35 Burst results for "Tony Blair"

Tony Blair Wades Into Vaccine Passports Debate

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:43 min | Last week

Tony Blair Wades Into Vaccine Passports Debate

"You've mentioned or the. The institute is also talked about favoring a vaccine passports and you know this is one thing that of course international travel will not continue for quite some time. It's something that it feels like. Has divided actually not just the uk but also europe for that matter with the idea of quarantines quarantine hotels. Why do you think vaccine passports are a good idea. And do you expect them to be taken up. I whether eucalyptus certificates pasta oughta validation. What would it be call it. It just seems to be inevitable. The countries will will want to know your disease status before you enter. And they're already demanding today. Dr respect to testing so many countries you can't get into outta We know the vaccination reduces transmission and reduces the likelihood of people getting the disease severity considerably. It seems to be obvious that countries hit for executive at Tourist industry of the tourists will wall today. Oh what's the disease status while the vaccination status of the people about sharon town with sharon restaurant way. So i think this is. This is my point to civilization. it will put in place of proper system. Now don't let a patchwork of different systems different processes validation topsy-turvy because you just find a lot of complexity in a lot of confusion

Europe UK Sharon Confusion
What Biden's America could look like

The Economist: Editor's Picks

11:22 min | 3 months ago

What Biden's America could look like

"In much of the world and nowhere more. So than among america's allies joe biden's victory has come as a great relief under his presidency. There will be no more bullying and threats to leave. Nato america will stop treating the european union as a photo on trade or its own forces stationed in south korea as a protection racket in place of donald. Trump's wrecking bowl. Mr biden will offer an outstretched hand working over simply on global crises. From kuroda to climate change under mr trump america's favorability ratings in many allied countries sank to new lows. Mr biden promises to make america a beacon again a champion of lofty values and the defender of human rights leading as he puts it in his acceptance speech not only by the example of our pa but by the power of our example allies are central to mr biden's vision he rightly sees them as a multiplier of american influence tuning a country with a quarter of global. Gdp into a force with more than double that he is also a multilateral by instinct on his first day in office he will rejoin the paris agreement on climate change which america formerly left on november the fourth unlike mr trump. He believes it is better to lead the world health organization than to leave it. He will reinvigorate arms control a priority being to ensure order new. Start the last remaining. Nuclear pact with russia is extended beyond february the fifth he would like to rejoin the nuclear deal with iran that mr trump dumped if he can persuade the iranians to go back into compliance inevitably. America's friends have a long list of things they hope it will do as it reimburses global leadership the demand stretch from places and organizations. Mr trump has abused such as the un and allies like germany. Two parts of the world. He has ignored such as much of africa. And it will not be smooth traveling not all countries in our style jake for a return to obama era politics when america lead from behind and blood. It's red lines. Several countries on nato's front line with russia like the way defenses. Have been beefed up under mr trump and asian allies like how mr trump has confronted. China talked a free and open indo pacific and worked on the cloud with australia india and japan. Mr biden needs to prove that he will not turn soft. His priorities will be to quell virus and improve the economy on both counts. He can count on little support and much pushback. If the senate is under republican control as is likely such troubles at home have probably also exacerbated. The country's reluctance to take on more foreign burdens. Who can be sure that world-weary jacksonians will come galloping. Back in twenty twenty four. Perhaps even with mr trump in the saddle so rather than pile demand upon needed demand. America's allies should go out of their way to show that they have learned to pull their weight. Nato partners for example should not relax defense spending just because mr trump is no longer bullying them. Germany should pay heed to french. Average to build european defense capacity. there is scope to do so without undermining nato europeans could lend a big hand to france in these suheil in asia. The quad could keep deepening naval and other cooperation. Japan and south korea should restrain their feuding taiwan or to make a more serious contribution to its own defense. I should also work with america to repair the international order. They can support efforts to resist chinese or russian rule. Bending many countries will want to join mr biden's efforts at concerted carbon cutting mr biden will face a world full of problems but he will also start with strengths. Thanks to mr trump. He has sanctions on adversaries including iran and venezuela that he can use as chips and among friends he can seek to convert relief at renewed american engagement into stronger. Burden-sharing is allies would be wise to answer that call with enthusiasm. Finally how princess diana shaped british politics netflix's flagship series. The crown has done a fine job of telling the story of postwar britain through the prism of the monarchy. The previous series nephew is in the mid nineteen seventies mired in the miners strike and the three day week new one which began streaming on november fifteenth. Introduces us to two women. Who were destined to change the country in profound ways margaret thatcher and lady diana spencer lady thatcher made it clear from the first but she was in the business of changing the nation. They design a spencer was a bird of a very different feather. Shy girl who had failed all her o levels twice and had no interest in politics she was brought onto the national stage for the soaker of producing mail as to the throne yet. The country is still living with her political legacy as surely as it is with lady. Thatcher's princess diana's genius was to mix two of the most profound forces of modern politics emotion and anti elitism into a powerful populist cocktail. She was one of the modern masters of the politics of emotion. Feeling the people's pain just as they felt hers. She repeatedly outmaneuvered prince. Charles during long war of the wales's because she was willing to bare her soul in public interview with martin bashir of the bbc in november. Nineteen ninety-five is now the focus of controversy as her brother earl. Spencer claims that it was obtained under false pretenses using forged documents. Whatever the reason for it. The interview was a masterclass in emotional manipulation at one pivotal moment. Princess diana acknowledged that she would never be queen but hope that she would be queen of people's hearts. The princess used her mastery of the politics of feeling to turn himself into a champion of the people against the powerful. The people's princess in tony blair's raise she patronized charities that helped marginalized folks such as hiv patients and kept company with pop stars and celebrities rather than with the usual royal wax. Books the most memorable music at her funeral was not an historic him. But a song by elton john adapted for herbert originally written about another icon. Turn victim marilyn monroe. Anti elitism was directed. Not at the monarchy's wells. She happily lived in kensington palace and received a seventeen million pound. That's twenty three million dollar divorce. Settlement plus four hundred thousand pounds a year but added stunted emotional state the traditional deal to which royal side allow them to behave as they liked in crowded kings have almost always had mistresses because they marry her reasons of dynasty not compatibility so long as they behaved with decorum in public princess. Diana regarded this humbug. She succeeded in reconciling the most. Jarring of opposites despite being a top tier aristocrat. Her family the spencers. Look down on the windsors this german carpetbaggers. She was universally known as die. Her death in a car crash won her a spectacular posthumous victory against the royal court. It produced the greatest burst public lack remission. Britain has ever seen and led to widespread demands that the royal should display more emotion. As if the damn cheek could replace the stiff upper lip as the definition of britishness. What would really do the monarchy. Good show that they had grasped the lesson of diana's popularity and editorial in the independent thundered would be for the queen and the prince of wales to breakdown cry and hug one another on the steps of the abbey this saturday. Cincinnati death emotional. Populism has threaded through politics. Tony blair presented himself as the people's prime minister. He championed cool. Britannia surrounded himself with popstars and urged his staff to call me. Tony the next conservative prime minister call me. Dave cameron a distant relation of princess. Diana's adopted this combination of compassion signaling. Hugging hoodies is instead of cracking down on juvenile delinquents and studied informality relaxing and kitchen suppers replacing previous. Tory premier stiffness. Both men were responsible to that emotional. Populism interfere with the affairs of state domestic and foreign policy choices continued to be conducted according to the dictates of reason evidence brexit tears. By contrast follow the diana's script they appeal to the heart rather than the had to win their arguments. They used feelings of patriotism and resentment rather than facts about trade flows. They denounced the elites for trying to straight the wisdom of the people in much the same way as diana files denounce the palace for ignoring the people's emotions lay turned on the nation's core institutions. Parliament the civil service the supreme court when they suspected attempts to frustrate their wishes they succeeded in defeating the establishment in much the same way as princess diana had by claiming to stand for emotion rather than reason and the people rather than the elite alexander. Boris federal johnson has reconciled the opposites. He embodies justice. She did a card carrying member of the metropolitan elite. He has managed to sell himself as a man of the people as she was die. So he is. Boris the first series of the crown shows a young queen. Elizabeth studying water badgett's english constitution under the guidance of henry. Martin the vice provost of eton who kept a pet raven in a cage and address the on crisis gentlemen budgets. Great work distinguishes between the dignified branch of the constitution. The monarchy and the efficient branch elected politicians implicit in that distinction is badges perception. That emotions pose a dangerous threat to the proper conduct of politics. The monarchy provides a controlled lead for them thus enabling responsible people to get on with the difficult task of running the country by using people's feelings as the fuel for her astonishing career princess. Diana broke that safety valve britain will be living with the consequences of the emotional populism that she helped to release for years to come.

Mr Trump Mr Biden America Nato South Korea Princess Diana Suheil Russia Kuroda Lady Diana Spencer Lady Thatch Iran Joe Biden Germany Japan Taiwan Donald Trump European Union
Blair and Major hit out at Boris Johnson's plans to override Brexit deal

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 6 months ago

Blair and Major hit out at Boris Johnson's plans to override Brexit deal

"British prime ministers he played crucial roles in bringing peace to Northern Ireland have joined forces urging lawmakers to reject government plans to override the Brexit deal with the European Union. John Major and Tony Blair say doing so imperils peace in Northern Ireland in damages. The U. K's reputation in an article in the Sunday Times of former prime minister say the current British government is shaming and embarrassing. The UK with legislation that if it passes goes against the very deal it's signed to allow for the UK is smooth departure from the you earlier this year. The British government in the European Union remain at an impasse when it comes to negotiating a new trade deal. And there's worry those talks could end up collapsing soon. They have until the end of the year to reach a deal.

British Government Northern Ireland European Union Prime Minister UK Tony Blair John Major U. K
Former UK leaders unite to slam Boris Johnson on Brexit plan

BBC World Service

00:29 sec | 6 months ago

Former UK leaders unite to slam Boris Johnson on Brexit plan

"British prime ministers Tony Blair and John Major have condemned plans by Boris Johnson's government to override elements of the Brexit withdrawal agreement relating to Northern Ireland. Mr Johnson said the legislation was necessary to protect the unity of the U. K. But in a newspaper article, the two former leaders said it would damage Britain's reputation threatened the peace agreement in Ireland and could prompt damaging retaliation from the U.

Boris Johnson Northern Ireland Tony Blair John Major Britain Brexit
"tony blair" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

12:40 min | 10 months ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Amanpour

"Fallout from Corona Virus Crisis. Questions about how to keep voters safe during the presidential election in the United States in November a casting more doubt on a process. That's already fraud with security concerns. My next guest is Stacey Abrams whose name often comes up as a potential running-mate for Joe Biden. She was leading the fight for free and fair elections well before the pandemic hit as founder and chair of the activist group fight. The issue hits close to home because Abrams lost a tied gubernatorial race in Georgia in two thousand eighteen off to the state purge more than a million voters from its roles stacey. Abrams joins me now from Atlanta. Welcome welcome back to our program. Stacey Abrams let me just ask you. You might have heard former Prime Minister Tony Blair talking about what's needed and I wonder if you had a comment on science based rational you know leadership to get us out of this deep deep hole in this tragedy in this economic pit that we're facing right now. What do you make of what he said? I think it's a bully down to the fundamentals. What he's talking about this competent. What democracies must show in this moment is the competence of skills of execution and of basing their decisions and rationale on science? And the facts. And what we've seen happen in. The United States has undermined the credibility of democracies around the world. Luckily we have counter narratives that are showing the competency works but one moment that Prime Minister Blair pointed to was question of who should lead the challenge. We have now. Is that in the absence of leadership from the United States. We're watching China us. It's fumbled response to actually De de legitimize democracy and other nations. They're the ones providing humanitarian support. They're the ones providing resources and the moment we see territory to authority -Tarian regimes where they get to claim the mantle of competence rather than democracies. That have I believe the ability to deliver? We put ourselves in a very fragile place. Not only for this pandemic but for the next international global health crisis me ask you because a lot of people were looking at the United States and very very worried even before this pandemic that there was a trend towards de legitimizing institutions towards de legitimizing denigrating fact and science all the way up from the White House and threatening the very nature of American democracy. Do you think this pandemic has has you know perhaps reverse that a little bit brought to the fore a much greater awareness of the need for not just but accountability science fat competence policy over just raw politics. Or do you think the reverse is true. I think unfortunately what we're seeing from president trump in the United States. What we're seeing from President Bolsonaro in Brazil is a false narrative that the worst is over simply by asserting political will and political want but we are also seeing luckily from governors both in the United States and governors Brazil is the importance of that second layer of government that state layer that local layer. That it's pushing back and saying that we will be competent. We will deliver for our people. Even the heads of state won't do their jobs. The challenges that we shouldn't have to rely on our mayors and governors to do the work that our federal governments were set up to do the challenge. I think that is embedded in. What we're seeing is that the diligent mutation doesn't stop we just simply shift focus we have to actually restore the capacity of our federal government store the capacity of our national leadership to actually meet the challenge of the moment. Because if we do not our ability to reassert the primacy of the Liberal Democratic Order is in Jeopardy Stacey aprons there are seventy thousand plus deaths in the United States of America. It's really very very tragic. It's been very hard hit. It is the epicenter of the world now with this corona virus in terms of infections and in terms of numbers of deaths. You can see obviously because it's happening in your state it's happening on the federal level. There's a huge push to reopen. You heard the president talking about you. Know the task force would be there but maybe it's emphasis in terms of trying to reopen safely. Your own state is ongoing. It's reopening right now and there is Forbes magazine which says the risk of exposure to this covert in Georgia has increased by more than forty percent since the state reopened for business. The governor is the person who narrowly a beach. You back in two thousand eighteen. What are you seeing on the ground in your own state? What are you hearing about this experiment of reopening right now the Friday before the state reopened I had a call with hundreds of Georgians in the most vulnerable part of our state This is an area where we have multiple counties that are included in the top forty counties for the highest rate of covert infection. And what they've said is that they haven't received the basics. They can't imagine reopening when they have yet to meet the basic standards of testing tracing in treating. But what we know has happened in Georgia across the board is that we've reopened too quickly but we haven't done the work of increasing our testing to a viable level every day. They're revisions to the number of infections in our state because there's a lag time in the data and it is not a decision that was grounded in facts or science. What's worse though? Is that because our populations are the least resilient we have some of the highest populations of poverty of people color who are who appear to be less resilient and less vulnerable to the disease we have the highest death rates among communities of color especially African Americans. I live in a state where we comprise thirty two percent of the population but blacks comprised fifty four percent of the deaths. There is a level of both disingenuousness but also of incompetence that undermines the question of reopening our economy. Because the bottom line is this. I've I've run businesses before and you can't run a business if you don't have customers. And if consumers came up helpfully and safely reentered the economy than the focus should be on the making sure that the health infrastructure is in place so the economic infrastructure can actually be sustained so then. Let me ask you about that because we've done a lot of reporting of course on these shocking statistics that show. African Americans Hispanics are suffering the most proportionately because they are the most on the front lines. Women also are the most on the front lines in terms of this key. Essential Workforce's out there right now. There's been another tragedy. A black man was killed in Georgia and I want to read what Joe Biden has tweeted about. A video that showed armored was killed in cold blood. My heart goes out to his family who deserves justice and deserves it. Now it's time for a swift full and transparent investigation into his murder. Some might say this shocking fact has been kind of overlooked because of the corona virus crisis. What do you say about the fact that this is still going on? I'm very privileged to be working with the group of activists that helped bring this to the four because it was indeed swept under the rug. This is a case that's been ongoing for several weeks. And it's been shifted from one district attorney to another. We are very pleased that the armory family is finally getting the attention they need. But what's more important is. The justice system actually works the challenge. I see is one of competence and leadership across the board any nation that allows justice to be served in meted out by vigilantes and not holding those people accountable is not just system and I'm very pleased. That Vice President Biden has spoken out so forcefully I to have called for an investigation that brings to bear the full resources of the State. But we also have to think about is. What's the next Aubrey case? What's the next moment of crisis? That is why the elections that are coming up are so critical. That's the only way a democracy we can choose the leaders who can set the moral tone for who we intend to be and what we have seen happen under. The current leadership at the federal level has been unable to meet this moment and unwilling to tell the truth about its failings. That's such a strong supporter of not only Vice President Biden but such a supporter of making sure that our elections be free and fair. Because it's the only way we can hire the leaders. We need to respond to issues like the pandemic but also to issues of justice like almost aubrey. So I'M GONNA GET Vice President Biden in a moment in your pitch to be his running mate but I I want to ask you about that. What you've been working on what you're talking about. Safe Secure Fair Elections. I said that you experience yourself what happened. When voter rolls had been purge? And we've seen what happened in Wisconsin when there was a you know they wouldn't allow full mail voting by ballot and it was in the middle of Corona virus. All you concerned that any part whether it's the election in November whether it's the primaries before that are in mortal danger right now from even happening Ju to this disease and Judah how it might be might be used when I create it fair fight. We believe that there would be some catastrophe that would assail our elections. I never imagined it would be a pandemic but we understood that we had to fight to protect. The infrastructure of our democracy and start to fix has been broken by voter suppression. That's why we actually launched in two thousand nineteen and we are fully embedded in eighteen states. We have forty three staffers across the country who are working on this effort including in Wisconsin. Because we were on the ground during the primary we were able to help man. The hotlines respond to the calls of concern and and the questions but we were also able to gather data and information that should support the federal desire and the federal imperative of actually putting money in the next cares package. The stimulus relief package that should invest in our elections. The calls for three point six billion dollars that will allow every single state. The scale up vote by mail operations and to also safely allow in person early voting and in-person voting on the day of the election. This is critical because we have families and voters who cannot use what by mail they may be able to have language barriers or they may be homeless or displaced by Cova nineteen and there are those who are going to try to vote by mail who may not be successful. Our responsibility is to make safest possible and the safest path is to ensure that early voting happens by mail and I would point out. This state of the Nation of South Korea began to experience cove. Nineteen around the same time as the United States. On April Fifteenth President Moon oversaw the highest turnout rate in the national elections in South Korea. In thirty years if South Korea a competent democracy can do it so can the United States. If we get the resources we need in time to deploy them to the states. Every state has the capacity to do this work. They have the standards that they need to meet the moment and we should have the desire to elect the people who can lead us out of this pandemic and into recovery. So let me ask you because again your name comes up over and over again about a possible running mate and the latest poll. Cbs YouGov Puts You Third Below Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris in terms of the favorites. Let's say and you've not been shy about pitching yourself showing your resume. You even played a little clip of what you feel is. Your is your right as a woman as a black woman to audition for a job even publicly. Tell me what it's like to be out there or dishing knowing that many people think you should certainly many people believe that it should be a black or Hispanic woman on the ticket. What what is what is your. What is your goal? What is the way you're doing it? The first of all the decision of who is vice president will be is solely the decision of Vice President Biden. He has done the job and he knows what he's looking for and he has a smart team that will choose and help them. Select from.

United States Joe Biden vice president Georgia Stacey Abrams Prime Minister Tony Blair president Wisconsin South Korea fraud founder President Bolsonaro Forbes magazine China Atlanta Brazil Liberal Democratic Order Aubrey
"tony blair" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

16:25 min | 10 months ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Amanpour

"Hello everybody and welcome to import. Here's what's coming up. We can't keep our country because we have to open our country as world leaders wrestle with how and when to reopen their economies former British Prime Minister Tony Blair off road map for exit from Corona Virus. Locked down then and as a young black woman who often didn't see people who look like me being asked to serve. When I'm asked the question I was raised to be honest and tell the truth and I answered the truth. Yes throwing her hat in the ring for Vice President while working to assure every vote counts. I speak with activist and Democrats Stacey Abrams and later I've never even knew. What was you know? Three months ago the private sector steps in to fill the holes in the government response Walter Isaacson speech with salesforce. Ceo Mark Benny off. Welcome to the program..

Prime Minister Tony Blair Ceo Mark Benny Walter Isaacson Stacey Abrams Vice President salesforce
Boris Johnson returns to work

Monocle 24: The Globalist

12:32 min | 11 months ago

Boris Johnson returns to work

"Now we begin the show here. In Britain. Boris Johnson has returned to work after recovering from cove nineteen. The British. Prime Minister's illness was severe enough to send him to intensive care for several days. A personal experience that he likes to being physically assaulted by an unexpected. An invisible mugger. Joining me now is Carol. Walker is a political analyst and former BBC political correspondent Carol. What else was Johnson keen to emphasize in his first speech since his return to work? Well I think the big point that he was making was that he was back in control fully recovered and I think he was trying very hard to convey the sense of figure and vm optimism which has always been such a big part of his character and his leadership but he also I think trod very difficult line because I think whilst he was trying to convey a sense of optimism a sense that this huge effort that everyone has put in in order to stick to those very tight restrictions at staying at home to try to prevent the spread of the corona virus. He also I think wanted to try to lower expectations about when and by how much those restrictions might be lifted so he made the point very strongly that the British people should be praised and thanked for their efforts but he was insisting that if the restrictions were lifted too soon than that would reach a second peak and that would cause further damage to people's lives but also to the economy which of course is suffering enormous damage through the lockdown. Well also joining us on the line is Lance Price. He's the former director of communications at number ten Downing Street. When Tony Blair was Prime Minister Lance? Obviously there'll be a huge amount of meetings. We know that that Cobra's already taken place with Johnson. What do you believe the government will be discussing know? What will the approach very much now looking to what Boris Johnson yesterday described the second phase of the crisis and and in many ways. That's the most difficult for ministers to deal with. We know that Boris Johnson was reluctant at the outset to impose a tough lockdown restrictions. But he saw the lights. If you like and and eventually did that. But it's it's much harder to stop to lift those restrictions and it is imposed them in the first place. Because you have to decide when and where you could modify the restrictions and that's going to be the central parts of discussion between ministers in the coming days and we're told an announcement some sort expected before the end of the week. So do you look at certain sectors of the economy that businesses? That were allowed to reopen. Or do you look at certain sectors of the population and say that's an age perhaps though geographically people can Stop to Mingle goal go out more and have more social interactions of one sort or another. I do you do that then. You have the really difficult job of selling that to the to the population at laws. Because if we're all following the same rules that's one thing if there's some rules for some people and different bills for others. It's much much harder self administered Carol. There's been a lot of criticism that the government really isn't sharing any of this information not enough information with the Public Johnson to talk about transparency. Do you think that we will begin to see more of the workings in the science that these decisions will be based on what I think? They will certainly try to make an effort to show that that is what they are doing. I think what we've seen over the last almost four weeks since Boris Johnson has been ill and recovering is the slight sense of vacuum and a government that was reluctant to show even the sorts of changes that it was thinking about for fear that the public would get carried away launch latch onto that and that the number of deaths in the number of infections would not then start to come round. It was interesting that Boris Johnson yesterday made the point that he was going to bring in the new labor leaders. A Kiss Donna and other political leaders I think that is important for the government because it wants to try to bind in potential opposition to the changes because as long says this is going to be very very difficult were already seeing a some signs of real resentment for example amongst the over seventy been told that they're going to have to be shielded that they brought to stay at home. There are of course some over seventy year olds who are incredibly. Fit Run marathons and so on and feel this all patry decision to say to older people. You are at risk you must stay at home is simply not fair and many of them we know are also missing contact with close members of their family that may be one of the areas where the government will try tentatively to try to ease the restrictions somewhat. But I think that point that Lance was making about the public is a very important one. I think the government really wants to try to take the public with it. The danger is if you start trying to say certain. Sections of the population can Now have greater freedom to do some of the things that they enjoy doing to make contact with other family members to go back to work and so on whereas other members of the population were you. Divide that by age or by geographical location cannot have those restrictions lifted lifted. I think that is very very difficult to sell. And that is why it looks to me. More likely that they will look at areas of the economy businesses. And so on and look which of those can be allowed to reopen. Whilst retaining the social distancing measures in order to try to at least contain any increase in those figures on infections sadly death lance is the opposition Labor Party under the new leadership of Sakir Stammer on the same page as the government. Well they all in the sense of backing the government's restrictions and instructions to the public but they have been putting pressure kissed on the right from day one of his leadership. Say there's been saying to the Prime Minister and two other ministers that you've got to be much more open with the public about your thinking. So he called on his first day for an exit strategy and he won't he's had the public deserve to be treated like grownups on that we should be told what the possible routes out of. This might be so that we can have a grown up discussion about that. I and I think the Labour leader has made it clear that he's going to give constructive oppositions he's not going to oppose parole position's sake but he does know that at the end of all. They are going to be very very difficult. Questions for the government to onset of ministers to answer whether it's on the provisional protective equipment so testing and all the rest of this and and he's not abdicate the role of opposition in order to get finished as a a a free ride in even in the depths of crisis A meanwhile the the daily corona virus briefings continue but with a slightly different formats. Carola government's not taking questions from the public will make a difference. Well I think this is part of that effort to try to show that they are transparent this effort to try to show that they really want to take the public along with them as this virus continues and as the restrictions look likely to continue in some form or another for many months to yesterday. We had the first of questions which are submitted by the public of course. Thousands were submitted and there was an independent polling order organization brought in to choose which question would be selected. We heard from one a citizen in skipped in Yorkshire. Who was asking when she'd be able to see her grandchildren again. And I think that although this was an important gesture towards allowing the public some sense that they're having a say in all this it has to be said that none of those present were able to give her any kind of clear ideas to win. That would happen. The scientists world saying well it slightly depends on the fingers. It's slightly depends on a when those infection rate start. Continue to come down. The government was saying well. We are looking at this in the round. We don't want to take risks with the population hancock. The Health Secretary was insisting that he didn't want to take risks with people's lives and yes I think it's important for the government to be seen to be listening to what the people are saying but the crunch point is going to come when it comes out with those decisions to what if anything is going to change and we see the response to that I mean because he made a handcart made a great point yesterday of saying that they don't see questions before they're actually asked them during the the briefing live. It would seem to me. That might make more sense for them to have an idea of what the questions were so they would have the answers. Yeah perhaps they might have been able to give linen skipped in a bit clearer answer to her question but I think they're trying to make the point that they already unprepared to take on an address any of the questions that people have now. There is a sense that this is a gesture. One question Once a day two a government minister the particularly government minister who is holding that news conference Easily of course a very limited say in what is happening. But I think this is part of them trying to show that they're open trying to demonstrate the transparency which Boris Johnson was very keen to talk about. And what you've seen is as launch was mentioning this pressure on the government to show the sorts of things it's talking about people have drawn comparisons with Nichola Sturgeon Scotland's first minister who put out a document about the government's approach. When you look through it to be perfectly honest didn't say a great deal more than the sort of information that we've got in the five tests which the government has in the covering the whole of the UK has set out which are getting guide it when it decides water win restrictions can be lifted but she had made the point of bringing out a lengthy document talking about various options. And I'm sure that that is the sort of thing that we certainly will see As we go through this we we know. Boris Johnson is chairing unimportant cabinet meeting on Thursday. We know Thursday is also very important date when the government has said that it hopes to hit one hundred thousand tests a day for frontline workers. Those are all being targeted front line workers. At the moment even yesterday was still many tens of thousands of that but I think what we get towards the end of the week the government will want to at least signal where it intends to go next in as we continue to where it tends to go next in terms of exactly which restrictions are going to be lifted. Who's going to be allowed to have those greater freedoms but I think that they will stress out all of this that if those infection rates start to climb up again then there is always the risk that the restrictions will simply have to be reimposed and overriding all of this. That is something that the government does not want to do lance just finally very quickly from you. How much other businesses being done? Brexit Brexit is still carrying on. Of course there's the real question about whether or not at the end of the period should be extended because can you deal with two major disruptions to the economy at one time but the government sticking to their line that they are going into. We'll transition has come to an end at the end of this year. Of course there is a whole boss range of other business which is still very home and sometimes the news but I wonder what would have been that bulletin. If you haven't been to the virus there's no still happening. Thanks very much. Indeed that was launched price and Carol

Government Boris Johnson Prime Minister Lance Carol Prime Minister Carola Government Lance Price Britain BBC Director Of Communications Walker Political Analyst Tony Blair Brexit Brexit Cobra Yorkshire Donna Labor Party Sakir Stammer
'Viral: Anti-Semitism in Four Mutations': A Close-Up on Hatred

People of the Pod

13:03 min | 1 year ago

'Viral: Anti-Semitism in Four Mutations': A Close-Up on Hatred

"In an unhealthy society? That has problems. They say who did this to us? And the Jews are always candidate. That's columnist George will who's featured in a new documentary on anti-semitism out in theaters across the country on Friday with us in the studio to discuss that film is its creator. Andrew Goldberg in two thousand nine. Andrew focused his lens on the resurgence of Anti Jewish hatred around the world and in mainstream media but after the two thousand sixteen election and the CHARLOTTESVILLE rally where protesters proclaimed the Jews will not replace us. Goldberg felt compelled to return to the topic for an even deeper exploration in viral for mutations of anti-semitism Goldberg travels through four countries. The United States Great Britain France and Hungary to speak firsthand with victims witnesses anti-semites an high profile figures including bill. Clinton Tony Blair Deborah Lipstadt and AJC Europe director. Simone Rodin Benkin in Pittsburgh. He examined the far right ideas that led to the attack on the tree of life synagogue in Hungary he looks at the Anti Immigration. Anti George Soros anti-jewish propaganda promoted by the government and in the UK. He explores the pain caused by the Anti Zionist messages from the UK's Labor Party the film also explores the repeated violence against Jews in France carried out by Islamists Andrew. Welcome glad to be here. Thank you so thank you for making this documentary and I'm curious. Can you kind of take our audience back to the original conception of it and how it evolved over time since I believe some events actually transpired in the making of the documentary will shortly after the election? We noticed there was sort of an uptick in anti Semitic incidents around the country. There were series a bomb threats which we know turned out to be bogus but those caught. Everyone's attention and suddenly everyone was noticing things and shortly after that a lot of tombstones were desecrated several different cemeteries and then the sort of global eyeballs started to notice these things talk about them more in the press and online and we immediately thought we should make a film about antisemitism and we didn't know what it would look like or what it would be. I think our initial thoughts were that would be about the United States but as we did more and more research and we knew this was a global issue. We knew it was happening in other countries. But as you unpack these things you realize that. There's an urgency to a lot of these stories and so we decided to really expanded and to look at four different situations. Those would be the far right in the United States. The far left in England in Hungary where the prime minister has launched a massive PR campaign against a Jewish philanthropist and in France where Islamist have been killing Jews in various terror attacks and other violent attacks against Jews to the tune of what unofficial numbers seemed to be more than three thousand a year. Now you've been making documentaries and doing journalism for twenty years As have I and I was a religion reporter for fifteen years in Chicago and I will tell you when I came here. I was stunned by just how much people hate. Jews. And I'm curious you I. I mentioned this to a former colleague at the Tribune recently and his response. He's in his eighties. He said we'll of course you grew up at a different time You know it's no surprise to me but yeah of course you didn't realize I'm just curious if this was a real shock to your system as you were doing the reporting the idea that Jews are hated was never foreign to me. I mean keep in mind. I'm fifty one and so I grew up where the Holocaust was not that far off. I mean I was raised in the seventies so I guess it was still thirty years old but it was not as it is now sixty plus years old where the next generation of people don't even know it was there Growing UP IN CHICAGO BEING JEWISH WAS It was not something to be celebrated at least among my friends and among my peers. I was made fun of for it a few times. It wasn't I didn't grow up in the midst of it but the Holocaust was connected to us in a way that it was very very real and so for that reason I understood that Jews were absolutely despised and I started making films in my first film that had anything to do with Jewish subjects was around two thousand and two or so and you know it was about Eastern European Jewish life before the war. So we're talking about you. Know all black and white footage of shuttles of Warsaw of what we might call the Yiddish world and that whole world is utterly destroyed in Eastern Europe and in Europe and in Russia and that made it pretty easy to see and in doing that film I started to learn about it. I automate fillmore at antisemitism in the media in the Middle East at one point and you realize that it is it is widespread. There's Anti Semitism where there are Jews. There's antisemitism where there are not Jews. There's Anti Semitism among people who are friends with Jews so my awareness of this has grown so in other words you entered into this project knowing there was a history of this but you had never seen it kind of in the current context as well. I had not seen it the way I see it now. I when I made a film in two thousand seven on antisemitism in the in the in the arab-islamic world per particularly North Africa and the Middle East I didn't focus that much on Europe and the US at the time antisemitism in the US was a very minor issue compared to what it is now. I don't want to say it was minor because there were plenty of people experiencing antisemitism but we didn't have it to the magnitude and we didn't have the Internet the way we do now but I knew that it was alive and well in the Middle East and that was surprising to see just how deep it is just how woven into the fabric of conversation and media it is. I was interviewing some kids in Egypt on the street and I said to them what are Jews they said User Satan Jews are evil. Juice should die. I said what if a Jewish kid was walking right here across the street and got hit by a car. They said we would call an ambulance. These two ideas existed right next to each other. And that's what's so interesting. One is in the abstract one is in the day to day Would you say that abstract versus day day is what's also infecting Western Europe United States? This wave of anti-semitism that we're seeing or is it. Is it very different? I think they crossover so for example. In Hungary there's virtually no violence against Jews In Hungary a survey showed that forty percent. Forty two percent of Hungarians held at least one or more anti Semitic views. Does that mean that? The people by larger anti-semites probably not but it means that the numbers are higher. Those numbers were higher than they were anywhere else in Europe or give or take a country. How many countries are there in Europe? A lot right so but there's no violence against Jews physical violence. That's what I mean physical violence against Jews but those lines do tend to cross over at points and so the fear is that it can translate these nationalist movement so in Hungary just to give some context the government has launched a huge campaign against George. Soros it's on Mute right now. It's not running right now but it ran not too long ago during the European Union elections. It came back up again. I asked one of the spokespeople of Hungary will come back and he told me that it would come back in a very consistent way so the whole idea that the Hungarian government has put forth. Is that this Jewish billionaire. George Soros is out to flood the nation with Muslim immigrants and since Muslim immigrants in the eyes of the Hungarian government are bad. You the Hungarian citizen the White Christian Hungarian citizen are in danger. And you're in danger because of a Jew. So here's these people are all worked up about a Jew who actually isn't doing anything like this but yet at the same time they're not vandalizing. All the Jewish shops are not beating Jews. And what have you? Although there's I've heard some rumblings that a little of that has happened so we'll have to see but I'm no expert on the data right. Well I think that's the argument. I mean argument. Deborah Lipstadt makes in the film. For example it starts with words it starts with comments and then does eventually escalate. That's the danger of not addressing it nipping in the bud. When you see. I think that's here right so I think that in America we've seen rage on the Internet translate into violence than I think you know the hatred in Hungary is really a government media campaign which took place on TV on the radio on the Internet. But also on billboards outside it was like an all encompassing life. You would drive down the street and you'd be bombarded with it here This antisemitism isn't billboards. I mean there's we'd see them occasionally but it's all on the Internet and people get the Internet sort of like you and your computer. You Lock yourself in this little space and then you start to get worked up and you start to hate and so we see that. Not all but many of these. Violent attacks in the United States are people who sort of incubated these ideas on the Internet. You raise a good point billboards in Hungary that was the been the vehicle of communication there for that. Soros campaign but I'm curious what about social media. What about the comments in violence on social media is it just as rampant in places like Hungary as it is here we'll so the makeup and the nature of the of the campaign in Hungary? We didn't break down so I don't know what percentage of it certainly on social media and not only was it on social media is a place where people can share about it right so in addition to whatever the government put on social media because the government had all these different forms they had radio they had. Tv They billboards aid magazines. It's social media mailings mailing mailing which is in the film How much of their media mix was the Internet? I don't know but if you're a person with anti Semitic views you can't do anything with billboard but some people did right hateful messages on billboards with magic markers in pain. They actually vandalize them. But by and large the billboards are you don't interact with them in the billboard. Don't post against back and forth a TV commercial. You don't respond to that. The Internet is where everybody took their hatred in their dislike of George Soros and they brought it to the Internet. And I think that's a place where you would see a lot more of this. Anti Jewish rhetoric the Internet is where it becomes the People's action not the government right. You have obsession in the film that talks about the brief history of blaming Jews. And you talk about the films that you've done in the past and the history of this but one critique of the film that I've read is that doesn't include enough historical context now I hear this critique all the time as a journalist you only have so much space or time right to address the whole of a situation but I'm curious what your thoughts are on whether to include more history or trajectory. The history of antisemitism is extremely complex. It grows out of misinterpretations if that's a word of people misinterpreted biblical scripture. It's changed and it's more throughout the centuries throughout Europe. If you WANNA talk about how it's been a part of the story of Christianity knew very thorny and complicated history which takes a long time to get in and out of now take that for a minute and think about. We have limited shelf space in our movie. I always say to people in movies not a casserole but take that from it in a notice that in the film we have that history. We have extensive history of the civil rights movement in the United States with history of the entire Orban's campaign and where that came from in Hungary in Oregon was we talk all about a migration and the history of colonialism in France as to give the backbone of that in England we talk about the Labor Party going all the way back to two thousand and eight. What we don't do is this deep analysis of Christian history but my response is also this. If I make a film about racism in about how African Americans are being shot in the street by police. Do I need to tell you? The history of why blacks are disliked by racists in this country. If I talk about misogyny do I need to tell you? The history of why people are misogynists to me and the same goes for LGBTQ. Americans no one's asking why. Why do I need to get into the fact of why Trans People are being murdered? Right now are being beaten up. I don't need to analyze that. Well that too comes from the Bible. Right hatred of homophobia grows right out of scripture. But I don't need to give that analysis so it's a it. We talk about double standards and antisemitism and I don't want to say this is anti Semitism but it's almost a reflex that people feel like anything has to do with Jews. With antisemitism with Israel has to be held to some type of second order of scrutiny and I found that a little bit frustrating. There've been some debates on college campuses about whether or not Jewish students who are pro. Israel can join feminist marches. Lgbtq right marches. You other causes. They feel excluded from those causes because of their Zionist positions and so. That's where intersection. -ality has come up a lot in conversations here is how do you address that exclusion? Even though it's very different causes communities have gotten together and there has not been room for the Jewish issue of antisemitism has four complicated reasons not been welcome into that crew. Because many in this left is idea. Do not like how they don't like what's going on with the Arab Israeli conflict let's not even parse the Israeli conflict. Unfortunate part of this. Is that a Jewish students who have nothing to do with Israel who are oblivious to Israel are still being singled out now. It's very dangerous to to assume. Length phrases like colleges are a battleground. We visited colleges as we spoke to a lot of students. It's a very complicated and mixed bag. But there's no doubt that on some college campuses and we don't have hard data on how or where or what we have a lot of anecdotes. We have a lot of very upset parents. We have a lot of very upset students. But what that actually translates into numbers. We don't know what we do know. Is that Jewish? Students are being asked to somehow be called to task for what Israel is said to be

Hungary United States George Soros Europe Government Semitism France Andrew Goldberg Middle East Chicago Israel Labor Party UK Simone Rodin Benkin Tribune Pittsburgh England Ajc Europe
UK formally leaves the European Union three years after Brexit referendum

Doctor Health Radio Show

07:10 min | 1 year ago

UK formally leaves the European Union three years after Brexit referendum

"I expect that dates the ladies shop the most incredible that a a is I got to try the people getting ready to celebrate a goal I lose with a country we across route the people we frequently establishment it's amazing that you've done this walk our audience through your your throughout the nation right here today nine from the most people know you and know your what you've done but walking through how many years have you worked on this project I first became concerned about what the European project man I didn't even know what globalism walls in those days but I first became concerned about it about the bureaucracy was winning a battle of a democracy about a one of the tires to a single currency dollar lady by Germany oppose worried about it back in ninety nine state of Illinois is buddy today I feel like cattle I just cannot stand aside and do nothing so I've now been campaigning on this for twenty seven years I'm also the father that pretty much full time pretty much seven days a week now do we went back the other day on the show and played your maiden speech from the European Parliament way you sounded and looked exactly the same as you do today shore just tell just tell our audience a little bit because I've I've heard in the press about some of the interviews you've given in the recent days about you being in the parliament how long you been there whether you're going to miss it all in all and of course you know that that's it for you in terms of the European Parliament but it's already to yell at about that and a little bit about what you see happening over the next year given that this this transition period for brexit well I walked into the European Parliament in nineteen ninety nine the three of us from you can collect it and we walked up the steps we've never been to the building before that we live in a Brussels before we did but what was the galley what we were doing if we walk through the door and that official that I'll I will let me pay easily so badly so we just got a political asylum with the beginning and then I woke up those same steps in June last year a little twenty nine of us I'm I'm not shows how the center of gravity in British politics I shifted what was considered to be we at all mad mad house become the mainstream so people can develop this country I guess that's the victory that I've been a Paul Solman unsettled and supported me although but if anyone one of the night I live in PM London time I'm gonna be in parliament square with a huge huge part of the old eyes which I call white full what was the night is the point of no return we are leaving this political union we are leaving the globalists supranational structure we never coming back about twenty what I was battle Wednesday on my last day in the debate before they threw me out of the chain but because I laid the union Jack them but never your bloody flags and leave I think she said rather the thought is that right now with the company what we did is we went straight to the buff okay okay yeah yeah I know we we try to get you on the show but but let me the better is a lot more level head said maybe the maybe another day yeah I think I was slightly over trained on that particular day but what was interesting was just listen to the speeches of a creek without power because they're all now saying who next alphabets of gum next alight journey will be sent rex it marks the beginning of the end not jealous of the European Union but if the whole global is project you know where big business big politics big banks that want to control our lives through big bureaucracy I we want nation states free markets free that would let let's say and I think we're winning how do you what happens in the next year how do you actually make a good because today is the beginning of it but I guess December thirty first is when the heart out is correct yeah I mean look I think in terms of history today's the big moment the rest is the tiles that the tide of course is very very important Boris Johnson I suppose because he's scared of me is has laid the right promises is now saying all the right things to be sticks to his promises that great I mean backing six they also the referendum I think people so I packed up my tends to go away what I'm saying to that everybody is all I am going to be that through this next process through this transition period through the next phase of the guys the engines are I will praise the prime minister the rooftops and he gets it right but I will sound the alarm if he gets it wrong so I'm gonna be on that case let's talk about praising alarm I want to mention you know about this globalist project and why this is such a important day in and Nigel I'd I needn't remind you that about the opposition party in the established order on the same day the night before I actually in accomplishes breaks it it's also going to be the acquittal of Donald J. trump by the established forces over here it's it's so amazing that would happen on the same day but I want talk about why way for second in this pandemic in coming out of Wuhan China but you know tied to the one belt one road in tight to the globalist projects and I think we've had two cases now in the United Kingdom why why his and a shock folks in the United States and also this pandemic it coming out of how we have a whole show no dedicated just that what what are your thoughts about that tight to globalism okay well let's start off with wildlife what is astonishing is if you look at the people who is all the advisory board to walk away in the United Kingdom what do you find you find the former bosses old L. cools little old friend of Tony Blair as friends of David Cameron's people around big businesses there on the gold you find people who were all confederation of British industry one of those globalists I have a group that all of our country they've been serving on the board you even find that this is astonishing former senior bosses of all civil service to be all the while lays bold I'm most stunningly able you find David Cameron our prime minister it was made to resign because look like that but it is now official interlocutor putting the Chinese and British governments Alice happened is Chinese money has corrupted completely corrupted the system and Boris Johnson of gone with the fly will miss one we've gone with what everybody around it is telling and I think it is into the judgment but one of the last judgment so I've ever seen in my life in this country I'm hoping we can buy the mechanisms are less it will just America that's not happy with this think about Australia right there in the call to make but he's very deeply intertwined with China even value in twenty twelve band while away from that digital fiber

Plan to Cut U.S. Troops in West Africa Draws Criticism From Europe

Monocle 24: The Briefing

13:02 min | 1 year ago

Plan to Cut U.S. Troops in West Africa Draws Criticism From Europe

"Look look first at NATO the the actual military chiefs of rich Jew shortly to convene in Brussels the United States brost hat chairman of the Joint Chiefs General Mark Milley has burned one interesting acting item on the agenda in advance prefiguring a potential drawdown of American forces in West Africa. This is extremely likely to prompt and unenthused response from France in particular which is extensively deployed a theater which it believes not without reason is a key frontline in the ongoing global campaign against Islamist extremism. Mary what's what's going on here. Won't use the United States Losing interest abruptly in West Africa. Well I think there are two reasons. one of them is because president trump is specially I think The top brass in American intelligence. They are very fixed on what they see As the future threat coming from China and that they are increasingly concentrating their resources looking in that direction the other thing and is that trump came to office and this is often forgotten Saying that he wanted to stop American engagement in in foreign wars. And this I think was one of the one of the reasons why he was elected. It was very popular policy For a lot of Americans and it remains so but right through his time as president trump has faced quite a lot of opposition from the top brass about cutting back on Americans abroad have been various attempts. He tried to pull Americans out of Afghanistan. The top brass objected. He tried to pull Americans out of Syria. Immediate media outcry from all the allies and saying he was betraying the Kurds. He tried to pull out of Iraq. Similar things West Africa could have basinas. Gene is a sort of slightly soft touch because the only people he's going to offend particularly by that again to be the French as we've seen well on the subject of the French being offended Jonathan they going to be aren't they and not without reason France already has four and a half thousand troops deployed in West Africa. There's two one hundred twenty more due to go shortly And it's not like they've been doing nothing night. They have found somebody to fight once they got there. Oh Yes yes. They've been very active. There and suffered suffered quite a few casualties as part of that. But also this fits for the Frans into a broader attempt by president. Emmanuel McCall to reset reset France's relationship with its former colonies in Africa lens going ahead on the economic front and on other fronts And and I think the question here is how much France wants to take responsibility for this region of the world how much it sees this. Moore's wars an international global Issue which the. US should continue to be involved with Mary. You made the accurate point. The trump's big pitch in two thousand sixteen was that he would bring troops home that America would not engage itself in pointless ridiculous interminable wars overseas etc.. He he probably does understand that the best pitchy can make this. November Is along the same lines. He he walked a very narrow path. Victory in two thousand sixteen but if he can go back the American people in two thousand twenty and say the economy's all right. I haven't started any stupid. That's probably his best shot. That being the case Do we wonder how nervous other NATO military chiefs are going to be the prospect of trump actually. Winning this thing is then possible that the arrest of NATO really has to stop thinking about the United States as the cornerstone of the alliance. Well I think that quite a lot of NATO but especially in the European Union That sense has really been strengthening. Ever since trump came to office there was quite a lot of diffidence Shall we say through the campaign. When trump seemed to cast aspersions on the future of NATO suggesting that it wasn't necessarily in US interest to Continue to be in NATO And you saw the Russians from that right across Europe but especially interestingly in Britain of course but also in eastern Central Europe where they see the United States and NATO in particular the protector. The A big protector of their security against Russia. Now it seems to me talk though Trump seemed to have been brought round a bit Um about the sort of survivability and relevance of NATO nonetheless that Trepidation in Europe remains and we've seen seen just in the last few days With a paper I think originating in the British military Where they say the new British government? When it does it's it's promised Security and defence review has got to look ahead to a time when the United States may and not be Engaged as it is in Europe and when the UK will have to look to being more autonomous in defense security terms and that is a complete rethink For All the British military your finds itself in classically horns Komo whatever cliche One canoes there on the one hand they want the United States to remain Invoke very very involved in NATO and if one is on his to be the main pair in NATO and supplier of troops And so on but at the same time particularly with trump in the White House. They don't want America to dominate dominate. When NATO is going so you get this whole debate about where is NATO? After the end of the Cold War Matt calls from about it being brain dead and having to rethink its future. Sure and so on. But you're has first of all to decide what role it sees for the United States and whether that allies with what trump things a couple. Let's move on now to the rare problem of what a retired. Pope should do with his time. Pope's usually leave the office of course only when recalled all to barracks by the omnipotent overlord but benedict the sixteenth bucked. This tradition in two thousand and thirteen when he handed in the big hat voluntarily since then benedict addict has mostly maintained inappropriate silence but he broke it a few weeks back to speak up in defense of priestly. Celibacy apparently concerned by reports that his successor Pope Francis Francis favored the church taking a more relaxed attitude. Will it now appears that Benedikt is walking it back. His name will be removed from future editions of the book in which he made his feelings known Mary. First of all It's obviously not possible to know the mind of a retired Pope Benedict the sixteenth sixteenth. But why would he be assuming that this point that anybody cares what he thinks. Well I think because he still has the rank this extraordinary sort of rank of Pope Emeritus America's extraordinary thing. I'm opposed America's you think he keeps on these credit card. Well that doesn't the hotel upgrade but by keeping the title even emeritus That puts tim effectively on a par with the current pope And I think that was always going to create difficulties and it's probably remarkable really that we haven't seen gene similar difficulties until now But I think that's also when you when you look at the two characters when you look at Pope Benedict as being What appeared a very reticent very theologically based very traditional minded German pope hope? And you look at Pope Francis who's latin-american And this in fact is where this whole troubles risen. Because he's talking about parts of the Amazon Wurzburg ver-very difficult priests. This argument is being going on for quite a long time as to whether if lifted the celibacy requirement. Then maybe it would be easier to find priests for those very remote remote areas But it does seem to me that in terms of character as well as in terms of everything else you're looking at two very different people and also a church which house has still a very strong conservative. Whatever the president pope says tries to do has a very very conservative lobby Maybe majority he I don't know and which you know finds it useful to appeal to the power of the Pope Emeritus. Jonathan an ice will confess to our listeners that I am not myself in especially accomplished a Catholic theologian. But you think I am. I'm hoping you know more about about this than I do. Just benedict the sixteenth quoted views on the issue in question itself. He says it doesn't seem possible to realize both vocations by which he meant the priesthood and marriage simultaneously. Now other married people in my experience have jobs boy. Is this one any different because When you become? I'm a priest as I understand it celibacy is part of your Decision to remove yourself from the material every every day human world and become somebody somewhat different Maria. I would like to expand this conundrum to the more general principle. Here which is which is what happens happens when people leave high office once you should that be the end of it once you are off the stage as it were should you therefore just shut up. Well I think One of the reasons may be the reason Currently for the continued existence of the House of Lords in the UK. is exactly I'm going to give a sort of position and role For people who have I think the current terminology is stepped back from public life But they can also make trouble even when they're in the Lord's even in what is regarded as subordinate position. vis-a-vis the comments I mean. We saw That Margaret Thatcher Entre gave her successor. John Major very hard time when he was in office And it's been I think it's quite difficult for people who've been to that extent engaged engaged on the front line Actually to say nothing when they see or seems to them that they're successor is behaving behaving such a foolish way when you suddenly become used to that and when you're still relatively young I mean that's the one has a number of quite young a young presidents prime ministers and so on retiring. Tony Blair Bill Clinton others who I think will find it very difficult just to say ongoing off to rotate long walks in the countryside. And say nothing I mean I. I'm sympathetic to that to an extent because it must be the heck of it adjustment from having the sort of the world hang. Hang on your every word to suddenly you know. Once you've sort of signed a piece of paper handed off nobody caring anymore but is there Jonathan away that you can do you. I guess constructive backseat driving. I mean I've just come back from Australia. Where our current Prime Minister Scott Morrison has been weathering? The bushfire crosses to a chorus of criticism. Some of it from one of his predecessors Kevin Rudd who broke with the protocol of differential respect and sank the Bhuttan with what unmistakably like relish the way that you can actually be helpful as a former officeholder. Yes I mean you can bring the wealth experience that you've had and good judgement judgement etcetera etcetera To to bear if your success was wanted of course they may not want they may not want somebody who was there and was perhaps more successful than them sitting on their shoulder the whole time so. It's very very difficult situation. I think you'd have a lot of ex-leader pitas find their way into leading a foundation for good works and so on but almost inevitably they get caught up in in what they used to do. I mean I think one of the one of the strongest conventions about not interfering not even commenting on your successor was in the United States. where past presidents were not not supposed supposed to say a word about their successor? But that's been broken barrack Obama who has been quite voluble On the subject of what he seizes uses the errors of Donald Trump's ways and on the one hand you know that's a lot of us who would say well you know good on him quite right for doing that on the other hand. I I think there's a very a very sensible place for this convention that says actually you should find something else to do or just imagine. Donald Trump defeated in November. I don't think he'll go silent silent.

Donald Trump Nato United States Pope Benedict France President Trump America Pope West Africa Pope Francis Francis Mary Pope Emeritus America Jonathan Afghanistan Brussels Syria Europe Iraq
Antisemitic incidents in Britain up 10% on last year

The Friends of Israel Today

09:00 min | 1 year ago

Antisemitic incidents in Britain up 10% on last year

"I like to welcome our dear friend from the other side of the pond. Trevor Stewart's sweet Trevor is our friends of Israel representative in the United Kingdom and Really Trevor Connects with churches and believers all around the UK sharing with them the truth about what the Scripture say about the Messiah Jesus and Israel and so it's such an important work that what he's doing and I can think of no one better to talk about this issue of what's going on in the United Kingdom the rise of anti-semitism that's going on over there than Trevor Trevor. Great to have you on the Friends of Israel today. Great to be with you Chris. Trevor the United Kingdom's community security. Trust the tea which is a British nonprofit that has been and logging antisemitic incidents in Britain since nineteen eighty-four reported just at the end of the summer that acts of hatred toward the Jewish people. Anti Semitism awesome is up in the UK. A ten percent from last year. They also cited. This is the third year in a row that the UK has seen a the rise in antisemitism. Trevor what is going on in the United Kingdom. Well I guess if reading all the reports a lot of this is to do with the The general general rise in Anti Semitism. I guess pretty much around the world but in the UK it's probably Exacerbated by the current situation in in in with brexit and the politicians Leticia political situation But I think there's been a general trend woods for quite a couple of years now and the report certainly gives us some interesting mm figures. Now you're talking about the fact that the elections are taking place and I believe those elections will happen in December and this seems to have a major player. I was just listening to some reporters on the news. Saying this really comes down between a election of Boris Johnson who wants to its brexit issue with Boris Johnson. And on the other side. You have someone like Jeremy Corbyn who says that terrorist organizations like Hamas and Hezbollah are his friends How did the UK come to this? Point where core been actually stands a chance to potentially become the polls aren't going in that direction but they even has a chance to be potential UK prime minister. He's been leader of the Labour Party for quite a few years. Now and I guess what's happening now is that politics over the last Six to twelve months search or maybe a little longer has become more polarized over the brexit. Issue Jeremy Corbyn is become a very strong player. He's a he's a very able speaker on. He's he's he's probably telling the people what they want to hear in terms of his latest manifesto So I guess he's he's reaching out not to to those suffering in terms of finances etc and he's he's wanting to nationalize a lot of things be all not. It's it's it's it's hard to tell quite how he's got to where he is accepted Maybe the way that he's put himself there is is to ensure that the people that are in his party or those that are on his side and I just recently heard that Corbin said if he becomes prime minister he is going to essentially a accept a Palestinian Tinian state which will be one of his almost as I access if he becomes Prime Minister of the UK is is that news true. That's something I I I think is true. I can't honestly say that. I heard him say that myself. But I think it's generally accepted that that would be the case. Now let me ask you this. When it comes to issues of Israel you know here in the United States dates of course there is polling? That shows that the United States is general generally pro Israeli pro Israel administration Many Americans across the political spectrum support the state of Israel. There's a there's a low percentage of people that you know it's not that they don't support four Palestinians but they they wanna make sure that Israel is supported and they believe that Israel has a right to the land the Zionists in some capacity is that the same for the United Kingdom right now in the state that it's especially the political state that it's in I think generally the the consensus Is that the the the country itself is is is more pro. Israel high now. A local member of parliament is and the Conservative Party. Generally is there are Supporters Quarters of Israel and all the political parties each political party is go to friends of Israel section to it We probably aren't quite as pro-israeli straddling the United States on reflection But certainly when we're not against the United States Boris Johnson's being behind it and in fact even previous Labor MP. Tony Blair was very very supportive. Who Israel I'm still remained supportive Israel? I WANNA come back to this issue of the rise of Anti Semitism the hatred towards Jewish people in the UK. We talked for a moment about the fact that there are the current political issues going on with with the election Johnson and Corbin Corbin being someone who's definitely anti-zionist someone. I don't know if I would label him as an anti Semite. But I definitely doesn't have a positive outlook of the Jewish people that Boris Johnson has has and the outlook on Israel. But is it just politics. Trevor or is there something else going on in the UK as well that we see that rise of antisemitism. That's been happening over the past three years steadily. I think politics probably has a part to play but You know if I look at the figures and the figures have been rising Crutchley for the last four or five years I think it's like everything else. Antisemitism is is something that looks beneath just beneath the surface In in every society. unsubtly it doesn't take a great deal to bring it to the four. Th there are people that are definitely anti Semitic and and now he's honest On their those that are definitely pro Israel and Pro Zion You get points in between I think over here the in the the general consensus is that the country is whole would be supportive of Israel. That's not always reflected in our politics and media. I want to ask you this because this is why. You're your ministry is so important to US trevor. Here in the United States as you serve with the Friends of Israel is that you are standing up and you're supporting Israel and the Jewish people you show solidarity with them. Can you share with US quickly about some of the work that you're doing In England to that show that solidarity with the Jewish people that Evangelical Djelic Christians loved them based on what the Bible says That that that we have a love and compassion for them and we stand in solidarity with them. I think one of the biggest things that we're doing is trying I to to make sure the church is aware of of Especially Replacement Theology. That sounds big and a lot of places and it's a tool which I give you frequently to help people understand Why the church it support Israel and basically it's because of who God is because he says in his word in that he chose his people in Toronto Trauma Chapter Seven Verses Six through ten And he commands us in Romans. Eleven to make them jealous and on. How can we make the Jewish people jealous if we don't love them? How can the Church love or hate those that God loves? There's so much that the church needs to understand and I think one of the do things that we do is to try and help the church understand so that they can actually Explain to others when when need be in terms of supporting the Jewish people we we attend a lot of meetings that are organized by the Jewish community and We are often If not the only gentiles in the room one of Our Future and tells in the room and therefore we can we can and actually share with the Jewish people often say synagogue. What should you go to where I would say? We're not we're not Jewish. But we're we're Bible believing Christians who who love and support Israel and the Jewish. These people conversation amazing. And you know what I'm GonNa tell you. Something Evangelical Ism in the United Kingdom has an amazing history when it comes to the even the establishment of of the state of Israel for our listeners. It's so important to remember the Balfour Declaration which was promised to give the Jewish people the land of Israel after World War One comes out of England. There are a lot of the emphasis of of the creation of the state of Israel. Something that comes out of the United Kingdom and we've been talking with Trevor Stuart Sweet who is representative in the UK and Trevor. I want to close with this. We've only got a few moments left. What can Bible believing Christians do when it comes to the United Kingdom thinking about the rise of antisemitism thinking about the political movements that are happening over there right now? What can Bible Believing Christians in America and Canada? Do for you bottom line top line. Pray this this country needs for years ago we were the ones that sent missionaries I. Today I feel it's the country that needs the missionaries to come in So you'll prayers are very much coveted on It's the one thing that we can do is pray Obviously support the friends of Israel. Gospel Ministry all ways because the word that the ministers doing worldwide as well.

Israel United Kingdom Trevor Trevor United States Boris Johnson Jeremy Corbyn Trevor Stewart Prime Minister Corbin Corbin Trevor Stuart Representative Labour Party Conservative Party Chris Britain Tony Blair America Gospel Ministry Hamas
Peter Morgan Presents "Successor" To "The Crown" As Series Enters 1960s, '70s

Fresh Air

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Peter Morgan Presents "Successor" To "The Crown" As Series Enters 1960s, '70s

"Let's get back to fresh air contributor Dave Davies and his twenty eighteen interview with Peter Morgan creator and writer of the crown and writer of the queen the last king of Scotland and frost Nixon the third season of the crown starring Olivia Colman as Queen Elizabeth the second begin Sunday on Netflix you know therefore is just terrific in this role and I've been I assume you were involved in the casting what were you looking for and what did you see in her arms thirty one year old on the cost of care for which is now sort of with almost impossible to imagine we'll see you know she was overlooked so this doesn't reflect well on me but I will tell the story and live in shame so what time is we'd be so I would be sent the list of people coming to the costing some are looked on the list and Wednesdays as it were costing session would involve the following five young actresses I looked on the list like a one is that when that when that one of the other ones are interesting I'll come in at eleven to see that one I'll come in at twelve because I'm busy and important to lime faltered and who whoever the sky for business I'm I'm not into that I overlooked and snapped on no fewer than five occasions until there was one time where like simply couldn't avoid it because interest in the one before the one off the hook and so I then states to see her none of what what what no one should what's the matter with and if you want to talk to this when they said pizza she's been on for five occasions and each time you have studiously avoided and I suppose she's fantastic he what did you see what what did you see captivate what but it's not an easy part I mean you have to be both forgive me well I said but we have to be both playing in stunning you know the she has to have both and and then a number of the actors that came in was simply too beautiful you know to conventional beautiful too the faces did not have the full range because Elizabeth winter is a beautiful walls it is arguably still a beautiful woman but not all the time not from every angle and her face lights up you know with a smile and can look quite grumpy quite like a wet weekend when not smiling and be overlooking pulling quite plain and you need to believe she has intelligence and understand her intelligence because the queen country to what people think I think she has an intelligence and a very sharp memory and intolerance of fools but at the same time she's not that intellectually curious and so she three both quick and alert and yet at the same time capable of repose and being quite does fall so it's not easy and she has to be emotionally stable and I don't think and act to connect I'm across the chasm but it's so helps if they all thought and clamp brought a lot of thought into the pond and then active a lot of the stuff they shouldn't have to perfection eyesore in a in an instant but she could do it want to talk about we've talked a bit about the queen which is this the feature film that you did before you did the series the crowns was directed by Stephen Frears and we'll we'll hear seen here this is about the moment in nineteen ninety seven when princess Diana has been killed in a car accident and because she is divorced from the royal family the queen sees her death as a private matter with no need for a public appearance reason statement from her the queen in fact she takes her family and Diana's two boys who are her grandchildren to the royal St in Scotland come to to just get away while London is morning and be in this scene we're gonna hear she gets a call for the prime minister Tony Blair played by Michael sheen who is concerned because the public and the press are seeing the royal family as heartless because it's expressed no grief at Diana's passing so we hear the queen pick up the phone to speak to the prime minister prime minister good morning match day sorry to disturb but I was just wondering whether you'd seen any of today's papers we managed to look at one or two in which case five question would be whether you felt some kind of response might be necessary I believe a few over either editors are doing their best to sell newspapers that would be a mistake to dance to their tune under normal circumstances I would agree box well my advice is I've been taking the temperature among the people on the streets and all the information I'm getting is that the mood what would you suggest prime minister some kind of a statement ma'am I believe the moment the statements has passed I would suggest flying the flag at half mast about pounds and coming down to London the earliest opportunity it would be a great comfort to all people and would help them with that grief grief if it's come down to London before I attend to my grandchildren who just lost her mother

Dave Davies Writer Scotland Peter Morgan Thirty One Year
"tony blair" Discussed on UN News

UN News

09:01 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on UN News

"That's from former British prime minister. Tony Blair who WHO also previously served as on boy for the Middle East quartet which includes the UN? He sat down with Dan. Thomas who heads up communications for the UN Global Compact the world's largest corporate sustainability initiative at the recent UN web summit in Lisbon Portugal having spent a decade in power from nineteen ninety seven. Mr Blair began by explaining the early development of the Millennium Development Goals. MDG's a precursor and blueprint right for today's SDG's when we began the MDG process We were pretty skeptical as to whether it would amount to more than warm words as it were and then as things started to happen I mean okay. We either didn't meet some of the very ambitious targets that were set but it did actually have an impact on the government's behavior and then in two thousand and five G. Eight summit which the UK Chad we made big commitments around around eight and so on which which made a real difference. So I think then when it came to the STD's people were even more ambitious. My only worry is the ambitions. It's a very broad and we need to translate them into concrete points of action because otherwise it just ends up as you know. Basically whatever one would Motherhood Apple Pie so we've got to be. I think much more specific now. On what are the action points that arise out of each of these goals. Berlin d eight millennium development goals seventeen sustainable development goals in one hundred and sixty nine targets. So it's a very very broad agenda do do you feel that the STD's STD's travels around the world do you think that the SDG's a- gaining traction in society with governments with the private sector. I'm yeah I think at a certain level they are but I think that people find them still hard to grasp in terms of well. What does that mean that I should be doing? So if you if you go down the list of them and there are more of them Then I think it becomes harder for people. If they're you're in politics to translate that into essay things that mean there's going to be concrete action happening so I think look one of the things that's happened in the world in the last few years is this is much more obvious what works. And what doesn't I mean you do have action. You can take based on experience and based on actual experiments armaments. That people have done that. Make a difference on things like health care the environment education and so on so I think what is necessary is each of these different. STD's to be then translated as I say into a program and then you've you've got to get some real you know. Part of the trouble is the moment. The world's quite divided okay so It's not clear whether this the leadership that collectively selectively in the world to make a big difference so this is the problem that you have whereas you know. I was fortunate period and away when I was in office. The people people really felt that was a real impetus behind those MDG's and even though as I say they didn't they they they didn't fulfil all the things they were supposed to on the other hand you can go through them and say well. There actually was a significant difference. May so I think we've got to we've got to we've about this challenge of CO concretize ation of the The SDG's and then we got the challenge global leadership which is right now top indeed and. That's a challenge that you're taking on with With Gusto educations one of your institutes focuses. What are you having to achieve with this global commitment to promote global citizenship and prevent violence extremism? That right so so this is an example where you might take a And turn it into something very specific so basically the SDG is about quality education. And there's a a lot of what is being done in the past few years on enrolling more people in schools but there are two problems with that if you don't improve the quality of what they're being taught then and you can put more people in the classroom but often they're just they're in the classroom. They're not necessarily being taught very well. So you've got a whole series of things around education reform and then you've got something else which is really important in today's world the most important things to teach young people to think creatively like to think imaginatively so they because technology gives people the opportunity to learn facts right. Your teacher is no longer someone. Who's who's telling you the facts as it used to be when I was at school? Your teacher is someone who's going to guide you through the maze of information that comes to you today right but what is really important important is to make sure that the young people are being taught to think in ways that allow them to question to be creative because when they go out into the workplace. That's the skill that's going to be most necessary so often with the very poorest countries in the world even if you simply enroll children in for example primary education but you're not reforming the systems around private primary education. Then they're just more more kids sitting in a classroom not getting taught very well. And how can technology make make that transition possible technologies essential and look. The single biggest problem with education in the developing world is quite apart from issues around teachers and so on and the and the bricks and mortar of the classroom. Is If you've got access to technology a whole lot of things become possible the rather wise impossible so you so you can be taught differently you can obviously study differently. And and in the end in the most imaginative ways people are being taught today. Some of the gaps in the quality of the teaching can be made up for with what can be provided the technology so technology is essential one of the things my instinct works is not just how you promote. Global Citizen Citizenship within education systems didn't but also. How do you help particularly remote? Rural areas get access to electricity so that the children in those areas have the ability to access technology. Do you feel more more optimistic than before with with at a place like the web summit where this innovators and entrepreneurs are working to overcome overcome challenges. I think Ed Tech is going to become a huge developing area. I think what is really important is to make sure that that isn't just in the wealthier countries and and some of the people that we are working with because might mine stooges programs in about fifteen to twenty different African countries. We're working with governments. There is the how we might use it. Take to bypass some of the legacy problems of Western systems so this enormous opportunity and people often. I mean one. The thing that's really changed. I think just in the last two years is a much greater. Focus on technology in some of the poorest parts of the world and people often think technology is a rich countries countries issue. But it's really not this massive things that can happen from financial payments to helping for example. I've seen projects amazing projects where women are starting businesses in remote rural parts because they got the mobile technology to do it and education. So there's a huge amount we can do and one one of the ambitions when the reasons I'm here at the summit is I would like to see us and do a major summit in Africa with the developing countries race because I think it'd be enormous interest and by the way there are really good tech entrepreneur does and some of these African countries. Today I mean again people might say we're going back five years you wouldn't have expected expected that but you go to virtually any African country today and people are trying to innovate and do startups and a lot of those are in the education nation field. I often think that the people who live in the very poorest countries of the most sustainable because they they kind of have to be the way that they they approach Eh lives and and and there were. They can be more innovative as well. Because you know one of the issues with the West is how how do you reform legacy systems. The built up over a long time healthcare education transport and technology the opportunity to go round that lead fro well can do you can do if it's done properly. And in education for a lot of young people in developing countries using technology to educate educate is going to give them a frankly a better chance of education the waiting till their systems come up to scratch because we work in countries..

UN MDG Tony Blair prime minister UK Dan Africa Global Citizen Citizenship Thomas Lisbon Portugal Berlin Ed Tech five years two years five G
UK Supreme Court to give its verdict Tuesday on the legality of the prime minister's suspension of Parliament

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:51 min | 1 year ago

UK Supreme Court to give its verdict Tuesday on the legality of the prime minister's suspension of Parliament

"The UK's highest court will rule this week whether the country's Prime Minister Boris Johnson and acted unlawfully when he decided to suspend parliament. Let's get more on this with our regular Westminster. Chronic lowlands price lots works as Tony Blair start of communications when he was UK the Prime Minister Welcome back loans just recap as to where we are today given the conclusion of events in court on Friday yes so for several days last week. The two sides in the collpase presented their arguments to the eleven justices of the Supreme Cream Colt and and not entirely clear whether they come back with judgment today or tomorrow and so much time need to weigh up the arguments but obviously the people have been trying to read the runes over the weekend and there seems to be a feeling growing that the decision may go against the government but on the lawyer and and I think we have to wait in the city wants to just come up with well what the losses oppresses suggesting that the supreme court is minded. It's ruled against the government because of a couple of reasons a degree of scrutiny by the leader of the Supreme Court Lady Hale and the fact that everybody was talking about the remedies which she's what can be done when the government a- found in fold at fault. Is that a suggestion perhaps that the government is in a lot of trouble trouble whether to find against to the the plans to suspend parliament or is this not actually the death blow that many campaign unpainted might be hoping for notice deathblow tour. I'm going to be a huge huge Paris because it's completely unprecedented in participants tickle and judicial history reach so be a major milestone but I think in Boris Johnson's mind and in the minds of leaders of the opposition parties as well is how does this play with the public when the public eventually come to express their view either in the general election ord another referendum. How will they respond to something like this? Will they think this just shows the stories are an incompetent they what they're doing. They're all over the place or will it just be further evidence for some voters sure it will be that kind of the whole establishments and now they could include the Supreme Court in that out to frustrate the the people's will so necessarily when the crucial we'll decisions of aid are made by the public be the death blow that Sir. I think people like you know who's the case and all the politicians who've been supporting the various cases against the government that got to be finally settled either today or tomorrow and nonetheless suggestion this weekend that the prime minister could suspend parliament once again if he so chose well what do yet Paul would come back. We'd have to come but possibly for a day or a Dan Hassle two who days perhaps and then be proved again that second prorogation would be completely illegal. They wouldn't be subject to further court challenge because there is always before the queen's speech but a short one and so in practical terms. It's hard to see what difference going to make it less. If parliament does come back Boris Johnson opponents in parliament use that very very very narrow window to ambush in some people and let's move on to a couple of other things that are bubbling along quite menacingly firstly. Let's talk about the brexit talks all suggestions that in actual fact instead of working towards towards an agreement to leave the European Union with a deal on the thirty first of October. The United Kingdom is engaged in brexit talks going backwards and I'm not sure that would be entirely fair. I was talking to journalists on the plane on his way to New York is sponsored your for a couple of days as for the United Nations General Assembly meeting where he's going to be a having private discussions with Angela Merkel and Emmanuel macron Donald Tusk and some of the other prime minister's and he was sticking to his line that he's cautiously optimistic about reaching a deal and and he some the detail of what he was saying on what he was speaking into journalists was around the ways in which the respect stock could be removed and replaced with other arrangements for trade across the border between North and south so I I think he's still I think genuinely does want to reach a deal if he can and some of the intractable problems which was most able to deal within three years is prime minister. He's trying to resolve it a much shorter period of time but I I I would caution against assuming that actually leads all just for show and doesn't really want to deal. I think he does and tell us as well about the domestic issues of the Labor Party at the main opposition party in the United Kingdom. It is having its annual party conference this week as do all the big parties in this conference season here in the United Kingdom in them. We were supposed to be given a sort of radical agenda of social mobility and paternity for all instead. We've had a weekend where the Labor Party seems to utterly split itself into and we now face vote to votes which conflicts each other at the conference there but what they're positional positional Brexit is yes in Party conferences supposed to be the sort of showcase moment where you present all your policies and save all the fantastic you're gonna do for the country and as as we're all expecting a general election pretty quickly a pre-election conference like this is really essential threatening yet all the headlines have been about the splits and divisions they have been putting forward awesome radical policies and some quite expensive policies as well to be frank about its had on social care for the elderly on abolishing prescription charges so quite radical. I'll stop on education as well and in in other areas but as you say it's all overshadowed by the row over brexit normally there's a thing called the conference arrangements committee they try Ryan sort of fudge. Thin says that there isn't a bus stop on the floor. They failed region agreements last night over the BREXIT. votes to the wilder vote today on the conference floor about Brexit the vast majority of the membership once Labor to become a pro remain party aw that's because the trade unions hold fifty percent of the votes in live conferences and most of the Loyalty Jeremy Corbyn. It's not clear that the membership number should get their way so he's going to be a shoes up at a very very significant and tell us how that leaves the Labor Party in its identity having been a man who worked when Labor when the Labor Party had the clearest idea can ever imagine if what they stood for yes and not unsuccessful in elections as well but put in not not to to to one side I mean there is a battle has been a battle going on for the soul of the Labor Party ever since Jeremy Corbyn became lead of the Party and a lot of people on MRI light my win the absol- Blairite if you want to call it that way of the Party of never really reconciled themselves the Jeremy Corbin's leadership and things have reached a crunch point now all and I think one reason for that is the people already looking to Jeremy Corbin's disappearances leader of the Labour party whether he resigns over there. There's the general election a fails once once again to become prime minister then he would go so a lot of the stuff that we've seen trying to either remove to Watson the deputy leader of the Labour Party or sidelined him. It's all about the succession Jeremy Corbyn and as you say quite rightly the battle for the soul of the Party of what part it really is and the battle lines. It's being thrown who's going to win. That is still clear price. Thank you as ever own monocle twenty four.

Prime Minister Labor Party United Kingdom Jeremy Corbyn Boris Johnson Supreme Court Labour Party Brexit Tony Blair Labor Westminster Paris Lady Hale European Union United Nations General Assembl New York Angela Merkel Thin Paul
Prime Minister, Boris Johnson And Prime Minister Gordon Brown discussed on Hugh Hewitt

Hugh Hewitt

10:56 min | 1 year ago

Prime Minister, Boris Johnson And Prime Minister Gordon Brown discussed on Hugh Hewitt

"Let me catch up on the British election understand that the special relationship matters to us a lot Great Britain has nuclear power. They have gone to war with us everywhere we've ever gone to war, South Korea. Vietnam. Afghanistan iraq. The Brits have been there, right with their nuclear power. They're rebuilding aircraft cares to jump jets. They're buying new thirty five. See, I believe they are important. We want them to leave the European Union. I do. I believe they could be. They could regain their past glory. As a trading company has it trading country opened a deal that everyone unburdened by the bureaucracy out of the European Union? And they put the question to the people three years ago. David Cameron won a majority government on the promise to have a referendum on whether or not to stay in the European Union and the people of Great Britain, voted, very healthy margin four or five percent four percent fifty to forty eight leave leave everyone in the country knew it was being talked about, like the vote for two thousand sixteen Hillary or Trump Trump won the constitutional majority. He didn't win the popular vote. I know that he won the constitutional majority of the way we've elected president since the framing of the constitution, and so Great Britain matters a lot to us. They've had great prime ministers, like Mattie Thatcher. They've had terrible. Prime Minister Gordon Brown. They've had good prime ministers. Tony blair. They've had week prime ministers. Theresa May have had funny prime ministers like the MAC. Mcmillan. They've had Wilson that all sorts of he was terrible. We need a good one right now. Theresa May has been terrible and feckless and they're not out of the peon union yet. So number of conservatives the way that it works over there as prime minister resigns as Theresa May has as the leader of her party. She remains the caretaker, prime minister and the party election, a leader who will in turn be elected that prime minister by the members of parliament. Well, how does a party with one hundred forty thousand card carrying members? I mean, these are the people really work the hustings these central committee people. These are the people who are delegates, you know, the equivalent to delegates at the Republican national convention, the democratic national convention. They are the party. How do those one hundred and forty thousand people pick a party leader interns, becomes the prime minister, will they vote? But there are a dozen. It's like the democratic primary, there it doesn't a fifteen different members of the Tory party who want to be prime minister, and they've all put out their hands. And they've said they wanted to be and they divide into two. Categories beginning, those who were leaving when Brexit was on the ballot and those who were for remaining when breakfast Brexit was on the ballot three years ago. Theresa May was a remainder. Never made a liquor sense to me that she should be the prime minister after David Cameron resigned and he resigned because he said, I was the remainder. I don't think I can leave a government that is committed to leaving and so pick a new prime minister and they did they pick threes. I mean, she she persuaded her colleagues that she ought to be it. She made Boris Johnson or foreign secretary Boris Johnson led the leave campaign with one principal deputy guiding Michael gov. Who doesn't look the part, but he's very smart also believed to be very slippery. So Boris Johnson police to be very Radic and a lot of fun. And former mayor of London, and a powerful personality says, I'm going to become the next prime minister, I'm going to stand, Michael g-o-v, who wants supported Boris Johnson for prime minister then stabbed him in the back fairly famous move and British parliament parliamentary politics and went over to Theresa May wants to be prime minister, one, other major lever wants to be prime minister Dominic Robb, so there are two lever three levers running Boris. G-o-v and Ron. Two of those three say come October thirty one we are leaving deal or no deal. Michael go says we can't leave without a deal. Michael go minute over the weekend based upon reports of a biography about the come out about him. He was something of a cocaine guy back in the day when he was a journalist. I don't know many journalists back in the day, who worked cocaine guys. But then again, I wasn't around London much. I'd have to ask Mark Stein about that. So Mike go by the way, we don't allow admitted cocaine users enter the United States. So it's gonna be tough to become the prime minister if you're we bought Brits before who, don't who had cocaine problems from coming in the United States. We don't want cocaine in the United States. And so he says he's reformed in a lot of time. We'll see how that plays out, but he's daddy that one's done. So from the leave side, there are Dominic Robb, and Boris Johnson. Over on the leave with a deal side, these are the remains who got religion. They stayed in the government. They didn't quit like David Cameron. They didn't fail like Theresa May. They say they can deliver deal to get us out. They want to lead the conservatives into the next election. They want to be the prime minister. There are a lot of the number one is a guy named Jeremy hunt. If you sent out the central casting, and you asked, please send us your very best central casting candidate for prime minister of Great Britain. They would send you back Jeremy hunt. I mean had in the pocket the whole prince of Wales handsome. He's smart. He's articulate president, like him and Boris Joe Boris. Johnson nickname is the rambling wreck from Georgia Tech goodness, the guy hasn't been to Barbara who's competent and a hundred years. And that's part of his charm. It's just kind of disheveled. Birdie Worcester character. And if you don't birdie Worcester is I can't tell you character from fiction. PG Wodehouse anyway. So Joe is going to what the way you get. The two is that all the members of parliament who are conservatives. And I think parliament's three hundred and thirty that got just under half. So what's that add up to one hundred? Seventy one hundred sixty different people hundred sixty members of parliament vote in a series of rounds. They call them crowns and the rounds are where. You've got to get at least fifteen percent of the hundred sixty which would be nine or ten for around one or you don't get to go around to, and then got ten people. They vote again, with one hundred sixty people and the one with the least votes drops off. And so you can give your buddy of I could be nominated for prime minister. So I would encourage if you're listening in Great Britain, I'd like to be on one of those ballots. Throw one my way, members of Parliament, I, I can't serve if nominated I cannot run if elected I cannot serve because I'm a proud American but, you know be fun at any of it. They get down to nine then, again, they get down to eight they get down to seven. They get down to six five four three two and then some people drop out, eventually, they get to, to get to a finalist and a semi-finalist to people, the person with the most votes parliament and the second most votes doesn't matter what order they in. That's the ballot that goes to the hundred and forty thousand. Electors. Hundred and forty thousand members of parliament. So if you get seventy thousand and one year the next prime minister Boris Johnson is heavily favored. I mean I should look up Ladbrokes. There's a. Betting house right in Ladbrokes online betting you can't use it till legal in the United States. But Ladbrokes always has a, a political thing broke prime minister. Let's see where the odds are this morning. I think for Johnson is the prohibitive favorite. But, but you never know until you actually find Ladbrokes in prime minister because they are constantly changing, and there's a big they call them big beasts. Big players. Michael Hesseltine, John Major people have been former prime minister and defence ministers and stuff like that. Right now. Boris Johnson is a five to four favorite. To become the next Tory leader. And that's prime minister Dominic Robb is a four to one favorite. Andrea lead sin is a ten to one favorite Andrea led. Some though, who's a lever remaining, excuse me. She's a remainder. Andrea, led some picks up no. No support this morning. Michael go visit tend to one. Jeremy hunt is at twelve to one and Peggy more. Dan, is it twenty to one saw Javi is at twenty two one. Those are really the only potentials when Jeremy hunt picked up, amber Rudd today, who was herself a sixty six to one player he'll go up. I think when they published the next odds, it'll be Johnson. Rob led some and hunt and it may be Johnson hunt, because the people don't really wanna leave. The people who are really remains at heart who think this is stupid, and I don't think it's stupid. I'm for them people vote. You got to do it people vote, they're all going to rally around someone. The idea is to the final round Dominic Robb just wants to get to the final round because he thinks. That the remains will prefer him to Boris and the contest is underway, and it's going to be wrapped up by July the contest is underway, and the vetting is the market is open, go back. And, you know if you're if it's legal, if you're in Great Britain, you can go bet. But I, I gotta tell you, I do not believe it makes sense to put a nother remainder in his and I'm very impressed with Jeremy hot. So is the president. I just don't think it makes a lick of sense to nominate someone for job when they were opposed to Brexit. I really really don't the timetable, by the way. For the election. I was looking at the guardian new rule one hundred sixty thousand conservative members and they will they will be casting their ballots, the week beginning July twenty second. So we are a good eight weeks away. And I'll bring you up dates on this. But you can get familiar with the names Boris Johnson Jeremy hunt. Dominic Robb Andrea led. Some, those are the ones you need to know. Michael go with the cocaine problem

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Prime Minister Gordon Brown Boris Joe Boris Theresa May Dominic Robb Parliament Jeremy Hunt Cocaine Britain Dominic Robb Andrea David Cameron Michael European Union President Trump United States London South Korea Great Britain
Friend or foe? Unpacking Trump's UK visit

The Heat

05:07 min | 1 year ago

Friend or foe? Unpacking Trump's UK visit

"Joining me now to talk about the ship. And Donald Trump's visit to the United Kingdom is Simon marks he is chief correspondent featured store, new seven great to have you with us lovely to be here. Now we've often heard about the special relationship and to be fed there is much in this relationship that strong, these two countries have a common language. Of course, historic links. They have a strategic relationship, which goes back a long way. But looking at it today. Do you still see as a special relationship? I think there is no question that it is a special relationship. It is not necessarily any longer. The only special relationship, and there is no question that it has been somewhat bruised and battered since Donald Trump became president of the United States. This is a president who has never hesitated to pull the rug out from beneath to recent may at every possible opportunity. During the course of the last couple of years now, the relationship, obviously is only ever as strong as the prime minister of Britain, and the president of the United States, personal relationship. I one of the earliest stories I covered as a journalist was the visit to London by Ronald Reagan in nineteen Eighty-eight speech that he made the guilt all and Margaret Thatcher was there. And, you know, the two of them were absolutely philosophically ideological soulmates. They got. Along like a house on fire. The special relationship in, when, in many ways, was never more special than it was at that point, take a look at another relationship. Tony blair. And George W Bush. They didn't come from a shared political background, Tony Blair labour party. Prime minister George W Bush conservative Republican and yet they forged a relationship so special that ultimately it consigned Tony Blair in the minds of many Brits to the as sheep of history because of his decision to join in the invasion of Iraq. So this is a relationship that has weathered a number of different outlooks and dynamics, but at the end of the day, those shed language the shared language, the sense of shared history, commemorating, the seventy fifth anniversary of d day, President Trump described while he was in London as perhaps the greatest liberation in history. I mean that underpins relationship. That I think, at least for the feast Siebel future will always be a very important bilateral relationship. But as you say, President Trump has pulled the rug from under to resume several times, he hasn't just don't resumes down to other allies. Well is the United States in Britain still trusted as now while sixty seven percent of the British public say that they don't have a favorable view of President, Donald Trump, and that partly fueled the protests that could be seen on the streets of London during the course of the last few days, but look, I, I mean, Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher's relationship was such Margaret Thatcher was often accused of turning Britain into America's floating aircraft carrier in Europe. Tony Blair was accused of being George W Bush's poodle by his opponents. So the relationship is, always a lopsided relationship the size of the American economy dwarfs the size of the British economy. The size of America's military. He might dwarfs, what is now Britain's somewhat tawny armed forces, and yet the relationship endures, and it is, actually a Matic if you're British Prime minister, or an American president the, you still talk in hallowed and revered terms about that special relationship. One of the reasons you do that is from an American perspective. Nothing Americans light more than wallowing in a bit of pump and pageantry that only Britain can can really do the way it, does it. And if your British Prime minister, you know, that Americans equally love going on holiday to the United States, and they love listening to American music and watching American TV shows so there's the cultural aspects to this that also underpin it as you point out lots of ceremony on the Monday of Trump's visit to the United Kingdom and on Tuesday, they did get done some business. The president met with resumes. Cabinet had a meeting with her as well. And I'm wondering how much substance can? We attach to this visit because to raise a may is on her way out. Yeah. I mean she's a here today. Gone tomorrow, prime minister, I mean, yes, there was pumping pageantry on day one. There's only one issue that's at the heart of all of this really and its trade if Britain leaves the European Union, and Donald Trump gave voice to his view once again that he believes the United Kingdom should leave the European Union. The UK will have to strike a trade deal bilaterally with the United States and US trade negotiators. No Britain will be desperate for a trade deal, and that potentially they will have Britain over a barrel in those negotiations. And at the end of the day from an American perspective all the other stuff is background music to trying to advance that trade conversation because the American see a massive opportunity that

Prime Minister Chief Correspondent President Trump Britain United States Tony Blair George W Bush United Kingdom Margaret Thatcher London Ronald Reagan Siebel America European Union Simon Europe Cabinet Iraq Sixty Seven Percent
 Fears rise over US conflict with Iran

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:22 min | 1 year ago

Fears rise over US conflict with Iran

"As American warships and warplanes make their way to the Gulf much of the rest of the world is in a spin over the increasing tensions between the US and Iran on Monday. The French foreign ministers on flute Riyan called for Europeans to remain United on their support for the Iranian nuclear deal. The Russian Foreign Minister Sega lever of said something similar not long after. And then the Saudis way didn't think to oil tankers with the targets of acts of sabotage off the coast of the U A and pointed the finger directly at the Iranians will tell us more about how everybody else is behaving joined by robot folks from London's Evening Standard newspaper, a very warm. Welcome fight. This tier Robert let's set the parameters. I it's been said the chances of the US and Iran going to to to war are pretty low despite all the sabre-rattling by Washington except for one thing and we've been here before tonight. It's John Bolton both has throughout much of his recent diplomatic. Life. That's par. Ten years. These being obsessed with Iran, go back to nine eleven and where Rumsfeld when he Defense Secretary switched very quickly from Afghanistan. Remember to Iraq was really the problem after all invaded Iraq disastrously in two thousand and three even at that point. So I'm getting more than ten years. John Bolton was calling from the side saying, no, no, no, the real problem with Iran. We've got to deal with Iran that was a very revealing interview type profile will profile type had view in the New Yorker last month in which they got out reams of quotes from Bolton abide Iran, and it is a gained his a game of bluff don't blind man's bluff that's sending a carrier on rotation less sending a command and control ship that can land six hundred US marines. Why do they? You need them. They've got a big base at Doha and saying behave Iran and you'll breaking this apnea, and the Iranians as usual are playing it by the book one name, we have to bring in new should very odd. And I think is real joker in the Pank is Jeremy hunt, the not very powerful foreign secretary, foreign minister of the not very powerful UK. But the fact that the U K is being cautious about backing the US. At this stage is a break with president think of Tony Blair think of Jack Straw, and two thousand two and two thousand three and I think that this is why it is looking very difficult. But the other person who will be whispering in Botende air, or at least Kushner's the son-in-law of the prime minister of the preposition is bound be Benjamin Netanyahu. So you brought in. Three nations of the United States one of the main place. Jeremy hunt from the u k Benjamin Netanyahu from Israel. I've spoken about France and Russia and the Saudis nothing is happening military insofar as there is no hot conflict, but everybody else is jumping to it. Yes. There's a lot of war talk. Sorry, excuse me. And we mentioned it is Boten. And it does seem that Mike Pompeo the secretary of state seems to be playing some sort of game. But he went to Brussels rather unexpectedly ran into the foreign minister's all of a of of the either virtually or or actually including MRs Bungaree me, the Adam the spikes personal that responsible collectively for for for the EU and put it in sort of coming pollens that he moral less gaunt as far as you can read it through polite. Upmarket newsp- copy, he cut the bum's rush. He the people one buying, you know, we've got its wall. We've got to be really careful about Iran because typical in to the patent it, and they're repeat offenders in this. It's the diplomat. Build up building the case against Iran from the Trump party really hasn't worked.

Iran United States John Bolton Jeremy Hunt Benjamin Netanyahu Gulf Iraq Riyan Bolton Mike Pompeo London Prime Minister Robert Secretary Tony Blair Washington
Centrism: the new populism?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

12:32 min | 2 years ago

Centrism: the new populism?

"During these last four years or so of ruction upheaval in the usually stable arena of British politics. It has been commonly supposed that something sometime has to give this week. It did MP's from both of Britain's major parties resigned. Their memberships and gathered together under the banner of the independent group. These MP's are broadly speaking either from the right wing of the left-wing labour party or the left wing of the right wing conservative party accordingly. A not unreasonably the independent group have found themselves characterized if not caricatured as centrists in certain agitated circles, these last few years centrist has become an insult a suggestion that those to whom it is applied are complacent careerists and all snug elitists, but what with one thing and another might centrism nevertheless, be Jew. A revival with a here in the UK or in other countries roiled by populism. What right now too. Centrism really mean, this is the foreign desk. There are certain things that I think people are yearning for to come back into the political debate long term issues that need desperate action climate change ageing society productivity in the economy, what on earth, we're going to do with technological revolution. All of those things have completely been put on the backburner that sense that you give any ground the stop being ideologically. Pure has lost any powers law slaughter sway over people. And that's where I think these of centrism is an insult partly comes from. 'cause it's come to mean being the wishy washy not really standing up believing as opposed to what I think people soup proponents that kind of at UB about what is about rational policy-making when we talk about centrism or the death of centralism what we are also talking about is the rise of ideologues. So by that token, I'm going to say centrism is basically the style of technocratic expert lead consensus. Politics making which seems to be on the way. Hello and welcome to the foreign desk. I'm Andrew moolah. And my first guest today walls, one of the first wave of seven defectors to the new independent group in the UK's house of Commons. Chris Liz Levi member of parliament for Nottingham east left the labor party earlier this week after thirty two years of membership saying labor had been hijacked by the machine politics of the far lift I spoke to Chris Leslie at colors house in Westminster. I started by asking him if he saw the independent group as a centrist movement. I think it is a center ground formation, basically trying to build a consensus around what we have characterized as the main stream values of the country. We worked together on a couple of sides of four of our statement of values the values not so the policy prescription. So we haven't sort of gone into particular details relate. Getting to one particular month of one particular, but we've talked very much about those things that we think cut across that center ground so notions of fair play focusing on opportunity and merit in terms of advancing through society, but also recognizing the importance of responsibility, both individuals having to take some responsibility. But also, the political responsibility international responsibilities. We all have I think the public. Yes. Want compassion in their politics and hate the fact that particularly from the conservative side. Has felt as though is left the vulnerable isolated, but they also care about tax payers money being spent properly with adequate scrutiny those are pretty basic things and sometimes taken for granted. But I think now is a period where we've had to reassert some of those values because the public have have haven't heard that from the main parties for a long time. What's your feeling about? Why centrism though has become it has literally become a term of abuse or centrist has become a turn of abuse, especially within the labor party in this country, which well within living memory prided itself on upholding exactly that you'll have heard this criticism already the idea that the independent group is basically a Tony Blair tribute act. Well, Tony Blair didn't have focused clue what was going on this week. And nobody he's I think he said himself. So we've decided to do our own thing and plow our own for oh, you can't look back to the last century for the answers of for the challenges that are going ahead. There are certain things that I think people are yearning for to come back into the political debate long term issues that need desperate action climate change ageing society in productivity in the economy, what on earth, we're going to do with technological revolution. All of those things have completely been put on the back burner because partly because Brexit has arrived and the main political parties have chosen to sit on the fence or take go down particularly euro-phobic route. So I'm aware that there is this attack that somehow the center ground is a grey scale mash up of those more clear of. Tipple's on either either end of the spectrum. I don't accept that characterization of the center ground. I think the values I hold are just as valid and strong, for example. I do not believe in lese, fair market solutions in all circumstances. I similarly do not believe in status ownership and control so answers in all circumstances. I believe in well-regulated Mark social market economy, which allows enterprise to thrive and helps us generate decent economy. So that the revenues we have pay for our public services and allows government to intervene on things like health and social care and education the basics that we all need to protect those most in need that isn't something that is has been talked about for a long time. And I think people have lost sight of that. But of course, it's it's a complicated thing sometimes to talk about that in a social media age wherein to itunes and sixty characters. Everybody wants to have. A black and white answer to every possible solution. You know, you've either got to be four something or against something and almost debate or nuance has been squeezed out of the body politic. And that is partly I think what hoping there will be a bit of a response to how do you respond to the criticism, which I know you've you've doubtless already heard and certainly going to here again, this is essentially a reanimation on attempt to reanimate the very very thing that the populist revolts from both sides of politics that we've seen were actually a response to. Yes and populism. I think is has is having its moment. I mean, you can see whether it's Trump in the states all happening in in Europe. And of course, it's fueled very much by this sugar, Russian the social media side. You can definitely whip up a lot of anger if you are a populist. But I think we now we've now coming to a point where that needs to be an antidote to populism insofar as I actually think if you build a populist appeal essentially on false promises that the solution to everybody's problem is something to do with stopping immigration, for instance, if you're coming from the right wing or that if everything is owned and controlled by an individual pulling levers in the treasury, then then everything will be fine that that those false promises will be found out. You know, one of the things I've worried about in the labor party has been the constant sort of tendency to go into making impossible promises, particularly on the on spending, which couldn't really be fulfilled and most people know in their hearts, they couldn't really be fulfilled without jeopardizing the economy, you know, everybody wants everything for free. But actually when you start asking, well d- mind, I ask how are you going to pay for it or where's the money coming from those difficult decisions have have been airbrushed out of the populist. Script and they don't want to have to confront some of those things. But as Trump is finding out in the states when it comes to fulfilling those promises that got him elected. He's now struggling with with when reality bites and similarly the populist movements are going to have to face that. And unless we have the confidence to call out. Snake oil salesman that actually they are peddling things that are not that are not realistic or achievable, then then the populace will continue to win if as seems likely for the next while anyway, the independent group is going to be thought of as what constitutes centrism in British politics. And I say that with all due respect to the Liberal Democrats how quickly and how practically I guess do you do you figure out how to stop? I think it's fair to say that right now, you'll see as being defined in terms of what you're not which is to say, you're not the hard left labor party. And you're not the cranky eurosceptic head bangers of the conservative party. How soon are you able do you think to start to finding yourselves in terms of what you are? Well, I hope from day one we've tried to have a positive and constructive set of values set out in on our website and on the put that we have from. Day one because it isn't just about what is wrong with the the main parties, it is very much about the values. We want to take forward now that isn't a full policy program or manifesto. We haven't even got the structures yet, we've got to have our inaugural meetings, and so forth and talk about you know, what roles people are going to do all of that is still to be to be discussed. But. You know, those positive values in the centre ground that echo as a microcosm of mainstream society. I believe we've had a good go at articulating those hope over the next few weeks and months people will look at that. And start to say, yeah, I understand where that's coming from. It is not about an ideological approach to understanding society or funding solutions it's about an evidence based approach to moving through public policy. Trying to take a longer term attitude to the way. Different challenges are addressed. But from a set of values that I think are certainly ones that I've always felt quite strongly about but people have to read them make their own judgment. And it's up to them. It's up to the public part of this is about also not. You know to to really push back at this notion that the party's own voters. Oh, this is a labor seat or this is a conservative area parties shouldn't own voters. They should earn votes from people. And I think we need a little bit more challenge to say stop being complacent. We want to try and earn votes by engaging with people and their interests and their attitudes. And hopefully, we'll try we'll try and do that. But it won't be a straight won't be a straight line. There will be ups and downs. If people are looking for disagreements between those of us who've come together, I'm sure they will be able to find them the nature of being an independent group is that we are going to take different stances between us, but I think we'll be able to tolerate those because in normal life people can tolerate different opinions. But somehow along the road, certainly within the labour party tolerance became forbidden. And you had to literally sign oaths of loyalty this past weekend to the great leader, and in a very intolerant environment, and that cultural changes of really really strong part of what we want to try and achieve that was Chris Leslie MP of the independent group.

Centrism UK Labour Party MP Conservative Party Tony Blair Chris Leslie Mp Donald Trump Chris Leslie Britain Liberal Democrats Treasury Chris Liz Levi UB Europe Nottingham
Scholars and Ex-Diplomats Warn of Chill After Canadians Detained in China

Amanpour

03:01 min | 2 years ago

Scholars and Ex-Diplomats Warn of Chill After Canadians Detained in China

"The United States, and what we're saying is many people governments, but also scholars and diplomats and people around the world are concerned about some of the things that China's doing we hope that registers. So in part of the letter you've said, it's understandable, rather the Chinese ambassador said it's understandable that these Canadians are concerned about their own citizens. But have they shown any concern sympathy for men now, she is the official who's being arrested in China after she was they say Elise. Legally detained and deprived of freedom. So give us an update about MS manning who is an executive chief financial officer at the big wall way tech giant, what is her condition? I mean, yo citizens are in jail. They haven't had access to lawyers and let me add Christine if I may not only are over to citizens in detention, we know from their testimony and from the testimony of others that their subject the lights are on twenty four seven other subjects around the clock interrogation. These things actually constitute torture in international law, sleep deprivation, what's happening with MS mum. Couldn't be more different. She got a good Canadian lawyer when she was arrested in Vancouver. She had a bail hearing. She made the case that she should be allowed to live in one of her two properties in Vancouver. She has hired her own security guards. And she's on a curfew where she has to be back in a residence at eleven o'clock at night. She's free to go again at six in the morning, and she's been seen many times in.

China Official Vancouver United States MS Chief Financial Officer Manning Christine Elise Executive
"tony blair" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Come on. No, no. I think that is. No, listen. I think that's ridiculous. There is nothing secret about it. President Trump told reporters today that he has never worked for Russia because you know, what they say, it ain't work. If you love what you do. The New York Times reported that at one point the FBI was so concerned about the actions of President Trump. They open an investigation into whether he was working on behalf of Russia now, even if Trump wasn't it's not a good sign that the FBI decided to investigate here. If a bunch of wrong stressing goes missing and the police alike, better check over a place. I know I need to make life changes. All right. The grading was somewhat difficult this time Colbert with the C. Plus, it wasn't a very good joke. Myers with a just because the punchline was a little bit surprising. I liked it corden with a b although he loses a half grade. Dana for pronouncing ranch, Ron. And in a related topic. He gets downgraded a full grade for being a foreigner taken American comedy jobs way from Americans ear loser. James corden, he's banned from comedy for life. Although he can keep doing that. Carpool thing if he wants carpool karaoke is pretty good. Yes. It's all right. Where's he from? It's harmless. He's a Brit. Oh, speaking Brits, the Brexit. You wanna talk about that? We'll have experts guests. We'll have a debate will take your calls. Where is that? What stage was that parliament's going to vote on it? And it's expected vote on Theresa May's stuff that they're going to vote on Theresa May's a negotiated settlement with the EU. And it is quite likely. It's expected that parliament will reject that agreement which around. What are all listen, I'm in knits expected. Then that then there will be a real problem because nobody's quite sure. Where to go from there? The only thing I want to talk about Brexit wise, because I think it will all come out in the wash, and we all have bigger problems than that. Is the dangers of direct democracy? Because you know, Tony Blair. It was not Tony Blair with Brexit or a bullet train. Well, any well. Yes, good point. So a moment in time a former British PM thought. All right. Let's get rid of this whole Brexit thing. Once and for all will have a vote vote it down, and.

James corden President Trump Brexit Theresa May Tony Blair Russia FBI Colbert Myers Ron Dana EU The New York Times
Prime Minister Tony Blair, Prime Minister And Congressman David Cellini discussed on Gardening Naturally with John Dromgoole

Gardening Naturally with John Dromgoole

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Prime Minister Tony Blair, Prime Minister And Congressman David Cellini discussed on Gardening Naturally with John Dromgoole

"Was a big big victory by a highly respected. Democrats are condemning the ruling, obviously, this ruling were permitted to stand. Seventeen million Americans would lose their health insurance. Rhode island. Congressman David cellini remains confident the ruling will be overturned on appeal while the legal process plays out. Obamacare remains in effect. Another hiccup in the bruising battle over Brexit. British Prime Minister Theresa may accusing former Prime Minister Tony Blair of undermining her efforts by calling for a second referendum on whether Britain should exit the European Union. Blair is claiming

Prime Minister Tony Blair Prime Minister Congressman David Cellini Rhode Island European Union Theresa Britain Brexit Obamacare
"tony blair" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Whoa. The economist us because we his Co. newest radio. This possible future season, we're asking should Britain again on Brexit. Okay, I is the former Prime Minister, Tony Blair a proponent of a second referendum on whether the United Kingdom should leave the European Union. He was the special Representative of the quartet of international powers seeking a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians today. He runs the institute for global change, advocating for the benefits of globalization. He's still finds himself drawn into heated debate on his support for George Bush on the war in Iraq with all its consequences. Tony Blair welcome to the economist asks, thank you. We're meeting very exciting time in terms of British politics, people think too exciting cools for a second referendum on leaving the EU or in the air. Just lay out your position that for me. So I've said for quite some time now that should be another vote, which isn't a rerun by the way of the twenty sixteen referendum. It will be a judgment on. What we've learned in the last two years and how we resolve the essential dilemma at the heart of the Brexit negotiation, which is if you want to stay close to Europe after Brexit, you're gonna end up in some form of arrangement where you're biding by Europe's rules, but you've just lost your say over them in which case the argument will be, what's the point of leaving? Or alternatively, you're going to be where a lot of the hotline Brexit is one which is with a clean break Brexit. When you get out of Europe out of its single market and custom union structures, in which case you're going to short term at least possibly medium-term, possibly long term damage to the economy in which case, the question is, what's the price? So what's the point? This is what's the price leads you to? I think to a grid lock in parliament which I think you can see increasing the happen than I been saying this now over year. There's not in my view, majority in parliament, anyone Brexit proposition. So to certain point, there is going to be no recourse except to either have a general election, which would be a mistake for the conservative body, of course do or to say, no, we're going to go back to the people and give them the final judgment over whether they preferred the deal this being offered to them or they prefer to stay. Right. Let's get to what the desireability like this. The moment on practicality, and you're a good skilled process politician from which reason may is. Now we have this gridlock in parliament which doesn't look like getting keened up. She put forward a deal sickle checker. Steel has left both leave and remain in parliament very dissatisfied. So what would be the route to another referendum? Would it be to say, we simply can't find a solution, so we go to through legislation for last and in that case, how does it fit. Around the fixed parliament actor and the other, the furniture like democracy. Once you end up with the gridlock in parliament so that you can't get an agreement on what the new relationship in Europe is, and parliament, contrary than the obvious things to send it back to the people and say, look, you're going to have to tell us whether in the light of what's happened in the last two years and where we are in parliament today, you want to proceed with Brexit all you want to stay. I think once parliament is paralyzed, I don't see what alternates the right will..

parliament Tony Blair Brexit Europe Representative European Union Prime Minister Britain United Kingdom Co. George Bush Israel Iraq Steel two years
"tony blair" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"This is back when Tony Blair, was still prime minister and when Putin was meeting with Tony Blair he. Did not like the fact that Tony Blair was taller than him and so the photographers for the Russian state news agencies had to take photos at really weird angles to. Make it. Seem as though that Blair was not taller than Putin not. Kidding that's why he does all these like shirtless horseback riding things I think he's had a, boob job, 'cause you, know how sometimes old. Man packs get like you. Know like, tennis Bali in a sock. They, even suffer, this tale So Bear with me here from bear with. Me I swear in bringing the tug. Button But when I noticed this when they got when they were walking? On the stage did you see how fast. Putin jumped on the step to you You did see. That I saw that I went. I knew it he is. So sensitive to that anyway I was fascinated by because, Trump's, like eleven thousand feet. Tall I come up to his armpit I'm like at Trump's armpit that's how I, met him before he's show before I I'm I'm art kit height Basically yeah Putin's like five six I'm, as, tall as Putin is Anyway Is. Funny I just saw that he'd like. They and I, mean it was so glaring at first and he really quick hopped up on. That and then he made sure to walk ahead of him as much as possible And get away from him, so that they couldn't do the size comparison and that goes along with everything that. I've read ever since? I I saw that story about him and Blair. That's like something that he does whenever he's around other, world leaders he will move in weird ways and get said that there's not. A hike comparison how funny is that he's got a little Polian thing happening Anyway that kind of I don't I don't care if it's petty it's it's I think it's it's illuminating. Don't? You think so I think it is I, think is. Very eliminating, any so we have a lot. More to get into including the media reaction to this which is ensure John Brennan result John Brennan why isn't. He listening to him he he spied on, Americans in light about it SuperBeets is going to help you deal, with all the garbage and it'll help you kick your Monday off right because SuperBeets I.

Putin Tony Blair John Brennan prime minister Trump Polian eleven thousand feet
New Zealand leader Jacinda Ardern gives birth

Paul Ross Full Set Breakfast

04:11 min | 2 years ago

New Zealand leader Jacinda Ardern gives birth

"Of the times read books is good morning she matt got some breaking news for you on the political front not westminster the other side of the world the new zealand prime minister just into auden has just given birth to a baby girl i know the second world leader ever to give birth in office so he was he was the fast oh i don't know was tony blair they had a baby and david came day menfolk out she did the giving birthday thing i think you're probably did pushing you didn't give anybody a little happy news and congratulations new zealand pm this is how you have to do to run new zealand's you can take maternity leave while you're doing it anyway matt surely the big the big events this week was going to be this big brexit rebellion led by the great rebel alliance leader dominic grieve in the end the rebel alliance collapsed even the rebel leader didn't vote for his own rebel amendment i mean we've talked before about how brexit could be bit tedious when when the person yes but dominic grieve says he won't vote for the dominic grieve amendment just pack up and go the whole thing was a bit of a a bit of good although sort of all strange scenes of national labour mp being wheeled the commons in a wheelchair as basically the tollways wouldn't let the labor party nods very well basically count them mp's materials come in everyone's very upset about this because there is there is this this rule that basically as long if an mp can get the grounds the parliamentary grounds that will count as them having voted and it's done on a sort of a gentleman's agreement on everything she was forced she was force she did if you're well enough to be in the world shanta come you're well enough to do it i'm not i'm no one she physically foster to do surely this is just a breakdown of trust between the taurean labour whips that's totally totally what's happened i think basically what happened was they they sort of get told up the convention of nodding through when they thought they might lose and then basically as as as the game plan down realize the rebels were going to bell basically i think they could at that point said look you know it doesn't matter what shock i'm soon is gonna win anyway but yeah it just goes to show how fractious this has gotten is only gonna get worse over the coming months extraordinary times that lead to more extraordinary times now other extraordinary events that donald trump of course in these very much we've been talking about for the wrong reasons but he's a when he comes over to europe during that trip when he's going to be meeting the prime minister and we found out yesterday the queen here in the uk is also going to meet vladimir putin not not on bitchy so that would be weird this is golden down terribly what in whitehall as you could imagine donald trump and vladimir putin preparing to meet at some point during his trip to europe i think basically the british government dynasty hope that he's after he's been to a brittany kind of play gulf on the saturday maybe could be could pop to see the day after i mean there's a massive row going on about the future of nato donald trump's commitment to nato he says other countries are playing by the rules that you have to spend two percent of gdp on defense spending interestingly the head of nato is in london today he's meeting to reason maintenance during a press conference later but yet based it feels like it's all coming to ahead ahead of this summit next month and yet don't trump cozying up to or at least talk about music volume of who did hasn't gone down very well funnily enough did did go down a little bit yesterday that was behind theresa may which he made a speech at the policy exchange is a conservative supporting thinktank some passive look very nice remember getting my invitation but but yet again after what have the horrific events the last party conference with a step started letters started falling down behind her from the logo the set started collapsing behind her i mean i can't believe this allowed to happen again we don't have salt in the wound up say either get my invited she ingested justice people the the.

Prime Minister Auden Matt New Zealand Two Percent
"tony blair" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Time nose hair clippers letting it grow times ago two years ago i was hosting the red carpet for the starkey gala and and i was sitting i danny the austin's were nice enough to invite and sit at their table that year and people sitting there at the table tony blair former prime minister oh yeah nike i sat next to alice cooper tony blair yeah what's my goodness jennifer garner johnny depp we're all at the table so as i'm sitting there jay leno came by the table because he was the host and i talked to him also on the red carpet and all i could concentrate on was the fact and i know this is a tmi but i'm not kidding now when i think of him this is not a joke this is all i think of had the world's longest gray nose hairs oh it was disgusting and i mean looked like it looked like a display at girton oh my god you got to really be careful because those growing really so probably was just hidden up there unfurled jason.

austin prime minister johnny depp jay leno tony blair alice cooper jennifer garner two years
"tony blair" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on talkRADIO

"Was in government and of course let's talk about this major role she played insecure in the two thousand twelve london olympics absolutely crucial because tony blair and the only people in the cabinet that's what we should picks brown was typos i i thought it was a terrible idea at the time i really did shamed of myself because i loved it the thing is she we had a meeting to plan how to get round listen i she went off and basically lobbied each individual member of the cabinet until we got the majority to toback that big and transformed i off the east end of london which was the course the most polluted bit of southern england she really did pay a key role in this is difficult for us on the outside to to know who who will crucial i knew that i knew how important players role was unable to who worked on on on the bed and just seeing some of the people epithet but the personal relationships are very very crucial when when it comes to sort of gladhanding in persuading people the britain will that london was the right choice basically we will out there in seeing a full for about on this week and tiny ban myself said we were the ones just grabbing out of every member of the international olympic committee we saw trying to persuade them and don't get any pulled off by fifty four to fifty i think is very very close yeah nobody wasn't amazing achievement and i think it was just something that was just so hot warming that that's it once when she really did a lot to make sure it didn't go roll nights so many accurately olympic games that she was so busy only on literally an amazing hardworking person some of the people leading the tributes today tesla yesterday tony blair said first prime minister during the time she was in the cabinet is a committed public servants always true and loyal decent unwise he said she knew she was dying she was prepared to give everything she had in order to help people in the future anymore wants to know what politics could achieve they can just look at her life and how she lived it and how she ended it is a testimony to all this best in politics which is a wonderful tribute but can i know i.

tony blair britain tesla prime minister london brown
"tony blair" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on WLOB

"Say look we got to look out for ourselves that's what trump ran on right and that's a lot of us say after a decade of fighting in iraq in afghanistan we gotta get out of there it's a mess we can't take on the responsibilities little world is that true where do you draw the line here's my number eight three three eight five two four eight six six i don't know the answer this guys i get pulled in in both directions and i want you to listen to this i want you to listen to tony blair this isn't two thousand and three i've never heard a more compelling argument for american intervention then this standing in front of congress he says america is powerful they're a beacon of hope for the world and the world needs you listen to this is not necessarily about assad because this is in two thousand and three tony blair it moved me to tears at the time that's what we're fighting full on it's worth fighting and i know it's hard on america and in some small corner of this vast country out in nevada idaho these places i've never been to but always wanted to go i know out there there's a guy getting on with his life perfectly happily minding his own business saying to you the political leaders of this country why me why us and why america and the only answer is because destiny put you in this place in history in this moment in time and the task is yours to do.

iraq afghanistan tony blair congress america assad idaho nevada
"tony blair" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"No the you man one he did in were king little why are nuri before it now nine abroad the talking mosley megan must off crazy voted down on murdered alvin open near would say in may the wind the villa leno tony blair here the unnamed through a muslim some of the the they'll break up the phone you know is only going to these are gone who don't no good kim a free tone these genetic japan of monets going no i got an old town mm in the he god he pushed him far thirty he's bullpen name no within them back for outlining of the.

tony blair kim leno
"tony blair" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

06:16 min | 3 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"On the j bichel by the way jb out segue we've act morrow added the morning would you in a few minutes i would ask would you'll be able to do this on a flight tears bb rex florida georgia line meant to be let in did you the non sas is enjoying herat he his opponent we and did you hear me everything the it is he'll be as massive in order to me me does it have meds of the man not only that these the maha dan coupled sent guy a global plan i as i didn't seem you ride angle in goma gaza mhsaa era the fate of so many woods playing up laimais dream the girl to know you beautiful anaesthesia see business bill no the award who me may has made the bill the come on oh come on me we he lied whoa nope his message will look me me in his meds and the and it'll madam the body for nine the base number one hit music station next after duly but new rules if the daily show that morning a would you i would ask what you'll be able to do this on a fifa target mosley brunei meghan myself crazy i voted down alerted out open new would say in may a windy fast in finland no by tony blair the unnamed through realized the mother as a mother in the one they'll pick up the phone you know is only going to these aren't gonna two no good came out a free don't be a threat the capanna then mon england and going and milk uh gone down he in the two imagine the push jump far thirty told the new buyers no down them back atlanta the it up man of diesel the muslim the film of the on the breakup the pla you're going to the drunken kqm free don't and the only give oh god down he and in the brain liam payne nary a mudslide boom arab like the word of god going to the drunk phil perry no nope oh god down mm in the he lu lu mm len goodman lorde well that he pronounce the baby number one hit music station as is the tv show i'm selena a broom and i'm crystal so davies not feeling too well today.

j bichel morrow herat dan finland tony blair england liam payne phil perry georgia fifa atlanta davies milk
"tony blair" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

06:13 min | 3 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"On the j bichel by the way jb out segue we've act morrow added the morning would you in a few minutes i would ask would you'll be able to do this on a flight tears bb rex florida georgia line meant to be let in did you the non sas is enjoying herat he his opponent we and did you hear me everything the it is he'll be as massive in order to me me does it have meds of the man not only that these the maha dan coupled sent guy a global plan i as i didn't seem you ride angle in goma gaza mhsaa era the fate of so many woods playing up laimais dream the girl to know you beautiful anaesthesia see business bill no the award who me may has made the bill the come on oh come on me we he lied whoa nope his message will look me me in his meds and the and it'll madam the body for nine the base number one hit music station next after duly but new rules if the daily show that morning a would you i would ask what you'll be able to do this on a fifa target mosley brunei meghan myself crazy i voted down alerted out open new would say in may a windy fast in finland no by tony blair the unnamed through realized the mother as a mother in the one they'll pick up the phone you know is only going to these aren't gonna two no good came out a free don't be a threat the capanna then mon england and going and milk uh gone down he in the two imagine the push jump far thirty told the new buyers no down them back atlanta the it up man of diesel the muslim the film of the on the breakup the pla you're going to the drunken kqm free don't and the only give oh god down he and in the brain liam payne nary a mudslide boom arab like the word of god going to the drunk phil perry no nope oh god down mm in the he lu lu mm len goodman lorde well that he pronounce the baby number one hit music station as is the tv show i'm selena a broom and i'm crystal so davies not feeling too well today.

j bichel morrow herat dan finland tony blair england liam payne phil perry georgia fifa atlanta davies milk
"tony blair" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

06:13 min | 3 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"On the j bichel by the way jb out segue we've act morrow added the morning would you in a few minutes i would ask would you'll be able to do this on a flight tears bb rex florida georgia line meant to be let in did you the non sas is enjoying herat he his opponent we and did you hear me everything the it is he'll be as massive in order to me me does it have meds of the man not only that these the maha dan coupled sent guy a global plan i as i didn't seem you ride angle in goma gaza mhsaa era the fate of so many woods playing up laimais dream the girl to know you beautiful anaesthesia see business bill no the award who me may has made the bill the come on oh come on me we he lied whoa nope his message will look me me in his meds and the and it'll madam the body for nine the base number one hit music station next after duly but new rules if the daily show that morning a would you i would ask what you'll be able to do this on a fifa target mosley brunei meghan myself crazy i voted down alerted out open new would say in may a windy fast in finland no by tony blair the unnamed through realized the mother as a mother in the one they'll pick up the phone you know is only going to these aren't gonna two no good came out a free don't be a threat the capanna then mon england and going and milk uh gone down he in the two imagine the push jump far thirty told the new buyers no down them back atlanta the it up man of diesel the muslim the film of the on the breakup the pla you're going to the drunken kqm free don't and the only give oh god down he and in the brain liam payne nary a mudslide boom arab like the word of god going to the drunk phil perry no nope oh god down mm in the he lu lu mm len goodman lorde well that he pronounce the baby number one hit music station as is the tv show i'm selena a broom and i'm crystal so davies not feeling too well today.

j bichel morrow herat dan finland tony blair england liam payne phil perry georgia fifa atlanta davies milk
"tony blair" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Channel 955

"Voted down open near would say in may the wind i know tony blair here the unnamed the mother am on the one they'll break off the phone you know he's only going to these drunk who don't new get came out a free don't go in and then loan knowing no uh gone down he mm with blue you push them forward birdie piece tobin name no finally curley man of the burmese through the mother of the film of the on the wake of the pa we know with only going to these ronkko will get killed three don't you and and the only no i'll go down he mm mm my is on nearby boom rabah kebir goodbye one of the builder dot com there were going to the drunk no you don't have any of them no way i got down and he and he and the in three who long is the mojo in the morning warmup show up it's mojo in the morning five lies to tell your mom or russia russia you sound like a troublemaker i can i can be while the mere fact you contacted us to do five lies means you're troubled to your parents yeah i am now a little bit of a back story on this one hair your mom is in we've done lots of.

tony blair russia curley
"tony blair" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Flu welcomed kofi how this by teaches police kupa caused a nerve permit us may now joined by jane to cite james tony blair house again intervened in eu debate was he said he's talked about second referendum again about reversing brexit honoring the problem here is is nobody says people just see the messenger and you know that when you hear the prayers gaon jay program the reaction to it are entirely predictable which is all 45 minutes weapons of mass destruction etcetera etcetera etcetera people the british public colleges determined not to listen to him and i think this is one of the problems for the the the the kind of pro second referendum 'cause they need some surprising different voices when nick clegg in tony blair you'll two main spokespeople they've got confer certain him to to quit by himself besieged questions about trust hang around their necks and so i think if if they all gonna make some real progress towards as they will need some people who are nor a form of politicians with trust problems two advocate that kohl's katie in there is actually any chance of a second referendum just to remain a pipe dream but i think james is right in the sense that not with the current people who were cooling for it i think if you really gonna get momentum for a second referendum it be done a you had i mean a prolific leave campaign a suddenly changed their mind because they decided that wasn't going the right way on this and that but if it's just the same people who is saying remain from the verb bright beginning in quite like has strong side remained not you know the kind of perhaps more pragmatic remain as identing it changes much annuals had that been looted tightness when he resigned to his twopronged resignation letter over christmas way he part of that was on transport infrastructure which was his job for the government and the of a half as on brexit but he someone who always was against the being the eu i think was quite entrusting it by wall teddy loves saying today was he was very critical of the government but he was perhaps more critical angry.

Flu kofi jane nick clegg tony blair james eu weapons of mass destruction christmas 45 minutes
"tony blair" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"And you trying to deal with the political situation in which increasingly in order to appeal to your activist space eat you've got to be quite confrontational towards those that don't agree with your in the different political party later good politics and bad governance yet this is this is a problem i think a real problem because in the end a lot of the problems to a lot of the solutions the problems we face a practical nor really ideological now i think what they do involve which is where i think the progressive side as as as inter as whipped with weddings moved on from the time the myself and bill clinton wet wet things have changed is that you will need a greater role for what i would call a strategic and empowering government that's in a that is definitely true because these big changes that are necessary in infrastructure technology and so on will require a government that's that's active ride powerful but it's important the government's not simply in a switching the cult back halfcentury because as not going to work weren't take another short break and will be right back with tony blair i want to talk about the current politics of your country and my country and how they fit into this rubric of the challenges to western democracy that you just mentioned we should talk about brexit and the forces interestingly the same sort of profile of voter who voted for brexit to remove a briton from the eu match up very nicely with the base of of president trump older less educated more a small town in rural than than city on the other side younger more metropolitan higher levels of education.

tony blair bill clinton eu president
"tony blair" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"tony blair" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Laura and now from the university of chicago institute of politics in cnn the axe files with your host david axelrod tony blair burst on the scene in the 1990s as the leader of new labour the labour party in britain and led the labour party to victory in 1997 after which he served ten very consequential years as prime minister of great britain during those years he help modernize a social safety network propelled britain's economy forward and then ultimately ran into significant opposition for his close relationship with george w bush and alliance over the iraq war i sat down in london last week with tony blair to talk about today's political environment and the future under brexit tony blair it's great great to be with you here in london you know you are a globally known person but a lot of people who listen to this podcast certainly in america are not all that familiar with your personal story in in in preparing and know you've written autobiography and so on in preparing for this i was struck by some things in your in your biography particularly how you grew up because you had a very sort of interesting childhood that changed very dramatically and i just wanted to ask you about the about your folks yes i was brought up actually in a in a very conservative household by my father was a member of the conservative party my my father come from very poor background himself he was a foster child in a pool potted glasgow.

Laura labour party prime minister britain london tony blair america foster child glasgow university of chicago institut cnn david axelrod george w bush iraq