20 Burst results for "Tony Mcdade"

"tony mcdade" Discussed on Fashion No Filter

Fashion No Filter

01:58 min | Last month

"tony mcdade" Discussed on Fashion No Filter

"Hi Ron, Monica and county here. This is a bit of a departure from our normal format. So we thought it would be best to introduce it properly. So you can know what to expect in the coming weeks. When George Fluid was killed at the hands of the white police officer in Minnesota on May twenty fifth. Global protests led to a moment of reckoning around systemic racism rightly seeping into every industry including our own. Of course George Fluid was not the first or the last person to be murdered hands of. Racist. Police. We're talking about brand Taylor Tony mcdade's an amyloid Aubrey amongst many many more. What's more previously existing racial inequities have also been magnified by the COVID pandemic highlighting deep-rooted problems in our societies fashion was forced to acknowledge in confront the ways in which it has failed to confront. It's systemic racism problem we at fashioned no filter had been thinking long and hard about how we can participate in this discussion in a genuine and meaningful way particularly given this is our first time speaking on the issue and see performance of content. We see our Indus. So as be coverage dies down, we've decided we want to support the momentum with a pass, the mic proposition that amplifies black voices and experiences. We've decided to lend our platform to black women. We admire in the industry so that they can share their experiences and stories. We also want to take this opportunity to announce special series has been guest edited by the Brilliant Henrietta Galina Creative director brand strategist and Co host of the conversations podcast with fifteen plus years in fashion. We aim to continue talking about race as part of our agenda. This really is just a place to start. We hope that these episodes will help herald change and continue to drive these important compensations forward. We still have a long way to go..

George Fluid COVID Henrietta Galina Ron Tony mcdade Minnesota brand strategist officer Aubrey director
"tony mcdade" Discussed on Hello Gen Z

Hello Gen Z

05:23 min | Last month

"tony mcdade" Discussed on Hello Gen Z

"While to episode three of Hello. Jesse. I'm Abby Hamlin here with my co host Christie totten. Black lives matter we've heard that statement everywhere this year, but the movement began seven years ago in two thousand thirteen when black activists, Alicia Garza Patrisse cullors, and Opel to Mattie created a Hashtag to honor Trayvon Martin. Today black lives matter is a global network of people demanding racial justice for Black lives in twenty twenty, we've seen protests across the United States and around the world from France to Japan to Australia after the death of George Floyd. Floyd isn't the only name protesters are invoking. There's Ron Taylor Tony mcdade and Ahmad rb among others. This. Year, we've seen a surge of anti-racist activism protests after Floyd's death continue petitions are circulating and people are demanding policy changes. Gen Z. has stepped up even leading some of these efforts. This generation isn't just using their phones for tick tock dances and youtube videos. They're using those platforms to call up social inequities and educate their peers and their parents. You remember Feroza Aziz from episode one. Is I gonNA teach you guys how long lashes so the first thing you need to do is grab your lash color curly lashes obviously then they're going to put them down and user phone using right now to search up what's happening in. China how they're getting concentration camps throwing innocent Muslims in their separating their families from children kidnapped. And on our last episode, we shared how a plume of ethnic and racial diversity is a defining characteristic for Gen Z.. Because they're. So racially diverse equity is a huge issue for them. They want their politicians, their workplaces, their movies, and their textbooks to reflect who they are. It's easy for this generation to move between online spaces and the real world. Of course, social media has been used to plan protests before but Gen Z. seems to have perfected it. You may remember all those school walkouts two, thousand, eighteen against gun violence and others in two thousand nineteen to raise awareness about climate change. and. Of course, there was Donald Trump rally in Dallas in June were young people protested by signing up for tickets and the not using them. Nikki Sanchez a nineteen year old from San. Diego. Who organized and participated in many of these youth protests she was seen in news outlets facing down a line of police officers. But that moment didn't just happen a lot of planning went into it. We use what we saw on social media, which was a lot of guides from the Hong. Kong protests a lot of diets from protests that were happening nationwide. They're saying what tips they were saying bring umbrella's if you don't WanNa, get pepper sprayed tried to bring. Protective gloves you WANNA throw back tear. Try to wear goggles to protect your eyes. There's gas mask. Here's a makeshift way to make gas masks tear gas. Tear gas reliefs. So it was just we took those tips that we put them in our fires and we put a we put out a statement to we. We said what our purpose was by. We were organizing you know to be prepared for anything of course, the coronavirus pandemic complicates these protests which are taking place at a time. When we're told, we shouldn't gather crowds to protect our health. But for some of these activists, this is life dust. Here's jalen Kennedy in eighteen year old from lakeside. California. Compromised, so I shouldn't be out protesting anyways, but I do it because it's my lunch. Like regardless of our Dyson, the corona or find. Back you know. I'd rather go out for diving. For My 'cause than having to like, sit watching one from the inside if you like I did nothing although these rallies are being organized online, they're not just social media stunt. Many of these protests are bringing people together. We've seen protests organized by highschoolers all across the country from California to Michigan to Maryland of money. I am sixteen m a rising senior at seven lakes and identified as in American, and I'm also a first generation from my name is Erica I am a seventeen year old rising senior in Katie my pronouns are she her. I am immigrant from. Venezuela. Is Jeff and rising senior something says well. Parental during a and I. Am American. In Katy Texas. Three young people decided to organize a black lives matter protests on their own. They put together a march and just three days using Google docs, facetime, and social media especially like in the area we live in an Katie very conservative. So that being said, there's kind of not a lot of activity going on and you know, Eric. I people g you know jump on that in my contact Jaffe needed something about that from that contacted me but was on generally just. Activity going on. Lamenting our push everyone you know even as a small compared to like New York. City we argue can still make it change, and we still can enable like black voices to the apple side in our own. I asked if they got any pushback I, we did as of the comments were like Oh.

George Floyd Katie Nikki Sanchez Black Alicia Garza Patrisse cullors California Abby Hamlin Ron Taylor Tony mcdade Christie totten Opel Jesse youtube Donald Trump Jaffe Feroza Aziz United States Mattie Trayvon Martin
"tony mcdade" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

01:51 min | 2 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"At his home in Manhattan. After suffering a heart attack. Hurricane Hannah is lashing the Texas coast with 80 mile an hour winds as it moves closer to landfall. Hurricane Douglas is turning toward Hawaii. At last report, Douglas has winds topping 100 miles per hour. A judge in Florida says police officers are not protected by a law which allows them to keep their identity secret. If they shoot and kill someone. It's a case that could set precedents across the country, A judge says. The name of an officer in Florida can be made public. The Leon County Circuit judge was reviewing the case after the officer in Tallahassee fought to keep his name under wraps after using deadly force. He's responsible for killing Tony McDade back in May. That's the transgender black man who encountered cops after allegedly stabbing Neighbor, then pointing a gun at the officers. The officer sighted Marcie's law in his defense to shield his identity. That law is designed to protect victims from disclosing information if it would put them or their families in harm's way, But the judge says that law doesn't protect officers when they're acting in their official capacity. The police union plans to appeal Nicole Wilson. NBC NEWS RADIO. A federal judge denies a request to keep federal agents from making arrests in Portland, Oregon, Oregon attorney General Rosenbloom filed a lawsuit to end the action amid protests over systemic racism and police brutality. The district judge explained she didn't show why this case is different from others looking to vindicate their rights to freedom of speech and assembly. The Trump Administration has said they don't plan on leaving the city until the violence stops. Jim Forbes, NBC NEWS radio, You're listening to the latest from NBC News radio. Love is completely trusted..

officer NBC Hurricane Douglas Florida Hurricane Hannah Trump Administration Jim Forbes Tony McDade Manhattan Leon County General Rosenbloom Nicole Wilson Oregon Marcie Hawaii Texas Tallahassee Portland attorney
"tony mcdade" Discussed on Asian Americana

Asian Americana

02:40 min | 2 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on Asian Americana

"You can also help us out by sharing our episodes and giving us good reviews on apple podcasts. Either way, thank you for listening and supporting us. However you can. Oh and one more thing we'll be talking about the tragic unjust lost at black lives. Today's at the. Won't replay any graphic audio, but still we'll be mentioning violence and death in the black community. So, please take care of yourself. However you need to. If you decide to listen to today's episode. Thanks, and here's the show. In the past several weeks there's been a lot going on on top of being months into a pandemic news about the continued unjust killings of black people. All over the US started to get mainstream attention with Montgomery and Georgia Brana Taylor and Kentucky Tony mcdade in Florida and George Floated Minnesota. Among the most publicized all while those responsible for their deaths seem to face little, delayed or no justice. All, this has inspired a tremendous response online in the media and notably in giant public demonstrations across the country. These of course are not the only cases. Black folks face all sorts of threats regularly, and as discussions and reporting shine more light on this issue, more and more tragedies. Place? Some having got untold for months, and even years until now and in the communities, and on basis I'm around I've been seeing lots and lots of conversation around the role of Asian Americans. Both as allies of black people and black lives, as well as our complicity in their mistreatment, the killing of George Floyd put an uninsurable framing around this one of the police officers involved wasn't Asian American so as I sit through post talking about people's experiences at public marches, slogans of Asians for black lives, an old photos from the sixties and seventies, featuring the yellow peril supports black power poster I also saw lots of discussion and criticism about whether these posts and actions were enough for even helpful. I feel like there's clearly a really wide range of familiarity with this history and these issues amongst Asian Americans which makes sense. Our communities are really varied and diverse and people have different experiences, different relationships to other communities and different exposure to the education and activism surrounding race in America. And despite these differences, now is a moment when we all happen to be having a million different conversations all about the same thing. How are we supposed to bridge those gaps with our friends, our family and folks in our communities today we explore the of how hundreds of people came together from all around the world to work on a letter, a letter that would be translated into forty plus languages and help everyone start talking to their families and communities about supporting black lives. I'm Quincy, Sarah. Smith and this is Asian Americana..

George Floyd apple US Tony mcdade Quincy Brana Taylor Kentucky Smith Minnesota America Montgomery Georgia Florida
"tony mcdade" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 2 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the listeners of cake. Later today looks like we'll have the fog and clouds rolling in through the coast and around parts of the Bay. Today's high temperatures ranging from the upper fifties of the ocean to the mid eighties inland. Independence Day. Partly cloudy in the morning and then Sonny, and it should reach 70 tomorrow in San Francisco 91 tomorrow in San for Excuse me in Santa Rosa. Same for Livermore. This's tomorrow Fourth of July. His politics with Amy Walter on the takeaway. Thanks so much for joining us this holiday weekend. We're about halfway through this year, and it's an understatement to say that 2020 has not gone is expected. We're grappling with the uncertainty caused by Corona virus. A record number of job loss is more than 120,000 deaths in the U. S and a complete loss of normalcy. Simultaneously. We are again in a moment of national reckoning confronting the current manifestations of our country's violent and racist history after the killings of black Americans, including George Floyd, Briana Taylor are very Tony McDade, and the list goes on. These days, weeks, months will be forever etched in our memories. For many, the experience of this national trauma comes at a time of major life transitions. So on this holiday weekend, we wanted to revisit some conversations we've had recently. People who are navigating all of this back in April, as.

San Francisco Amy Walter Sonny George Floyd Livermore Santa Rosa Tony McDade Briana Taylor
"tony mcdade" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:45 min | 2 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The media to Montgomery, where a new memorial to lynching victims asks us all to face this country's past. I think people realized something bad probably did happen and they don't want to acknowledge it because they're afraid they're going to be punished for it. I have no interest in punishing this nation for its history. Want to liberate us on this week's special episode of on the media from Alabama tonight at eight on 93.9. It's politics with Amy Walter on the takeaway. Thanks so much for joining us this holiday weekend. We're about halfway through this year, and it's an understatement to say that 2020 has not gone is expected. We're grappling with the uncertainty caused by Corona virus. A record number of job loss is more than 120,000 deaths in the U. S and a complete loss of normalcy. Simultaneously. We are again in a moment of national reckoning confronting the current manifestations of our country's violent and racist history after the killings of black Americans, including George Floyd, Briana Taylor, all MoD are very Tony McDade and The list goes on these days, weeks, months will be forever etched in our memories. And for many, the experience of this national trauma comes at a time of major life transitions. So on this holiday weekend, we wanted to revisit some conversations we've had recently. People who are navigating all of this. Back in April, as the economic toll of the pandemic was just beginning to come into focus. We talked to several people who are starting out in life. These are the people who will be living with the repercussions,.

Amy Walter Montgomery Tony McDade George Floyd Briana Taylor Alabama
"tony mcdade" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

06:40 min | 2 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Is James Earl Jones reading the historic address during performance of voices of a People's history of the United States, that's edited by Howard Zinn the late great historian introduce the address Frederick Douglass once a slave. became a brilliant and powerful leader of the Anti Slavery Movement. In eighteen fifty two. who was asked to speak in celebration of the fourth of July, Fellow citizens. Pardon me. And allow me to ask. Why am I called upon to speak today? What have I or those I represent to do with your? National independence. Are The great principles. Of Political Freedom and Of Natural Justice embodied in that declaration of independence extended to us and am I therefore. Called, upon to bring our humble offering to the national alter and to confess benefits. An expensive out gratitude. For the blessings resulting from your. Independence to us. I am not included within pale of this glorious anniversary. Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us the blessings which you this day rejoice not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice. Liberty. Prosperity and independence bequeathed, but your father's is shared by you not by me. The sunlight the bought life and healing to you has brought stripes and death to me this fourth of July. Is Yours. Not Mine. You may rejoice. I must mourn. To drag a man in fetters. Into the grand illuminated, temple of Liberty. In call up on him to join you in joyous anthems were inhuman mockery. And sacrilegious irony. Do you, mean citizens to mock me. By asking me to speak today. What. To the American slave. Is Your Fourth of July. I answer a day. But reveals the him more than all other days of the year the gross injustice and cruelty, which he is a constant victim to him. Your celebration is a sham. You're busted liberty an unholy license, your national greatness swelling vanity. Your sound rejoicing are empty and heartless your denunciation of tyrants. Brass Front. Impudence. Your shots of Liberty and Equality Hollow Mockery. Your prayers and hymns, your sermons and Thanksgiving's. With all your religious parade and solemnity. To him, mayor bombast fraud. Deception in piety, and he puck crecy, a thin veil to cover up crimes that would that would disgrace a nation of savages. There's not a nation. Of the Earth guilty, the practice, more shocking and bloody. Than other people of these United States At this very hour. At a time like this. Scorching irony. Not convincing argument is needed. Oh Had I the ability. And could reach the nation's ear, I would today poff a stream, a fiery stream of biting ridicule, blasting, reproach, withering, Spot, Taza and stern rebuke. For Eight is not light. That is needed. But fire. He did not the gentle shower, but thunder. We need the storm. But whirlwind the earthquake. The feeding of the nation must be quicken. The conscience of the nation must be roused. The propriety of the nation must be startled the hypocrisy of the nation. Must be exposed. The crimes against God and men must be proclaimed and denounced. That was James Earl Jones reading the words of Frederick, Douglass. We turn now to look at the uprising against police, brutality and racism, following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May. Twenty fifth the protests have helped dramatically shift public opinion on policing and systemic racism as De Fund. The police becomes a rallying cry of the movement. For more on this historic moment we turn to the legendary activists and scholar Angela, Davis Professor Emeritus at the University of California Santa Cruz for half a century Angela Davis has been one of the most influential activists and intellectuals in the United States and an icon of the Black, Liberation Movement I interviewed her in early June and asked her if she thought this moment is truly a turning point. This is an extraordinary moment. I've never experienced anything lights that conditions are currently experiencing. The conjunction. Created by the COVID nineteen pandemic and the recognition of the systemic racism that. That has been rendered visible under of these conditions because of the disproportionate deaths in black and left next communities. And? This is a moment i. don't know whether I ever expected to experience When the protests began of course around the murder of George Slade and Briana detail in. Aubrey and Tony mcdade and many others who've lost their lives to racist violence and vigilante. When these protests erupted I remembered.

United States Frederick Douglass James Earl Jones temple of Liberty Angela Davis Howard Zinn Taza University of California Santa George Floyd fraud Davis Professor Emeritus De Fund murder Aubrey George Slade Minneapolis Tony mcdade Briana stern
"tony mcdade" Discussed on News Beat

News Beat

05:30 min | 2 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on News Beat

"Many different context and I'm just talking about police killings right there, so many different contexts in which police them into contact with women, girls, transgender non conforming people were harmed comes to someone who is seeking help I think Tony mcdade's cases another example where according to Tony's facebook page. He had experienced tremendous. TRANSPHOBIC violence the day before he didn't get protection, he got killed. He we airing at Black Trans Woman in Louisville, who similarly had experienced just months? TRANSPHOBIC homophobic violence from her neighbor, culminating in them, setting a fire on her porch the night before, but when the police showed up the next day he is. So I could go on. There are so many stories and I think. It really breaks my heart. Actually these days particularly is that. Sometimes I can't remember all the names. Because at this point I, just know so many and.

Tony mcdade facebook Louisville
"tony mcdade" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

02:26 min | 3 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Need you to lead to Don't just listen Help It's important that we keep this dialogue going and this energy alive because for centuries there have been fights for justice and equality in this country led by black people Thiss movement is no different but as white people this is the breaking point This time we've gotta have their backs Trust us We know that sports are important It's why we're gathered here tonight But do black lives matter to you when they're not throwing touchdowns grabbing rebounds serving aces If that was uncomfortable to hear good I used to shy away from moments like this because it's convenient to be quiet To be thought of a safe and polite Colin Kaepernick never shied away He knew that discomfort was essential to liberation and that fighting the oppression against black people is bigger than sports So will it be uncomfortable Yes And speaking up when we make mistakes Yes that cannot stop us from trying And not just for a few days or a few I G posts This is our moment to prove that we know a better world is one where black lives are valued No one deserves white privilege It's not something we earned Leaving black people and not just in instances of police brutality and then finding your lane to get educated and amplify is the first step It's great that sports are back but George Floyd won't be there to see them Briana Taylor won't be there to see them Ahmad are very Tony McDade Nina Pop Ray Sharp Brooks Dominique Remmy Fells Alien Polanco Toy in Salou won't be there to see them way can't let sports try and take us back to the way things were Every athlete at every level has the power to show what it looks like To fight for what is right moments in sports like the 1968 Olympics with Tommie Smith and John Carlos Fist in the air to Colin kneeling there helping night the conversation around racism Our return must be part of the fight for justice Our return can't just return to business as usual Our return is our turn to stand up for what's right It's a return We all need Go sports inspire sports Give us hope Sports make us feel sports bring us together They remind us what it's like to be on the same team.

Colin Kaepernick sports George Floyd Briana Taylor Ahmad Salou Olympics Tommie Smith John Carlos Fist Thiss Tony McDade Nina Pop Ray Sharp Dominique Remmy
"tony mcdade" Discussed on Reply All

Reply All

07:28 min | 3 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on Reply All

"So lost Monday after two weeks of protests over killing of George Floyd Brianna Taylor Tony mcdade, and so so many other black people. I ended up in a conversation with a black woman who told me about a very weird situation found herself in. If you don't WanNa, go by your real name, we can change your name. Yeah, I don't because the only reason is i. feel I feel really sorry for this girl. Like how I feel and my understanding of it is not what she feels and I'm almost as like poor baby but I. don't want her to be embarrassed. Ever, here's this. She's GonNa. Know this is her because. so anyways. Yeah, because. How I responded to her. This is and as you just heard was actually a real name. She's a photographer. Listen La. My Aunt told me that. After recent protests, one of her colleagues posted to twitter in support of photographers. It was opposed to editors and just people in general. That was kind of saying hire black women right now, so because you know it directly affects them in. They're covering these issues that are happening and so she did this list, which was just incredible highlighting black women photographers. And you know just created a lot of traction for a lot of us and so I just saw a lot of activity on my social media, and you know people sharing my photos and. You know just leaving me comments at some point Michael a message from a white woman who was like I'd love to support you. What just let me know how and let me know what you've? Mo is I said. Here's my website. Please let me know if you what print you'd like to buy. You know we can work that out. If not maybe can compile some images from this protests, I will be more meaningful, and then we can just figure out something from there. This is my van Venom. I'm Ben after message might looked to her phone until something confusing. A payment from this woman along with a message, saying that she was traveling, I would reach out about getting improvement should go back and so I was like. Well. That's not really what I meant. and also was really low as well like because she said. Let's talk about a prince, so I'm not sure if she thought that was the price of a print, maybe she did. Or if that was just money that she was just getting I. Don't know what it was, but I know. It was interesting because we hadn't talked about. Any exchange in terms of the pricing. My went back and forth about whether she wanted to tell me the exact dollar amount of but donation she was worried, but being mount could be a giveaway to the person's identity. But eventually she told me. It was. If. It was a charity donation to me. That's mad insulting. If that was a print, really insulting, what was that? What was it? It was. I mean I would. If we use this Buddhist bleep it okay, so guy. was. and to me if it was a charity charitable donation to my being black fund I, don't. I don't even know what that would have done for me in any way because in twenty twenty. You know things are expensive and I'm not expecting anything from anyone you know and like I'm I'm pretty okay. This thing my experience, it's incredibly confusing payment some variation of the as Manhattan to everybody I know my sister. My neighbors, my friends, white people have been sending back people payments in these really weird bizarre ways often completely out of the blue and frequently completely unsolicited. Put on a call on twitter, asking for people to share their experiences with this and I heard all of these people who gotten notification that some white person has it in cash. The weirdest form of reparations as if to say, he's a few bucks so racism. I just got a random Ben Mao. and. It's sad her way either drinks tonight eight. Sending back. Biz that thing all over the country in Chicago. I heard from close designers, aspiring filmmakers political organizers, computer program teachers. Academics, Puzzles Photographers Comedians lagerback. Usually middle class. Time on the forty s for continually kept coming through and I was like. Well we'll take you according to my completely unscientific survey. It seems like you're more likely to get them. Oh payments from your white friends. If you live in a mostly white area, went to a mostly white college, or if you work in a mostly white field gets comedy. You won't get any of these. It turns out if like me, you tweeted about doing a story on, said them payments. Thankfully, white people don't tend to send these emojis these payments to seem to be small amounts of money like the amount you might contribute to colleagues. Birthday cog made to people. On the whole fantasy, completely fine or seem like. You know for like lack of a better term like Oh. Thank you. Thank you like Michelle Obama was given these little. I've heard of people like receiving money from colleagues. Colleagues in some cases actually make less than the people visiting money to. These payments also come from exit. Grab a cup of coffee on me. It was just really weird. 'cause I never seen. A dollar amount. With police brutality before you made that same person had been double that amount to a call. Anyways, the main thing I learned is that it's extremely likely that you a black person are going to feel bad about it I talk of Maya I felt a little bit and south. Totally. Don't want to take your charity for you to feel better. You Know I. Don't know I mean. There's a lot of assumption on my end, but I just don't want to be a point of your conversation with your friends like hey I donated to this attack this lack of. And that was my contribution like. Yes, make it more meaningful. Associations initial posted. Ben Okay Yeah. Higher Higher. Higher. Yeah. My Afaq new woman donate the money to a national bill fund and matched it. She gracefully just sort of washed our hands of the whole thing. But she never did find out what exactly this person who sent her money was thinking. That question I was able to get to the bottom of when I heard about the case of another woman named Noni. She's twenty three lives in north. Carolina, I was just in my room on the phone with my friends and I get a notification on my phone, and it is a random van Mo from a guy I went to college with and so I click on it right as it's coming on my phone because I'm like what the kiss. And Olic ago my APP and read it to you. Okay so so give me five dollars five. Yeah. What? Five anyway, so we continue. Okay, here's what the memo's Ed. Thanks for spreading awareness have a coffee. Weight Thanks for spreading awareness have coffee. Yeah, it's a starbucks campaign. It sounds like. Sounds like it. Wasn't sure what to do. She hadn't talked to this guy in.

twitter Ben Mao. George Floyd Brianna Taylor La starbucks Michelle Obama Mo Tony mcdade Chicago Carolina Michael Manhattan
"tony mcdade" Discussed on Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

04:40 min | 3 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

"We're live, so we have to talk about the people like Tony mcdade and we haven't talked about people like Nepal up and so when we talk about all these different issues, there is a connection and the fact that people are protesting in. In the streets, and how and in some cases with people coal riding in other cases, a rebellion is a reflection of how the queer movement got started in the first place. If you look back to stonewall nine, hundred sixty nine, it started because black and Latino drag Queens transgender people along with Lgbtq people from the community fall back against police brutality. That's what the. The stonewall rebellion was all about it was about the fight against police brutality, and now black people were fighting back against police brutality as well. America's never like this never liked to see violence, but it seems to be the only people to pay attention as what got people pay attention nineteen sixty-nine started. A movement is what getting people to pay attention right now? Has It always been a smooth relationship. This these intersections or have there been tensions, and certainly you know recently Los. Angeles, there have been. There's been news coverage of that, but but I wonder historically. Whether everything's always been. A recognition that fundamentally the causes the same. It's never really been a smooth transition. You know you look back at a coalition politics always involves a certain amount of distrust and certain amount of of course, trust Bernice Johnson Reagan from sweet honey in the rock road essay about this. Wonderful Book called home, girls, a black feminist anthology, and she wrote Sem coalition politics where she talks about coalitions mean you'd have to get people who don't necessarily see eye to eye with you in every 'cause, but see I with you on the larger calls and come together for a specific purpose and maiming, you disagree from town time and you go back to your own community, and you come back to the coalition, and you work together, but a coalition is not necessarily where you're going to be supported..

Bernice Johnson Reagan Tony mcdade Nepal Queens America Los Angeles
"tony mcdade" Discussed on Nancy

Nancy

02:54 min | 3 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on Nancy

"And also beyond black. Trans Women being excluded from the conversation. We've also seen trans men like Tony mcdade be excluded as well <hes> he was a trans man shot by police in Tallahassee last month, and some people have been fighting to have. His name honored at protests as well <hes> for people who don't get why he should be included. What what do you say to them? THEM WHY is it important that Tony's name be included if the Senate Trans, humanity and Trans lives right and I think the say people want answers from the Tallahassee Police on Tony. mcdaid on who they say was armed. They say was this <hes> who they say was that, but they're not really a lot of reports about what happened. It's only the what the police are saying. Happens. And then then a lot of people are also talking about. She's not a victim of police violence, but Nina pop who is them a most recent I'm Black Trans Woman. Who was stabbed? Then Roll Missouri in early. May so I think that the those that push. To include their names? Is Just Center Trans. People and Trans. Lives and black lives in this moment, and there was even a march the other day that Senate on stonewall where a group of activists <hes> did a march that was explicitly devoted to him. In the midst of the protests for George Void so i. think that's what that's about. What would a truly inclusive black lives matter movement? Look like to you. I! Think truly was the black lives. Matter would look like the movement that the three original founders had envisaged right, and we should say three founders you referencing. Are Patrisse cullors Alicia? Garza, and ultimately that's right. The irony is that two out of three of the founders of all living, and then two hundred or three. R LGBTQ and they when they started were deliberately creating a movement that was intersectional, and which is committed to fighting transphobia. It's actually one of their stated principles, but the problem. Is that because Blm? For sorts of reasons that makes sense. It's not a hierarchical organization. It's decentralized one through decentralisation that means that the local group of people who ever decide to pull themselves together and declare themselves the Ambi- Ellen <hes> RBM. and. That means that you can end up. Not Trying to end up. Hating the existing biographies as they exist, and so, that's what I think happened. I don't think that it's a straying of. I think that it's just a structural thing and and the decision to create a decentralized organization which means that those values that are held at the top. Don't fall down all the way to the bottom because it's not a top down organization, so it really do think that that's part of

Emara Jones America trump Cath Tobin Saint Paul Minnesota Brooklyn assault Emara producer
'All Black Lives Matter'

Nancy

02:54 min | 3 months ago

'All Black Lives Matter'

"And also beyond black. Trans Women being excluded from the conversation. We've also seen trans men like Tony mcdade be excluded as well he was a trans man shot by police in Tallahassee last month, and some people have been fighting to have. His name honored at protests as well for people who don't get why he should be included. What what do you say to them? THEM WHY is it important that Tony's name be included if the Senate Trans, humanity and Trans lives right and I think the say people want answers from the Tallahassee Police on Tony. mcdaid on who they say was armed. They say was this who they say was that, but they're not really a lot of reports about what happened. It's only the what the police are saying. Happens. And then then a lot of people are also talking about. She's not a victim of police violence, but Nina pop who is them a most recent I'm Black Trans Woman. Who was stabbed? Then Roll Missouri in early. May so I think that the those that push. To include their names? Is Just Center Trans. People and Trans. Lives and black lives in this moment, and there was even a march the other day that Senate on stonewall where a group of activists did a march that was explicitly devoted to him. In the midst of the protests for George Void so i. think that's what that's about. What would a truly inclusive black lives matter movement? Look like to you. I! Think truly was the black lives. Matter would look like the movement that the three original founders had envisaged right, and we should say three founders you referencing. Are Patrisse cullors Alicia? Garza, and ultimately that's right. The irony is that two out of three of the founders of all living, and then two hundred or three. R LGBTQ and they when they started were deliberately creating a movement that was intersectional, and which is committed to fighting transphobia. It's actually one of their stated principles, but the problem. Is that because Blm? For sorts of reasons that makes sense. It's not a hierarchical organization. It's decentralized one through decentralisation that means that the local group of people who ever decide to pull themselves together and declare themselves the Ambi- Ellen RBM. and. That means that you can end up. Not Trying to end up. Hating the existing biographies as they exist, and so, that's what I think happened. I don't think that it's a straying of. I think that it's just a structural thing and and the decision to create a decentralized organization which means that those values that are held at the top. Don't fall down all the way to the bottom because it's not a top down organization, so it really do think that that's part of

Tallahassee Police Tony Mcdade Senate Tony. Mcdaid Tallahassee Ambi- Ellen Rbm. R Lgbtq George Void Garza Alicia BLM Missouri Nina Stonewall
"tony mcdade" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

04:14 min | 3 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"New HIV diagnoses well who are trans gender particularly transgender women of color experience appalling levels of violence and this violence is exacerbated by poverty and racism these statistics show it is not possible to achieve justice in a vacuum marriage equality and celebrity culture will not solve it neither will political agendas focused on unquestioned assimilation gaining rights for some while ignoring the violation and suffering of others does not lead to justice at best it resulted privilege unless we eradicate the systemic oppressions that undermined the lives of the majority of L. G. B. T. Q. people we will never achieve queer liberation and that again from Barbara Smith yes Merican lesbian feminist and socialist latest significant role in building and sustaining black feminism in the United States by the way I wanted to I wanted to mention here that season six episode three of the podcast making gay history which was released last year was about barbers Smith's you want to know more about her that's a cool place to go to check it out well that is a powerful piece mmhm so pick news out of the U. K. of all places and I've seen this going around several other places too but it's kind of cool of them to published this they they have a list of seven things that you can do at it basically it says how white queer people can help right now and the first one is to call for accountability most immediate thing allies can do is sign petitions and contact political representatives to demand justice for both George Floyd and Tony McDaid someone we haven't mentioned about here closet free before but today a trans man of color who is also the subject of of police violence a petition calling for charges to be filed against all four officers involved in in Floyd staff has so far attracted ten million signatures a separate petition petition is simply calling for justice for Tony McDade and at the time of publication has been signed by more than four hundred thirty thousand folks second the protest if you feel safe doing so consider joining a protest understandably not all queer people be able to do this if being in large groups and or around police pose poses a danger to you or if you're disabled and concerned about access or making a safe exit don't feel compelled to protest there are many lanes of resistance and each of us can't occupy all of them but if you want to protest T. to find organized demonstrations through social media follow trusted black organizers protest with a buddy and maintain social distancing a widely shared infographic has other good pieces of advice for protecting yourself while protesting and many of the old standard the pieces of advice around protesting safely have have come up again and I think it's a really good to relieve that sort of information in the times that we are in here the ACLU has a good you know no you're right right as a protester right on.

"tony mcdade" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

05:26 min | 3 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on Food Psych

"Hebert welcome to food sake I. AM Christy Harrison and I'm recording this on June second of twenty twenty, when there is a revolution happening for racial justice, and I'm so here for it because I believe that black lives matter and I support justice for George Floyd and Brianna Taylor and RB. And Tony mcdade and all the other black people who've had their lives taken from them over the years through the racist actions of police and vigilantes, and this racist murder has to stop so honor of the movement to defend black lives, and also in recognition of the fact that the Anti Diet Movement must also be an anti-racist movement because. Is Built on a foundation of racism as you heard in the episode with Sabrina strings that I reposted last week. This week. I wanted to re post another. With a brilliant black thinker and writer who speaks to some of the racial justice issues that are connected to this anti at work. This interviews from three years ago in July of twenty seven team, and it's with amazing writer and body Liberation Activists Sonya, Renee Taylor. Sonia has been instrumental in helping make the eating disorders and body positivity space, more aware of racism at its intersections with Diet Culture and eating disorders for a long time. She's been doing this work for many years I. I heard of her and. And saw her in two thousand fifteen when she was presenting at eating. Disorders Conference and so I want to honor her contribution to this work and to this field and make sure that you all go check out her work. Her website is Sonya. Renee Taylor Dot. com and she has a great book called. The body is not an apology that I. highly recommend reading as well. So in this interview that we did three years ago, we discussed why we need more radical body love in the world how to deal with weight gain and weight stigma while learning intuitive eating, what means stream body positivity get so wrong why understanding oppression and racism and intersecting identities is key to creating a world that's truly body positive and truly liberated how to navigate diet culture as a body acceptance activists how to begin to untangle internalized oppression, and so much more. It's a great conversation. I cannot wait to share it with you in just. Just a moment I'm not going to be answering listener question this week because I want to use this time to share some resources for folks who like me are still learning about anti-racism and working to do better, and that's not everyone listening. There are some folks here who are already so far into the anti-racist work and don't need these resources and are leading the way and I wanna thank you for doing that work. Especially, my black listeners and other listeners of color who've been on the front lines of this antiracism work for so long. So, thank you for your work. And to all my black listeners I wanNA send you empathy and compassion and support for what you're going through in this difficult time and descend solidarity, and to say that black lives matter and I'm with you in whatever way I can be. And for those of you, listening who have the unearned social privilege that comes with being white or white passing in this racist culture I wanNA. Call on you to start and or continue engaging in a practice of anti-racism in whatever way you can, because we truly cannot work for body liberation if we're not working for antiracism and I think on a Taylor does such a great job of explaining that her notion of radical body positivity that you'll hear about in a moment I am by. No means an expert on anti-racism as As I'm sure you can imagine right. I'm someone with white privilege. For the last several years I have been making a conscious effort to learn about anti-racism and to unlearn the racist culture that we're all born into, but you know I realized recently with this latest uprising that my anti-racist efforts had become a little passive had become not as active as I would like them to be and I'll talk more about that in the interview airing next week with Mony Melton because I, think she has some really important perspectives on that. Also I'm a white person with a lifetime of being steeped in this racist culture as so many of us are so I'll probably always be on learning, but I'm committed to making the effort and to listening to and learning from people who know way more about this stuff than I do. So from a perspective of someone who's very much still learning, I wanted to share a few resources that I've found helpful in my anti-racism education. I'm giving some sort of more general racism resources. Because as I'm recording this I don't know where the revolution will be. By the time you hear this episode I don't know what's going to be needed on the grounds. I wanted to just give you a few places to start people. People to follow to learn more get more information on social media and all that stuff so i. a couple of books that I love so you WanNa talk about race bypassed food site gassed Joma Aluko. It's a wonderful starting point a wonderful jumping off point if you are new to antiracism work and she even says like that's what she recommends it for. She wants to be a first step for people, not an end point. <hes> an anti-racist by Abram ex. Candy is also a wonderful book and he also says like. Stop reading. My Book. Take that as a starting point and go from there and take use it to take action. Just think that the reading reading of the book is the only

writer Renee Taylor Brianna Taylor Renee Taylor Dot. Tony mcdade twenty twenty Sabrina Christy Harrison murder George Floyd Sonya Taylor Sonia Mony Melton Joma Aluko Layla twitter Abram Candy
How to Cultivate Radical Body Love with Sonya Renee Taylor

Food Psych

05:26 min | 3 months ago

How to Cultivate Radical Body Love with Sonya Renee Taylor

"Hebert welcome to food sake I. AM Christy Harrison and I'm recording this on June second of twenty twenty, when there is a revolution happening for racial justice, and I'm so here for it because I believe that black lives matter and I support justice for George Floyd and Brianna Taylor and RB. And Tony mcdade and all the other black people who've had their lives taken from them over the years through the racist actions of police and vigilantes, and this racist murder has to stop so honor of the movement to defend black lives, and also in recognition of the fact that the Anti Diet Movement must also be an anti-racist movement because. Is Built on a foundation of racism as you heard in the episode with Sabrina strings that I reposted last week. This week. I wanted to re post another. With a brilliant black thinker and writer who speaks to some of the racial justice issues that are connected to this anti at work. This interviews from three years ago in July of twenty seven team, and it's with amazing writer and body Liberation Activists Sonya, Renee Taylor. Sonia has been instrumental in helping make the eating disorders and body positivity space, more aware of racism at its intersections with Diet Culture and eating disorders for a long time. She's been doing this work for many years I. I heard of her and. And saw her in two thousand fifteen when she was presenting at eating. Disorders Conference and so I want to honor her contribution to this work and to this field and make sure that you all go check out her work. Her website is Sonya. Renee Taylor Dot. com and she has a great book called. The body is not an apology that I. highly recommend reading as well. So in this interview that we did three years ago, we discussed why we need more radical body love in the world how to deal with weight gain and weight stigma while learning intuitive eating, what means stream body positivity get so wrong why understanding oppression and racism and intersecting identities is key to creating a world that's truly body positive and truly liberated how to navigate diet culture as a body acceptance activists how to begin to untangle internalized oppression, and so much more. It's a great conversation. I cannot wait to share it with you in just. Just a moment I'm not going to be answering listener question this week because I want to use this time to share some resources for folks who like me are still learning about anti-racism and working to do better, and that's not everyone listening. There are some folks here who are already so far into the anti-racist work and don't need these resources and are leading the way and I wanna thank you for doing that work. Especially, my black listeners and other listeners of color who've been on the front lines of this antiracism work for so long. So, thank you for your work. And to all my black listeners I wanNA send you empathy and compassion and support for what you're going through in this difficult time and descend solidarity, and to say that black lives matter and I'm with you in whatever way I can be. And for those of you, listening who have the unearned social privilege that comes with being white or white passing in this racist culture I wanNA. Call on you to start and or continue engaging in a practice of anti-racism in whatever way you can, because we truly cannot work for body liberation if we're not working for antiracism and I think on a Taylor does such a great job of explaining that her notion of radical body positivity that you'll hear about in a moment I am by. No means an expert on anti-racism as As I'm sure you can imagine right. I'm someone with white privilege. For the last several years I have been making a conscious effort to learn about anti-racism and to unlearn the racist culture that we're all born into, but you know I realized recently with this latest uprising that my anti-racist efforts had become a little passive had become not as active as I would like them to be and I'll talk more about that in the interview airing next week with Mony Melton because I, think she has some really important perspectives on that. Also I'm a white person with a lifetime of being steeped in this racist culture as so many of us are so I'll probably always be on learning, but I'm committed to making the effort and to listening to and learning from people who know way more about this stuff than I do. So from a perspective of someone who's very much still learning, I wanted to share a few resources that I've found helpful in my anti-racism education. I'm giving some sort of more general racism resources. Because as I'm recording this I don't know where the revolution will be. By the time you hear this episode I don't know what's going to be needed on the grounds. I wanted to just give you a few places to start people. People to follow to learn more get more information on social media and all that stuff so i. a couple of books that I love so you WanNa talk about race bypassed food site gassed Joma Aluko. It's a wonderful starting point a wonderful jumping off point if you are new to antiracism work and she even says like that's what she recommends it for. She wants to be a first step for people, not an end point. an anti-racist by Abram ex. Candy is also a wonderful book and he also says like. Stop reading. My Book. Take that as a starting point and go from there and take use it to take action. Just think that the reading reading of the book is the only

Writer Renee Taylor Renee Taylor Dot. Brianna Taylor Twenty Twenty Tony Mcdade Sabrina Hebert Sonya Murder George Floyd Christy Harrison Taylor Sonia Mony Melton Joma Aluko Candy Abram
"tony mcdade" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

08:46 min | 3 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

"Cities and towns across the country. Protests have broken out telling the police killings of George, Floyd. We honor Taylor Tony mcdade others while many of these protests were peaceful. Others have turned violent with buildings, being destroyed or looted in clashes, breaking out between the police and protesters. In light of these events, we wanted to bring you an episode from our archives to better understand some of the history behind the black lives matter protests why protests sometimes turned violent how governments often respond and what the role of social media is all of this? This episode was originally recorded with Avi Green in two thousand seventeen, and we're bringing it you a bit earlier this week. Our usual schedule given this weekend's offense. Hi I'm Miranda Kelly, and this is the scholars strategy network Snow Jargon. Each week. We discussed in American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon. In this archive episode Avi spoke with Professor Ashley Howard She's an assistant professor of African American history at the University of Iowa shears their conversation. Professor Howard. Thanks for coming on new jargon. Thank you for having me. Why did these protests happen? Well there's no one easy answer, but if I were to give an umbrella term to why they happen is that people feel that they are not receiving equal treatment under the law or in society, and they feel that all of the established means getting equal treatment have failed them. You mean in a way. They're sort of fed up and sick and tired, absolutely fed up in sick and tired I think this is something that people often forget when we think about not only the uprisings or the violent protests that happened in the past two or three years, but also looking historically that there are lots of preceding events that occur beforehand there. There were marches there protester letters of indignation. There were speeches given fun of City Councils, and for whatever reason those cries. Those grievances were gone unheeded unheard, and because of that people take to the streets, and it gets attention, and it's a very loud cry for help and for acknowledged professor. How can you just tell me about one protests from beginning to end? I would love so I'd like to start with kind of the protests. That's been nearest and dearest to my heart. It's the one that I've been researching the longest, and it also takes place in my hometown of Omaha. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six fourth of July weekend. There are a group of young people. In a parking lot of the Safeway Grocery store on North Twenty four straight. And this kind of an area where people congregate and it was. Evening. GOOP young people were setting off firefighters or firecrackers. A police officer comes. They begin to throw firecrackers at this police vehicle, the police kind of get scared and equipped takeoff they come back and forth, and this kind of sets it off people. See Police as indicative at this time of the state of unfair treatment, and oftentimes these police, public attractions are the catalysts for these uprisings, so over the course of three days young people go up and down North Twenty Fourth Street in the black enclave, and they set small fires. They break windows. They steal goods out of these stores, and the very much engaged in property, violence as protests, but meanwhile has this is going on. You have the mayor of the city Av Sorenson actually meeting with these youth activists listen to their grievances listening to what? What they feel is going on the community. And why love, starting off with Omaha is because Omaha had a long history, a civil rights activism prior to the nineteen sixty six engagement, and what was so notable is at the end double ACP, an urban league had been begging the state for years to open up an unemployment office on North, Twenty Fourth Street, and for years that desire for a building was met. You know was ignored, and by the end of the week of those three days of uprisings North Omaha got their unemployment office. While you know it's funny because I think the words are so charged when we think about uprisings or protests that end in violence that involves some aspect of violence on TV you hear about riots. Can you tell me a little bit about why you call them violent uprisings, and what you think of some of those other words? I mean in some ways. I think riot is pejorative, because it seems that when people use that term, it's divorced from the context in which people are participating at it seems as it's just want violence as a social and Beran, and not actually rooted in issues, and you don't violence approach as protests had along and storied history in the world, so if you think of Labor bread riots. In France in England. Through the green corn rebellion in the United States hey, mark an uprising working class people people without a lot of political capital engage in violent protests as a way to make their voices heard, and it seems that really in the nineteen sixties when blacks began to use this as a primary tactic in their. Repertoire of protest actions that really begins to be demonized in not lauded as you know the underclass kind of going up against those in power and so for me, I like to use rebellion or uprising, because I see these actions on a political. Continue up that you have protests, you have marches, you have demonstrations and at one end of that spectrum. Is this violent protests? It's not divorce from the other things that have come before, but it's the next step when those issues are continually ignore it. Well. It's interesting to think about the more recent violent protests in the context of that long longer history of protests and the longer history of civil rights and racial relations in the in the states as a white person and also somebody who's gone through sort of the standard His. You know I'm not a student history just like history and high school and all that sort of thing. Boy. Is there a difference in the way that we hear about the non violent protests. Martin Luther King. Gandhi all that sort of thing, and and then the way that Events like watts are described and certainly the way that the media today traits events like Ferguson. And there's a difference between how they were portrayed in the moment, and how they're remembered so watts south central l., A. Nineteen, sixty five. This is one of the first when the earliest large uprisings, and so there is the infamous McCone commission that came out where Ronald Reagan is referring to these folks as mad dogs and lawbreakers, and so even though they're pathologising to actions of the people who are engaging in this type of protests they. They. Still understand that it's rooted in politics. The kerner commission, which came out in nineteen, sixty eight, which looked at that. What's been called the long hot summer of nineteen, sixty seven, and that and that was summer with a whole bunch of protests and uprising. Something about that's correct. That was the deadliest summer and the one with the most amount so in the aggregate, the most amount of in terms of scale and scope the largest. Amount of uprisings, this is when you're and Detroit. Both happened and the Kerner Commission looked at this, and said that this is actually rooted in the fundamental desire to have full inclusion American Society and that it's this notion that had as Robert, focus and a scholar who wrote about this in the contemporary moment, said it's not a attempt to overrun America but to alert America. That's something is very wrong and I think when we look at it today, you know it seems. A bit as an anomaly, I at the time Ferguson has time of Baltimore. There was a black president. I think many of us had kind of been lulled into this false sense of security of a a sort of colorblind society. That racism was over. No longer are people using the end where no longer is. The clan burning crosses on people, Yar People's yards. It's over, but in many ways is racism became more systematic or structural, more institutional and hidden, and so these issues still exists is that people don't realize that they're

Professor Ashley Howard professor Avi Green Taylor Tony Miranda Kelly George Floyd City Councils African American University of Iowa
Violence in Resistance

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

08:46 min | 3 months ago

Violence in Resistance

"Cities and towns across the country. Protests have broken out telling the police killings of George, Floyd. We honor Taylor Tony mcdade others while many of these protests were peaceful. Others have turned violent with buildings, being destroyed or looted in clashes, breaking out between the police and protesters. In light of these events, we wanted to bring you an episode from our archives to better understand some of the history behind the black lives matter protests why protests sometimes turned violent how governments often respond and what the role of social media is all of this? This episode was originally recorded with Avi Green in two thousand seventeen, and we're bringing it you a bit earlier this week. Our usual schedule given this weekend's offense. Hi I'm Miranda Kelly, and this is the scholars strategy network Snow Jargon. Each week. We discussed in American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon. In this archive episode Avi spoke with Professor Ashley Howard She's an assistant professor of African American history at the University of Iowa shears their conversation. Professor Howard. Thanks for coming on new jargon. Thank you for having me. Why did these protests happen? Well there's no one easy answer, but if I were to give an umbrella term to why they happen is that people feel that they are not receiving equal treatment under the law or in society, and they feel that all of the established means getting equal treatment have failed them. You mean in a way. They're sort of fed up and sick and tired, absolutely fed up in sick and tired I think this is something that people often forget when we think about not only the uprisings or the violent protests that happened in the past two or three years, but also looking historically that there are lots of preceding events that occur beforehand there. There were marches there protester letters of indignation. There were speeches given fun of City Councils, and for whatever reason those cries. Those grievances were gone unheeded unheard, and because of that people take to the streets, and it gets attention, and it's a very loud cry for help and for acknowledged professor. How can you just tell me about one protests from beginning to end? I would love so I'd like to start with kind of the protests. That's been nearest and dearest to my heart. It's the one that I've been researching the longest, and it also takes place in my hometown of Omaha. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six fourth of July weekend. There are a group of young people. In a parking lot of the Safeway Grocery store on North Twenty four straight. And this kind of an area where people congregate and it was. Evening. GOOP young people were setting off firefighters or firecrackers. A police officer comes. They begin to throw firecrackers at this police vehicle, the police kind of get scared and equipped takeoff they come back and forth, and this kind of sets it off people. See Police as indicative at this time of the state of unfair treatment, and oftentimes these police, public attractions are the catalysts for these uprisings, so over the course of three days young people go up and down North Twenty Fourth Street in the black enclave, and they set small fires. They break windows. They steal goods out of these stores, and the very much engaged in property, violence as protests, but meanwhile has this is going on. You have the mayor of the city Av Sorenson actually meeting with these youth activists listen to their grievances listening to what? What they feel is going on the community. And why love, starting off with Omaha is because Omaha had a long history, a civil rights activism prior to the nineteen sixty six engagement, and what was so notable is at the end double ACP, an urban league had been begging the state for years to open up an unemployment office on North, Twenty Fourth Street, and for years that desire for a building was met. You know was ignored, and by the end of the week of those three days of uprisings North Omaha got their unemployment office. While you know it's funny because I think the words are so charged when we think about uprisings or protests that end in violence that involves some aspect of violence on TV you hear about riots. Can you tell me a little bit about why you call them violent uprisings, and what you think of some of those other words? I mean in some ways. I think riot is pejorative, because it seems that when people use that term, it's divorced from the context in which people are participating at it seems as it's just want violence as a social and Beran, and not actually rooted in issues, and you don't violence approach as protests had along and storied history in the world, so if you think of Labor bread riots. In France in England. Through the green corn rebellion in the United States hey, mark an uprising working class people people without a lot of political capital engage in violent protests as a way to make their voices heard, and it seems that really in the nineteen sixties when blacks began to use this as a primary tactic in their. Repertoire of protest actions that really begins to be demonized in not lauded as you know the underclass kind of going up against those in power and so for me, I like to use rebellion or uprising, because I see these actions on a political. Continue up that you have protests, you have marches, you have demonstrations and at one end of that spectrum. Is this violent protests? It's not divorce from the other things that have come before, but it's the next step when those issues are continually ignore it. Well. It's interesting to think about the more recent violent protests in the context of that long longer history of protests and the longer history of civil rights and racial relations in the in the states as a white person and also somebody who's gone through sort of the standard His. You know I'm not a student history just like history and high school and all that sort of thing. Boy. Is there a difference in the way that we hear about the non violent protests. Martin Luther King. Gandhi all that sort of thing, and and then the way that Events like watts are described and certainly the way that the media today traits events like Ferguson. And there's a difference between how they were portrayed in the moment, and how they're remembered so watts south central l., A. Nineteen, sixty five. This is one of the first when the earliest large uprisings, and so there is the infamous McCone commission that came out where Ronald Reagan is referring to these folks as mad dogs and lawbreakers, and so even though they're pathologising to actions of the people who are engaging in this type of protests they. They. Still understand that it's rooted in politics. The kerner commission, which came out in nineteen, sixty eight, which looked at that. What's been called the long hot summer of nineteen, sixty seven, and that and that was summer with a whole bunch of protests and uprising. Something about that's correct. That was the deadliest summer and the one with the most amount so in the aggregate, the most amount of in terms of scale and scope the largest. Amount of uprisings, this is when you're and Detroit. Both happened and the Kerner Commission looked at this, and said that this is actually rooted in the fundamental desire to have full inclusion American Society and that it's this notion that had as Robert, focus and a scholar who wrote about this in the contemporary moment, said it's not a attempt to overrun America but to alert America. That's something is very wrong and I think when we look at it today, you know it seems. A bit as an anomaly, I at the time Ferguson has time of Baltimore. There was a black president. I think many of us had kind of been lulled into this false sense of security of a a sort of colorblind society. That racism was over. No longer are people using the end where no longer is. The clan burning crosses on people, Yar People's yards. It's over, but in many ways is racism became more systematic or structural, more institutional and hidden, and so these issues still exists is that people don't realize that they're

Omaha Kerner Commission Professor Ashley Howard Ferguson Avi Green Miranda Kelly Taylor Tony A. Nineteen Safeway Grocery Professor George Martin Luther King Ronald Reagan City Councils United States America Assistant Professor
"tony mcdade" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

04:59 min | 3 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

"Professor Howard. Thanks for coming on new jargon. Thank you for having me. Why did these protests happen? Well there's no one easy answer, but if I were to give an umbrella term to why they happen is that people feel that they are not receiving equal treatment under the law or in society, and they feel that all of the established means getting equal treatment have failed them. You mean in a way. They're sort of fed up and sick and tired, absolutely fed up in sick and tired I think this is something that people often forget when we think about not only the uprisings or the violent protests that happened in the past two or three years, but also looking historically that there are lots of preceding events that occur beforehand there. There were marches there protester letters of indignation. There were speeches given fun of City Councils, and for whatever reason those cries. Those grievances were gone unheeded unheard, and because of that people take to the streets, and it gets attention, and it's a very loud cry for help and for acknowledged professor. How can you just tell me about one protests from beginning to end? I would love so I'd like to start with kind of the protests. That's been nearest and dearest to my heart. It's the one that I've been researching the longest, and it also takes place in my hometown of Omaha. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six fourth of July weekend. There are a group of young people. In a parking lot of the Safeway Grocery store on North Twenty four straight. And this kind of an area where people congregate and it was. Evening. GOOP young people were setting off firefighters or firecrackers. A police officer comes. They begin to throw firecrackers at this police vehicle, the police kind of get scared and equipped takeoff they come back and forth, and this kind of sets it off people. See Police as indicative at this time of the state of unfair treatment, and oftentimes these police, public attractions are the catalysts for these uprisings, so over the course of three days young people go up and down North Twenty Fourth Street in the black enclave, and they set small fires. They break windows. They steal goods out of these stores, and the very much engaged in property, violence as protests, but meanwhile has this is going on. You have the mayor of the city Av Sorenson actually meeting with these youth activists listen to their grievances listening to what? What they feel is going on the community. And why love, starting off with Omaha is because Omaha had a long history, a civil rights activism prior to the nineteen sixty six <hes> engagement, and what was so notable is at the end double ACP, an urban league had been begging the state for years to open up an unemployment office on North, Twenty Fourth Street, and for years that desire for a building was met. You know was ignored, and by the end of the week of those three days of uprisings North Omaha got their unemployment office. While you know it's funny because I think the words are so charged when we think about uprisings or protests that end in violence that involves some aspect of violence on TV you hear about riots. Can you tell me a little bit about why you call them violent uprisings, and what you think of some of those other words? I mean in some ways. I think riot is pejorative, because it seems that when people use that term, it's divorced from the context in which people are participating at <hes>, it seems as it's just want violence as a social and Beran, and not actually rooted in issues, and you don't violence approach as protests had along and storied history <hes> in the world, so if you think of Labor bread riots. In France in England. Through the green corn rebellion in the United States hey, mark an uprising working class people people without a lot of political capital engage in violent protests as a way to make their voices heard, and it seems that really in the nineteen sixties when blacks began to use this as a primary tactic in their. Repertoire of protest actions that really begins to be demonized in not lauded as you know the underclass kind of going up against those in power <hes>, and so for me, I like to use rebellion or uprising, because I see these actions on a political. Continue up that you have protests, you have marches, you have demonstrations and at one end of that spectrum. Is this violent protests? It's not divorce from the other things that have come before, but it's the next step when those issues are continually ignore it.

Professor Ashley Howard professor Avi Green Taylor Tony Miranda Kelly George Floyd City Councils African American University of Iowa
"tony mcdade" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

06:58 min | 4 months ago

"tony mcdade" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Way if he fucked up and made a mistake. That's one of those like one in a million fuck ups. So I, understand people not giving him the benefit of the doubt. You know what I mean because that's such was the is it and is value away? who if how call yourself a family friend? If you don't know that Greg I'm a stranger and I know that that's like all I know you don't. Like like they've done press toys about this A. Different like I. Don't know how you cannot know this like. Are you just like? You know what it is. It's like China Cain scamming I. Hope Shocking is a scam 'cause if not, he's the worst fucking. Find raise of all time. And that's how it feels to me like I. Actually Hope he's just being transferred because if. You're the worst family friend they've ever had like. Don't be then. Don't even bring that part of I'm actually have family enemy I hate this child I hate their parents and I'm fucking and I'm also probably like Bra. How did you fuck up this man? Bay for everybody's sake. I hope it was just a mistake, but I can't imagine making a mistake that that bad. Debt Like posted everywhere and you know Gabby is very outspoken and shit and. Gary said nothing about it yet. Maybe you know. Maybe. Maybe I missed something but I if she ain't said nothing. Is a bad look 'cause she's. Gabrielle Union off list. Baby yet. NOMO cookout so events than anything else they get planned. Yeah, I'll see Yeah. Honestly hurts. Say about it so I. I don't know man she tweeting about the rise and shit right now, so it had been hilarious. They was like ooh. What she just. She ignored the fuck out of this year so I don't know. At the Terry crews did around she probably office. She probably off of us for a while. in others terrible news or black tradesman was shot dead by White Cop in Florida's third fatal police shooting in two months. Oh Tony mcdade. A Black Trans man was shot, and of course we had to go through the whole thing. Miss, gender. Miss dead naming, and so it was really confusing. People was like you what happened in the shooting and you know all that stuff. They heard name and all this and people find out more information. It's like Oh, the media and the police MS gender, despite in all the stuff whereas they may twenty, seven hundred weekday, was shot and killed by police officer in Tallahassee North Florida local news, which along with Florida Police Department initially. Miss Gender Day reported that he was a suspect in a fatal stabbing Tallahassee police chief Lars reveal. told reporters at a news briefing the suspect when that stabbing fled on foot and description was provided to responding offices. The suspect's description that was broadcast was a black male wearing all black balled armed with a knife. officers will call around ten five am shortly after the identify man happy staff. He later died from his injuries fifteen minutes after being provided with descriptions, officers confronted Tony mcdaid on a nearby. Street in Parma Complex. He was shot by an unnamed white police officer died in hospital at least eleven, other or genetics, people have been fatally shot or killed by other violent means eight, twenty twenty. You know I wonder if the number this year is going to fall because people can go outside. Some of those. That's the only life positive of of this Kinda Shit is like they'll be less school shooting because Noah's at school stuff like that. Problem. Down all those numbers drop the enlists victims all across the board and all. Districts. Yes, so you know of course because they don't have it on film. I think you'll see less people talking about this because as a black trans. Man You'll see less people talking about it, and also if it's true that he stabbed somebody and they die, you definitely see less people talk about it because you know people mostly like to bring up the cases, even black people. What a sweater! About this, but it kind of ends up being about it every time you gotta bring up the cases where the person was doing absolutely nothing wrong You know with seeing you know why. Would this latest killer name? They keep releasing new videos like. They got one where it's like. He was struggling with the police in the back of the car. It's like. Our saying is that doesn't justify killing. Rights, you have a job to do not. The killing a black person can't be the be all end all of every admission out you know. Let's see a youth pastor white. Oh, I see. A youth pastor claims he was kidnapped by black man to avoid admitting that he was in a hotel room. What Christopher keys has been arrested and charged solicitation of sodomy for attempting to hire a male prostitute, unfortunately his hope for night with the hooker cost typically keys was robbed by two masked men. It's hotel room, but instead of telling the truth. He claimed he had been kidnapped by two black man. Was The while story made his way to facebook. The whole story crumbled as quickly as good pastors reputation. Keys admitted to the beliefs while he was at the hotel and an employee told officers he was a frequent visitor to the location. According to the police admitted his married until I officers that he liked to play around. But that's not the story he wanted to tell. In fact, you tell obviously plan. I'll tell them his family. He was kidnapped. He told the police. I mean okay. He is white, so he knew that the cops wouldn't care. He might. Have the check into the hotel. When he opened his door, expecting hook up, the masked man stepped into the room before skis to the bed. Point where he left to go to pass this truck to take while another man came into, keep him from fleeing The government took his wallet phone. enke's was later. Recover in a Walmart parking lot. He's Auto Fran. He'd been carjacked and kidnapped by two black men who robbed him and took him to the whole tail. Now my question is did the people who were they black like? was he into black prostitutes, or is he just make up? Park has also racist. We don't know. As doors brass on social media. Star Rob Local television station car winner the story and wonder how they could miss the police before for kidnapping, the community at the investigating, they confirmed the whole story was fake, and got the actual story from the.

officer Tallahassee Greg I Florida Police Department Gabrielle Union Tony mcdade facebook Florida Gabby Parma Complex Tony mcdaid Gary Christopher keys kidnapping Noah Lars solicitation