip today all right back to the show all right so like we said in the introduction we're really excited.

warren buffett daniel coyle york times tony shay twenty percent thirty day
"tony shay" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on Acquired

"All right so chapter one sean parker starts napster and that gets brutally murdered by the music industry chapter to facebook in its own success becomes the dominant thing and there's there's no reason to focus on wire hog there with their chapter three so for chapter three we come back to sweden now and to daniel eric the co spotify so daniel as we said he started his first company in nineteen ninetysix at the age of thirteen he was in school it was a website a web developer for clients sorta like tony shay and does apple's guys when they moved out to california yeah man that was that was the thing to do in in high school that was you could make way more money than anybody else because is highly valued skill it was the work didn't have to be good like there was no good i mean there's no like modern frameworks for doing any web development then so you just throw something together and adults are amazed that their businesses on the internet there's no squarespace at this point in time now so after a couple of years daniels making like fifty thousand dollars a month and has twenty five employees he's still early teenager he ends up he does go to college briefly he goes to the royal institute of technology which is the top engineering school in sweden but he drops out he wants to focus on on startups he joins one startup called tra at ends up getting acquired by ebay then he becomes the.

sean parker web developer tony shay apple daniels sweden ebay facebook daniel eric spotify california royal institute of technology fifty thousand dollars
"tony shay" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Hastings they got the product right but he also seemed to be obsessed with the product that is netflix yeah yeah who do you look at these while that person's obsessed with the product that is their company a good example of that where you go while this person really works on the features inside the company tony shay zappa's comes to mind to he was a real culture of cessna person i think you know the one of the most exceptional kind of like see as jeff weena from then and i you know i don't know the kind of inner workings but my my sense is that that kind of redes oversea legendary products fresh juice and the genius behind linked in in recreated the product but jeff created company is right and it's like and the the work that jeff did behind the scenes to convert that into what it is is is is kind of remarkable now you know in in kind of the you know some of my angel investments that have made so there's former truly employers like sammy cofounded truth me he's boarding amazing culture within vertu health which is you know diabetes really does that one of yours as one of my angel investors and how's he diabetes join him software or with hardware primarily software but it's a just the clinical trials around that and thought and training and nutrition is such a hard space i just had a company called open listings on which is trying to do like red fin approached real estate.

Hastings tony shay zappa jeff weena jeff diabetes netflix sammy
"tony shay" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"tony shay" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"Is not necessarily what people are therefore it's expensive to go you travel to go so i think the best conferences have speakers they get you fired up with some where to go like i think about my style as a speaker i do think i'm a motivating speaker but i'm not a motivational speaker motivating you to execute business tactics i'm not motivating you to be happy i'm not motivating you to work harder but i am motivating in my delivery of business advice so the the speakers are critical and what i love about the speakers nerve van is that their customers you know it's the people in the field doing the job well one of the coolest things about our event is that most of the speakers never speak these are not people that are out on circuit these are not people like me and jimmy that are going to conferences a couple of times a month getting paid to speak there are actually getting paid to practice what they're going to speak about their the boots on the ground so we can talk theory but they're executing that's why people liked jimmy and i because you our speakers were also workers on top of the speakers it's the keynotes you know i've seen some amazing keno speakers people like diana naiad who swam from cuba to florida in her sixties unlike her 20th attempt i got a chance to see the the sea of zap owes tony shay given amazing talk i actually got a chance to see the gentleman that was stuck on the side of a mountain for a hundred and 27 hours who had actually cut his own hand off to free himself i saw him give one of the most amazing speeches of my life.

cuba tony shay jimmy diana naiad florida 27 hours