3 Burst results for "Tony Klatten"

"tony klatten" Discussed on Cineflek

Cineflek

03:52 min | 5 months ago

"tony klatten" Discussed on Cineflek

"Just. Like shoot the breeze about movies for like an hour it would like nothing would make me happier. It probably feel like enlightened it'd be like so happy director Rami friends with his probably Richard Linklater he seems like so chill and just like he seems like he'd be A. Gamble del Toro. He's Sut-. He's if you just listen to any interviews with me. So well spoken and he's just got the soft Spanish. and His. podcast oh. Yeah. I. Know. I should I should just like. Reach out to him. I think my I've told you this before by Dream podcast guests, which is not a question that I got question that I'll ask myself even what are your dream podcast guess May to dream podcast guests to drink podcast guests are. Gamma. Del Toro. So I'd love to chat with them. So I think we should do. A before sunrise. PODCAST. Yeah I'd love to I. Love. You WanNa do that joint to do that with before sunset or do you want to do them separately which one's which is makeup makes before sunrise the first one Yaojie the first one he can do that tomorrow. So feels out of question. Will you be doing any top ten rankings on the show which I think it'd be very fun actually. Especially, now that I'm doing two week I think that would be doable. We could do a regular episode. Monday we could do like a top. We do a top ten like top ten ROM coms emulate go back and forth time favorite. Ron. Comes or like just something like that and you'll be very fun. Very Fun getting suggests and Sophie Sophie is coming up on the podcasts by the way Do you know for what movie night out he do legally what? Really. Really, really fun one to record some excited for that. When the on the other day I, just like started I like was walking through the room I stopped watched a scene instill closer watched another. Just sat down and just watched half the movie. Yeah. My mom did the exact same thing just like this is funny. It's really funny and it just it's. I Love Okay I love that scene where She has her admissions video like. for Harvard and they're like trying to an excuse to let her in get. She's so cute and. She's. Of. A. To my missions. Clara asks if you could make a movie with any actress slash actress, who would be I know your answer would be Philip Seymour. Hoffman I do Philip Seymour often. L. The guy from marriage story it's name under ever love. I love driver I'd love to work with him on something that'd be so cool. I know one that we both overlap on foreign pugh L. Yeah she's great. Emma. Thompson would be in that. For sure for me I, just like I'd love to work with Emma Thomson I think more than anything. Bill Hader. Was Thinking Bill Hader too I think that would be number one. I think that like I. Love to get Chris Cooper in another cool thing these days I think he's like so awesome. Luke. Wilson, I'd also love to get something else. Cool. Though. I think I think my top few actresses be Amy Adams Tony Klatten Thomson. Brunelli top ones I just love to work with. Yep. If he could be if you work on a movie what part what?.

Del Toro Bill Hader Emma Thomson Richard Linklater Philip Seymour Sophie Sophie Ron director Rami Harvard Wilson A. Gamble Gamma Tony Klatten Thomson Chris Cooper Thompson Amy Adams Clara Luke Hoffman
"tony klatten" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

You Can't Make This Up

14:00 min | 1 year ago

"tony klatten" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

"Its meaning or or maybe was never really fully. Understood is how on the investigation of a rape to the victim often feels like a second assault and people say it and I thought well. Let's let's show why that is true. I had not been through that experience myself so I sat down and got really educated on what happens and you know once you learn. What the details are you. You understand what that means on a more a a level that gives it an emotional truth that I think gets gets lost or maybe doesn't doesn't ever land in the first place so it was really important to show that when people say that they really mean it it's not it's not just talk and you know interestingly. I feel like one of the things that feels. Hardest is how many times she has to retell the story and it's it's not a physical. It's it's not you know part of the exam. It's not taking samples she every time she relives it every time and there's no reason she should have to say it five five times when we when we screened the first episode at Fifty one fast in New York and it was the first time we saw an audience experience it there was just an audible gasp when one of the detectives puts down the pen and says could you just write it down now and you know I think what we learned earned in making it for those who haven't been through this experience is that even under the best of circumstances it can be such a unavoidably the dehumanizing process you know even when it's you have skilled and trained detectives even when you have conscientious medical professionals the the fact that a victim's body is treated like a crime scene in what that's like you know these are things that I think people don't understand and and back to seize the point about the nature of trauma and memory and the fact that I think I read somewhere that I think in Kennedy's book that Rape Victims that the way memory functions after trauma for rape victims like trying to put together the pieces of a jigsaw puzzle and missing some the pieces you know you in a crisis you sort of can fixate on one moment or something in a sort of act of self preservation in many things get locked out and as much as we all know this. I think on a broader societal level people don't they don't they don't. I don't understand that that's what happens. I mean I think we've heard it in in recent times and things like you know whatever you think of happened in terms of those hearings with Brad Kavanagh on whatever you think took place it was so disturbing because we are in the middle of I think of post production on this to hear people say well. Why could she not remember how she got home and then we were reading on this material and making the show and it's like absolutely understandable tandel that someone might not remember how they got home in the wake of extreme trauma so I I think it's you know making it was an education for us to one one thing though that you mentioned that police detective and there's also the character of the foster mom judith who sort of first begins to sort of articulate some doubts and the Lynnwood police detective at it would have been really easy to set them up as kind of monsters or like really callous characters but you're very very clear in your depiction that even though you're indicting what they're doing your clear that all of their mistakes are coming in their minds from the best of intentions they think that they are acting out of gentleness and compassion and that their frustrations are coming from understandable places talked to us about the way you wanted to depict picked those characters in particular the ones who doubted and we want to know too if you talk to them actual individuals yeah those those two individuals we did not talk to you know we had the benefit of Kenan t having done tremendous reporting for their article and then and then further reporting for their books so there was a trove of material the other thing was that we the the characters are inspired by real characters and the the actions taken are consistent with the actions taken in the real case but we've taken some liberty really to protect the privacy of the people involved but in terms of of the portrayal of those characters. You know what this is is a cultural issue. It's not a couple of really bad actors out in our society. If we just get rid of them we'll be fine. It's a cultural issue that every single one of US plays into to one degree or another so it was it felt really important to me to show that people with the best of intentions and good hearts can by a Eh by going along with the assumptions that are made within law enforcement within our culture about what victims should look like and should act act like can make horrible disastrous mistakes and I just thought it was it's a lot more powerful for a viewer to be watching this and say a yeah I could see myself making those same assumptions and then possibly looking at the understandings that that they themselves hold about these issues news and because if you just have a villain who is nefarious making these mistakes or bad calls is distancing. I'm from the viewer and the truth is I would like to implicate all of us in this. You know I'd like all of us to look at ourselves and look at the assumptions we make sense and and and make some changes because it's not GonNa change otherwise you know so anyway yesterday morning. She called and told me what happened. Yes I was just horrified. Find angry upset worried all of it. I went straight over there right away and the whole thing just fell off. Are you saying you think Marie made up the attack. I am not drawing any conclusions I just I woke up this morning with all this stuff spinning around in my head and I thought and you guys should have the whole pitch the context another thing that is so powerful about that first episode is you see the the impact that it has unknown Marie of not being believed and they're sort of the emotions that like we all think we would have a sort of your heartbroken. You're upset. You're devastated but then you also also start seeing how quickly somebody can go to just needing this nightmare to end. It is Lindsay and I were talking about this beforehand. How hard that portion of the episode was to even watch just wanted it to be over and I yeah and I was telling Linda that you know I think because of are reporting previously that like I have no righteous judgments about this. I like really get it but I didn't even this totally. This episode totally wiped away. This is judgment. I didn't even know that I had which is that like we'll but I would never recant right a rape. I would never just like we all think we'd never false confession. I would never say happen and you really feel in this like you. Just want it to end. You will do whatever the heck it takes to make that happen. Obviously that is what you wanted people to feel. How did you go about doing that. I can t really laid the groundwork because they you you know they're reporting of this was so strong and there was so much detail that just the facts of what happened in this case are so compelling you know that's that's what Marie went through Egypt. You you go go into it with everybody sharing the same foundational understandings of what you're trying to create create and if you have talented and and people working with integrity sometimes it works out the right way. I have one last question than when I just just handed over to lens here so one of the things that really stuck out to me then about that second episode compared with the first episode because in the first episode we see this case go horribly wrong and then in the second episode. It's very much setup is sort of the polar opposite of that. Another rape has happened but here is how things can go well. L. and here is how like the polar opposite of how a detective could handle this case one of the things that happened in the Nassar cases that it was a female out detective and a female prosecutor eventually who cracked the case and a lot of what they get asked or what we get asked about it is sort of like well is it because they were women women yeah like was there some sort of magic about just like their female empathy et. Cetera et Cetera and this is very clear about showing that it's not not just about being a woman having empathy it is about really good wording investigative work and that informed understanding. What what did you want people to take away about watching the detective in the second episode work on? I'm glad you said that it's not completely gender specific and the Truth Truth of it is those detectives in Colorado had so much more experience in investigating sexual assault than the ones in Washington. I think this was maybe his second or third sexual assault he had just come over from narcotics the one in Washington and and didn't have the training and experience that they had so training and experience definitely trump's gender I think so we eventually get to meet detective. Grace Rasmussen in is the character in the series various. How did you go about merging the real life personalities and experience of these detectives and Sergeants and and like what did you add. What did you want to make to make this work to make it to make the characters can blend in the way that they did because they kind of have this mentor relationship and I'm yeah no. It's it's an effect that I'm not sure I read in the original propublica peace and it's just something that struck me we we didn't again as I said before we didn't want to invade these people's privacy and have their private lives broadcast to one hundred in ninety countries that wasn't what they signed on for when they took on this case as detectives and so with their blessing we did a fair amount of fictionalization but the core elements of their characters I tried to hold onto as sort out of bedrock principles for both characters and then from those built a relationship between them and personal lives that supported the story story. We were trying to tell but those are those are are some dramatic license in in in service of the story. We're trying to tell reserve anything in particular that when you watch the series now that you really feel like you guys executed in a way that you exactly like he just really nailed it or any kind of like really standout moments for you. In this series I if you could only have people watching a one particular episode right like or or works late. I think you know our three leads executed every moment of this thing exactly exactly as we'd you know that are then we could have even hoped for you know. I think that we just had three extraordinary women and amazing supporting cast confusing supporting cast. I tell you though you know there's one moment at the end at the very end after the after the detectives have finally caught the sky and there's a scene with Tony did you did you watch the whole thing. I did okay so there's a scene with Tony and her husband in the car when she she's finally gotten the guy and it wasn't something she and I had talked about. I had thought a lot about the sacrificial nature of the work that these people take on and and the cost the personal cost that it can you know impose on a life and there's just a moment at the end of that scene which you've you feel all this really tough character finally show how much it costs her to do her job as well as she does it and and I just it surprised is me in the moment and it was so brilliant and moving and so that's that's one that stands out but it's certainly not the only one in the show there's also seen I think think I'm trying to remember which episode it's in. It's in the middle and it's the scene in the truck outside his home where it's Tony Klatten merit weaver mark in the front seat of a car for I think seven minutes and our director Michael Dinner who did a fantastic job with the the Middle Chunk Bank of this series he is not a fan of scenes that run longer than three and a half or four minutes and he was an certainly not just sitting in a car and he's a grocer. He's a HE'S A. He's a sort of delightful grocer. He grabbed a lot about shooting seven-minute seen people talking in a car and it was it was was it beautifully written scene and it was so just completely captivating to listen to have a moment where these two women who've been so much about the job.

rape Marie assault Tony Klatten Brad Kavanagh Grace Rasmussen Lynnwood Michael Dinner Washington Lindsay US New York Linda Kenan t Nassar Kennedy Colorado director Egypt
"tony klatten" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"tony klatten" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"Think by was i was very much what ching as a teenager without a love her back catalogue she's one of those and she yeah this to terni collects in my mind those the one of murals wedding have oh tony klatten that's the one of the six cents and hereditary toni collette nightmares so i don't know which toni collette albie feeling when she comes in she's gonna be very hopefully i'm not gonna feel nervous having to look at her and talk to her thinking about hereditary we'll be fine of course there a whole bunch of movies out as well that we need to discuss this week we go some reviews what will say we mccallum plane the pa book club that summer my friend dahmer lemon do blah and ishmael goose yeah quite low french in there yeah so this is what my half frenchness will come out and hopefully i'll do some good pronunciations and of course you guys if you want to join in with the show you can get in touch with us all the usual ways you know email mail bbc coda uk you know the deal text eight five five eight and you can find us on facebook and on twitter with attainment so let's have a look at the top ten the box office top ten in the uk number ten we have the life of the play you see this i haven't because i was i live in brighton and there was no life of the party available to me.

tony klatten facebook twitter brighton toni collette mccallum uk