21 Burst results for "Tony Morrison"

"tony morrison" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

05:31 min | 5 months ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"We speak, we write, we do language, that is how civilizations heal, which is such a beautiful and powerful quote. I love to hear what about their quote resonated with you enough for it to be the start of your book. Yeah. I think in the moments when I allowed myself to sit in the fear of what it would mean to put this very intimate collection of stories out into the world, Tony Morrison's quote and her body of work in general was a reminder of why it was necessary or is necessary. Because there were moments writing this book where I'm like, oh no, if I should put this out or I'm giving so much of myself in this book in order to talk about what joy looks like and how it lives alongside all of these other big emotions and feelings we have. And I think I had to keep coming back to that quote. We do language as artists as writers. It is our responsibility. Our task, if you will, to chronicle document, what is going on in our world and also to use the art as a way to help people heal as we're navigating whatever it is going on. Today, it's a pandemic and racial unrest yesterday. It was another thing, or it was all those things. And so I think that was why it was important for me to open the book with that because I want everyone to be reminded of that also that this is what we do. We do language. We tell the stories, even the ones that are very hard to tell. So you have been, I feel like a lean mean writing machine for the past. Year plus, right? Even though you've been doing it much longer, I wonder how this collection of essays is different than the other work that you produce this year. It's very different in that I think with this because I was telling so many stories from my own life. I felt a kind of liberation on the page that I have not felt before. I gave myself permission to just tell it. You know, and to be as vulnerable as I possibly could, not in an effort to spill the tea, all right, or to get back at maybe people in my life. But mostly to get it out of me, right? And also to help other people realize that they are not alone in the journey and that joy is still possible..

Tony Morrison
"tony morrison" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

06:59 min | 10 months ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

"Happy, not because you wanted to take care of them. Or because you cared about them. And how that impacted me, how that's impacting me. And how that's impacting me is that it's constant neglect. I don't agree with you because. I was taught from when I was little by you to stand up for what I believe in. And the same thing you taught me, you're beating me for. Wow. I'm really hurting. I'm really hurting. And I feel disappointed. And I'm learning from you how to hurt people. And I'm learning from you how to hurt people. Let's say everything that's coming up. I'm learning from you how to hurt people, so when I grow up, then I can hurt the ones I love. Boy, that's raw, hard to watch. How did that feel for you, Louis going back to that pain? Felt terrible. You don't want to go back there, you're afraid to go back there. But when you went back there and could see where all of this is coming from. Was that a breakthrough moment for you? Yeah, was it something I've known, but it was a breakthrough moment because I feel like I was in a place with her where she could understand me and a new kind of way. What did you learn about yourself? I learned that to really change the way I want to be to be a good father. I have to deal with that. You seeing your husband that way, that vulnerable and I know you have felt at other times that he used the past as an excuse, but what was that like for you? Oh, it was horrible. You don't want to see somebody that you love. I'm feeling like that feeling like that. I know a lot of people are like, why do I need to go back there? That was back then. What does that have to do with now? Well, recreating it is necessary in order to move beyond explaining it. But when you re experience it rather than just talk about it or talk about it, then you release the pain. And if you release it. That's what I said. And you're saying that connecting back to that pain allows you to not to heal it, but at least open up a space. So that you can see yourself more clearly. So mom and dad would what do you need from us? That would heal all that for you. What do you need from us? Show me how to love, and how not to hurt people. Show me how you're supposed to treat someone that you love. All I know is how to hurt and how to fight back in some way and how to run my mouth. And how to be abusive and you're my parents and you responsible for it. As much as I am. Seeing what you've learned from us as parents, what new decisions do you want to make when you grow up than what we've taught you? What would you change? Yeah. When I grow up I'm going to be good to my family and love them and no matter what they ever do, I'm not going to tell them I don't want them until your dad, how are you going to treat your wife? I'm going to treat my wife with respect. And I'm going to listen to what she has to say and I'm going to drag her all around. I'm going to give up all that I had learned from you, mom and dad. And I'm going to give up all that I've learned from you, mom and dad. No matter what. No matter what. So what are you saying is when you grow up instead of being like us, you're going to be as strong, productive, man, in this world who treats his family. Like their wanted and loved and you're gonna say goodbye to your loyalty to us. What do you need for me to help you? Thought that. I just need your love. I need I need I need your love and support. I definitely need to know a little more of it by you. That's the big childhood wound. So how are you feeling right now? I'm feeling terrible. But I think that, you know, this is how you get to where I want to be. Shannon, do you believe Louis can change? Yeah. Yeah, you do. Yeah. You said this is a big womb. What was the big wound? Louis was basically sort of erased in childhood when he was not visible. You know, you used the word early about disrespect. Yeah. Just no respect. It was aggressive abuse that made him experience so much pain, and then he had to cover it over. I think another word is that somehow you disappeared in your childhood as a person as a result of the intensity. Yeah, and by disrespect that, I mean, your age of respect, but that you never felt validated. Validated. As a person. Seen as a person. Yeah. Another thing is experienced as a person. Experiences. It's when a child experiences their parent experiencing them as a positive, beautiful being. That does something to the child. Yeah. That's very different from just saying, hey, you're a great kid. Yeah, you know what? It's what Tony Morrison said on the show on. What your kids always looking for is do your eyes light up? Absolutely. And they enter the room. Yes. Do you see me? Do you really see me? Am I visible? Am I visible? Now, what's interesting is I've heard you say that verbal abuse can be more damaging than physical abuse. Verbal abuse is more prevalent. Yep. A verbal abuse also characterizes you as a person, whereas in physical beauty, you fundamentally get hurt. Yeah. Verbal abuse, your soul is attacked, your personality is attacked, something about your value. Is assaulted. All negativity is abusive. Yeah. And the scars from that have deeper memories than the physical scars. Yeah. Well, in this part of their intense marriage therapy session, harvel forces Louis and Shannon to face their pain head on. Take a look. When we were on the show, we talked about facing the past.

Louis Tony Morrison Shannon harvel
"tony morrison" Discussed on MIP Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

MIP Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

05:55 min | 11 months ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on MIP Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

"So would you argue that this book foot because was what made it so popular. You would argue. That's the only reason it was popular. And therefore it maybe it should not be as valued or as classical as as people would argue for it to be. Well have to be a little careful. Only because playing is a pretty good. You know twain is a pretty good writer aside from that he is a pretty good writer and he does he. He can turn a phrase and so forth but at the same time malcolm it is that essentially because of the inherent negatively that is associated with the word nigger the book in it of its the book also not only embolden but almost justified white america's use of the terminology even though the american usage was a reflection of what was going on every single day. And i think twain picked up on that and tapped into into the culture. Even though of huckleberry finn is in fact about more than that as well i mean it is about. Is you know. It's a critique of religion it's a secretary of classism and it's a critique of of white people as well but i might monument is that twain because he could he could be in both worlds. I think he took advantage of that and capitalize on it. You mentioned tony morrison and again folks. The governor the gubernatorial candidate would ban toni. Morrison's books and you know there. Is this conversation going on on fox news about the discomfort white folks white students would feel having to leigh tony morrison and talk about critical race theory and talk about race. That would make them feel harming uncomfortable. Which tony morrison said about huckleberry finn. And i'm going to paraphrase is that she sought to quote release huckleberry finn from the clutch of submittal nostrums about lighting out for the territory and instead revive its contest. Dettori combative critique of ante. Bellum america the hell it puts the reader through is exactly toni. Morrison's point the novel produces and reproduces palpable alarm. And and that that would be a good thing she even wrote it..

twain tony morrison huckleberry finn malcolm leigh tony morrison america toni Morrison fox news Dettori
"tony morrison" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

MTR Podcasts

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

"I am with food saying all right so we had the last question. If you ready for the last question this is this is kind of suggestion oriented and maybe brandon question again. But what is a little known book that you would like to see like make it may extra points if you can go local. I don't know if you guys were aware of point based system this podcast based on just one second year year a sudden death overtime or have you. Yeah yeah right exactly. No well i would say i so largely at the thing is like little known is what's tripped me up because the thing is everybody knows james baldwin and tony morrison but not everybody has read their stuff like everybody knows them by name. You know so. I weigh like Like toni morrison's possibly my favorite novelist. James baldwin's possibly my favorite fiction writer. And i feel like it's because they both have content that crosses into beaufort those lanes so again are they little known authors know. How often am i discussing. Either their work with someone not that often not often enough. And i feel like that's something important to me That being said you know how shoutout seles doke. Sue has a small collection of poetry with us who's always just good warm energy so i'm selling her book right now but i'm i'm selling like her. Her energy to her vibe or vibe is really. i love her yeah you know. Yeah like go go. Pick up a black classic writer. You know somebody that you've heard of but you probably haven't read that's Go tell it on the mountain for james baldwin and they're not say home for tony morrison specifically There you go for that. Yeah there you go got a veracious reader. Giving you suggestions that suggestion listeners. Take advantage so that's pretty much the end of the questions so i like to Offer the opportunity for both of you to shamelessly shamelessly..

tony morrison james baldwin doke brandon Sue
"tony morrison" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"That wasn't coded as positive. And i carry that in me all the time even as like it wasn't until i was an adult and started. You know you have that moment. I think sometimes where you repeat something that appearance said to you or did to you that has maybe become a family joke or lichen inside joke between links links and everybody looks at you like that. That's not funny. That's not very kind. You know or you. Repeat something on the worst. You repeat it to like your therapist because you're like well you know such and such and such a thing and the therapist gives you liked the eyebrows and is like. I'm sorry that here like what i like is that and it's because every time you hurt. Every time you got upset it was it was so downgraded it was. You were made to feel so silly for experiencing that emotion that you learn to turn it into something silly and you've never considered how it has seriously impacted you and it has seriously impacted a. It's it's great. It's not great all you having your head is rolling tape of like well. Yeah my mom. Did this. But i have a list of fifty other things that she didn't so i think this one doesn't count. Have you talked to your parents either of them about this book. I'm just really really curious. As the whether they read it and how they receded. they haven't read it yet My dad is going to see my dad next week. And he wants me to like hand it to him and like sign hit in front of him and stuff so So he won't read it until then though i think he has listened to a lot of my interviews lake. Read the articles and things like that My mom probably won't read it. I don't know like she might read it. She might not. I don't feel very attached to whether she reads it or not. I didn't write it for her. I love her. And i wanted to be fair to her but i did not write the book for her. Who did you write it for. I wrote it for me. This is the book. I was looking for the first and last time i visited my local library you like. This is the book that i really wanted and needed like i. I read that quote years and years and years ago. That random quote. That i think is and i can't confirm but it has been attributed to tony morrison a few times that i've seen where she essentially say you know. Write the book you needed or write the story you needed or something when you were younger and at first i thought that was like some new high and like did make a lotta sense but eventually i realized that that's what i was already doing. I was trying to write the book that i needed when i felt most alone in most. Lost yeah. I wanted to write something that was specific but that had the potential to connect to a wide berth of people Under the common experience of childhood childhood is hard. And i also want people to know you know we remember things i think that's also part of it. I remembered these are my memories. This is my story. And i didn't get to tell the truth without fear for a really long time but now i have me to protect me and the person the young young person inside me who felt like she couldn't tell the truth about who she was. has a really strong ally with.

tony morrison
"tony morrison" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"They say things come in three some expecting the next terrible disease to afflict our country. It's gotta be leprosy on rocks today. We hear from eleven a reporter and golfer who writes about the intersection of race golf and we check in with the golf team for howard university. A historically black institution. The school recently restarted. A men's and women's squad thanks to a donation by steph curry. That'll fund it for six years and a few weeks ago. It got a new pile of money at a fundraiser. In california can the howard university bison helped bring a moment of racial reckoning to gall so before we begin we gotta set up howard university legendary school in washington. Dc founded in eighteen sixty seven part of the so-called black ivy league of historically black colleges and universities or hpc us for short famous alumni. A bunch vice president connell harris. Us supreme court justice thurgood marshall authors. Tony morrison zora neale hurston and our own heff. La times managing editor of new projects..

howard university steph curry golf black ivy league of historical connell harris california washington Tony morrison Us supreme court neale hurston thurgood marshall La times
"tony morrison" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"Unfortunately you and i share something in common in that were survivors of abuse. And i was so ashamed of that. And i never wanted anybody to know and i figured that if i ever told a guy that i had been a victim of violence that he would run for the hills right once i decided. I need to get this out. I found out that the the right people that aren't for my friends and relationships romantic relationships. You get the people in your life. Who actually are supposed to be there. And who accept you for you. Are you change breath absolutely and if you been traumatized by something like that that is part of the culture that entraps you and in very much dot culture says you will put up with a new will stay silent and it's one of the strongest socialized behaviors because it is so layered with shame in so layered punishment. If you come out tell when. I wrote a book about my own experience Since the perpetrator in my case was my father and he was very prominent in the mormon church. I got all kinds of backlash like a death. Threats like people killed all the yard the plants in my yard. I got threats against my children. I was They were trying to arrest me on. How many put in prison. i mean it just. It was pretty gnarly and It was still worth it. Not because not just because i wanted to tell my story but because new i believed as a sociologist i believed that the religious culture. My childhood was a hotbed. So the abuse of women and girls. And i felt like okay. My truth needs to be out there to balance their story so that people who may be caught in the middle have a choice right. Because i didn't know anyone who would speak out. When i was a kid so i took that chance and i i stopped counting. Thank you letters at two thousand out. People who said i was in the same situation and and now i can talk about it so when we just end up and speak our truth we not only free ourselves but as tony morrison says the function of freedom to free someone else. Yeah what do you think..

mormon church tony morrison
"tony morrison" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Ancestors their daughter throughout that group. So you really want to work on his folks. There are so many things i can also talk about. We have used up by hour and a half but and the enormous appreciation Fit with a quote. That i wanna read but also just so pleased that you know Florida state put a dining hall in a in a football stadium. You would walk by and see. Those people are the way i played high school. So i'm not sure. I have the same quality of layers but Or coaches are coaches. Actually give of our job because it seems like you call a lot of audibles have that. And that's why. I was a quarterback in. Actually they hated the fact that i didn't do what the but i saw something better in front of me. That's where the magic happens. Tommy with magic happens. That's clearly where your magic happens and you clearly are someone who i think you were off other people's lives but i think so. Many people work off your vibes and there must be a safety that you illuminate anna daring this because you seem so open to the process a process. That is so grueling. Most difficult to be opened with that so Everything all the entropy is there to try to stop you from being someone. Who's just roy. Have an idea and you just do that idea. So i'm happy that you call audibles and that they gave it to the third string running back. I am going to read this. Tony morrison quote I think i've heard you say it from her incredible speech for any of you who have never read the nobel prize speech. You should read her speech. But she said Language can never pin down slavery. Nor should it yearn for the arrogance to do so it's forces it's felicity is in. Its reach toward the inevitable. She then later in that same speech said we die. that may be the meaning of life. But we do language a language that might be the measure of our lives. And i wanna thank you very for using your language of cinema to reach for that that is inevitable And we are very fortunate to have you as a filmmaker on the horizon. Right now and. I can't wait to see what you do next. I know it's lion king. After that. So and i understand why lion king it's a fascinating thing that you're doing this and i can't wait and Thank you very very much. Thank you appreciate you. Thank you for everything. You did You wanna talk about that appreciate you talking you bet. Thank you very and thank you to everybody. Who was there.

Tony morrison Tommy football Florida anna roy
Sadie Hoagland Discusses Her New Book, "Strange Children"

Read Between the Lines

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Sadie Hoagland Discusses Her New Book, "Strange Children"

"There. How are you today. I'm excited to be here. Thank you so much for having me. I'll thank you for coming autumn so excited to talk with you. So can you tell me about your writing. Sure so i think of my rating as a bit dark a bit funny at times. I think i'm very interested in voice. So i tend to use a lot of first person though i've definitely expanded in the last couple of years to use more third person i am very interested in language in sentence level writings. So that's actually for me. One of the primary reasons i write and story is sort of secondary. So i'm interested in story and structure and all that but i love just like reading a good sentence in that so that i think translates into my rating. I really like spending some time. Crafting sentences that that maybe kind of mixed up poetry and prose. Yeah very much. So and i just finished reading her book strange shoulder and it was just so incredible. I act- i was mentioning it to her before the interview to and i can totally see the influences from like putting some poetry throughout it. So what not the idea to put poetry in the book in that way. I think i really am drawn to poetic writers like cormac mccarthy who has an epigraph in the book from him on tony morrison falconer hugest tend to have turns of phrases or ways of describing things that are just so original so i think that's. That's a huge kind of drivers. I like reading that kind of book about the kind of language based but also on their time in the book win. I just not very often. But i do kinda break. The lion at one point in usually. It's when i'm trying to describe something pretty dramatic Felt like i needed the page needed space in between sort of the steps of what was happening so You know when characters being victimized when she gets up to leave and so that kinda breaks the

Tony Morrison Falconer Cormac Mccarthy
interview With Caleb Azumah Nelson

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

06:06 min | 1 year ago

interview With Caleb Azumah Nelson

"Kayla. Thanks so much for joining me. I know that you have huge demands on your time because your book has just exploded. Hasn't it yeah. I've been kind of astounded by iolanthe disapora in jeopardy seeing everywhere. I think it's you know. I was a little bit worried about coming out in the lockdown and it just i haven't had to have that worry at the moment it just feels like the supposed be really overwhelming and really. I'm really grateful now. I introduced you as a photographer and writer d. You now think that that's switched. Are you a writer. Perhaps with the bisa photography feel like. I've always been a writer. I and i think photography is has been another medium in which i can communicate and express like i've been writing since i can remember likelihood you're like four or five years old scribbler. Like really terrible. Shoot stories have l-. I think the the medium of photography really allows a visual element to come into my work and very much comes through in this book open water. There's a lot about you feel the sort of the poetry the visual the creativity. I mean those are major themes aren't they about about creativity. I think the the the starting point or for any saw them. Artistic expression is feeling and emotion. And then it's working is working from that once have the feeding emotion. I'm trying to express define the best medium for in this case. It was writing but the but the writing contained these elements. Are these references to music can to to visual artists than film which took the narrative elsewhere afforded a different dimension. I i. I would have been possible if i just like kind of ryan straight pros and of course if the two characters one is a dancer. One is a photographer like you. That will so you to kind of explore all of those teams much more than living it. Yeah there's i guess there's a I guess everyone has their that. Point is expression even if is like a professional level epic. Everyone is has something that they do to express themselves in. It was important for me to to have the these law autistic expressions index the title itself. Open water for me. It feels like you're talking about freedom there but you will set talking about the dangers that can lurk in a water. Yeah it some there. Was this idea of justice. Like real ruled in almost infinite freedom. You know when you you'll standing on a beach yukon see where who had the see and like the that kind of idea but not knowing what does look like what. Dangers are present in our in our every day. I think it was important for me to have these Protagonists to have. Like the kind of fullness wholeness like range in which they good light just be in. Just have this freedom by. I wanted to comment on what happens when you find that. Freedom interrupted without giving any of the plus away at this point. Yeah a lot of this is told through dialogue. Which i know is fiendishly difficult to achieve and then at one point you sort of depart from the traditional writing style the whole kind of you say she says tell me about that. Change of structure the About giving too much away the bat point in the story. The narrative has been a bill and bill bill and then reached this kind of the apex this peak in which the image i had to switch the structure slightly so that it was hughley the protagonist kind of like spilling in a way like it was. It's like feeling a competent. And the woods at that point had just spilled over and that's what began to emerge and not not lots of the narrative using the this second person who almost away fruit was really important for me to create this kind of very intimate as very intimate narrative in which the reader can beat by the burford. An audience member nossa the protagonists themselves at an. Did you write it like that from the start or were you fiddling about with with that structure. That was really attention from the beginning. I think i'm always wondering a novel could be like. I'm always astounded by different nobles. Come across the us. Full more structured as a narrative device that this would only serve to push an artist the book has described as absolutely nailing the black experience the london black experience when you were growing up with their books for you that spoke to that or are we only now. Seeing the emergence of of works that will speak to the next generation. Yeah i think when i was when i was growing up his voracious reader like i would just read anything i can get my hands on but there were specific which was speaking to that black british experience. Like our say. The mallory blackman might really An kind of like primary and early teen years and then later on as eighty smith but it was a real struggle to to kind of find tips. The the like i instantly recognized i could. I could understand kind of relate to to various fictional works especially from the over. The pond said like james baldwin and tony morrison writes slide. Those are really integral to save my reading and writing growing up the yet only the kind of feels like now. There's a slight pushing the direction in which the narratives that haven't been beginning to be by fitness way to

Iolanthe Disapora Kayla Hughley Bill Bill Ryan Mallory Blackman London Tony Morrison United States James Baldwin Smith
"tony morrison" Discussed on My Two Cents with Towanda Harris

My Two Cents with Towanda Harris

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on My Two Cents with Towanda Harris

"So amazing. And i know we are going to end that with rapid fire questions. These are just some fun questions that will give listeners. More insight on who you are. They don't require a whole lot of explanation. But you can just tell me the first thing that comes to your mind ready ready okay. What is your favorite snack. A popcorn his regular popcorn. Buttercup hor flavor popcorn happily. Is this himalayan pink salt popcorn s my favorite. I'm a salty snack girl so popcorn chips. Those are my go-to all the that sounds really really good. Okay so what was. What is your favorite topic to teach about Writing this general enough to say whatever topic just writing. Great writing okay. I'll give you that you. Hey what's teacher left. The most memorable impression on you know any teaches to hear this. I'm in touch with a lot of. it Okay out of my teachers. When i was younger but unlimit say oh probably my fourth grade teacher. Her name was sister on a private school so we called our teachers sister and she was my favorite with that was. You don't have to like to name some more. You can heavily my first grade teacher. Also because when i was sick i remember she let me put my head on her desk until my mom to pick me up like really small things like that are where i remember. My teachers by sixth grade teacher used to tell us stories about when she was a little girl in love them also. She changed my reading life forever because she gave me on a tony morrison book in sixth grade. Wow it's funny as you're talking. I'm going back to the first question. I asked you about students feeling safe. Happy in love in your classroom. I mean i think it just goes back to your experience that you had when you were in the classroom that that's pretty powerful all right. So what tips. Would you give to a first year teacher or a teacher that is trying to create this space. Or we've been sustainability and environmental justice. Anything that we talked about within their classroom i would tell a first year teacher To be their cell. I know for.

tony morrison
"tony morrison" Discussed on NIGHTLIGHT: A Horror Fiction Podcast

NIGHTLIGHT: A Horror Fiction Podcast

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on NIGHTLIGHT: A Horror Fiction Podcast

"Okay. I already told them I. Sound. Would soul. I realized I was writing white here actors and it wasn't I made I met writers who do it intentionally and they say well for marketing purposes but it was not even that for me it was like I literally erased myself right? Don't even think to write anybody else. I you know when I started my first novel, the between which was horror. It's alternate realities that kind of thing. I didn't have any role models. I hadn't even read an activity about novel at the time I was I don't even know what made me think I could do it but I love Stephen King and I loved to Tony Morrison, and then I read Gloria Naylor's mom day which had some metaphysical aspects like, oh Okay I try to be that. 'cause 'cause Gordon Naylor is very respected writer, but she's also reading about metaphysical. And I also interviewed Anne Rice when I was reported for the Miami Herald I was still struggling with this because people integrated her reading about Vampires and she interview she said, look my books are taught in universities. And it was almost as if the floodgates open. So I went from literally writing short stories and even a almost nominally managed about white people to overnight starting the between, which was not just embracing myself and my blackness but was embracing myself as John Writer who is not going to be writing stories and not to denigrate anybody who does contemporary realism about characters having Tiffany's and realizations and small moments it was gonna be about big big big stuff life death immortality survival. That's the one component that I think is the threads through all horror for EMF. It really appeals to me is survival behaviors and characters. Sometimes, we'll fail in those are the bad examples that trip and fall care don't let that be. Right. Okay now. For that trip and fall care. I'm looking for that care for WHO's GONNA pick up a weapon WHO'S GONNA learn how to fight L. Their Demons Bat. Let me figure out how to kick your ass. Here. Trip of all run. A run down to the basement like where I'm going to be blocked in Elo is anybody there. that. You were on your own. You gotTa pick better by. Don't be so damn curious about the noise. or at least if you're going to. The. Noise stick. I was in an AIRBNB cabinets wooded I wouldn't say it was the woods, but it was a wooded neighborhood was the closest I could get to the woods have Internet. And the first night I heard this noise like. I.

writer Anne Rice Gloria Naylor Tiffany Gordon Naylor Miami Herald Tony Morrison Stephen King Elo John Writer
Interview with  Glory Edim

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

04:42 min | 2 years ago

Interview with Glory Edim

"Her second in policy, which we look forward to hearing more about welcome glory are you having me? Oh thank you so much for joining us in your kicking off our season two of the podcast series. So what a way to start the fall? Oh, this is incredible. I'm glad to be a guest I am a fan of your work. In addition to just enjoying the book itself, I'm a fan of what you've been able to accomplish with well red black girl particularly in the way of used the platform of of a literary network to intentionally highlight narratives that are often ignored or ones that disappear from her collective consciousness as to African descended womanhood, the beauty and diversity of our voices experiences I enjoy speaking to people like yourself and I often wonder how is this person get here? What was their journey like? Why do they do what they do? So you ready to get into it? Yes, I am. Act One call to adventure. As a writer entrepreneur, of course, there are paths that we take and processes that we engage in to get us to where we are today, and sometimes we do that. Emotionally, we have spiritual processes, intellectual ones, and so on. How did you become interested in doing the work you do today? Well, it was a long and Berry unexpected journey and I think it really started for me at Howard University by alumni really supported me feel seen in loves and space where black women aren't always valued our university boosted lifted me up. So it was there that I countered Zora Neil hurston and Tony Morrison and my Angelo, all incredible authors that allowed me to see myself more clear in allowed needs to really start to think about who I wasn't the world in the work that I wanted to do, and originally I majored in journalism and I minored in geology and I was always surrounded by just incredible people that motivated me whether it's my professors my best friends I just always had a beautiful reflection to someone saving mealy you can do this and whether it was reading pursuing journalism, I, always find courage is supported and I think that's the main takeaway from my spirit's is becoming not. Yet or do serve the festival and so many other names. It's having a support system being passionate and being able to identify what your vision is. Jahns I've been able to say without a doubt that my purpose to really be of service to other black women and help uplift them in a leary space yawns I gained so much joy from that. I didn't know that was what I was going to be doing when I was a freshman in college, but it just organically happened as I started pursuing my career. Network in meeting other people it just services evolved this beautiful way. So years later, we well red black girl but I know that seed was planted on campus our university I, like fat because and maybe this is just my own personal perspective of going to a Pwi a predominantly white institution that it's not to say that you don't have professors that encourage and cultivate you your skills, your interest but I wonder if if it's something about going to an HP, see you that it's like Hashtag black excellence all around and then you. Just really entrenched in that moment of Oh, you dig Tony Morrison to, and it's not like we have one week where we covered Tony Morrison then that's it. No, it's extends like it's like the whole life cycle like I think back when I was a freshman I taught at a school that was called the Maya Angelou Public Charter school and I don't think I could have done that anywhere else but in DC as a student at Howard University and those moments gave me again the sense of purpose of helping. Other children and working in space with other black students and working with black professors just around we twenty four, seven that I didn't have I didn't have a chance to second-guessed took away. Any doubt I had when I was at a randomly whites all as a high school student and then when I graduated I, just have the sense of I mean in. Regards like entitled to myself were that I felt like I do anything united feels token is any way because I knew

Tony Morrison Howard University Angelo Maya Angelou Public Charter Sc Zora Neil Hurston Writer PWI Berry HP
Interview With Ta-Nehisi Coates

Longform Podcast

06:12 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Ta-Nehisi Coates

"Tallahassee welcome back to the podcasts what numbers this? Number seven. I think it might have been six. It's crazy. I can't even remember it used to be when we did a new one I would go back and listen to the old one. To See what we talked about before make sure no repeat myself. I just can't do it anymore. I can't listen to six. An, our audio. Preparation, so I gotta go off my My Memories. Yeah. It's been a lot. It's been a lot I WanNa say I feel very fortunate. I feel honored really that you are willing to have this conversation because I know you recently. Lost Friends Chadwick Bozeman, who is you know the world is experiencing that loss but I know you're experiencing it in a different way. Thank you for taking the time to do this even despite that. Now it's okay I mean we had committed before and. It's an experience to. Meet somebody. And you know I don't want to overstate Khushab was like a really private dude. And I think whenever you have people who are up at a certain level certain currency. That people try to deal in in you know overstating their proximity. So you know this wasn't a cow who I talk to every day or anything. But we did know each other we did it on. You know pretty much in the same circle. You know this guy met. Jesus. Nineteen Ninety seven ninety eight when. The students in the fine arts building decided to. Take, the administration building at how to prevent. Called it the absorbing of the fine arts college into the broader Liberal Arts School Indus- turn basically terrifies into a program as opposed to independent, which was crazy because. So much of what you know how a calling card is turning out autism Donny Hathaway To puffy to Tony Morrison just this long history. So it seemed crazy anyway him you another close friend of mine basically led the takeover and. are coveted for the hilltop for. You know some like at the beginning of my career I've probably been working for David. been mentioned several times. You know in other caucuses we we've done a couple of years at definitely maybe a year two years something like that. But anyway else coming in for the student newspaper and I say all that to say to watch him. On this arc. To see him you know student plays at Howard. He was always such a serious serious office. An intense and probably like the dude, I would least. Be Likely to pick to become. A major Hollywood leading man not because he lacked the talent. But he was so serious I'm. Dead dead dead serious about his art in and you know he really really didn't play and didn't have time. For Shenanigans. So just watches I mean he's one of those. Really really rare case, there's so much in the world it makes people feel like. Taking shortcuts in messing around and And Chad. Rare case that did it on principle and. Basically you know. Hard work you know. I know when people pass folks alight. They say this I never did any wrong or you know, etc. That's not what I'm saying. But I I was privileged to watch his as office. By went back and watched the onstage interview you did with him at the Apollo. And one of one of the things you said there was you sort of started off by saying because it was about Black Panther obviously, and and you said something like I didn't know that I needed this movie until I watched it you know and Kind of wonder how much of that? Connected with him being in that role or just. Yeah. No I mean. I would that was part of it. You know what I mean chat always had like this kind of you know otherworldly About himself. When he got past it's not like I was like, oh, he clearly can't this. You know what I mean is I said it was unexpected. You would be on this rise like this. I. Guess I'm more doubting. The system Hollywood. I think like an by point or somewhere around I point started writing a comic book. So it was like crazy. You know that you know he would be Erin I'll be right in the book and then I just so proud of that. So You know and even at that moment. He agreed to do conversation at the I mean you're talking about you on a billion dollar film. Again I knew. That they were. Promoting film it you know how exhausting? Because I think this was after they had gone on this global tour promote I knew how exhausting that was. After they had done grueling Toyota, he would just sit there and you have to remember what we know now was he was diagnosed about it. Yeah. Yeah. So he's been diagnosed with. You know what I mean and he sits up on stage in. But we had a pre call? His Russia with very very assistant. You know about that. You know we cheat the time limited data and I'm like, okay I'm. Trait. Up there with that, we got on the stage he has so much to say. And you can tell if you look at the interview, he just has so much to say and I think there was some point isn't Chin who has a black me the mask could come the and wants to get. Out At enchanted signs it. You know he was very conscious about what they're meant. And what what their moment met and it is. I just spe is it is hard to be sitting here talking to you about this in the past tense. Yeah. He has so many lighters just enviable qualities that relatively brief moment you know he really was king you couldn't have picked a better person to to carry it.

Hollywood Liberal Arts School Indus Tallahassee Khushab Chadwick Bozeman Donny Hathaway Toyota Chin Howard Tony Morrison David. Apollo Russia Erin
"tony morrison" Discussed on The Kame House Podcast

The Kame House Podcast

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on The Kame House Podcast

"So i seen that happen in season two already but i mean it bothers me because i know i know that he can project bins likeness fourth and let him speak but he chooses not to for what what. Why why is that a choice. 'cause i know and he's tired of some student. It's tom i agree. I wish he was alive. I was with somebody. They could bring them back alive honestly. 'cause i don't like it. I feel like it's abusive. Then every time. I see him on screen. I feel bad for him. And i'm like this. White man is keeping him captive. I'm really interested in how you feel about the end of the season i revisited. Are we visited bro season. Two i finish it could avenue avenue bashi right crystal. You say you're going to try. What's movie ocean wife ways. I a slaps Music which offered me crystal fao turn on. I was reading this article on On a facebook. i'm trying to save it wrapped up now article. Okay my bad. All right. So i want to shout out jamila woods. I'm so mad. I was my own too so i'm gonna do a spotlight because she released the song caught. Soula seles beautiful if you. I don't know i'm gonna try to a quick background of saloon. Why it's so important. Sula is name is a book by Tony morrison which she is a major important black author. I love tony. Morrison death But the song is very beautiful Song very beautiful. So i can gone. I can talk about it forever..

jamila woods fao White Tony morrison facebook Sula Morrison tony
"tony morrison" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

10:02 min | 2 years ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Hosted deliciousness inside him a rich secret. I, WANNA remember a say, ask reactive asking the tell you. Enough Joe says, pulling out A, we'd would do what you say revest. He whips the weeds from a soul like not cake at an had enough berries. Joe Says I'm full. He Looks Doumanian Vince, the picket strike grass. Leoni and Michael Leave about walking out to the garden. Leonis Redcar cranks to live from growls down the road and they disappeared the tunnel of trees. I. Think about climbing into the car with him just to see where they go. But I don't I follow. Joe. Joe and ribbon. Kayla instead. Boys footsteps and I watch I. Watch the way reverses them around furrows and troves how he cooks and beans for dinners the way he make sure they're clean when they latte on sleep watching this family grabs me and saw twists and pulls tight. It hurts it hurts so much I can't look at it so I don't. I, go out. The Night? Cloudy I WANNA. Bow into the earth to sleep. But I'm so close I'm so close. I can hear the sound of the waters. The scaling bird would lead me over tumble with the wind. So a crawl under the house instead. Line, the dirt under the living room where they all sleep making a caught of the earth and I sing songs without words. The songs come to me out of the same air that brings the sound of the waters. I Open my mouth and I hear the Russian of the waves. This is what I see. Across the face of the water there is land. Is, green and hilly dense with trees riven by rivers, the rivers flow backward, they begin in the sea and inland, the air is gold. The goal of sunrise and sunset perpetually peach their homes set atop mountain ranges valleys on beaches there vivid, blue, and dark red, cloudy Pink, and deepest purple, their Yurt Adobe dwellings and teepees, and long houses and villas. Some of the homes are cluster together in small villages, graceful gatherings of round steady huts with domed roofs and their cities, cities that harbor plazas and canals and buildings. Barron minarets and hit gable roofs and Crotch and beasts and massive buildings that look as if they should collapse. So weirdly flower into the sky yet they do not. There, are people tiny indistinct. They fly and walk and float and run. They are alone. They are together. They wanted the summits, they swim in the rivers and sea. They walk hand in hand in the parks and the squares disappear into the buildings there never silent ever-present is they're singing. They don't move their mouths and yet it comes from them. Croon in in the yellow light, it comes from the black earth, the trees and the sky it comes from the water. It is the most beautiful song I have ever heard, but I can't understand a word. I am gasping when the vision passes the dark underbelly of Rivers House looms before me creaking than silent. I looked to my right and see a flash of the water, the rivers, Dennis, the cities, the people in darkness. I looked to my left and see the world again, and then it is gone. I claw at the air, but my hands strike nothing. They ran no doorways to that. Golden I'll absence isolation I can. Could just to you. was over here, you should just keep going. This real easy. I suggested that we read about home one 'cause I'm home. But also because I feel like home is so much a part of what I do and also obviously what you do. So I was looking for kind of. Quotes kind of connected to this idea home. So I wanna read a few of those quotes and see how they kind of Mesh with your definition of own. Hair, Clyde has no man ever steps in the river in the same river twice. Thomas will you can't go home again and then the third one is Tony Morrison home is memory in companions and or friends who share the same memory. I, know that's hard. It's three remember probably shouldn't be doing something. But I wonder like, do any one of them kind of Echo, your idea of home. If not like how how does your does your idea kind of Jive with one of them? I feel like my entire. Career. I've been wrestling with that idea, right? Wrestling with this idea of home trying to figure out what that means for me. I was actually thinking about why you're reading from survival math because. You reading about home and reading like telling us about your memories of your home and then bringing us to this place where you're also talking about how that home you know that you knew and that you loved and perhaps hated all at once. has become something. Else right. I. It. Back when I was first. Trying. To wrestle with home in my work I. Remember one of my friends said something akin to to. Thomas Wolf's quote, right? Like you can't go home again. Right, and when my friend said that to me. It was as if I had never heard that before. And I think before he said that to me I sort of harbored this idea that I could, and then he said that to me, and then I realized that. In fact, I couldn't because the home that I knew and loved and yes, a little bit hated all at once that home in many ways had changed didn't exist anymore. And so I think in some respects, one of the reasons that I invented also. You know I've explored that that place and I write about that place in. So much of my work is. Trying to. Sort of. Catcher worried about will construct my memory of what my home what. was like in the past and I'm immersing myself and my characters into that world. And in some ways Attempting to to make that place live again a. But I think that that that it would be interesting to hear from you too about about that because I, mean, as you read earlier like your home. I mean, I feel like you're wrestling with some of the same. Things all work when you were talking I was thinking Oh, you're like you've created this place that is kind of a reflection of home, but it's not perfect home, right like you like you're examining home, but you're also seeing places where. Home. has failed it citizens or the you know the people that are there and I think that's interesting because I feel like if we could create a new home, the most of us were trying to kind of you know, invent some sense, our sense of perfection. But that is probably not our job to make a perfect home and yeah, you know I was also thinking about how like I think that? What I'm really after his the distance between, I can never get there and this is my memory of it. And so I'm always trying to like. Reflect and kind of stay connected to these memories because I feel like. If, I lose the memories like. then. I'll never be able to kind of reach those that kind of nostalgia or those kind of. Positive feelings I had about not just the place, the the people, and also I hear a lot of. Your connected to the landscape. Right. In a way that I'm not connected to the landscape of Oregon, I'm connected more to. Like the city in a sense, but really the people, right. So when I think of home I, don't necessarily think of like Calama th falls or you know like I don't i. don't have any kind of childhood memories about visiting the zoo or things like that. I think about like people that I knew what happened to them. So I think that's an interesting way. They like yours is both the people and the kind of natural landscape in a way that uh, the minds isn't. That's really interesting because I just took it for granted both of those. Aspects of home. I'm. We need more landscape. I need to get out the northeast I. Guess. Maybe, I, should travel because people even I. see them and they're like Oh yeah. You're from Portland like have you been to such a size? I'm like no. Actually I haven't, but sounds beautiful though. Maybe. Next Time I. Go home. I'll try it. Out..

Joe Thomas Wolf Doumanian Vince Rivers House Wrestling Leoni Kayla Yurt Adobe Tony Morrison Michael Leave Dennis Clyde Portland Oregon
"tony morrison" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on The Archive Project

"To finish in this episode, it's nearly impossible to tell from when she is talking and from when she is reading her poetry. She begins with their ninety nine year old grandmother and takes us on a kind of. Graphical tour with her work. It's by turns, solemn, hilarious, tender and heartbreaking. Your spinning. Thank you so much. Good Evening Portland. WILD IMAGINATIVE IRREVERENT PORTLAND. Have I come to the right place. Excellent! I've come tonight. To tell you what my grandmother taught me a long long time ago. But I'd like to start with a quote. A woman has to be a daughter. Before she can be any kind of a woman. If she doesn't have that in mind. If. She doesn't know how to relate to her ancestors to her tribe. She's not good for much. Tony Morrison. My grandmother is the very reason I have become the very poet. You are about to spend some time with this evening. Born in one, thousand, nine hundred. She taught me that telling a lie was something akin to murder..

Tony Morrison Portland PORTLAND murder
"tony morrison" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"That place to kind of at least be able to understand or see? That people are talking about totally different things talking about. But freedom means the United States. So, Tony Morrison and James Baldwin were often trying to see the way. The notion of freedom had embedded in it. A bargain up like. Like. We don't mean all of your. And that is like a hard with no one meeting under appreciate. The. Extent of the challenge. That, we're still every generation living with. To actually Name this sort of The what how do want to save is the way that this notion of freedom is is cons, not just contested. But. It's like. It's constructed in interbrew. And so anytime we bring it up. We're almost inviting. About. Our histories the like install we relearning this when we think about the the battle right now today over the statue's. Reminded that our history is right here right now, not back. They're still running through us. So we have these political and try to come together. Eat Off, try to all what support team amendment meaning the equality protections mean of the protection clause and every generation. We have idle. and. We have people saying today. lgbtq rights are protected by the other people especially clause. Okay, we had to get to that. View the language of the fourteenth amendment. Never change how we look at it who we're willing to see as protected by. Constantly. Under construction and even under vein. And you know most of us I think. It's hard to.

James Baldwin Tony Morrison United States interbrew
"tony morrison" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"The intuition and realized like Oh Colson Whitehead right, speculative literary fiction like people. People don't say that apparently, but that's what he writes, and and that is the most attractive thing to me so then I read zone. Want even though I do not read horror and I don't like zombies because I was like, but it's Colson Whitehead, so it's probably going to be something completely different to the way people are presenting it, and it was and I'm so glad that I read because it is absolutely fantastic At is one of the most rewarding reading experiences probably. Especially because there's a part where now yes, he is very very in terms of what I consider literary fiction in terms of just a real almost preoccupation with language which I adore, but also at some point in the story can be like Oh my gosh, please stop talking about these buildings as though they're humans as they were birth I got so frustrated in the middle. Middle of the book I was like going to hit you. Please stop doing this, but I know but I knew, but there's something, but there's also that whole demo- juice that he does where you cannot believe that he put that string that he put that concept into that string of words and you could. You could not imagine someone else composing that better or even composing anything. Comparable to it so all of that to say basically, he's one of those writers like Tony Morrison for me where you're writing speculative literary fiction, but because of what publishing does on the on the back end of it, which is you know with an eye toward the marketplace where they try to strictly defined things. It, it can make it difficult for people to realize how much stuff out there there is that that does resemble. What they naturally do, and and is already possible to be published. 'cause you know a lot of times, people will tell you this you can't. There's nowhere to put this. You can't write it like this..

Colson Whitehead Tony Morrison
"tony morrison" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"And that was one of the reasons she wrote beloved. She said now that actual bench is a sub celebratory place to contemplate to set a spell as we say and maybe even the CASTA spell what Morrison conjured up in her writing and her being is magic of the daily and extraordinary enchantment of black life off it is morrison more than anyone who measures the trauma. Triumph of the enslaved creates in her work a living monument vehement to our shared past and are far off future one of words and wisdom of silence shattered and the unsaleable. WHOA named made legible? She's a friend to our minds. I want to end with a poem by Morrison. Once once she wrote in her work titled Five Poems called. I am not seaworthy. It's a work of music and mystery of words that sing. I am not seaworthy. I'm not seaworthy. Look look how the fish mistake my hair for home. I had a life like you. I shouldn't be riding the see. I am not seaworthy. Let me be earthbound star fixed mixed with Sun and smacking air. Give me the smile. The magic kiss to trick little boy death of my hand. Oh not seaworthy. Look how the fish mistake my hair for that was poet. Kevin Young Young Director of the Shamburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem. We'll be back with more remembrances of Tony Morrison in a minute.

Tony Morrison Kevin Young Shamburg Center for Research Harlem Director
"tony morrison" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

10:59 min | 3 years ago

"tony morrison" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"This is democracy now democracy now DOT ORG the Warren Peace Report. I'm Amy Goodman today in special broadcast we spend the hour remembering Tony. Morrison one of the nation's most influential writers. She died in August at the age of eighty eight from complications of pneumonia. In nineteen ninety-three. Tony Morrison became the first African American woman to receive. The Nobel Prize is for literature she also won Pulitzer Prize in one thousand. Nine hundred eighty eight for classic work beloved. Toni Morrison was born in Lorain. Ohio in nineteen thirty one. She did not publish her first novel the Bluest eye until she was thirty nine years old she wrote while taking care of her two young sons as a single mother other in juggling a day job as a book editor at Random House as an editor. She's widely credited with helping widen the literary stage for African Americans and feminists menace much of Morison's writings focused on the female black experience. In America. Her work was deeply concerned with race in history especially freshly the sin and Crime of transatlantic slavery and the potentially restored of power of community in two thousand twelve. President Obama awarded. Where did Tony Morrison the Presidential Medal of Freedom Tony Morrison? She is used to a little distraction as a single mother working at a publishing company by hi day she would carve out a little time in the evening to write often with her two sons pulling on her hair and tugging at her earrings. Once a baby spit up on her tablet so she wrote around it. Circumstances may not have been ideal but the words that came out We're we're magical Toni. Morrison's pros brings us that kind of moral and emotional intensity that few writers ever or attempt from Song of Solomon to beloved Tony Reaches Us deep using a tone that is lyrical precise distinct and inclusive. She believes that language arcs toward the place where meaning might live. The rest of us are lucky to be following along for the ride upon her death. President Obama said quote. Toni Morrison was a national treasure. Her writing was not just beautiful but meaningful. A challenge is to our conscience and a call to greater empathy. This is an interview. Tony Morrison gave to the Australian Journalists Ianovich in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight for the program. Toni Morrison uncensored. You don't think you will ever change right books that incorporate what what lives into them substantially time being a substantial. You can't understand how powerfully raise questions as you could never ask a wider. When are you gonNA write about black whether he did or not or she did not even even the inquiry comes from position a being in the center and being used to being in the same being used to being an end and and saying you know? Is it ever possible you will enter demands chain. It's inconceivable that we're I already already am is mainstream on no. That wasn't the implication of my question. I think you are very very much in the mainstream. But it's a question of the subject of Jio narrative whether you want to alter the parameters of it with you see any Any benefit in doing that or will you clearly see disadvantages entering it from your point of view it just took disadvantages to know pluses for me. Being an African American rider is sort of like being a Russian writer Peres about Russia in Russian for Russia and the fact that it gets translated and read other people. There's a benefit it's a plus but he's not obliged to ever consider writing about French people or Americans and that's Tony Morrison being interviewed by the well known Australian Journalists Bench Nineteen Ninety Eight. Well today. We remember Tony Morrison through those who knew and loved her editors writers musicians as we bring you highlights from a celebration of her life memorial. All that took place here in New York November twenty first at the Cathedral of Saint John The divine it drew thousands. We begin with Oprah Winfrey who produced and and starred in the One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety eight film adaptation of Morrison's beloved Oprah's Book Club also brought Toni Morrison's novels to a wide audience. The first time I came face to face with Tony Morrison was in Maya Angelou's backyard for a gathering ring of some of the most illustrious black people you've ever heard of to celebrate Toni Morrison's Nobel Prized Victory My head and my heart were swirling. Every time I looked at her. I mean I couldn't even speak speak. I had to catch my breath and I was seated across from her at dinner and there was a moment when I saw Ms Morrison just gesture to the waiter for some water and I almost tripped over myself. Trying to get up from the table to get it for her eh Eh said sit down. We have people here to do that. You're a guest so I sat down I obeyed of course but it was not easy. I tell you to sit sit still or to keep myself inside my body. I felt like I was all seven years old because after all she was there and so many others that day Mari Evans Sister Angela. Davis was there Nikki. Giovanni was there read a dove. Was There Toni. Cade Bombard was there. It was a writers Mecca and I was there sitting at the table taking it all in and as I look back that day remains one of the great thrills of my life. You know I didn't really get to speak to Tony. Tony Morrison that day. I was just to dazzle but I had already previously called her up to ask about acquiring the film rights to beloved. After I finished reading it I found her number called her and when I asked Mr is it true that sometimes people have to read over your work in order to understand it to get the full meaning. And she bluntly he replied that my dears cold reading I was embarrassed. But that statement actually gave me the confidence years later. When I formed the book club on the Oprah Show to choose her work I chose more of her books than any other author over the years Song of Solomon and First Soula the bluest eye and powered ice and if any one of our viewers ever complained that it was hard going or challenging challenging reading Toni Morrison I simply said that my dear is called reading there was no distance between Green Tony Morrison and her words? I loved her novels but lately I've been rereading essays which underscore that. She was also one of our most influential sensual public intellectuals. In one essay she said if writing is thinking and discovery and selection and order her and meaning it is also aw and reference and mystery and magic and this facts can exist without human intelligence but truth cannot she thought deeply about the role of the artist and concluded that writers are among on the most sensitive most intellectually and archaic most representative most probing of all the artist. She believed it was a writers leader's job to rip the veil off to bore down to the truth. She took the cannon and she broke it open among her legacies the writer she paved the way for many of them here. And this beautiful space tonight celebrating her Toni Morrison was her words. Words she is her words for her. Words often were confrontational. She spoke the unspoken. She probed the unexplored she wrote of eliminating the white gaze of not wanting to speak for black people but wanting to speak to them to be among them to be among all people. Her words. Don't permit the reader to down them quickly and forget them. We know that they refused to be skimmed. They will not be ignored. They can cut you. Turn you upside down make you think you. Just don't get it but when you finally do when you finally do and you always will when you open yourself to what she is offering you experience as I have many times reading. Tony Morrison a kind of emancipation. Cancer patient liberation and ascension to another level of understanding because by taking us down there amid the pain gene the shadows she urges us to keep going to keep feeling to keep trying to figure it all out with her words and her stories as guide and companion and she asks us to follow our own pain to reckon with it and lasted transcended while. She's no longer on this earth her magnificent soul her boundless imagination her fierce fierce passion. Her Gallantry she told me once I've always known I was gallant..

Tony Morrison writer President Obama Nobel Prize Amy Goodman Pulitzer Prize pneumonia Lorain Oprah Winfrey Ohio Mari Evans America New York editor Solomon President Cade Bombard Eh Jio