18 Burst results for "Tony Kushner"

"tony kushner" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:31 min | 5 months ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"By Pulitzer winner Tony Kushner. Directed by Oscar winner Steven Spielberg. Also postpone the star studded costume epic. The last duel from Gladiator director Ridley Scott and the French Dispatch the latest weirdness from West Anderson, director of Grand Budapest Hotel. You don't think it's almost too seedy this time. Make it, Mr Crimmins. I can see that he's comes, were all shot, edited and ready to go in time for Oscar consideration, but their studios opted to wait. From a financial perspective. It's easy to see why. Until a couple of weeks ago, New York and Los Angeles, the two markets that make or break prestige pictures were still not allowing theaters to open almost as bad. The theater's elsewhere that were open we're reducing attendance to his little is 25% of capacity. That scared off. Even the commercial crowd was double Oh, seven. He wasn't at the multiplex. Nor were marvel superheroes or the fast and furious crew if they weren't willing to brave the crippling pandemic economics at cinemas. Why should Oscar hopefuls? So when filmmakers had the clout to say, let's wait. They did and who had that clout the same mostly male, mostly white stars, producers and studio heads who've always had it. Who apparently didn't have that clout. Well start with the women who made Nomad land and promising young woman or the Korean American director of the low budget. Indeed, Minotti or even the well connected folks behind Judas in the Black Messiah. Thies ain't.

Tony Kushner Steven Spielberg Ridley Scott Los Angeles New York 25% West Anderson Crimmins seven Minotti two markets Gladiator Pulitzer Oscar Nomad land Grand Budapest Hotel Judas in the Black Messiah Korean American a couple of weeks ago double Oh
The Trial Of The Chicago 7 With Director Aaron Sorkin And David Fincher

The Director's Cut

04:31 min | 7 months ago

The Trial Of The Chicago 7 With Director Aaron Sorkin And David Fincher

"Aaron thank you for letting me do this thank you for doing. I hope it's not just the right amount of excruciating. But but i wanna i wanna i wanna move this. I want to try to cover as much ground as possible. Because you know. I'm easily board but But i also want to give you But i have sort of subdivided in terms of you know just overall kind of progressions in in in casting and production and post production. I wanted to start. I I've always found your writing appealing personally. in the same way that i always love bill goldman's and and the reason for that is you're a decidedly serious person who is actually writing comedies about a dramatic ventures that have real stakes and end the example. That i have is like butch and sundance where they're debating the different ways that the super policy might kill them when he says they could go for position they can start a rockslide. That could get us that way. What else could they do. I'm treating the next line. But it's a could surrender of albion account on that. Tell me about and that was a occurred to me on social network that that you were that you were doing this thing that the the writing the the storytelling was extensively Comic in in. And i don't mean that in a derogatory lightweight sense It was wildly entertaining in talking about things. That were you know. truly dramatic and is not a is that something that you're conscious of or am my of of disappeared on my own. It's something that i'm conscious of and by the way bill goldman mentor me. Beginning from mike early twenties you know he passed away a few years ago. You know. we're very close. He was teaching me before we met with his with a screenplay with A nonfiction and then he a red by i play which was a few good men and he saw something in me. And if you want to teach me how to write screenplays but yes. I always think first of all if you can tell serious story. Funny you're you're doing yourself a big favor. Part of it might just come from an insecurity. Maybe a healthy insecurity of a comedy drama. I am not good enough at Either events do only one of them commit something pitches while or their other. I mean obviously goldman is one but are there other Heroes personal screenwriting heroes at. You can point to in sort of say this is. This is something off from them or their work. This is something that you know. Certainly tchaikovsky the answer is our number screenwriters in patty tchaikovsky For a host of reasons. Both my brothers herman joseph Billy wilder true There are things. I get from a contemporary screenwriters as well. Tony kushner quentin tarantino Amanda So i'm i'm i'm easily influenced i and the ad as a screenwriter at a now that a i've directed a couple of films I really i try to be a diagnostician. Mom I'll watch you watch film of yours Not necessarily social network Any of them. I'm end up a love. Something and i'll try and reverse engineer. I will try to in my mind. First of all figure out what it was i loved about it and then try to figure out how you got

Bill Goldman Aaron Butch Patty Tchaikovsky Herman Joseph Billy Wilder Mike Goldman Tony Kushner Quentin Tarantino Amanda
"tony kushner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

10:08 min | 1 year ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"Took all human parts away and left. This loosely assembled on appealingly package edged mass of appetites and put it in a suit with a ridiculous clown tie painted orange. Put it in the White House and all the things that you're you're saying are truth. This rampaging is is out there doing this stuff. I don't really think he necessarily needs to plan a look over this way. You can't not cover this stuff. If the president of the United States gets up and Speaks in front of a bunch of Jews and makes every anti Semitic comment. You could possibly make that has to be considered news. You can't you can't just pass on but I think that there's still with slight one of the things in talking to a lot of people because I've sent everybody know to see it. Go see so you really have to say that you have to. Because it's absolutely astonishing and funny and shattering at the end and the thing that's shattering I think for people. Is I think exactly this. That when you grapple with history. I mean. It's interesting to me that you say you don't like watching watching news but you read a lot of or you're obviously a lot of history and critical theory but what you're plunged into. That struggle with those issues is only really engaging to people who understand consequence however fitfully they understand it who understand that there is such thing as objective reality that one abandons it's at one's peril that there's such a thing as human community however frayed it is around the edges and in the center that we are all in this in in one way or another together that what we do to the least of us with the rest of us will pay the consequences if you get all that together and you and you're willing to sort of GRAPPO. Oh on that depth and it is one of the reasons we go to the theater. You know the past isn't past the present and its future as well but and that's terrifying if that's is true because then I mean i. I liked his model hope without hope. Democracy is impossible. That's the struggle ruggles of course there's playwrights we have the sort of great luxury of being able to plunge as deeply as our talents will allow us into into that morass. We don't have to make policy. We don't have to like work our way around. You know the tea party. In and the senator we control all the rules and there are no consequences at all as far as we know we don't even really have to take responsibility certain sense because we're not ordering people out in the street to do a specific thing we're just sharing our nightmare nightmares. which is really feels like this? So the side of the country has really been willing to grapple with this regardless of uh of its failings is part of the country that holds the life and the possibility in the future of our democracy in its hands and that we have to make common common cause with one another. I think because if we don't if we don't join and common cause in common purpose and there's never been in clear a purpose then getting rid of this creature in the White House we really put the Bath Tub. And it's all going to was so funny. I like everyone Okada. Hey I'm GONNA hate that. I'm about to say this or making me say it sort of I assert ready to play right right during the election. I started writing it but it was a play at thought about all through two thousand fifteen of into that moment because I've I've felt this. Rising tension been happening in this hyper articulation of things. That like I only ever seen hyper articulated in my high school in Virginia where I literally went to a Graduation party on a plantation home. And they were like this is cool with you right here me but it was a but the thing with people say those kinds of things in public more often. I would like have some viral clip from Fox News pop up more with someone just like says wildly like whoa like that. Sounds like my friend's Dad. WHO's a doctor from Martinsville Virginia but like and it was like a political person who actually had power and I've always said that slightly isn't about about trump because it's not it's about where I am who I am but I think that if there was one thing that the play was saying that like should be rallying cry and what makes his moment? The most urgent moment is that not only do we have someone who's like a hyper articulated like anti Semite in every single motion literally is a white supremacist. And it's like that whole. All Party was so they became hyper aware of their whiteness when the blackness and our president was President for eight years and like I think for eight years. They've Mike How do we get the inwards out of power. That's it's funny. You bring that up because I think one of the phenomena of American political life right now that is the most it's challenging and upsetting to me is the phenomenon of whiteness as an acknowledged feature. And I mean it. In this way that there's a intellectual line of people studying the process by which different say ethnic groups became white right the ways in which whiteness sort of expanded the ways in which the category was defined and that starts kind of project of the intellectual political left and then the notion of Whiteness and white privilege and what it means and what whiteness means in a political empowered sense. But there's another way in which people can think of themselves. This is white in a very explicit way which is a project of the political right like giving a white power salute. But we're dealing in a moment where like whiteness. As an explicit political political project is extremely at before the project of the understanding of it as central to the project of one of the political coalitions which which is making sure. There's a place for. This is the most charitable interpretation a place for an centeredness of Whiteness in an America. That should be fundamentally fundmentally. A White Man's republic that question of Whiteness means ends up hanging over the entire political discussion of the country and sort of aw digested and interpreted in different ways on different sides in some ways becomes kind of central object and a lot of ways of the fight will both Whiteness Whiteness. maleness are in crisis right. Now right exactly literally there is a crisis of extinction it's fake extinction you guys. You're you're not going anywhere you're GONNA be fine. We've wanted to trust a Lotta people. But no you're GONNA hang on for a while but I think that like like this relationship to whiteness as the great linked to power and like the only thing you see when you look power in something that is in threat right now the scary thing about where the left liens and that is that because of this conversation we're having around like representation who gets represented in how there's even a sensitive and liberals in their attempt to like be woke. Propagate this idea of like white extension. I'd be like wow you know I was up at screenwriting GIG. But no one's hiring whiteman anymore. That's literally not true. Look at the statistics like they barely raised on like Black Brown and women working in our industry like every a year. They're still like wow. How did it go up more? Everyone seems to say they can't get a job and I'm like I don't know how like every person job I was kicking true fear of extinction idiotic as it is. I mean is rising I think in part is a reflection some turning into like pollyanna take things are better than but I think that there is a that trope gets aired more and more because an African American men made it to the White House front because Shonda rhimes is is one of the leading television producers and and is producing shows with African American characters. Who are the leads rather than you know? Somebody's side kick. I've met people like it when we were doing west side story this last year when we suddenly went from being twenty twenty century Fox two part of the Disney Empire but I met the Disney diversity team and they're they're they're women and their color and they're I I mean it's the future there are massive changes underway and so of course the screaming and freaking out. You know there's no room for white people men as annoying is that is you have to expect it to get louder and louder the more ground they lose. Because that's I I do see it as kind of the market of a degree of progress. There's also part of what makes things perilous and interesting right. Is that those this. I think actually summarize a lot about where or American politics are people that are trying to sell things to America are very focused on diversity because they are trying to sell things to people who are thirty five and younger under forty and younger political power in America Recipe People Sixteen older. Yeah those are the people that vote in every election. Those are the people who population sense ends because of the baby. Boom there are a ton of voters up there and so there's a weird disconnect in America in which the cultural power or at least the sort of cultural projection or the target of cultural projection is a fairly diverse and heterogeneous group of people that are under forty and the political power is still with folks over sixty yes and and if you are and this is why it all looks super threatening from the perspective of white Christian conservative men of a certain age age because it really does look culture losing its mind but or like it doesn't have any place for you like it's it's changed crazily on TV and everywhere you look because like they're not trying.

White House America president United States Virginia Disney Okada senator Martinsville Virginia Bath Tub Fox News Shonda rhimes Fox whiteman Black Brown
"tony kushner" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"While you were writing this book, you ask your mom, what do you want your legacy to be? And she said, my children might travel and flowers. Yes, it's the essence of my mom doesn't sit 'n helping people. How would you? How would you answer that. Legacy. I thought about that. Oh, I've thought about it. Sort of sporadically in that actors must have had a desire for a legacy long before it entered the conscious part of the brain on some level because we know that we leave a legacy in in our work in our in film. You know, there's a tangible legacy for me. I, I don't think about the the gifts I wanna leave so to speak because there's sort of an emotional legacy in a spiritual legacy, and then there's like hard core things. And what I will say is that when when mom was diagnosed, it was hard on all of us, the siblings, it was hard on all of us, and there's a lot of. Duties that we had to take up that you really wanted your parents to have done. So I know for Mike has like, well, guys, I don't want you to have to go through all my stuff and figure out what's important, what's not. I don't need to have to figure out who gets this or that or another, and I definitely don't want to leave. Any of the, I just don't wanna leave the properties and things in in a in a mess. So I went ahead and got every I got a lot of things in order so that if anything did happen to me that my kids wouldn't have to make a lot of decisions, even simple things like, you know, if I'm not remembering who you are and if or if you have to take care of me and money's low, go ahead, put me in a home. I'm not going to be upset about that. I don't want them to make promises to take care of me forever. If they can't do it Marcia gay harden, it's been really lovely to talk to you about this. Thank you for that done. Are we down on that note? My kids can kick me out to a nursing home. Around leave it all your your kids and Marcia gay harden, and found her way to Canada your kids interview. They said, can you get on the line and gives eve, I can get mom and do a home that it'd be great. That's why we have it. You know, you have not in writing, but we have it on on Canadian public radio. That's it. No, we're not gonna end that here. Typically after every interview we play a song and there's so much music, especially with the music related to your mom in in your book, is there a song your mom would want us to play on the way out of this interview? My mother's favorite song is blue skies. Small and it may. But the song that I end the book with is everything must change. It's a beautiful song and it I ended with her flying in the clouds, kind of Tony Kushner's, angels, angels in America was my image of my mother being part of the healing of all of us in the universe that my mother's a part of that with her beauty, Russia gate heard much better in the interview. I think. Thank you. Thank you so much speaking to me. I really appreciate it. Thank is of the tone, raced Russia. Gay hardens. New book is called the seasons of my mother, a memoir of love, family and flowers. She join me from Santa Monica, California..

Marcia gay harden Russia Mike Santa Monica California Tony Kushner Canada America
"tony kushner" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"While you're writing this book, you mom, what do you want your legacy to be as she said, my children might travel and flowers. Yes, it's the essence of my mom doesn't sit 'n helping people. How would you? How would you answer that. My legacy. I thought about that. Oh, I've thought about it. Sort of sporadically in that actors must have had a desire for a legacy long before it entered the conscious part of the brain on some level because we know that we leave a legacy in in our work in our in film. You know, there's a tangible legacy for me. I, I don't think about the the gifts I wanna leave so to speak because there's sort of an emotional legacy in a spiritual legacy, and then there's like hard core things. And what I will say is that when when mom was diagnosed, it was hard on all of the siblings. It was hard on all of us, and there's a lot of. Duties that we had to take up that you really wanted your parents to have done. So I know for Mike has like, well, guys, I don't want you to have to go through all my stuff and figure out what's important, what's not. I don't need have to figure out who gets this or that or another, and I definitely don't want to leave. Any of the, I just don't wanna leave the properties in things in a in a in a mess. So I went ahead and got every I got a lot of things in order so that if anything did happen to me that my kids wouldn't have to make a lot of decisions, even simple things like, you know, if I'm not remembering who you are and if or if you have to take care of me and money's low, go ahead, put me in a home. I'm not going to be upset about that. I don't want them to make promises to take care of me forever. If they can't do it Marcia gay harden, it's been really lovely to talk to you about this. Thank you for that done. Are we done? Is that on that note, my kids can kick me out to a nursing home. Leave it all your your kids and Marcia gay harden found wage earners in Canada or kids interview. Can you get on the line and gay? See if I can get mom and do a home, that'd it'd be great. Right? We have it in, you know. You know, you have not in writing, but we have it on on Canadian public radio. That's it. No, we're not gonna end that here. Typically after every interview we play a song and there's so much music, especially with music related to your mom in in your book, is there a song your mom would want us to play on the way to this interview? My mother's favorite song is blue skies mismile in at me. But the song that I end the book with is everything must change. It's a beautiful song and it I ended with her flying in the clouds, kind of Tony Kushner's, angels, angels in America was my image of my mother being part of the healing of all of us in the universe that my mother's a part of that with her beauty, Russia gate heard too much better way to in the interview. I think. Thank you. Thank you so much speaking to me. I really appreciate it. Thank you of the race. Russia gate hardens. New book is called the seasons of my mother, a memoir of love, family and flowers. She join me from Santa Monica, California. Everything..

Marcia gay harden Russia Mike Santa Monica California Tony Kushner Canada America
"tony kushner" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"At sunday night's tony awards the musical the band's visit triumphed over spongebob squarepants negroes familiar properties like harry potter and angels in america had big nights to in between the awards there were singing and dancing and bruce springsteen on this episode of pop culture happy hour we're wrapping up the tony awards must be remember chef and television host anthony bourdain i'm stephen thompson and i'm linda home here with me and stephen is glen weldon of the npr arts death hi glen and in our fourth chair today he's an ingredient from the recipe we call pc h h classic trae graham trae hey how are you i'm good you'd like to think of myself as a little bit like tarragon not everybody likes it but occasionally good with shredded chicken absolutely in the first bunch of meals you ever had yes couldn't be couldn't be happier to have you with us to talk about theater i want to start out by talking about the play that won for best revival of a play because it's one of the more familiar pieces of the people were talking about last night and that's angels in america by tony kushner staged this time with andrew garfield and nathan lane and you know variety of of wellknown people trae what do you wanna say about angels in america this moment in our lives one of the big differences of courses that when it was first staged no one knew any of the people in the cast were and yet it also made this gigantic national sensation angels is a play that is shaping up to be a modern american classic they're obviously gonna talk about tony kushner and the same breath with people like o'neil and williams and these massive american playwrights who defined eras of theater and it's a play that should not win tony awards it's not a commercial play a seven hour.

harry potter america bruce springsteen anthony bourdain stephen thompson tony kushner andrew garfield nathan lane glen weldon williams seven hour
"tony kushner" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"We have it in you know have not in writing but we have it on on canadian public radio that's it no we're not gonna end it here typically after every interview we play a song and there's so much music especially with music related to your mom in in your book is there a song your mom would want us to play on the way out of this interview my mother's favorite song is blue skies mismile in it me but the song that i end the book with is everything must change it's a beautiful song i ended with her flying in the clouds kind of tony kushner's angels angels in america was my image of my mother being part of the healing of all of us in the universe michigan heard and that's a much better in in the thank is russia gate hardens new book is called the seasons of my mother and memorial love family and flowers she join me from santa monica california oh beautiful as that nina simone and everything must change the song suggested by marcia gay harden the oscar and tony award winning actor i love talking to russia about her mom that was really wonderful and if you want to your mom or you know someone who's missing their mom this mother's day the sunday you can find it online at cbc dot ca slash q or by going to our coupon cast.

tony kushner america santa nina simone michigan russia gate tony award russia
"tony kushner" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Right we have it in you know you have not in writing but we have it on on canadian public radio that's it no we're not gonna end that here typically after every interview we play a song and there's so much music especially with music related to your mom in in your book is there a song your mom would want us to play on the way out of this interview my mother's favorite song is blue skies small and it may but the song that i end the book with is everything must change it's a beautiful song i ended with her flying in the clouds kind of tony kushner's angels angels in america was my image of my mother being part of the healing of all of us in the universe michigan heard and that's a much better in thank you russia gate hardens new book is called the seasons of my mother memoir of love family and flowers she joined me from santa monica california oh beautiful is that nina simone and everything must change the song suggested by marcia gay harden the oscar and tony award winning actor i love talking to russia about her mom that was really wonderful and if you wanted to your mom or you know someone who's missing their mom this mother's day the sunday you can find it online at cbc dot ca slash q or by going to our coupon cast for more cbc podcasts goto cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

tony kushner america santa nina simone michigan tony award russia
"tony kushner" Discussed on Still Processing

Still Processing

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on Still Processing

"Yeah and the ways in which these absences have altered them right alec shocker would never walk into school with his brother ryan scott vehicle wouldn't never joke around with cameron at camp helena ramsey would never hang out after school with max do you know montalto would never waive her friend liam at lunch joaquin oliver would never play basketball with sam or dylan olena petty would never care lug would never chris hasten would never luke hoyer would never martine do yano would never peter wang with never elissa i'll head would never jamie guttenberger would never met pollick would never something about the way she expressed that straight out of this play and i mean just her repetition of the language they're just straight out of tony kushner to me and our last president but yes also true but but learned how to they learn how to have impacted meaning in a way that can't be overlooked and i think what sort of i feel really optimistic i felt i was very cynical about the march and some ways oh well it's just really tough i feel the same way i felt after the inauguration which is just that there are kids of color who deal with this every day and you know namie wilder who was an eleven year old from alexandria virginia my hometown sit up and said a lot of the names of kids of color black young women who had been killed by gun violence before after during the parkland stuff and so when i think about who gets the spotlight and who stories matter it really deeply affects me upsets me because attention is paid in some ways to white students that isn't too soon of color that said when i looked at the photos and i listened to the speeches and a lot of that went away because i can i can understand how collectively this is towards the same end and it's good openly it's good and within that i guess radic asian of cynicism i felt myself being tentatively hopeful that maybe this is a way to think about a blueprint for how not forward necessarily because change takes a long time and there's a reason that angels in america.

namie wilder jamie guttenberger peter wang martine luke hoyer dylan olena sam ryan scott america cameron president tony kushner pollick yano basketball joaquin oliver liam camp helena ramsey eleven year
"tony kushner" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"Danube just so much going on there in the end he just couldn't he's like i'm not a nazi i'm not going to kill these people and they show that in the movie and it's just to me that was what made this very powerful and there's another plotline of an israeli soldiers part of of the idea and they sort of the training that goes in and the practicing of this mission and and it's and there's also some great stuff with eddie morrison who's playing shimon fabulous he's just terrific and everything that i see him in and in the guy who's playing gets rabin well we're gonna talk about him or liar ashkenazi 'cause he's in my little movie and been a talk about and so there's great back and forth so there's three different sort of plotlines that they follow but again the main one is is about roseman pike and daniel bruhl in it's a powerful movie and i did not expect to walk away from it enjoying as much as i did good but i think through the sheer force of roseman pike danube room i just loved it and it was just very powerful because it shows you what is it very complicated issue and it's not just and dry as good and evil there's a lot of different things going on with this reminds me of one of my very favorite steven spielberg movies is still munich oh yes movie it's so powerful that blew me away because i used to think that spielberg was kind of a sentimentalist and that just shows you what that he can be tough and and it was written by tony kushner the play right and i and who also wrote lincoln and it's made me feel like when spielberg has a really good writer in that he can help execute the vision of like that's when he's at his really greatest and very best but this kind of reminds giving me a little bit of immunity a lot of that in it it's not i don't think i don't think it is good as munich.

eddie morrison daniel bruhl tony kushner lincoln writer rabin ashkenazi roseman pike steven spielberg munich
"tony kushner" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"A kariuki it's it's not it doesn't it doesn't work adapted argo one it b be says southern wildlife for pie lincoln in several linings playbook i'm fine with that at that is probably a hard movie to too to kind of fairly high dose had of take different pieces firm and turn it into a script this is a pretty mighty tony kushner i just don't understand what what went on there yeah i just i can't believe it a gun lincoln is like the what is one of the five greatest living playwrights writing at his at his peak like that screen play and the one of the most pleasurable things about the shots people fired at that script was his defence of it which was totally coach it to me the liberties he was proud to have taken with the connecticut senators with a connecticut congressmen and their vote against for thirteenth amendment well here's went on and then then widen they're just one best picture to i don't think people loved the movie but i think to not acknowledge that it is just like a thunderously rates are really well ridden screenplay i'm sorry k i still don't understand the parameters for that category well i mean she you her adapted screenplay what that did screenplay to me is like i i don't know what is the first part of what am i judging it on there's only judging by how difficult it was to adapt or a my judging and just by the script as good oh and it was adapted like nick it could be one or the other either depending on one or the other above i mean i don't know what they were thinking in terms i think that also they were just they wanted to honor argo as an achievement i think that was when i knew was going to really window richard argo this one is interesting 'cause it's based on two different things round see that very often you don't see him polling our or a writer polling from two different so i think it was a really hard.

tony kushner nick argo richard argo connecticut writer
"tony kushner" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"A kariuki it's it's not it doesn't it doesn't work adapted argo one it b be says southern wildlife for pie lincoln in several linings playbook i'm fine with that at that is probably a hard movie to too to kind of fairly high dose had of take different pieces firm and turn it into a script this is a pretty mighty tony kushner i just don't understand what what went on there yeah i just i can't believe it a gun lincoln is like the what is one of the five greatest living playwrights writing at his at his peak like that screen play and the one of the most pleasurable things about the shots people fired at that script was his defence of it which was totally coach it to me the liberties he was proud to have taken with the connecticut senators with a connecticut congressmen and their vote against for thirteenth amendment well here's went on and then then widen they're just one best picture to i don't think people loved the movie but i think to not acknowledge that it is just like a thunderously rates are really well ridden screenplay i'm sorry k i still don't understand the parameters for that category well i mean she you her adapted screenplay what that did screenplay to me is like i i don't know what is the first part of what am i judging it on there's only judging by how difficult it was to adapt or a my judging and just by the script as good oh and it was adapted like nick it could be one or the other either depending on one or the other above i mean i don't know what they were thinking in terms i think that also they were just they wanted to honor argo as an achievement i think that was when i knew was going to really window richard argo this one is interesting 'cause it's based on two different things round see that very often you don't see him polling our or a writer polling from two different so i think it was a really hard.

tony kushner nick argo richard argo connecticut writer
"tony kushner" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Because in 1992 one felt that there was some sort of hope and the main character this drag queen par walter embodies the kind of spirit the won't be quenched and i think for a lot of us now and maybe i'm speaking only for myself but i suspect not uh we do feel as if we're appearing constantly into the abyss and there's a in the play a very moving line the world only spins forward and i think in 1991 money to you thought yes that's possibly true and since then we had clinton obama now were at the trump presidency do you think gushed does the world on the spin forward does it also doubled back on itself might it therefore have even greater resonance that it did at a time because i as i mean i'm i'm sufficiently ancient that i remember the early nineties quite well of certain certain and certainly in retrospect cut decade now does seem coined of all the day from history in between if lightly full of the berlin wall and the full of the twin towers and things have since uh i guess for america and the rest of the will get a little bit more real is it possible that this these quartercenturyold play has even more exciting than it did at the time i think so and one very extraordinary thing that nobody could have anticipated is that the play is steeped in a very real and fee brow anger about the beginning of the second sort of reagan presidency and you know he was the bad guy wit large now of course many people look back almost in the style gic lay on the reaganera who'd of use that phrase as having at least the vestiges of a kind of compassion that has some have been subsumed by a pervasive malignancy and i do think one of the reasons the place still delivers emotionally is because whatever one says about the shape of the world and there are a lot of very grim and grievous things we could say about it tony kushner himself who still very much with us for a robust he's about to do a movie remake of west side story of all things a directed by steven spielberg the play is shot through with his generosity of spirit and that something.

walter clinton obama america tony kushner steven spielberg berlin reagan
"tony kushner" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"You're listening to the daily with me andrew muller tony kushner's play angels in america was written to capture a particular subject aids at a particular time and place the 1980s in the united states it did so to considerable undeserved acclaim following its premiere in 1991 winning its reuter tony's and a pulitzer more than a quarter of a century later america is a much different place for better or for worse but one of the rooms in which there has been progress in the medical treatment of aids and the general treatment of people who have it so why is a revival of angels in america one of the most anticipated openings of rule voice spring season when joined now by mud wolf the two critic for the international new york times matt as you would just saying off eh you saw rangel's in america on broadway the first time round an a brief reminder of water walls and why it had the affected well it's an epic for one thing and it's spliced together the political the sexual the medical the historical in into a kind of theatrical tapestry that we don't see much anymore hugely ambitious very rich and robust funny strange surreal and it isn't a chronicle necessarily of what it's like to suffer from aids if it were just that happily advances in medicine would mean that we've moved on from that it's also what it's like to be a human being in any time confronted with conflicts both macro and micro cosmic in difficult times and i think all of us would agree that the times now are very difficult as they were in the early nineties when the play was first premiered so to tony kushner was smiles and often alert enough to to imbue it we've we've universal and the tunnel frames in the in in the in the same way that you don't have to have unit faltered as in court to enjoy henry the fifth exactly right under and the funny thing is you know at the central character in the play as this garkhal prior walter who said.

united states rangel america aids andrew muller tony kushner matt henry
"tony kushner" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Like this bit about this in this and they put it there and everybody ran the anchor leg of vis relay for terrorists and i wrote a not bad in the time swore the fig leaf that they tried to use was while there's some newsworthy stuff in there for instance we see that on american hassle there was some pay inequality between jennifer lawrenson brown twitch my reaction was my god first of all okay if if that's the newsworthy thing then why are you still printing you know the studio reactions to adam sandler's movie or for that matter the fact that i was questioning the the casting of a a one of the actors in in steve jobs or all the angelina jolie stuff that kind of thing secondly if your concern is really the pain equality on american hustle why haven't you done any reporting out all why haven't you made a phone call to say are these numbers accurate did jennifer larence come on the movie late when there was less money did she work fewer days does she have a bigger backend is that the reason why am i reading these numbers right but that was for me the absolute low moment for the american press which i'm happy to see is making a comeback are at the final things just as fun quick rapidfire who's the writer whose most influence you had a chest who's the greatest working writer not named arendse oregon you could include man it's still won't be made tony kushner where do you do your best thinking and brainstorming in my car that i also remember from previous interview something about showers and copyrights showers i get my car when i need to have an argument with myself i at drive ramp i'll turn on music i gallison to in high school and i'll try to start a fight with myself to see if i can get a a scene going when i'm stuck during the day.

jennifer lawrenson jennifer larence writer tony kushner adam sandler oregon
"tony kushner" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Semantically uh is is is hard to do by the way it's much easier if you're writing a book in a certain way to do that but to do it cinematic lay uh in a non dived acted it kind of way i think that was that was a real challenge there are other themes i mean he his divorce his parents divorce is sir starts with them in a way with close encounters seen again et really autobiographically told an catchmeifyoucan uh and it resonates through many of us other other films the impact of divorce the impact of a broken family and yet wanting somehow to as tony kushner says uh like shakespeare's tragedies what's loss must come back again and that is a big theme in his movies and i think people really see him generally as you know because of the blockbusters people don't see him so much as a personal filmmaker but what what we discovered in the process of making this film is that he's a very personal filmmaker even in the blockbuster's but i've always felt that about him when somebody asked him ditch what did you learn from this film on the red carpet the other night he said he he he he saw he said i'd never connected to dots i have he said i you know i mean in even the movie he says i guess i am a very personal filmmaker it's not something that he'd spent a great deal of time thinking about but a lot that i think is because he doesn't really want to question where these things come from that he leaves that when i asked him if he saw any themes in his work he said sure there but that's your job.

tony kushner shakespeare
"tony kushner" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"And husband of tony kushner zakariya husband at such a ton kushner who obey i'm sure by the way mark harasses listened to it's going great you know i am my own person to mentioned the tony kushner thing too i always have to hear what the tony kush yeah he kinda do ease tony kushner we're going to do anyway fantastic story in the new york times buddy woman named a genie rousseau do cler all who was a spy in world war two and the article was spurred by her death at the age of ninety eight so johnny declare all was an amateur spy she spoke fluent german flawless germano accent and during the war a believe during the after the nazis had already occupied france she became an interpreter in paris rinse says he should the french businessmen representing their interests as they negotiated with the german occupiers and while she was doing that she used all the things that but we're true about being a woman in the 1940s to get information on the germans essentially she played dumb sh there's a wonderful line she said when she was talking to these germans she uh for instance when they spoke of this astounding new weapon the floor of a vast distances she would say i kept saying what you are telling me cannot be true i must have said that a hundred times in anecdotally worked so she heard all the stuff and passed along to the british and then she was caught she was actually caught a couple of times different times and ended up in a concentration camp and would not talk about her experience in the concentration camp after she did however meet her husband who had also been imprisoned and book involved in auschwitz.

mark tony kushner rousseau world war france auschwitz tony kush new york times johnny paris
"tony kushner" Discussed on By The Book

By The Book

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"tony kushner" Discussed on By The Book

"I think given the stage directions fringing america tony kushner's shows you should see all the wires stuff meaning wanting late on wanna kushner wants you to know like girl is no angel first of all let me say if you have not watch the hbo mini series adaptation of angels in america you should do it right now it is a masterpiece it is very topical and at holdup movies great emma thompson is very angela kardashian anger full but only god brad he's kind of like anti emma thompson anti angels yeah and he he just sucked all the magic ray out of my sentinel but honestly his scepticism was starting to rub off on me here we are talking at the end of we too but bums me out is it feels like one of those acting exercises that didn't work on you but you see at work on everyone you know and like everyone in the room is cry and your life i'm gonna look like are crying and that sort of yeah and so i feel like i feel like maybe if i hadn't gone to acting school this will be a lot more like oh my god but i feel like i've done the like get caught up in it i can't believe this is the happened you know like the steel so mystical bigger than me like maybe that's there she where he had this ruin you know why the working to full shoot of like prophet sold on instead of paying for years of acting school you could have just read this book the whole time ya regression feels a lot like acting school.

tony kushner america emma thompson angela kardashian