35 Burst results for "Tony Blair"

Vote for New UK Prime Minister Goes to 4th Round

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:26 min | 4 months ago

Vote for New UK Prime Minister Goes to 4th Round

"Michael gove, who's the smartest member of the British Parliament, is out there pitching her. And he went on one of the Brit stations yesterday on LBC with Andrew marr and made this pitch about kimmi bad not cut number one. Michael goat. To be fair, she has Mormons through the experience and Tony Blair or David Cameron has when they became prime minister. And she's been in a runner party of course. Jeez. Oh, absolutely. And also, she's the same age as Rishi and she's been in government in three very different roles. All of which she's accomplished successfully. I know all of the candidates. I've either worked with them because they've been junior ministers and departments that I've been running all these supported me in previous leadership elections. Our new hesitation saying that of all of the people who worked with me in a department that I ran, cami was undoubtedly the outstanding minister. She has an intellectual grasp second to none. She has a capacity to communicate with confidence, but also with empathy. And also, she's brave. It's a rare junior minister who tells their Secretary of State where to get off because their secretary state is getting something wrong. Can we do that to me repeatedly? There were a number of occasions where I told her that I disagreed. She took it in very good part. But it's that confidence based on an understanding from first principles of what you want to achieve that you need in a

Kimmi Michael Goat Michael Gove Andrew Marr British Parliament LBC David Cameron Tony Blair Rishi Cami
"tony blair" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

01:56 min | 6 months ago

"tony blair" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Also have those moments and those comebacks that we have seen in the chambers they've been absolutely amazing. So huge game, huge game is gonna be a fantastic game for sure, but I think Liverpool have a small advantage. We stayed a lovely hotel in San Denis ahead of the opening game of the 98 World Cup. Well, Scotland. Yeah, but I'm talking about I'm talking about it in a different context. Right. It's not a game. Otherwise, I wouldn't say we, as you know. Anyway, the Scotland team, we say that there's love. And Tony Blair came to the hotel. The prime minister, two russias all look. Prime minister back at the time. Shut off. Because there's an England supporter, best of luck. Apparently the next question is for you, Craig. I have no idea what that hotel was wasted on. I was I can't remember the name, but it was lovely. It was a very posh one. Craig, what's your handicap in golf? Who on the panel is the best golfer? Me. Put your handicap. Two. Two. At the moment. I play the most. Or Stevie doesn't play anymore. What he does. He didn't rejoin the golf club this year because he's too tight that want to spend the money. And then it was going to come and play the idea, but he fell over the dog, which is true. And so he's got a bad shoulder. So is that the best you've ever been at too? No, I'm scratch. Wow. Scratch, one, two, three, four, recently, but I'm to at the moment. So you're not as good as you used to be. Well, across the board, I think you could see that. But he's definitely. It's a tough, listen, it's not a difficult. Ali, he's only just started playing. Shaq is a disaster. Dan can barely pick a club walk. And Steve is a good golfer. He has a good golfer. He's just got demons in his head. What? Lots of demons. We need to videos from the golf course.

San Denis Scotland Craig Liverpool Tony Blair World Cup golf Stevie England Shaq Ali Dan Steve
"tony blair" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:33 min | 10 months ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"So I think those are all things that she's going to tackle and she has also stressed in her bio when she talks about running organizations primarily health organizations, how important it is to have the culture right at a place, not just structures, but also how the people feel about the way they work. And obviously, one thing we know about the parties of Downing Street is that that was a culture that perhaps had a grip had been lost and that people weren't really fully focused on how they presented themselves and how they felt about how they worked. So I think that's something she'll want to tackle too. So if she's a COO, chief operating officer, which people will be more familiar with in the business world, is he the CEO? Boris Johnson. Good question. Good question. I think that's something she's going to have to work out. I mean, Downing Street, as I say, it's a strange place. You've been inside. There are private rooms and then there is a very old fashioned building and people tucked away and nooks and crannies. So I think she'll want to investigate how the structure should change, how it should be set up. Tony Blair, as long ago as that he called for there to be a department for the prime minister. And finally, that is something that Boris Johnson says, he wants to bring to fruition. So I think she's got a sort of clean slate there to really put down how everyone works..

Boris Johnson Tony Blair
Joe Rogan, and the Media Double Standard

The Larry Elder Show

01:29 min | 10 months ago

Joe Rogan, and the Media Double Standard

"That joy Reid said in her blog 2008 referring to Charlie Crist whom she suggested was gay. Quote, I can see poor Charlie on the honeymoon. Ogling the male waiters and thinking to himself God, do I really have to see her naked? Who says that? She even walked Ann coulter using transgender stereotypes. Not a problem. In a 2005 blog post, titled postmark America read wrote a post about Tony Blair's son, visiting bathhouses in the U.S., while in turning for David dreyer, the former California House member. And the post also referred to former lawmaker Barney Frank, the first openly gay member of the House. As a quote absolute bollocks poacher, close quote. Now joy Reid's apologized for all this, although I never heard her apologize for being a 9 11 truther that to me has not been addressed. But Joe Rogan just apologized.

Joy Reid Charlie Crist David Dreyer California House Ann Coulter Charlie U.S. Tony Blair Barney Frank Reid House Joe Rogan
"tony blair" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:30 min | 10 months ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That is based on looking at equities as a lesser rate of bonds And that is what my analysis showed We could go lower than that mind you I'm not saying it will bottom out there but I will say that the sweet spot IE the equilibrium bank is somewhere between those levels And that is obviously just a straight feed through from what's happening in the rate complex If rates are going to go higher equities are going to go lower and investors are going to be a lot more demanding from their work in 2020 and 2021 So more demanding investors while looking at the NASDAQ futures we've seen quite some volatility this morning earlier erasing losses of as much as 2.2% currently down by just three tenths of 1% Thanks so much for your wise words really interesting Our currency and rate slash is then ram they're from our markets live team So that on the fed those the geopolitics though Tom to think about Ben Wallace the defense secretary has been out discussing the UK's position on Ukraine and coming up next we'll discuss what does Vladimir Putin get out of the current uncertainty 100,000 troops on the board with Ukraine but no one really knows if an invasion is coming or not Yeah we've been speaking on TV to the former UK prime minister Tony Blair hopefully we'll hear from him on radio as well shortly about his views on how the UK NATO and the U.S. can respond to this buildup of troops by Russia He is of course a man that prime minister Tony Blair former.

Ukraine Ben Wallace UK Vladimir Putin Tom prime minister Tony Blair NATO U.S. Russia
"tony blair" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:57 min | 11 months ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And, you know, he could be a pain in the backside when he wanted to be. He was no angel. It's true. But, you know, he was such a big presence in so many people's lives. It's not until you've lost somebody like that that you realize just how big a circle he influenced or was part of. And, you know, there is a huge hole that can never be filled. Well, hazel, thank you very much for taking the time to talk to me and all of us today. Okay, thank you very much for giving me the chance. Hazel hunt there. One of the military mothers who's come together to write to her majesty, the queen over the extreme displeasure that Tony Blair set only Blair has been given a knighthood, she lost her 21 year old son private Richard hunt, who'd been in the army for less than two years when he became the 200th British soldier to die in the war in Afghanistan in 2009..

Hazel hunt hazel Tony Blair Richard hunt Blair army Afghanistan
"tony blair" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Progressives on the left And it was let's you know let's be honest it was successful Tony Blair was an extremely successful prime minister in the UK and Bill Clinton was reelected in the United States and of course of course it's like dust in the wind And so I'm not sure candidly that either Hillary Clinton or Tony Blair can give us a clear eyed vision of the future because they come from such a different political tradition that seems so far in the past now Well particularly when you talk about Taiwan as a possible flashpoint because of the sea lanes it becomes incredibly important and in Japan for instance you know would not would not just look away I'm not sure we have enough time to really go into this in great detail now Eric Just wanted to thank you for joining us and coming on Can you come on It's a pleasure It's a pleasure Honestly it's a pleasure guys to have substance of conversations about these issues that are of such great concern to us all not just a business but will everybody You're having them there and I know that's what you mean And hopefully you can have them here more often Thank you very much Eric Eric Yeah All right so the time now is about 38 minutes past the hour Let's squeeze and look at markets because we have a big unfolding story and that is and actually if you think about it Alibaba really goes to the heart of what we've just been talking about Because I should say it's my view that the reason traders are selling down this stock a lot is more because the future is unknowable and it doesn't look like you can really predict what kind of company Alibaba is going to be going forward Sold down 11% in the U.S. session It's down some 55 56% from its 52 week high that was just last November And its earnings while they were weaker than expected they still had revenues up 29% in a projected revenues up 20 to 23% and it was easy to sell into that because that was less than expected But if you think about it it's really the uncertainties going forward that probably are creating a lot of lack of confidence in the stock Ant group rose an estimated 39% its profit was up that much in the June quarter and it contributed a $1 billion to Alibaba's earnings In some other news in terms of the broader equity market the hanxing index is down 1.6% The hang seng tech index is down a similar margin down 1.6% The nikkei is still holding on to gains up a quarter of a percent but the a 6 200 is negative And right now we see the straits times index in Singapore negative down a tenth of 1% The tie axis is up about a third of 1% The yield on the ten year treasury now 1.59% slightly higher and WTI crew is slightly higher 79 13 a barrel Doug All right let's get an update on global news here on daybreak.

Tony Blair Alibaba Eric Eric Bill Clinton Hillary Clinton U.S. Taiwan Eric UK Japan Singapore
"tony blair" Discussed on The Red Box Politics Podcast

The Red Box Politics Podcast

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on The Red Box Politics Podcast

"Blair knew how to manage the media. Present himself project through the camera lens. His success go. Bam really couldn't do it though. I'm interesting when gordon brown became prime minister he wants had a proper job. He'd he'd been a tv reporter put it whatever he learns as a tv reporter. He'd forgotten by the time he became prime minister he he goes brown was was figuring in a lot of ways in number ten because he wanted and plotted and planned to to become prime minister them when when it happened. He wasn't up to the job. I remember looking at gordon brown. When he was prime minister and i noticed that his fingernails to the quick and usa i felt was filled with with sort of bio against tony blair. Because he thought that he'd been deprived of the job for so long. Lebron felt he was almost being eaten up from inside was it bio against any blah. An eating himself up from the outside the long comes. David cameron the exact opposite a man who worked in tv he. He knew the power of television. It struck me while i was making a film band. David cameron that that every prime minister i'd filmed with had got themselves a spin. Doctor was david cameras effectively. The spin doctor who became prime minister. It feels like there's a bit of a pattern emerging between the tv friendly media-friendly prime minister giving way to saudi-born. Could so you went. From million into wilson was much more telegenic. Callahan gave way to heathrow really struggle with television thatcher. Giving away two major. It was much more. You know sort of hard work. Tony blair gordon brown. David then of course gives way to theresa may much more in the brown heath but willard mode of really struggling to connect with mass media. This very difficult time and she just did not like television did not like herself being exposed to the to the cameras. I remember what So dunkin said when mrs may Was once asked on television. What was the naughtiest thing that she'd ever done and She said that she wants ran through a field of wheat. And ellen duncan it to me if only she had added naked. We thought more. Well somebody probably has one field of week naked lavar worse field is voice..

gordon brown David cameron david cameras Blair tony blair Lebron brown brown heath usa Callahan heathrow saudi Tony blair wilson theresa willard David dunkin ellen duncan mrs
"tony blair" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"Our water supply. So the some of the the hopeful that trends that we saw in the mid twentieth century been reversed over the last several decades a lot of study dementia very concerned about how that is going to result in employer brain health over the next several decades. Thank you daniel per the book. I think i'm quoting here us. You say increase access to formal and informal education decreases in smoking as you noted public health programs and societal infrastructure. And then you use the equal signs brain health Then you see. Further psychosocial benefits are result thereof improved neuro plasticity cognitive reserve said all from these programs Shock and amazement. Public health actually does a pay a return and i thought it was interesting. You probably are aware the fourteen fifteen billion dollar public health care act passed ten was under constant attack in fact those money some of those monies we use for pay fors So those funds were cut because you know it further than the book you know. I don't know if you use this phrase. But of course we fetish cise individualism in this country. So there's no such thing as population health issue in all comes down. You side of course margaret thatcher and tony blair etcetera Reagan there's no such thing as a population health issue installed. The individuals concerned our fault. So i thought all well reasoned. I i do want to call out. Use the phrase of course alice static load. There's a lot of mental health aspects of all this involved. You get to this to some extent along with of course lead in the water and sanitation. I'd like to call that out because you did talk a fair amount about social isolation loneliness..

dementia daniel margaret thatcher tony blair Reagan
"tony blair" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Knowles, giving you the latest updates from the gay stop. Oh, and by the way, I'm not throwing a bomb. I'm not referring to activists. I'm referring to the actual Rainbow Police Force. We have a mass hysteria going through not just the United States. Just the anguish fear at least and and in the West, probably more broadly. We're not focusing on the real challenges that we have. As a country. We are inventing new challenges. We are indulging in delusions of victimization. While the Taliban is taking all of our weapons in Afghanistan, hundreds of billions of dollars of weapons We here in the West are worried about microaggressions against Pan Tran. Pseudo by non binary sexual Whatever. I mean, just completely fictitious categories in the United Kingdom. They're retiring old patrol cars, all just regular run of the mill cop cars. To keep peace on the streets. They are retiring them. And replacing them. With rainbow colored anti hate crime cars. A police officer in the United Kingdom explains the move The rainbow cars, the hate crime cars, whatever you want to call them. They are part of our vehicle fleet, So you know we're always replacing vehicles. They get all of the police sort of insignia put on them as normal. But there will normally be Then something added on that is to do with the rainbow side of things, but they're out there is non patrol vehicles. Sometimes people will ask us. How can you afford to do that? You know that's not right to to spend money on putting a rainbow on a car. Well, actually, the cost is quite minimal, but the confidence that it can bring by just having that rainbow on there and people say to me, you know, the impact of seeing the rainbow is so huge and the idea is that the cars are there in the communities generally on normal policing patrol just again to show the community that we want you to come forward. Something is happening that you know isn't right then we absolutely want you to come forward. So is there to try and give confidence to our LGBT plus community but also to other Underrepresented groups and unless we have an organization where all of our staff feel that they can feel included that they are included, Um I don't think we can deliver the best service to our communities. Now I know that that was in another language that was in British. So I would like to translate that for you into American. The Taliban. China plays Come invade us, please. We are no longer a serious people. We do not understand anything about our society or criminal justice or I'm becoming a little South African. I don't know My accent is not great. This is pathetic. This is really this is like a Monty Python sketch. This is I want to be a woman. You want to be a woman. I want to have babies there. This is literally a Monty Python sketch. And now it is. Police chiefs in the United Kingdom, saying We're not going to focus on real crime anymore. We're not going to focus on people you know, stabbing you and taking your property so Then, at the philosophical level, we're not going to focus on the protection of private property. We're not going to focus on the protection of our political order in our political tradition. Instead. We're going to focus on finding out whether or not anyone in the community Has any objection in their own mind or conscience. Two men dressing up like women, and we're going to root that out because Transphobia It's not. That's not what we're going to stand for here in the United Kingdom. But we have the same sort of thing happening here in the United States. Tony Blair, who was the prime minister who brought his nation into the war on terror. He was PM while George Bush was the president. He was a representative of the kind of neo liberal consensus of the 19 nineties. He was he was sort of the equivalent of Bill Clinton. But Bill Clinton wasn't all that different from George W. Bush was all the same kind of thing we're going to have Really rip roaring economy at home. We're going to cut taxes a lot. We're going to cut some regulation. But we're going to project power overseas. We're going to project the kind of liberal vision of society over on the Middle East. Tony Blair's furious He said the decision to pull out of Afghanistan Is in the Cilic. And he wrote, he wrote a 27 100 word piece on his website about this. I will spare you the piece, but it's worth pointing out his problems here because I think it actually gets to the heart of what we're all dealing with. He says. The world is now uncertain of where the West stands because it's so obvious that the decision to withdraw from Afghanistan in this way was not driven by grand strategy, but by politics. We didn't need to do it. We chose to do it. We did it in an obedience to an imbecilic political slogan about ending the Forever wars as if our engagement in 2021 was remotely comparable to our commitment 20 or even 10 years ago. And in circumstances in which troop numbers had declined to a minimum, and no allied soldier had lost their life in combat. In 18 months, the absence of across the aisle, consensus and collaboration and the deep politicization of foreign policy and security issues is visibly atrophying US power. And for Britain out of Europe as from Britain out of Europe and suffering the end of the Afghanistan mission by our greatest ally with little or no consultation, we have serious reflection to do. So he's also bringing up Brexit here. We also didn't really like Brexit. So notice what he's saying. He's saying that we pulled out of Afghanistan because of this imbecilic political slogan about the Forever wars. Right, this imbecilic democratic process whereby the people Decided they didn't want to be there anymore. And by the way, in some ways following the wisdom of the founding fathers, virtually all of whom warned explicitly against continual warfare. I'm thinking of James Madison. I'm thinking of Washington's warnings about entangling alliances, and Jefferson then invokes them too. He's an imbecilic that we would allow the people to make this decision. Now. People don't know what the West stands for. Right, Tony that That's the problem. You're getting. You've identified the problem, but you're getting the order wrong. It's not that now we don't know what the West stands for because we pulled out of this godforsaken backwater in the Middle East. We pulled out of the godforsaken backwater. And we bungled the political mission there. Because we don't know what the West stands for. What is it? What are we after This was this was the grave problem of the 19 nineties. The 19 nineties we had we won the Cold War..

Tony Blair George Bush Tony Bill Clinton United Kingdom Afghanistan 2021 Rainbow Police Force James Madison United States 18 months Cold War George W. Bush Middle East Jefferson Taliban Europe 19 nineties Knowles 10 years ago
What Happened in Afghanistan?

Sky News Daily

01:43 min | 1 year ago

What Happened in Afghanistan?

"Across sky news on television mobile and our social channels. We've been reporting on the developments in afghanistan with was the fifteenth. Today that seemed to take some by surprise it led to questions about what the past twenty years has all been four following britain america and its allies presence in the country as the situation continues to develop. We wanted to examine the shifts in the geopolitical landscape since the shocking fall of kabul. I'm deborah hanes foreign affairs editor at sky knees. I'm never last some the ship producer. India reporter based in delhi almost exactly twenty years ago. Nine eleven the upshot from that. Just give us a a kind of really potted history of that evolution of the mission to afghanistan like you said. The invasion of afghanistan was to oust al qaeda and the taliban regime that had harboured the group on their soil and that was achieved in terms of the collapse of the training camps and the collapse of the taliban regime very quickly. And then you had a american british other. Nato troops on the ground and the mission started to evolve into one where they tried to set up and stabilize a government and bring democracy to the country. But that's a huge effort and well. They should have been completely focused on that effort. The war in iraq began was launched. The choice was made by the us to go into iraq on the futile hunt for weapons of mass destruction and that was a mission that the u k under tony blair as prime minister supported

Afghanistan Deborah Hanes Taliban Kabul Britain Delhi Al Qaeda America India Nato Iraq Tony Blair
"tony blair" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on NPR News Now

"I'm nora raum former british prime minister. Tony blair is blasting the us lead withdrawal from afghanistan as imbecilic. He was an office when the uk deployed troops to afghanistan after nine eleven and says the move jeopardizes everything achieved since then teri schultz reports former prime minister blair supported the british deployment in afghanistan in two thousand one. But he says leaving. The country now is tragic. Dangerous and unnecessary. He said on sky news that allowing the taliban to take back. Control is neither in afghanistan's interest nor the world's they will give protection and sucker to al qaida. You've got isis already. In the country trying to operate at the same time and the only people really cheering this decision of the people. Hostile to western interests. Lair says the trump administration's decision to withdraw completely was driven by politics and not strategy and he criticizes president biden for following it. He says britain must stay in afghanistan until everyone who needs evacuating is out for npr news. I'm teri schultz. in brussels. president biden says the evacuation at kabul airport accelerated this weekend and the us is committed to removing all us citizens and at risk afghans in an address from the white house. Saturday he said any american wants to get home will get home. Four days after testing positive for the corona virus. Texas governor greg. Abbott says he's now tested negative. Texas public radio's jerry. Clayton has more. Abbott made the announcement saturday evening on his twitter account..

afghanistan teri schultz nora raum president biden Tony blair al qaida npr news blair taliban kabul airport us uk Lair britain brussels white house Abbott Texas greg Clayton
Tony Blair, Who Led U.K. Into Afghanistan, Criticizes the Pullout

First Day

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Tony Blair, Who Led U.K. Into Afghanistan, Criticizes the Pullout

"Leaders. Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, who sent troops to Afghanistan after the 9 11 attacks, says the U. S decision to withdraw from the country has every jihadist group around the world cheering. Rough waves are crashing along the coastline in the northeast. As tropical storm on re unleashes wind and rain National Hurricane

Former British Prime Minister Afghanistan U. National Hurricane
"tony blair" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Prime Minister Tony Blair and Johnny Depp together clearly Johnny Depp, so we're even know they were so embarrassed. They didn't even know what to do. And Jason and Colin were holding court at that table. Yes. Yeah, I'm sure. You know you're the most interesting people there. Know, we were sitting around like watching Alice Cooper and Tony Blair. Talk to each other. Fascinating. Visible. Yeah. Did they talk to you? Um Yeah. I mean, a little bit, Tom. Uh, Tony Blair Did I sat right next to the former British Prime minister. He was delightful stick connecting with the peasant, right? Yeah. Totally. Thank you, Elizabeth. Thank you. That's exactly Elizabeth. Yes, I love it. Okay. Let's talk about Britney Spears quick before I go because I want to make sure that I update you on how she's going to talk to the judge in her conservatorship case next month. Okay, this is happening. On Dorsey's is are telling TMZ. That Britney does not feel trapped in the 13 year conservatorship that she has 99% of the freedom she'd have. If she weren't in a conservatorship. The only thing she's prevented from doing our crazy things like buying three cars at a time, which is something that she tried to do back in the day. She is free to travel. She goes to Hawaii quite often. She lives her life in L a without real restrictions, and that she's very aware that her life was out of control. Before the conservatorship was put in place. It created a structure and it helped with her assets, which were dwindling. The problem that Britney Spears has, according to these sources, is her father, Jamie, that the two don't even speak anymore. She's been mad at him for a long time about business issues and certain people Jamie embraced on the team. Britney feels like people that Jamie was bringing in were motivated not by Britney self interest but by their own, and she wants him out as co conservator of the estate, and that is why she's going to go before the judge. Yeah, and she's going to talk. The hearing next month, TMZ says I was wondering about this is likely going to be open to the public. Yes. Oh, I guess that's what TMZ says. Oh, and trusting, really interesting. Write him out of there, and she has said she's not gonna perform again as long as Jamie is part of the conservatorship. That.

Jason Jamie Johnny Depp Colin Elizabeth Britney Spears 13 year Hawaii 99% Tom Britney TMZ Dorsey Alice Cooper two three cars Tony Blair next month Prime Minister L a
"tony blair" Discussed on X96

X96

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on X96

"We have boner candidate number one. Tony Blair, No 20 Player discharge Prime Minister of England. Hey! He said, apparently, hey, wasn't gonna lock the country down again, no matter what, Let the bodies pile high, he said. Boner candidate number two. Excuse me, Tony. It's Dr Rosario, A a woman testifying at a council meeting in North Carolina, South Carolina, one of the Carolinas. And in the end, the council man was so disrespectful to her. She kept saying. Excuse me, But I'm a doctor. Would you call me Dr Rosario? Well, okay, Mrs Rosario. He just kept going on like that. He did get his just desserts, however, and was fired. Good. And Boehner, candidate number 31 Grand slam was just not enough intruders breaking into the same Denny's twice in one night. Make themselves I'm assuming a grand slam to Grand Slam breakfasts each Mary, one of owner T shirt. And the winner by just five votes was Boner. Candidate number two. Excuse me, Tony. It's Dr Rosario. Okay, That's your winner of round two. Now goes forward to Boehner Fight Might be boner of the day depends on how well it does against the winner of around one you'll find out and you'll vote. 9 20 this morning. That's when Boehner fight happens. Go ahead and get that case. Following is a sponsored feature. What I meant to do was there we go. Hi, Mark. Stuart, are you there? I'm here. Yeah. Wait a minute. Wait a minute. Wait a minute. Mark. You sound like you're driving or you distracted driving. I hope not. Good heavens. Mark. Mark, Are you driving me? Yes. Are you driving? Maybe, but the core. I'm hands free. Okay, Well, this is where this is Marcus with the advocates. And I just think it's ironic that we were going to talk about distracted driving today and awareness of cyclists and pedestrians and all of that kind of stuff because it is a serious problem. You feel confident? Big problem? You feel confident, though you feel very confident. Okay? I'm okay. Yeah, Like I said, if you're the rule that we always tell people that you're going to talk on your phone, make sure that it's Cordless. I mean, why not Cordless, but it's Bluetooth when you're driving. Yeah, and and generally for Ah, brief conversation as as this one will be your You're okay the while you're driving. How many calls do you think the advocates get a month from accidents that have involved Distracted driving. Oh, I would say the majority of the accidents today are Somehow by distraction, and I would say 80% of those air cell phone related, But most of the time, it's not necessarily talking. It's usually people looking down, texting. Is talking, even if they have it in their hand. They're usually looking forward so they can kind of see what's going on in there a little bit more cognizant of the dangers around them, but the biggest issue we see his people texting and driving. You know, another way of I just I can't understand how people eat in the car. You know, While they're driving, driving around eating to me, that's really a distraction. Right or shaving. I feel lot of people when I'm driving to work. Really? Oh, my God, like electric one like one of those electric shaver. Yeah. No, Gina lathered up that Zach got a bowl of water. You know, Although I all kinds of crazy, crazy stuff happens of people doing things in the car. They shouldn't be doing right Mark. That's right. Well, if you so if you get hurt in an accident involving A distracted driver. I think the very first thing you should do after the police leave the scene is called the advocates. What's that mark? I'm parked. OK, good. Good. Oh, good. Feel better now, Um, a mark. I saw just this is just off the wall. But I saw the advocates TV commercial. Yesterday, I think and it's this was this. It was this attorney for the advocates out hiking. And then he gets a call. He gets a call, and and it's a client and the advocates. You guys will take you guys take calls, no matter what, right. Yeah, we take calls 24 7. So a lot of people joke around his friends of mine or something will be with me and I'll get a phone call on my cell phone and I take it and step away. And they say, Hey, it's exactly like your guys is commercial s. Oh, wait. You We do take calls, even on vacation. The attorneys have taken calls all over the state, Some people even outside of the country. Um yeah, We're always available so that advocate in that commercial was really good looking, and I thought I thought I'll bet that's about that's Mark Stuart and his name, but he was really good. I know I'm the attorney that they have do all the radio the advocates is. Look if you've been hurt in an accident, distracted driving It doesn't matter whether the attorneys for the advocate throughout hiking or on you know, in other parts of the state, they'll still take your call 24 hours a day, seven days a week and Mark anything you want to add to this before we say goodbye. Yeah, I would just say we're getting into the summer season, which is known as the 100 deadliest days of summer and Utah on.

Tony Blair Mark Stuart Mark Tony Stuart Boehner Gina 80% Yesterday Rosario Utah Mary twice 24 7 Zach Carolinas one night first five votes each
"tony blair" Discussed on Pop Culture Gamers

Pop Culture Gamers

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Pop Culture Gamers

"In manchester. Went to the pub had a few beers at went through to a restaurant. Something to eight and then went to the cinema for about midnight showing opening weekend. Golden boy and it was rammed absolutely packed and people were cheering. When when jerry jones did something that it was great atmosphere for some yeah from memory cinemas and may my friend we every friday night was the sitter to the. You know the big shy you know. We saw all the law to the rigs. All the style was Add you wouldn't actually would literally have cigarettes to yourself hours near ever get a private showing yet. Effectively speaking it was like having a private short absolutely love. it was really a a forbade steph. The biggest thing for me is getting back to the. Although i won't be in a rush to get back to what a whopper by detail will but the other side of the coin as the we as where i live because the slow through snow compete shops as it were My by gave basically got to go to our cost of to to tesco all said's brace sage. He's probably won't ever aid tesco's decks to useless akos is probably your best bet books Obviously we have we ever see x. Looking forward to get back to their also looking forward to hopefully to not be restrictions between areas we go middlesbrough and go tastes. I pack weather's a game like that. You know the assault shops. Yeah yeah it's It's hopefully not too far away now is next week. Well yeah about travelling out your area shape. Suppose people shop with her every route know patriot with chapels bum. Born s across the country for nothing bothers social sought of a cow. You but we agree to when you read. The guy settled fake. You actually stipulates stadium clavier. I think the just tell you that but right now indicates we looking up because we knew couple pedro de cabinet. Go out about wage steadied. Upset would not risk anyway Bob yeah yeah paul question. Our keiko wilson he asks. Which game do you play to relax. You find a good walk around in full out. Seventy six helps to relax me in particular due to the great radio students. Don't think good question. Consta- rack i actually in a similar vein to full lau. I find scarring bailey relaxing but generally see the pti paycheck. I mean she fall asleep..

manchester jerry jones keiko wilson next week Bob tesco friday night eight paul Golden boy pedro de Seventy six akos couple
"tony blair" Discussed on Pop Culture Gamers

Pop Culture Gamers

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Pop Culture Gamers

"You're also not connected to where you on to really in in the real world outside if you'll feel world and that's authentic that's Situation i competing at moment. If i'm in my house on my which doesn't happen huge amount than it's possible. Some soccer say but that doesn't really happen much. I think where the might work in the future as like a very old next generation episode of star trek the game where the put the seagull. Your prize got taken over at wesley app to say that they're dribble that one. Yeah i think when you get something that you can put on. The slight of your face doesn't offer go over your eyes. Spain's the information strip aid have you don't have to move it. Saw thought controlled that saw via when we get to that point in the future i think might be a innovation that people will take yet possibly but i think gets it is the disconnection for me. That is ruining on some of them. Have now you can flick it to your external camera on you. Hopefully screen smell. I'm which is a good idea but it. Yeah especially if you're wearing if in seoul headphones as well you just lately shops offering need to maybe go to a designated places on they were talking about setting them up in shopping malls and stuff. Wade will my suck up. Version of games. Arcade via would would thrive more than. It is a moment with the kovocs situation which headset objects. Somebody's sweat at difficult. Yeah okay let's Got jason question. Ed he's With the end of lockdown on the horizon what gate related things were excited about do divorced. I doubt i'll be able to go. Comey club this year. We might be able to if the whales while because it said no amber editor year. Maybe ever made up there. But i'm really cared to get back to the cinema. And the retro gaming shops have avoided so about yourself. I will definitely think ajax on if that's if that's on this year that's usually in september so if if that's home than i will walmart certainly try and get tickets to that would say at least one day anyway What else yeah shops. Just twit it just not haven't been to shop seora going out for something to eat. Cinema are the items that she say when you were talking about three day that my main experience three d. movies a voice being in soon amok sore title in three d. in similar pretty To sell but yeah just taught Elements of normal normal life athlete for me a a excuse me. I have a baby for over a year. It's the longest life. Since the first time i ever went to this over the age of fall the i have not been to the cinema because i well when i was twenty eight. You know that was a friday night. Least midnight showed a senator at half the eighth. Each state paid may be the only ask for a private screening. We were ready to offline somebody else would walk in subtypes and i want somebody. Bay is abuse. That was eight. We would really hats off so we sat behind him. Cada i remember When the the first two pit bulls in the movie. James bond movie goldeneye when that on released a over released weekend. I went to see a my mind. Who's at university of manchester time and we went to remember that which similar is but it was in..

walmart september eight friday night goldeneye jason Spain this year twenty eight Ed star trek Each state first time over a year wesley app three day first two pit bulls Wade of normal normal life athlete Bay
"tony blair" Discussed on Pop Culture Gamers

Pop Culture Gamers

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Pop Culture Gamers

"Anyway. Going up to see where the playwright david. H asset number five. We've got re entry of loggins erode that as a classic by him of him of capillary. Yeah amongst men of many other things. Yeah also austin powers. Yeah and the faubus critise yup face to know what this reentry said she said. Hey because we notify is thaw a red trade but is the america. Where will for lupton. And i bet that is a everywhere helped by the fact it was of buy one get one. Free of zafy. Fa- rachel yeah. That's the advocate yet is a good movie. That was the iro offers. Well the baotou tree is so which is view disney movie at which is the same. As last week as will do about nineteen eighty-four. You're always align wonder won his liaise. Sally is so do you have any talk about. Tbb wise Inside his apartment. Marching nor great deal heightened story. Thank you. I'll tell you about a watch it so i've been watching and i won't be watching these cocoa. Have you ever heard of this. Is it new. No it's About five years old eight. Say a comedy starring greg davies from the beginning his. Yeah tall small stor yet. All abc from fred's one of ross's Hold fate as well. Yeah date a basically The top sincere middle at middle class saw of fab lay. Who has the whole world of ted upside down whether that daughter returns from thailand. The wherever it was with had you husband called cookie. He's absolutely cooking require others. Good name for it. This is just one of those. Really funny situation comedies. The whole shortchanges after the end of season one because there was a reshuffle of the cast. The the doll to got changed actress. I the character of cookie actually got killed off. His son came in instead here. Radio beta love interest fall. Great davies daughter. The same so she was in love with the father. Abed musab the saudis played by tyler lautner from twilight saga. but it's. it's just a good soft like bbc to british comedy watching this. I'm watching it are met flicks but obviously could you know. Get in the classes as well but definitely worth a watch a say okay. Greg davis i've had them back snows. She's she's things so that's right. Yeah yeah she's a good actress but by wife fix hilarious. Because i think that she's convinced it can which is greg davies. Character is actually may other figs of of assault. Light faces apple's so we'll ever think she thinks abc's been secretly spying on million copies of the stuff that i how i would react to stir which is quite.

tyler lautner Greg davis thailand Abed musab Sally greg davies last week davies david eight season one disney million copies About five years old british cookie one tree twilight saga america
"tony blair" Discussed on Pop Culture Gamers

Pop Culture Gamers

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Pop Culture Gamers

"So yes that was by by. Gabby week this week as well so with that will go. All the two babies tv ad straight wendover letter lion selby's movies tv in streaming at we have s'amuse add the most popular lifted composer. As you know muck without looking at now. I did say yeah to thoroughly deserved in my opinion absolutely so the most popular olympic composed has been identified as job williams for the fourth year rid. Yes well yeah. So he life. Well yeah i mean you know you look at the. The movie stood style. Was red lobster drastic. Pack but out of the top three hundred at trees to classic. Fm hall of fame. Pull he had made out of three hundred on a seaming. That's more than anyone else. I have received so well that is. Yeah well as the world's alive so in the top three hundred they must've been in life they right said to qualify as a living composer. Well unless of course was enough. Olympic compulsive that three hundred. Yeah maybe but abc book trees that we're in bed with the seventy three was closely council. Said that would solve the higher. Santa private right at two for two jaws to unite t. At what eight tonight. Indiana judge rates lost acco hundred five at sixty six packed for example was harry potter philly with star wars at then sixteen shitless list. Yeah i mean he is just so good at that. It almost makes the music hall of the star of the movie. Doesn't it great. Yeah sunday with something like stalls the music installs taken on is becoming sign an entity in itself really that soundtrack i think well they not my seven days of his piece these anyway. Yeah i absolutely love pace us a have book you know. The the earth awards had subaru lewis webs as well Boats so. The us i had was about paul ritter. Very sad so the what are the styles. If friday night did paul ritter as died of a bridge shaeber. He was best known for his role in friday night. Dinner which talked about a few times. Before i that show but it was also a a salary. Sykes noble plebs How to rise idioms in the harry potter and half blueprints basically adding quantum of solace at evidently. He passed away peacefully at home with his wife. For two subs. Yeah southern i think it was just too young isn't fifty five was five years old than i am. Yeah just that's frightening default. Although it'd be ferreted think he was the old. I thought he was like sixty two. Yeah he's i think when you kind quite thin soup.

paul ritter friday night five years two three hundred two babies Santa this week seven days fourth year two subs Olympic sixteen harry potter philly sunday Indiana two jaws tonight harry potter seventy three
"tony blair" Discussed on Pop Culture Gamers

Pop Culture Gamers

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on Pop Culture Gamers

"Saying yeah so. That was quite too coincidental advocate going to wear. Hopefully wales become this year. Is that in cardiff telford. All right into comical but up be good atmosphere and yeah well a few guest us. It could be there Abe it's going to be carried. Gilead jabs bastos from buffy. The vampire slayer the k. Off the walking. Dead jason isaacs. Yeah yeah yeah burger. Yeah when it's not That's november so that might be open completely by then highly as in back to normal. Maybe what was noble kind of normal as the it's novelist were gonna get. Yeah hopefully that is definitely a viable whole pitted. Try get picture with jason isaacs saw starting to figure if patriots with the captain ufc star trek. Because i've got. I've got made with william shatner. I've got mayor. George takei well. Jason isaacs goats. Be down there isn't it. It has plus the fact. He's a lot cheaper than the world's cheaper the chapter to tell you that now. Hopefully so eight three if you want to look at. It is running from the twelfth to the fifteenth of gene. Which i think is kind of around where it was has been a second week agenda time. It actually say all of the stuff that we're going to be told his they offer a year because of covid. Well yeah who knows. Cup levels at st.

william shatner fifteenth twelfth jason isaacs Abe second week Jason isaacs George takei this year november cardiff telford star trek eight three Gilead wales ufc captain
"Vaccine Passports" Spark Debate and Division

Monocle 24: Midori House

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"Vaccine Passports" Spark Debate and Division

"Over the merits of vaccine passports is gathering steam as countries around the world debate how to kick start travel and public. Gatherings denmark became the first european country to introduce a form of vaccine certificates today while in the uk. Prime minister boris. Johnson has said that proof of vaccines will be required for major public events. The opposition labor party has opposed the idea calling them discriminatory but the parties. One time standard-bearer. Tony blair disagrees. I spoke to the former labor prime minister for monocle. Magazine's april issue a little of what he had to say on. The subject seems to be obvious that countries it for example owed up tourist industry other the tourists walk out whilst the disease status or the vaccination status of the people of about sharon with about shero restaurant. Wait i think this is inevitable. My point is if it is inevitable. Put in place a proper system now let a patchwork of different systems. Different processes validation gras topsy. Turvy because you just find a lot of complexity in a lot of confusion and you would also probably facilitate role at so you need proper validated systems. The best cities for the developed countries of the well to agree such a system between themselves or for example. We're working on a programming africa to allow a common travel costs between african countries. These things have to happen so my point is get ahead of the curb eight sensitive.

Prime Minister Boris Labor Party Denmark Tony Blair Johnson UK Confusion Africa
Tony Blair Wades Into Vaccine Passports Debate

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Tony Blair Wades Into Vaccine Passports Debate

"You've mentioned or the. The institute is also talked about favoring a vaccine passports and you know this is one thing that of course international travel will not continue for quite some time. It's something that it feels like. Has divided actually not just the uk but also europe for that matter with the idea of quarantines quarantine hotels. Why do you think vaccine passports are a good idea. And do you expect them to be taken up. I whether eucalyptus certificates pasta oughta validation. What would it be call it. It just seems to be inevitable. The countries will will want to know your disease status before you enter. And they're already demanding today. Dr respect to testing so many countries you can't get into outta We know the vaccination reduces transmission and reduces the likelihood of people getting the disease severity considerably. It seems to be obvious that countries hit for executive at Tourist industry of the tourists will wall today. Oh what's the disease status while the vaccination status of the people about sharon town with sharon restaurant way. So i think this is. This is my point to civilization. it will put in place of proper system. Now don't let a patchwork of different systems different processes validation topsy-turvy because you just find a lot of complexity in a lot of confusion

Europe UK Sharon Confusion
"tony blair" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"tony blair" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"At its new time Saturday at three PM This'll is Maura money with economists Steve Moore now Steve Moore. Welcome back, Bubs. Thanks for joining us on this beautiful Saturday afternoon is beautiful Washington. See, I think it's beautiful in New York around the country, Although we're getting snow tomorrow, both in D C and New York don't forget to call in and about 15 20 minutes to the more money hotline and 77 talk radio W BBC Let me give you that number again because we want to hear from you 1 808 48 w A. B C 1 808 48 w A B C. Call it um So my next guess I'm so excited about this Mark Pan, who is one of the smartest political minds I've ever met? Politics and I've been in this game a long time. 35 years or so what of rest of a this guy has he was the pollster and political consultant for Bill Clinton back in the 19 nineties. By the way, Bill Clinton, I think as a Republican, was one of the most successful Um, presidents we've had in modern times in terms of really being so good for the economy in the stock market. So, in fact, with Mark a little bit about that he's also consulted with them, You know, amazing number of really successful people, including in addition to Bill Clinton, uh Tony Blair and Europe and Hillary Clinton when she ran and I think he's actually done some Some Consulting for Donald Trump as well, I'm not so sure about that. But Mark thanks so much for being joining the show today. Hey, How are you? Thanks for the intro. No. No consulting for Donald Trump, though I did meet him twice, but well, let me start. I want to ask you about politics. But before we do, I don't know if you heard the The final part of my opening remarks about what's happening. San Francisco because I just got smoke coming out of my years, and I just love your thoughts about this mark. I don't know if you have been following this, but San Francisco the school board there is going to erase the names of Abraham Lincoln, George Washington and Paul Revere from the school's What's going on here? Yeah. You know, that school board voted 6 to 1 was clearly I found. I found remarkable uh, you know, I really think that's way out of sync with where the country is the country. You know, the country barely wants to rename any statues whatsoever, and I really don't think they're going to be, you know, for taking Abraham Lincoln also to school That's just not gonna make sense to most Americans. So Uh, do you consider yourself a Republican or Democrat or independent? What is your political affiliation these days? Well, I've been a moderate Democrats for like, 50 years, but I think that was back. My mother was an FDR Democrat. Right? But you know what They say There aren't any moderate Democrats. You know, when I was a centrist, I was a centrist when centrism was was a bit more popular than it is today. So that's what I wanted to explore with you this afternoon is what happened to the moderate Democrats. You know, I I'm not happy with the start of the Biden presidency. I don't like a lot of these initiatives that were coming out and I'll tell you, Marco, I don't like him, and I'd like your thoughts about that. I don't think that Joe Biden is putting jobs first, and I think that's what Americans want. I mean, we want two things right now. In our country. We want to get jobs open. We got to get stores and schools open. And then, of course, we want to combat this disease and get the backs vaccine out there so that we can all get back to life is normal. I'm not so sure. A lot of these things like you know, killing the Keystone pipeline are I think at best they're in a relevancy to the main mission at hand. Well, I think you're right that people said Look, the two most important things are the virus and the economy. And then, frankly, none of the other issues registered particularly high after that, I think there there there. A lot of people concerned about health care Somebody. Immigration's some later father down the list on climate change. I think you've seen the administration off really put forward, you know its agenda. Such as they told you one leading with climate change. First reading with racial justice leading with, you know, reversing Donald Trump's orders. You're seeing that the administration do kind of Democratic Democratic left agenda going into this You haven't yet seen any real compromise. I mean, that's where the covert bill you know issue is they've put forward almost two trillion Will there be a compromise? That's more like one trillion, or will it be no compromise? I mean, people are looking to know. Are we really getting back to when I work with Bill Clinton in the nineties? Genuinely everybody would walk away from the table with something they really want. It is a balanced budget. But according to our values where we saved Medicare, Medicaid education, they would be real tradeoffs. Real winners. Well, you guys did amazing job. I mean, people forget that we had. What was it three or four balanced budgets with actually very large bunch of surpluses. Sorry. We were afraid we were gonna wipe out the deck. Yeah, you were the most fiscally conservative administration in modern times. So congratulations. No, that was an incredible thing. And you know Bill Clinton. Also he cut the capital gains tax. We did the free trade deal with Mexico. We we did the balance budgets. We do welfare reform. And I guess the question I would ask, because, you know, I do think that when you have moderate Democrats, it's it's could be very good for the economy has happened under Clinton. What? I don't you know, I don't understand why Biden isn't reaching out more to the Republicans and saying, You know, let's make some deals here. It seems like maybe I'm wrong about this mark. I don't want to be unfair to Joe Biden, but seems like Democrats just want to steam roll or over the Republicans rather than try to split, you know, split the middle and do things that could be, you know, could get Republican and Democratic votes. Remember what happened in both parties. Is that even though you know surprisingly if I if I asked the country what is your ideologies, 24% will say they're liberal 38% will say they're moderate, and 38% will say their current conservatives when you when you divide it in half 38% that's moderate, you know, winds up being a minority within the Democratic Party and then minority within the Republican Party..

Bill Clinton Joe Biden Donald Trump Mark Pan Hillary Clinton Democratic Party New York Republican Party consultant Washington Steve Moore Abraham Lincoln San Francisco FDR Maura Tony Blair Europe centrism
What Biden's America could look like

The Economist: Editor's Picks

11:22 min | 2 years ago

What Biden's America could look like

"In much of the world and nowhere more. So than among america's allies joe biden's victory has come as a great relief under his presidency. There will be no more bullying and threats to leave. Nato america will stop treating the european union as a photo on trade or its own forces stationed in south korea as a protection racket in place of donald. Trump's wrecking bowl. Mr biden will offer an outstretched hand working over simply on global crises. From kuroda to climate change under mr trump america's favorability ratings in many allied countries sank to new lows. Mr biden promises to make america a beacon again a champion of lofty values and the defender of human rights leading as he puts it in his acceptance speech not only by the example of our pa but by the power of our example allies are central to mr biden's vision he rightly sees them as a multiplier of american influence tuning a country with a quarter of global. Gdp into a force with more than double that he is also a multilateral by instinct on his first day in office he will rejoin the paris agreement on climate change which america formerly left on november the fourth unlike mr trump. He believes it is better to lead the world health organization than to leave it. He will reinvigorate arms control a priority being to ensure order new. Start the last remaining. Nuclear pact with russia is extended beyond february the fifth he would like to rejoin the nuclear deal with iran that mr trump dumped if he can persuade the iranians to go back into compliance inevitably. America's friends have a long list of things they hope it will do as it reimburses global leadership the demand stretch from places and organizations. Mr trump has abused such as the un and allies like germany. Two parts of the world. He has ignored such as much of africa. And it will not be smooth traveling not all countries in our style jake for a return to obama era politics when america lead from behind and blood. It's red lines. Several countries on nato's front line with russia like the way defenses. Have been beefed up under mr trump and asian allies like how mr trump has confronted. China talked a free and open indo pacific and worked on the cloud with australia india and japan. Mr biden needs to prove that he will not turn soft. His priorities will be to quell virus and improve the economy on both counts. He can count on little support and much pushback. If the senate is under republican control as is likely such troubles at home have probably also exacerbated. The country's reluctance to take on more foreign burdens. Who can be sure that world-weary jacksonians will come galloping. Back in twenty twenty four. Perhaps even with mr trump in the saddle so rather than pile demand upon needed demand. America's allies should go out of their way to show that they have learned to pull their weight. Nato partners for example should not relax defense spending just because mr trump is no longer bullying them. Germany should pay heed to french. Average to build european defense capacity. there is scope to do so without undermining nato europeans could lend a big hand to france in these suheil in asia. The quad could keep deepening naval and other cooperation. Japan and south korea should restrain their feuding taiwan or to make a more serious contribution to its own defense. I should also work with america to repair the international order. They can support efforts to resist chinese or russian rule. Bending many countries will want to join mr biden's efforts at concerted carbon cutting mr biden will face a world full of problems but he will also start with strengths. Thanks to mr trump. He has sanctions on adversaries including iran and venezuela that he can use as chips and among friends he can seek to convert relief at renewed american engagement into stronger. Burden-sharing is allies would be wise to answer that call with enthusiasm. Finally how princess diana shaped british politics netflix's flagship series. The crown has done a fine job of telling the story of postwar britain through the prism of the monarchy. The previous series nephew is in the mid nineteen seventies mired in the miners strike and the three day week new one which began streaming on november fifteenth. Introduces us to two women. Who were destined to change the country in profound ways margaret thatcher and lady diana spencer lady thatcher made it clear from the first but she was in the business of changing the nation. They design a spencer was a bird of a very different feather. Shy girl who had failed all her o levels twice and had no interest in politics she was brought onto the national stage for the soaker of producing mail as to the throne yet. The country is still living with her political legacy as surely as it is with lady. Thatcher's princess diana's genius was to mix two of the most profound forces of modern politics emotion and anti elitism into a powerful populist cocktail. She was one of the modern masters of the politics of emotion. Feeling the people's pain just as they felt hers. She repeatedly outmaneuvered prince. Charles during long war of the wales's because she was willing to bare her soul in public interview with martin bashir of the bbc in november. Nineteen ninety-five is now the focus of controversy as her brother earl. Spencer claims that it was obtained under false pretenses using forged documents. Whatever the reason for it. The interview was a masterclass in emotional manipulation at one pivotal moment. Princess diana acknowledged that she would never be queen but hope that she would be queen of people's hearts. The princess used her mastery of the politics of feeling to turn himself into a champion of the people against the powerful. The people's princess in tony blair's raise she patronized charities that helped marginalized folks such as hiv patients and kept company with pop stars and celebrities rather than with the usual royal wax. Books the most memorable music at her funeral was not an historic him. But a song by elton john adapted for herbert originally written about another icon. Turn victim marilyn monroe. Anti elitism was directed. Not at the monarchy's wells. She happily lived in kensington palace and received a seventeen million pound. That's twenty three million dollar divorce. Settlement plus four hundred thousand pounds a year but added stunted emotional state the traditional deal to which royal side allow them to behave as they liked in crowded kings have almost always had mistresses because they marry her reasons of dynasty not compatibility so long as they behaved with decorum in public princess. Diana regarded this humbug. She succeeded in reconciling the most. Jarring of opposites despite being a top tier aristocrat. Her family the spencers. Look down on the windsors this german carpetbaggers. She was universally known as die. Her death in a car crash won her a spectacular posthumous victory against the royal court. It produced the greatest burst public lack remission. Britain has ever seen and led to widespread demands that the royal should display more emotion. As if the damn cheek could replace the stiff upper lip as the definition of britishness. What would really do the monarchy. Good show that they had grasped the lesson of diana's popularity and editorial in the independent thundered would be for the queen and the prince of wales to breakdown cry and hug one another on the steps of the abbey this saturday. Cincinnati death emotional. Populism has threaded through politics. Tony blair presented himself as the people's prime minister. He championed cool. Britannia surrounded himself with popstars and urged his staff to call me. Tony the next conservative prime minister call me. Dave cameron a distant relation of princess. Diana's adopted this combination of compassion signaling. Hugging hoodies is instead of cracking down on juvenile delinquents and studied informality relaxing and kitchen suppers replacing previous. Tory premier stiffness. Both men were responsible to that emotional. Populism interfere with the affairs of state domestic and foreign policy choices continued to be conducted according to the dictates of reason evidence brexit tears. By contrast follow the diana's script they appeal to the heart rather than the had to win their arguments. They used feelings of patriotism and resentment rather than facts about trade flows. They denounced the elites for trying to straight the wisdom of the people in much the same way as diana files denounce the palace for ignoring the people's emotions lay turned on the nation's core institutions. Parliament the civil service the supreme court when they suspected attempts to frustrate their wishes they succeeded in defeating the establishment in much the same way as princess diana had by claiming to stand for emotion rather than reason and the people rather than the elite alexander. Boris federal johnson has reconciled the opposites. He embodies justice. She did a card carrying member of the metropolitan elite. He has managed to sell himself as a man of the people as she was die. So he is. Boris the first series of the crown shows a young queen. Elizabeth studying water badgett's english constitution under the guidance of henry. Martin the vice provost of eton who kept a pet raven in a cage and address the on crisis gentlemen budgets. Great work distinguishes between the dignified branch of the constitution. The monarchy and the efficient branch elected politicians implicit in that distinction is badges perception. That emotions pose a dangerous threat to the proper conduct of politics. The monarchy provides a controlled lead for them thus enabling responsible people to get on with the difficult task of running the country by using people's feelings as the fuel for her astonishing career princess. Diana broke that safety valve britain will be living with the consequences of the emotional populism that she helped to release for years to come.

Mr Trump Mr Biden America Nato South Korea Princess Diana Suheil Russia Kuroda Lady Diana Spencer Lady Thatch Iran Joe Biden Germany Japan Taiwan Donald Trump European Union
Blair and Major hit out at Boris Johnson's plans to override Brexit deal

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Blair and Major hit out at Boris Johnson's plans to override Brexit deal

"British prime ministers he played crucial roles in bringing peace to Northern Ireland have joined forces urging lawmakers to reject government plans to override the Brexit deal with the European Union. John Major and Tony Blair say doing so imperils peace in Northern Ireland in damages. The U. K's reputation in an article in the Sunday Times of former prime minister say the current British government is shaming and embarrassing. The UK with legislation that if it passes goes against the very deal it's signed to allow for the UK is smooth departure from the you earlier this year. The British government in the European Union remain at an impasse when it comes to negotiating a new trade deal. And there's worry those talks could end up collapsing soon. They have until the end of the year to reach a deal.

British Government Northern Ireland European Union Prime Minister UK Tony Blair John Major U. K
Former UK leaders unite to slam Boris Johnson on Brexit plan

BBC World Service

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Former UK leaders unite to slam Boris Johnson on Brexit plan

"British prime ministers Tony Blair and John Major have condemned plans by Boris Johnson's government to override elements of the Brexit withdrawal agreement relating to Northern Ireland. Mr Johnson said the legislation was necessary to protect the unity of the U. K. But in a newspaper article, the two former leaders said it would damage Britain's reputation threatened the peace agreement in Ireland and could prompt damaging retaliation from the U.

Boris Johnson Northern Ireland Tony Blair John Major Britain Brexit
Boris Johnson returns to work

Monocle 24: The Globalist

12:32 min | 2 years ago

Boris Johnson returns to work

"Now we begin the show here. In Britain. Boris Johnson has returned to work after recovering from cove nineteen. The British. Prime Minister's illness was severe enough to send him to intensive care for several days. A personal experience that he likes to being physically assaulted by an unexpected. An invisible mugger. Joining me now is Carol. Walker is a political analyst and former BBC political correspondent Carol. What else was Johnson keen to emphasize in his first speech since his return to work? Well I think the big point that he was making was that he was back in control fully recovered and I think he was trying very hard to convey the sense of figure and vm optimism which has always been such a big part of his character and his leadership but he also I think trod very difficult line because I think whilst he was trying to convey a sense of optimism a sense that this huge effort that everyone has put in in order to stick to those very tight restrictions at staying at home to try to prevent the spread of the corona virus. He also I think wanted to try to lower expectations about when and by how much those restrictions might be lifted so he made the point very strongly that the British people should be praised and thanked for their efforts but he was insisting that if the restrictions were lifted too soon than that would reach a second peak and that would cause further damage to people's lives but also to the economy which of course is suffering enormous damage through the lockdown. Well also joining us on the line is Lance Price. He's the former director of communications at number ten Downing Street. When Tony Blair was Prime Minister Lance? Obviously there'll be a huge amount of meetings. We know that that Cobra's already taken place with Johnson. What do you believe the government will be discussing know? What will the approach very much now looking to what Boris Johnson yesterday described the second phase of the crisis and and in many ways. That's the most difficult for ministers to deal with. We know that Boris Johnson was reluctant at the outset to impose a tough lockdown restrictions. But he saw the lights. If you like and and eventually did that. But it's it's much harder to stop to lift those restrictions and it is imposed them in the first place. Because you have to decide when and where you could modify the restrictions and that's going to be the central parts of discussion between ministers in the coming days and we're told an announcement some sort expected before the end of the week. So do you look at certain sectors of the economy that businesses? That were allowed to reopen. Or do you look at certain sectors of the population and say that's an age perhaps though geographically people can Stop to Mingle goal go out more and have more social interactions of one sort or another. I do you do that then. You have the really difficult job of selling that to the to the population at laws. Because if we're all following the same rules that's one thing if there's some rules for some people and different bills for others. It's much much harder self administered Carol. There's been a lot of criticism that the government really isn't sharing any of this information not enough information with the Public Johnson to talk about transparency. Do you think that we will begin to see more of the workings in the science that these decisions will be based on what I think? They will certainly try to make an effort to show that that is what they are doing. I think what we've seen over the last almost four weeks since Boris Johnson has been ill and recovering is the slight sense of vacuum and a government that was reluctant to show even the sorts of changes that it was thinking about for fear that the public would get carried away launch latch onto that and that the number of deaths in the number of infections would not then start to come round. It was interesting that Boris Johnson yesterday made the point that he was going to bring in the new labor leaders. A Kiss Donna and other political leaders I think that is important for the government because it wants to try to bind in potential opposition to the changes because as long says this is going to be very very difficult were already seeing a some signs of real resentment for example amongst the over seventy been told that they're going to have to be shielded that they brought to stay at home. There are of course some over seventy year olds who are incredibly. Fit Run marathons and so on and feel this all patry decision to say to older people. You are at risk you must stay at home is simply not fair and many of them we know are also missing contact with close members of their family that may be one of the areas where the government will try tentatively to try to ease the restrictions somewhat. But I think that point that Lance was making about the public is a very important one. I think the government really wants to try to take the public with it. The danger is if you start trying to say certain. Sections of the population can Now have greater freedom to do some of the things that they enjoy doing to make contact with other family members to go back to work and so on whereas other members of the population were you. Divide that by age or by geographical location cannot have those restrictions lifted lifted. I think that is very very difficult to sell. And that is why it looks to me. More likely that they will look at areas of the economy businesses. And so on and look which of those can be allowed to reopen. Whilst retaining the social distancing measures in order to try to at least contain any increase in those figures on infections sadly death lance is the opposition Labor Party under the new leadership of Sakir Stammer on the same page as the government. Well they all in the sense of backing the government's restrictions and instructions to the public but they have been putting pressure kissed on the right from day one of his leadership. Say there's been saying to the Prime Minister and two other ministers that you've got to be much more open with the public about your thinking. So he called on his first day for an exit strategy and he won't he's had the public deserve to be treated like grownups on that we should be told what the possible routes out of. This might be so that we can have a grown up discussion about that. I and I think the Labour leader has made it clear that he's going to give constructive oppositions he's not going to oppose parole position's sake but he does know that at the end of all. They are going to be very very difficult. Questions for the government to onset of ministers to answer whether it's on the provisional protective equipment so testing and all the rest of this and and he's not abdicate the role of opposition in order to get finished as a a a free ride in even in the depths of crisis A meanwhile the the daily corona virus briefings continue but with a slightly different formats. Carola government's not taking questions from the public will make a difference. Well I think this is part of that effort to try to show that they are transparent this effort to try to show that they really want to take the public along with them as this virus continues and as the restrictions look likely to continue in some form or another for many months to yesterday. We had the first of questions which are submitted by the public of course. Thousands were submitted and there was an independent polling order organization brought in to choose which question would be selected. We heard from one a citizen in skipped in Yorkshire. Who was asking when she'd be able to see her grandchildren again. And I think that although this was an important gesture towards allowing the public some sense that they're having a say in all this it has to be said that none of those present were able to give her any kind of clear ideas to win. That would happen. The scientists world saying well it slightly depends on the fingers. It's slightly depends on a when those infection rate start. Continue to come down. The government was saying well. We are looking at this in the round. We don't want to take risks with the population hancock. The Health Secretary was insisting that he didn't want to take risks with people's lives and yes I think it's important for the government to be seen to be listening to what the people are saying but the crunch point is going to come when it comes out with those decisions to what if anything is going to change and we see the response to that I mean because he made a handcart made a great point yesterday of saying that they don't see questions before they're actually asked them during the the briefing live. It would seem to me. That might make more sense for them to have an idea of what the questions were so they would have the answers. Yeah perhaps they might have been able to give linen skipped in a bit clearer answer to her question but I think they're trying to make the point that they already unprepared to take on an address any of the questions that people have now. There is a sense that this is a gesture. One question Once a day two a government minister the particularly government minister who is holding that news conference Easily of course a very limited say in what is happening. But I think this is part of them trying to show that they're open trying to demonstrate the transparency which Boris Johnson was very keen to talk about. And what you've seen is as launch was mentioning this pressure on the government to show the sorts of things it's talking about people have drawn comparisons with Nichola Sturgeon Scotland's first minister who put out a document about the government's approach. When you look through it to be perfectly honest didn't say a great deal more than the sort of information that we've got in the five tests which the government has in the covering the whole of the UK has set out which are getting guide it when it decides water win restrictions can be lifted but she had made the point of bringing out a lengthy document talking about various options. And I'm sure that that is the sort of thing that we certainly will see As we go through this we we know. Boris Johnson is chairing unimportant cabinet meeting on Thursday. We know Thursday is also very important date when the government has said that it hopes to hit one hundred thousand tests a day for frontline workers. Those are all being targeted front line workers. At the moment even yesterday was still many tens of thousands of that but I think what we get towards the end of the week the government will want to at least signal where it intends to go next in as we continue to where it tends to go next in terms of exactly which restrictions are going to be lifted. Who's going to be allowed to have those greater freedoms but I think that they will stress out all of this that if those infection rates start to climb up again then there is always the risk that the restrictions will simply have to be reimposed and overriding all of this. That is something that the government does not want to do lance just finally very quickly from you. How much other businesses being done? Brexit Brexit is still carrying on. Of course there's the real question about whether or not at the end of the period should be extended because can you deal with two major disruptions to the economy at one time but the government sticking to their line that they are going into. We'll transition has come to an end at the end of this year. Of course there is a whole boss range of other business which is still very home and sometimes the news but I wonder what would have been that bulletin. If you haven't been to the virus there's no still happening. Thanks very much. Indeed that was launched price and Carol

Government Boris Johnson Prime Minister Lance Carol Prime Minister Carola Government Lance Price Britain BBC Director Of Communications Walker Political Analyst Tony Blair Brexit Brexit Cobra Yorkshire Donna Labor Party Sakir Stammer
'Viral: Anti-Semitism in Four Mutations': A Close-Up on Hatred

People of the Pod

13:03 min | 2 years ago

'Viral: Anti-Semitism in Four Mutations': A Close-Up on Hatred

"In an unhealthy society? That has problems. They say who did this to us? And the Jews are always candidate. That's columnist George will who's featured in a new documentary on anti-semitism out in theaters across the country on Friday with us in the studio to discuss that film is its creator. Andrew Goldberg in two thousand nine. Andrew focused his lens on the resurgence of Anti Jewish hatred around the world and in mainstream media but after the two thousand sixteen election and the CHARLOTTESVILLE rally where protesters proclaimed the Jews will not replace us. Goldberg felt compelled to return to the topic for an even deeper exploration in viral for mutations of anti-semitism Goldberg travels through four countries. The United States Great Britain France and Hungary to speak firsthand with victims witnesses anti-semites an high profile figures including bill. Clinton Tony Blair Deborah Lipstadt and AJC Europe director. Simone Rodin Benkin in Pittsburgh. He examined the far right ideas that led to the attack on the tree of life synagogue in Hungary he looks at the Anti Immigration. Anti George Soros anti-jewish propaganda promoted by the government and in the UK. He explores the pain caused by the Anti Zionist messages from the UK's Labor Party the film also explores the repeated violence against Jews in France carried out by Islamists Andrew. Welcome glad to be here. Thank you so thank you for making this documentary and I'm curious. Can you kind of take our audience back to the original conception of it and how it evolved over time since I believe some events actually transpired in the making of the documentary will shortly after the election? We noticed there was sort of an uptick in anti Semitic incidents around the country. There were series a bomb threats which we know turned out to be bogus but those caught. Everyone's attention and suddenly everyone was noticing things and shortly after that a lot of tombstones were desecrated several different cemeteries and then the sort of global eyeballs started to notice these things talk about them more in the press and online and we immediately thought we should make a film about antisemitism and we didn't know what it would look like or what it would be. I think our initial thoughts were that would be about the United States but as we did more and more research and we knew this was a global issue. We knew it was happening in other countries. But as you unpack these things you realize that. There's an urgency to a lot of these stories and so we decided to really expanded and to look at four different situations. Those would be the far right in the United States. The far left in England in Hungary where the prime minister has launched a massive PR campaign against a Jewish philanthropist and in France where Islamist have been killing Jews in various terror attacks and other violent attacks against Jews to the tune of what unofficial numbers seemed to be more than three thousand a year. Now you've been making documentaries and doing journalism for twenty years As have I and I was a religion reporter for fifteen years in Chicago and I will tell you when I came here. I was stunned by just how much people hate. Jews. And I'm curious you I. I mentioned this to a former colleague at the Tribune recently and his response. He's in his eighties. He said we'll of course you grew up at a different time You know it's no surprise to me but yeah of course you didn't realize I'm just curious if this was a real shock to your system as you were doing the reporting the idea that Jews are hated was never foreign to me. I mean keep in mind. I'm fifty one and so I grew up where the Holocaust was not that far off. I mean I was raised in the seventies so I guess it was still thirty years old but it was not as it is now sixty plus years old where the next generation of people don't even know it was there Growing UP IN CHICAGO BEING JEWISH WAS It was not something to be celebrated at least among my friends and among my peers. I was made fun of for it a few times. It wasn't I didn't grow up in the midst of it but the Holocaust was connected to us in a way that it was very very real and so for that reason I understood that Jews were absolutely despised and I started making films in my first film that had anything to do with Jewish subjects was around two thousand and two or so and you know it was about Eastern European Jewish life before the war. So we're talking about you. Know all black and white footage of shuttles of Warsaw of what we might call the Yiddish world and that whole world is utterly destroyed in Eastern Europe and in Europe and in Russia and that made it pretty easy to see and in doing that film I started to learn about it. I automate fillmore at antisemitism in the media in the Middle East at one point and you realize that it is it is widespread. There's Anti Semitism where there are Jews. There's antisemitism where there are not Jews. There's Anti Semitism among people who are friends with Jews so my awareness of this has grown so in other words you entered into this project knowing there was a history of this but you had never seen it kind of in the current context as well. I had not seen it the way I see it now. I when I made a film in two thousand seven on antisemitism in the in the in the arab-islamic world per particularly North Africa and the Middle East I didn't focus that much on Europe and the US at the time antisemitism in the US was a very minor issue compared to what it is now. I don't want to say it was minor because there were plenty of people experiencing antisemitism but we didn't have it to the magnitude and we didn't have the Internet the way we do now but I knew that it was alive and well in the Middle East and that was surprising to see just how deep it is just how woven into the fabric of conversation and media it is. I was interviewing some kids in Egypt on the street and I said to them what are Jews they said User Satan Jews are evil. Juice should die. I said what if a Jewish kid was walking right here across the street and got hit by a car. They said we would call an ambulance. These two ideas existed right next to each other. And that's what's so interesting. One is in the abstract one is in the day to day Would you say that abstract versus day day is what's also infecting Western Europe United States? This wave of anti-semitism that we're seeing or is it. Is it very different? I think they crossover so for example. In Hungary there's virtually no violence against Jews In Hungary a survey showed that forty percent. Forty two percent of Hungarians held at least one or more anti Semitic views. Does that mean that? The people by larger anti-semites probably not but it means that the numbers are higher. Those numbers were higher than they were anywhere else in Europe or give or take a country. How many countries are there in Europe? A lot right so but there's no violence against Jews physical violence. That's what I mean physical violence against Jews but those lines do tend to cross over at points and so the fear is that it can translate these nationalist movement so in Hungary just to give some context the government has launched a huge campaign against George. Soros it's on Mute right now. It's not running right now but it ran not too long ago during the European Union elections. It came back up again. I asked one of the spokespeople of Hungary will come back and he told me that it would come back in a very consistent way so the whole idea that the Hungarian government has put forth. Is that this Jewish billionaire. George Soros is out to flood the nation with Muslim immigrants and since Muslim immigrants in the eyes of the Hungarian government are bad. You the Hungarian citizen the White Christian Hungarian citizen are in danger. And you're in danger because of a Jew. So here's these people are all worked up about a Jew who actually isn't doing anything like this but yet at the same time they're not vandalizing. All the Jewish shops are not beating Jews. And what have you? Although there's I've heard some rumblings that a little of that has happened so we'll have to see but I'm no expert on the data right. Well I think that's the argument. I mean argument. Deborah Lipstadt makes in the film. For example it starts with words it starts with comments and then does eventually escalate. That's the danger of not addressing it nipping in the bud. When you see. I think that's here right so I think that in America we've seen rage on the Internet translate into violence than I think you know the hatred in Hungary is really a government media campaign which took place on TV on the radio on the Internet. But also on billboards outside it was like an all encompassing life. You would drive down the street and you'd be bombarded with it here This antisemitism isn't billboards. I mean there's we'd see them occasionally but it's all on the Internet and people get the Internet sort of like you and your computer. You Lock yourself in this little space and then you start to get worked up and you start to hate and so we see that. Not all but many of these. Violent attacks in the United States are people who sort of incubated these ideas on the Internet. You raise a good point billboards in Hungary that was the been the vehicle of communication there for that. Soros campaign but I'm curious what about social media. What about the comments in violence on social media is it just as rampant in places like Hungary as it is here we'll so the makeup and the nature of the of the campaign in Hungary? We didn't break down so I don't know what percentage of it certainly on social media and not only was it on social media is a place where people can share about it right so in addition to whatever the government put on social media because the government had all these different forms they had radio they had. Tv They billboards aid magazines. It's social media mailings mailing mailing which is in the film How much of their media mix was the Internet? I don't know but if you're a person with anti Semitic views you can't do anything with billboard but some people did right hateful messages on billboards with magic markers in pain. They actually vandalize them. But by and large the billboards are you don't interact with them in the billboard. Don't post against back and forth a TV commercial. You don't respond to that. The Internet is where everybody took their hatred in their dislike of George Soros and they brought it to the Internet. And I think that's a place where you would see a lot more of this. Anti Jewish rhetoric the Internet is where it becomes the People's action not the government right. You have obsession in the film that talks about the brief history of blaming Jews. And you talk about the films that you've done in the past and the history of this but one critique of the film that I've read is that doesn't include enough historical context now I hear this critique all the time as a journalist you only have so much space or time right to address the whole of a situation but I'm curious what your thoughts are on whether to include more history or trajectory. The history of antisemitism is extremely complex. It grows out of misinterpretations if that's a word of people misinterpreted biblical scripture. It's changed and it's more throughout the centuries throughout Europe. If you WANNA talk about how it's been a part of the story of Christianity knew very thorny and complicated history which takes a long time to get in and out of now take that for a minute and think about. We have limited shelf space in our movie. I always say to people in movies not a casserole but take that from it in a notice that in the film we have that history. We have extensive history of the civil rights movement in the United States with history of the entire Orban's campaign and where that came from in Hungary in Oregon was we talk all about a migration and the history of colonialism in France as to give the backbone of that in England we talk about the Labor Party going all the way back to two thousand and eight. What we don't do is this deep analysis of Christian history but my response is also this. If I make a film about racism in about how African Americans are being shot in the street by police. Do I need to tell you? The history of why blacks are disliked by racists in this country. If I talk about misogyny do I need to tell you? The history of why people are misogynists to me and the same goes for LGBTQ. Americans no one's asking why. Why do I need to get into the fact of why Trans People are being murdered? Right now are being beaten up. I don't need to analyze that. Well that too comes from the Bible. Right hatred of homophobia grows right out of scripture. But I don't need to give that analysis so it's a it. We talk about double standards and antisemitism and I don't want to say this is anti Semitism but it's almost a reflex that people feel like anything has to do with Jews. With antisemitism with Israel has to be held to some type of second order of scrutiny and I found that a little bit frustrating. There've been some debates on college campuses about whether or not Jewish students who are pro. Israel can join feminist marches. Lgbtq right marches. You other causes. They feel excluded from those causes because of their Zionist positions and so. That's where intersection. -ality has come up a lot in conversations here is how do you address that exclusion? Even though it's very different causes communities have gotten together and there has not been room for the Jewish issue of antisemitism has four complicated reasons not been welcome into that crew. Because many in this left is idea. Do not like how they don't like what's going on with the Arab Israeli conflict let's not even parse the Israeli conflict. Unfortunate part of this. Is that a Jewish students who have nothing to do with Israel who are oblivious to Israel are still being singled out now. It's very dangerous to to assume. Length phrases like colleges are a battleground. We visited colleges as we spoke to a lot of students. It's a very complicated and mixed bag. But there's no doubt that on some college campuses and we don't have hard data on how or where or what we have a lot of anecdotes. We have a lot of very upset parents. We have a lot of very upset students. But what that actually translates into numbers. We don't know what we do know. Is that Jewish? Students are being asked to somehow be called to task for what Israel is said to be

Hungary United States George Soros Europe Government Semitism France Andrew Goldberg Middle East Chicago Israel Labor Party UK Simone Rodin Benkin Tribune Pittsburgh England Ajc Europe
UK formally leaves the European Union three years after Brexit referendum

Doctor Health Radio Show

07:10 min | 3 years ago

UK formally leaves the European Union three years after Brexit referendum

"I expect that dates the ladies shop the most incredible that a a is I got to try the people getting ready to celebrate a goal I lose with a country we across route the people we frequently establishment it's amazing that you've done this walk our audience through your your throughout the nation right here today nine from the most people know you and know your what you've done but walking through how many years have you worked on this project I first became concerned about what the European project man I didn't even know what globalism walls in those days but I first became concerned about it about the bureaucracy was winning a battle of a democracy about a one of the tires to a single currency dollar lady by Germany oppose worried about it back in ninety nine state of Illinois is buddy today I feel like cattle I just cannot stand aside and do nothing so I've now been campaigning on this for twenty seven years I'm also the father that pretty much full time pretty much seven days a week now do we went back the other day on the show and played your maiden speech from the European Parliament way you sounded and looked exactly the same as you do today shore just tell just tell our audience a little bit because I've I've heard in the press about some of the interviews you've given in the recent days about you being in the parliament how long you been there whether you're going to miss it all in all and of course you know that that's it for you in terms of the European Parliament but it's already to yell at about that and a little bit about what you see happening over the next year given that this this transition period for brexit well I walked into the European Parliament in nineteen ninety nine the three of us from you can collect it and we walked up the steps we've never been to the building before that we live in a Brussels before we did but what was the galley what we were doing if we walk through the door and that official that I'll I will let me pay easily so badly so we just got a political asylum with the beginning and then I woke up those same steps in June last year a little twenty nine of us I'm I'm not shows how the center of gravity in British politics I shifted what was considered to be we at all mad mad house become the mainstream so people can develop this country I guess that's the victory that I've been a Paul Solman unsettled and supported me although but if anyone one of the night I live in PM London time I'm gonna be in parliament square with a huge huge part of the old eyes which I call white full what was the night is the point of no return we are leaving this political union we are leaving the globalists supranational structure we never coming back about twenty what I was battle Wednesday on my last day in the debate before they threw me out of the chain but because I laid the union Jack them but never your bloody flags and leave I think she said rather the thought is that right now with the company what we did is we went straight to the buff okay okay yeah yeah I know we we try to get you on the show but but let me the better is a lot more level head said maybe the maybe another day yeah I think I was slightly over trained on that particular day but what was interesting was just listen to the speeches of a creek without power because they're all now saying who next alphabets of gum next alight journey will be sent rex it marks the beginning of the end not jealous of the European Union but if the whole global is project you know where big business big politics big banks that want to control our lives through big bureaucracy I we want nation states free markets free that would let let's say and I think we're winning how do you what happens in the next year how do you actually make a good because today is the beginning of it but I guess December thirty first is when the heart out is correct yeah I mean look I think in terms of history today's the big moment the rest is the tiles that the tide of course is very very important Boris Johnson I suppose because he's scared of me is has laid the right promises is now saying all the right things to be sticks to his promises that great I mean backing six they also the referendum I think people so I packed up my tends to go away what I'm saying to that everybody is all I am going to be that through this next process through this transition period through the next phase of the guys the engines are I will praise the prime minister the rooftops and he gets it right but I will sound the alarm if he gets it wrong so I'm gonna be on that case let's talk about praising alarm I want to mention you know about this globalist project and why this is such a important day in and Nigel I'd I needn't remind you that about the opposition party in the established order on the same day the night before I actually in accomplishes breaks it it's also going to be the acquittal of Donald J. trump by the established forces over here it's it's so amazing that would happen on the same day but I want talk about why way for second in this pandemic in coming out of Wuhan China but you know tied to the one belt one road in tight to the globalist projects and I think we've had two cases now in the United Kingdom why why his and a shock folks in the United States and also this pandemic it coming out of how we have a whole show no dedicated just that what what are your thoughts about that tight to globalism okay well let's start off with wildlife what is astonishing is if you look at the people who is all the advisory board to walk away in the United Kingdom what do you find you find the former bosses old L. cools little old friend of Tony Blair as friends of David Cameron's people around big businesses there on the gold you find people who were all confederation of British industry one of those globalists I have a group that all of our country they've been serving on the board you even find that this is astonishing former senior bosses of all civil service to be all the while lays bold I'm most stunningly able you find David Cameron our prime minister it was made to resign because look like that but it is now official interlocutor putting the Chinese and British governments Alice happened is Chinese money has corrupted completely corrupted the system and Boris Johnson of gone with the fly will miss one we've gone with what everybody around it is telling and I think it is into the judgment but one of the last judgment so I've ever seen in my life in this country I'm hoping we can buy the mechanisms are less it will just America that's not happy with this think about Australia right there in the call to make but he's very deeply intertwined with China even value in twenty twelve band while away from that digital fiber

Plan to Cut U.S. Troops in West Africa Draws Criticism From Europe

Monocle 24: The Briefing

13:02 min | 3 years ago

Plan to Cut U.S. Troops in West Africa Draws Criticism From Europe

"Look look first at NATO the the actual military chiefs of rich Jew shortly to convene in Brussels the United States brost hat chairman of the Joint Chiefs General Mark Milley has burned one interesting acting item on the agenda in advance prefiguring a potential drawdown of American forces in West Africa. This is extremely likely to prompt and unenthused response from France in particular which is extensively deployed a theater which it believes not without reason is a key frontline in the ongoing global campaign against Islamist extremism. Mary what's what's going on here. Won't use the United States Losing interest abruptly in West Africa. Well I think there are two reasons. one of them is because president trump is specially I think The top brass in American intelligence. They are very fixed on what they see As the future threat coming from China and that they are increasingly concentrating their resources looking in that direction the other thing and is that trump came to office and this is often forgotten Saying that he wanted to stop American engagement in in foreign wars. And this I think was one of the one of the reasons why he was elected. It was very popular policy For a lot of Americans and it remains so but right through his time as president trump has faced quite a lot of opposition from the top brass about cutting back on Americans abroad have been various attempts. He tried to pull Americans out of Afghanistan. The top brass objected. He tried to pull Americans out of Syria. Immediate media outcry from all the allies and saying he was betraying the Kurds. He tried to pull out of Iraq. Similar things West Africa could have basinas. Gene is a sort of slightly soft touch because the only people he's going to offend particularly by that again to be the French as we've seen well on the subject of the French being offended Jonathan they going to be aren't they and not without reason France already has four and a half thousand troops deployed in West Africa. There's two one hundred twenty more due to go shortly And it's not like they've been doing nothing night. They have found somebody to fight once they got there. Oh Yes yes. They've been very active. There and suffered suffered quite a few casualties as part of that. But also this fits for the Frans into a broader attempt by president. Emmanuel McCall to reset reset France's relationship with its former colonies in Africa lens going ahead on the economic front and on other fronts And and I think the question here is how much France wants to take responsibility for this region of the world how much it sees this. Moore's wars an international global Issue which the. US should continue to be involved with Mary. You made the accurate point. The trump's big pitch in two thousand sixteen was that he would bring troops home that America would not engage itself in pointless ridiculous interminable wars overseas etc.. He he probably does understand that the best pitchy can make this. November Is along the same lines. He he walked a very narrow path. Victory in two thousand sixteen but if he can go back the American people in two thousand twenty and say the economy's all right. I haven't started any stupid. That's probably his best shot. That being the case Do we wonder how nervous other NATO military chiefs are going to be the prospect of trump actually. Winning this thing is then possible that the arrest of NATO really has to stop thinking about the United States as the cornerstone of the alliance. Well I think that quite a lot of NATO but especially in the European Union That sense has really been strengthening. Ever since trump came to office there was quite a lot of diffidence Shall we say through the campaign. When trump seemed to cast aspersions on the future of NATO suggesting that it wasn't necessarily in US interest to Continue to be in NATO And you saw the Russians from that right across Europe but especially interestingly in Britain of course but also in eastern Central Europe where they see the United States and NATO in particular the protector. The A big protector of their security against Russia. Now it seems to me talk though Trump seemed to have been brought round a bit Um about the sort of survivability and relevance of NATO nonetheless that Trepidation in Europe remains and we've seen seen just in the last few days With a paper I think originating in the British military Where they say the new British government? When it does it's it's promised Security and defence review has got to look ahead to a time when the United States may and not be Engaged as it is in Europe and when the UK will have to look to being more autonomous in defense security terms and that is a complete rethink For All the British military your finds itself in classically horns Komo whatever cliche One canoes there on the one hand they want the United States to remain Invoke very very involved in NATO and if one is on his to be the main pair in NATO and supplier of troops And so on but at the same time particularly with trump in the White House. They don't want America to dominate dominate. When NATO is going so you get this whole debate about where is NATO? After the end of the Cold War Matt calls from about it being brain dead and having to rethink its future. Sure and so on. But you're has first of all to decide what role it sees for the United States and whether that allies with what trump things a couple. Let's move on now to the rare problem of what a retired. Pope should do with his time. Pope's usually leave the office of course only when recalled all to barracks by the omnipotent overlord but benedict the sixteenth bucked. This tradition in two thousand and thirteen when he handed in the big hat voluntarily since then benedict addict has mostly maintained inappropriate silence but he broke it a few weeks back to speak up in defense of priestly. Celibacy apparently concerned by reports that his successor Pope Francis Francis favored the church taking a more relaxed attitude. Will it now appears that Benedikt is walking it back. His name will be removed from future editions of the book in which he made his feelings known Mary. First of all It's obviously not possible to know the mind of a retired Pope Benedict the sixteenth sixteenth. But why would he be assuming that this point that anybody cares what he thinks. Well I think because he still has the rank this extraordinary sort of rank of Pope Emeritus America's extraordinary thing. I'm opposed America's you think he keeps on these credit card. Well that doesn't the hotel upgrade but by keeping the title even emeritus That puts tim effectively on a par with the current pope And I think that was always going to create difficulties and it's probably remarkable really that we haven't seen gene similar difficulties until now But I think that's also when you when you look at the two characters when you look at Pope Benedict as being What appeared a very reticent very theologically based very traditional minded German pope hope? And you look at Pope Francis who's latin-american And this in fact is where this whole troubles risen. Because he's talking about parts of the Amazon Wurzburg ver-very difficult priests. This argument is being going on for quite a long time as to whether if lifted the celibacy requirement. Then maybe it would be easier to find priests for those very remote remote areas But it does seem to me that in terms of character as well as in terms of everything else you're looking at two very different people and also a church which house has still a very strong conservative. Whatever the president pope says tries to do has a very very conservative lobby Maybe majority he I don't know and which you know finds it useful to appeal to the power of the Pope Emeritus. Jonathan an ice will confess to our listeners that I am not myself in especially accomplished a Catholic theologian. But you think I am. I'm hoping you know more about about this than I do. Just benedict the sixteenth quoted views on the issue in question itself. He says it doesn't seem possible to realize both vocations by which he meant the priesthood and marriage simultaneously. Now other married people in my experience have jobs boy. Is this one any different because When you become? I'm a priest as I understand it celibacy is part of your Decision to remove yourself from the material every every day human world and become somebody somewhat different Maria. I would like to expand this conundrum to the more general principle. Here which is which is what happens happens when people leave high office once you should that be the end of it once you are off the stage as it were should you therefore just shut up. Well I think One of the reasons may be the reason Currently for the continued existence of the House of Lords in the UK. is exactly I'm going to give a sort of position and role For people who have I think the current terminology is stepped back from public life But they can also make trouble even when they're in the Lord's even in what is regarded as subordinate position. vis-a-vis the comments I mean. We saw That Margaret Thatcher Entre gave her successor. John Major very hard time when he was in office And it's been I think it's quite difficult for people who've been to that extent engaged engaged on the front line Actually to say nothing when they see or seems to them that they're successor is behaving behaving such a foolish way when you suddenly become used to that and when you're still relatively young I mean that's the one has a number of quite young a young presidents prime ministers and so on retiring. Tony Blair Bill Clinton others who I think will find it very difficult just to say ongoing off to rotate long walks in the countryside. And say nothing I mean I. I'm sympathetic to that to an extent because it must be the heck of it adjustment from having the sort of the world hang. Hang on your every word to suddenly you know. Once you've sort of signed a piece of paper handed off nobody caring anymore but is there Jonathan away that you can do you. I guess constructive backseat driving. I mean I've just come back from Australia. Where our current Prime Minister Scott Morrison has been weathering? The bushfire crosses to a chorus of criticism. Some of it from one of his predecessors Kevin Rudd who broke with the protocol of differential respect and sank the Bhuttan with what unmistakably like relish the way that you can actually be helpful as a former officeholder. Yes I mean you can bring the wealth experience that you've had and good judgement judgement etcetera etcetera To to bear if your success was wanted of course they may not want they may not want somebody who was there and was perhaps more successful than them sitting on their shoulder the whole time so. It's very very difficult situation. I think you'd have a lot of ex-leader pitas find their way into leading a foundation for good works and so on but almost inevitably they get caught up in in what they used to do. I mean I think one of the one of the strongest conventions about not interfering not even commenting on your successor was in the United States. where past presidents were not not supposed supposed to say a word about their successor? But that's been broken barrack Obama who has been quite voluble On the subject of what he seizes uses the errors of Donald Trump's ways and on the one hand you know that's a lot of us who would say well you know good on him quite right for doing that on the other hand. I I think there's a very a very sensible place for this convention that says actually you should find something else to do or just imagine. Donald Trump defeated in November. I don't think he'll go silent silent.

Donald Trump Nato United States Pope Benedict France President Trump America Pope West Africa Pope Francis Francis Mary Pope Emeritus America Jonathan Afghanistan Brussels Syria Europe Iraq
Antisemitic incidents in Britain up 10% on last year

The Friends of Israel Today

09:00 min | 3 years ago

Antisemitic incidents in Britain up 10% on last year

"I like to welcome our dear friend from the other side of the pond. Trevor Stewart's sweet Trevor is our friends of Israel representative in the United Kingdom and Really Trevor Connects with churches and believers all around the UK sharing with them the truth about what the Scripture say about the Messiah Jesus and Israel and so it's such an important work that what he's doing and I can think of no one better to talk about this issue of what's going on in the United Kingdom the rise of anti-semitism that's going on over there than Trevor Trevor. Great to have you on the Friends of Israel today. Great to be with you Chris. Trevor the United Kingdom's community security. Trust the tea which is a British nonprofit that has been and logging antisemitic incidents in Britain since nineteen eighty-four reported just at the end of the summer that acts of hatred toward the Jewish people. Anti Semitism awesome is up in the UK. A ten percent from last year. They also cited. This is the third year in a row that the UK has seen a the rise in antisemitism. Trevor what is going on in the United Kingdom. Well I guess if reading all the reports a lot of this is to do with the The general general rise in Anti Semitism. I guess pretty much around the world but in the UK it's probably Exacerbated by the current situation in in in with brexit and the politicians Leticia political situation But I think there's been a general trend woods for quite a couple of years now and the report certainly gives us some interesting mm figures. Now you're talking about the fact that the elections are taking place and I believe those elections will happen in December and this seems to have a major player. I was just listening to some reporters on the news. Saying this really comes down between a election of Boris Johnson who wants to its brexit issue with Boris Johnson. And on the other side. You have someone like Jeremy Corbyn who says that terrorist organizations like Hamas and Hezbollah are his friends How did the UK come to this? Point where core been actually stands a chance to potentially become the polls aren't going in that direction but they even has a chance to be potential UK prime minister. He's been leader of the Labour Party for quite a few years. Now and I guess what's happening now is that politics over the last Six to twelve months search or maybe a little longer has become more polarized over the brexit. Issue Jeremy Corbyn is become a very strong player. He's a he's a very able speaker on. He's he's he's probably telling the people what they want to hear in terms of his latest manifesto So I guess he's he's reaching out not to to those suffering in terms of finances etc and he's he's wanting to nationalize a lot of things be all not. It's it's it's it's hard to tell quite how he's got to where he is accepted Maybe the way that he's put himself there is is to ensure that the people that are in his party or those that are on his side and I just recently heard that Corbin said if he becomes prime minister he is going to essentially a accept a Palestinian Tinian state which will be one of his almost as I access if he becomes Prime Minister of the UK is is that news true. That's something I I I think is true. I can't honestly say that. I heard him say that myself. But I think it's generally accepted that that would be the case. Now let me ask you this. When it comes to issues of Israel you know here in the United States dates of course there is polling? That shows that the United States is general generally pro Israeli pro Israel administration Many Americans across the political spectrum support the state of Israel. There's a there's a low percentage of people that you know it's not that they don't support four Palestinians but they they wanna make sure that Israel is supported and they believe that Israel has a right to the land the Zionists in some capacity is that the same for the United Kingdom right now in the state that it's especially the political state that it's in I think generally the the consensus Is that the the the country itself is is is more pro. Israel high now. A local member of parliament is and the Conservative Party. Generally is there are Supporters Quarters of Israel and all the political parties each political party is go to friends of Israel section to it We probably aren't quite as pro-israeli straddling the United States on reflection But certainly when we're not against the United States Boris Johnson's being behind it and in fact even previous Labor MP. Tony Blair was very very supportive. Who Israel I'm still remained supportive Israel? I WANNA come back to this issue of the rise of Anti Semitism the hatred towards Jewish people in the UK. We talked for a moment about the fact that there are the current political issues going on with with the election Johnson and Corbin Corbin being someone who's definitely anti-zionist someone. I don't know if I would label him as an anti Semite. But I definitely doesn't have a positive outlook of the Jewish people that Boris Johnson has has and the outlook on Israel. But is it just politics. Trevor or is there something else going on in the UK as well that we see that rise of antisemitism. That's been happening over the past three years steadily. I think politics probably has a part to play but You know if I look at the figures and the figures have been rising Crutchley for the last four or five years I think it's like everything else. Antisemitism is is something that looks beneath just beneath the surface In in every society. unsubtly it doesn't take a great deal to bring it to the four. Th there are people that are definitely anti Semitic and and now he's honest On their those that are definitely pro Israel and Pro Zion You get points in between I think over here the in the the general consensus is that the country is whole would be supportive of Israel. That's not always reflected in our politics and media. I want to ask you this because this is why. You're your ministry is so important to US trevor. Here in the United States as you serve with the Friends of Israel is that you are standing up and you're supporting Israel and the Jewish people you show solidarity with them. Can you share with US quickly about some of the work that you're doing In England to that show that solidarity with the Jewish people that Evangelical Djelic Christians loved them based on what the Bible says That that that we have a love and compassion for them and we stand in solidarity with them. I think one of the biggest things that we're doing is trying I to to make sure the church is aware of of Especially Replacement Theology. That sounds big and a lot of places and it's a tool which I give you frequently to help people understand Why the church it support Israel and basically it's because of who God is because he says in his word in that he chose his people in Toronto Trauma Chapter Seven Verses Six through ten And he commands us in Romans. Eleven to make them jealous and on. How can we make the Jewish people jealous if we don't love them? How can the Church love or hate those that God loves? There's so much that the church needs to understand and I think one of the do things that we do is to try and help the church understand so that they can actually Explain to others when when need be in terms of supporting the Jewish people we we attend a lot of meetings that are organized by the Jewish community and We are often If not the only gentiles in the room one of Our Future and tells in the room and therefore we can we can and actually share with the Jewish people often say synagogue. What should you go to where I would say? We're not we're not Jewish. But we're we're Bible believing Christians who who love and support Israel and the Jewish. These people conversation amazing. And you know what I'm GonNa tell you. Something Evangelical Ism in the United Kingdom has an amazing history when it comes to the even the establishment of of the state of Israel for our listeners. It's so important to remember the Balfour Declaration which was promised to give the Jewish people the land of Israel after World War One comes out of England. There are a lot of the emphasis of of the creation of the state of Israel. Something that comes out of the United Kingdom and we've been talking with Trevor Stuart Sweet who is representative in the UK and Trevor. I want to close with this. We've only got a few moments left. What can Bible believing Christians do when it comes to the United Kingdom thinking about the rise of antisemitism thinking about the political movements that are happening over there right now? What can Bible Believing Christians in America and Canada? Do for you bottom line top line. Pray this this country needs for years ago we were the ones that sent missionaries I. Today I feel it's the country that needs the missionaries to come in So you'll prayers are very much coveted on It's the one thing that we can do is pray Obviously support the friends of Israel. Gospel Ministry all ways because the word that the ministers doing worldwide as well.

Israel United Kingdom Trevor Trevor United States Boris Johnson Jeremy Corbyn Trevor Stewart Prime Minister Corbin Corbin Trevor Stuart Representative Labour Party Conservative Party Chris Britain Tony Blair America Gospel Ministry Hamas
Peter Morgan Presents "Successor" To "The Crown" As Series Enters 1960s, '70s

Fresh Air

05:48 min | 3 years ago

Peter Morgan Presents "Successor" To "The Crown" As Series Enters 1960s, '70s

"Let's get back to fresh air contributor Dave Davies and his twenty eighteen interview with Peter Morgan creator and writer of the crown and writer of the queen the last king of Scotland and frost Nixon the third season of the crown starring Olivia Colman as Queen Elizabeth the second begin Sunday on Netflix you know therefore is just terrific in this role and I've been I assume you were involved in the casting what were you looking for and what did you see in her arms thirty one year old on the cost of care for which is now sort of with almost impossible to imagine we'll see you know she was overlooked so this doesn't reflect well on me but I will tell the story and live in shame so what time is we'd be so I would be sent the list of people coming to the costing some are looked on the list and Wednesdays as it were costing session would involve the following five young actresses I looked on the list like a one is that when that when that one of the other ones are interesting I'll come in at eleven to see that one I'll come in at twelve because I'm busy and important to lime faltered and who whoever the sky for business I'm I'm not into that I overlooked and snapped on no fewer than five occasions until there was one time where like simply couldn't avoid it because interest in the one before the one off the hook and so I then states to see her none of what what what no one should what's the matter with and if you want to talk to this when they said pizza she's been on for five occasions and each time you have studiously avoided and I suppose she's fantastic he what did you see what what did you see captivate what but it's not an easy part I mean you have to be both forgive me well I said but we have to be both playing in stunning you know the she has to have both and and then a number of the actors that came in was simply too beautiful you know to conventional beautiful too the faces did not have the full range because Elizabeth winter is a beautiful walls it is arguably still a beautiful woman but not all the time not from every angle and her face lights up you know with a smile and can look quite grumpy quite like a wet weekend when not smiling and be overlooking pulling quite plain and you need to believe she has intelligence and understand her intelligence because the queen country to what people think I think she has an intelligence and a very sharp memory and intolerance of fools but at the same time she's not that intellectually curious and so she three both quick and alert and yet at the same time capable of repose and being quite does fall so it's not easy and she has to be emotionally stable and I don't think and act to connect I'm across the chasm but it's so helps if they all thought and clamp brought a lot of thought into the pond and then active a lot of the stuff they shouldn't have to perfection eyesore in a in an instant but she could do it want to talk about we've talked a bit about the queen which is this the feature film that you did before you did the series the crowns was directed by Stephen Frears and we'll we'll hear seen here this is about the moment in nineteen ninety seven when princess Diana has been killed in a car accident and because she is divorced from the royal family the queen sees her death as a private matter with no need for a public appearance reason statement from her the queen in fact she takes her family and Diana's two boys who are her grandchildren to the royal St in Scotland come to to just get away while London is morning and be in this scene we're gonna hear she gets a call for the prime minister Tony Blair played by Michael sheen who is concerned because the public and the press are seeing the royal family as heartless because it's expressed no grief at Diana's passing so we hear the queen pick up the phone to speak to the prime minister prime minister good morning match day sorry to disturb but I was just wondering whether you'd seen any of today's papers we managed to look at one or two in which case five question would be whether you felt some kind of response might be necessary I believe a few over either editors are doing their best to sell newspapers that would be a mistake to dance to their tune under normal circumstances I would agree box well my advice is I've been taking the temperature among the people on the streets and all the information I'm getting is that the mood what would you suggest prime minister some kind of a statement ma'am I believe the moment the statements has passed I would suggest flying the flag at half mast about pounds and coming down to London the earliest opportunity it would be a great comfort to all people and would help them with that grief grief if it's come down to London before I attend to my grandchildren who just lost her mother

Dave Davies Writer Scotland Peter Morgan Thirty One Year
UK Supreme Court to give its verdict Tuesday on the legality of the prime minister's suspension of Parliament

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:51 min | 3 years ago

UK Supreme Court to give its verdict Tuesday on the legality of the prime minister's suspension of Parliament

"The UK's highest court will rule this week whether the country's Prime Minister Boris Johnson and acted unlawfully when he decided to suspend parliament. Let's get more on this with our regular Westminster. Chronic lowlands price lots works as Tony Blair start of communications when he was UK the Prime Minister Welcome back loans just recap as to where we are today given the conclusion of events in court on Friday yes so for several days last week. The two sides in the collpase presented their arguments to the eleven justices of the Supreme Cream Colt and and not entirely clear whether they come back with judgment today or tomorrow and so much time need to weigh up the arguments but obviously the people have been trying to read the runes over the weekend and there seems to be a feeling growing that the decision may go against the government but on the lawyer and and I think we have to wait in the city wants to just come up with well what the losses oppresses suggesting that the supreme court is minded. It's ruled against the government because of a couple of reasons a degree of scrutiny by the leader of the Supreme Court Lady Hale and the fact that everybody was talking about the remedies which she's what can be done when the government a- found in fold at fault. Is that a suggestion perhaps that the government is in a lot of trouble trouble whether to find against to the the plans to suspend parliament or is this not actually the death blow that many campaign unpainted might be hoping for notice deathblow tour. I'm going to be a huge huge Paris because it's completely unprecedented in participants tickle and judicial history reach so be a major milestone but I think in Boris Johnson's mind and in the minds of leaders of the opposition parties as well is how does this play with the public when the public eventually come to express their view either in the general election ord another referendum. How will they respond to something like this? Will they think this just shows the stories are an incompetent they what they're doing. They're all over the place or will it just be further evidence for some voters sure it will be that kind of the whole establishments and now they could include the Supreme Court in that out to frustrate the the people's will so necessarily when the crucial we'll decisions of aid are made by the public be the death blow that Sir. I think people like you know who's the case and all the politicians who've been supporting the various cases against the government that got to be finally settled either today or tomorrow and nonetheless suggestion this weekend that the prime minister could suspend parliament once again if he so chose well what do yet Paul would come back. We'd have to come but possibly for a day or a Dan Hassle two who days perhaps and then be proved again that second prorogation would be completely illegal. They wouldn't be subject to further court challenge because there is always before the queen's speech but a short one and so in practical terms. It's hard to see what difference going to make it less. If parliament does come back Boris Johnson opponents in parliament use that very very very narrow window to ambush in some people and let's move on to a couple of other things that are bubbling along quite menacingly firstly. Let's talk about the brexit talks all suggestions that in actual fact instead of working towards towards an agreement to leave the European Union with a deal on the thirty first of October. The United Kingdom is engaged in brexit talks going backwards and I'm not sure that would be entirely fair. I was talking to journalists on the plane on his way to New York is sponsored your for a couple of days as for the United Nations General Assembly meeting where he's going to be a having private discussions with Angela Merkel and Emmanuel macron Donald Tusk and some of the other prime minister's and he was sticking to his line that he's cautiously optimistic about reaching a deal and and he some the detail of what he was saying on what he was speaking into journalists was around the ways in which the respect stock could be removed and replaced with other arrangements for trade across the border between North and south so I I think he's still I think genuinely does want to reach a deal if he can and some of the intractable problems which was most able to deal within three years is prime minister. He's trying to resolve it a much shorter period of time but I I I would caution against assuming that actually leads all just for show and doesn't really want to deal. I think he does and tell us as well about the domestic issues of the Labor Party at the main opposition party in the United Kingdom. It is having its annual party conference this week as do all the big parties in this conference season here in the United Kingdom in them. We were supposed to be given a sort of radical agenda of social mobility and paternity for all instead. We've had a weekend where the Labor Party seems to utterly split itself into and we now face vote to votes which conflicts each other at the conference there but what they're positional positional Brexit is yes in Party conferences supposed to be the sort of showcase moment where you present all your policies and save all the fantastic you're gonna do for the country and as as we're all expecting a general election pretty quickly a pre-election conference like this is really essential threatening yet all the headlines have been about the splits and divisions they have been putting forward awesome radical policies and some quite expensive policies as well to be frank about its had on social care for the elderly on abolishing prescription charges so quite radical. I'll stop on education as well and in in other areas but as you say it's all overshadowed by the row over brexit normally there's a thing called the conference arrangements committee they try Ryan sort of fudge. Thin says that there isn't a bus stop on the floor. They failed region agreements last night over the BREXIT. votes to the wilder vote today on the conference floor about Brexit the vast majority of the membership once Labor to become a pro remain party aw that's because the trade unions hold fifty percent of the votes in live conferences and most of the Loyalty Jeremy Corbyn. It's not clear that the membership number should get their way so he's going to be a shoes up at a very very significant and tell us how that leaves the Labor Party in its identity having been a man who worked when Labor when the Labor Party had the clearest idea can ever imagine if what they stood for yes and not unsuccessful in elections as well but put in not not to to to one side I mean there is a battle has been a battle going on for the soul of the Labor Party ever since Jeremy Corbyn became lead of the Party and a lot of people on MRI light my win the absol- Blairite if you want to call it that way of the Party of never really reconciled themselves the Jeremy Corbin's leadership and things have reached a crunch point now all and I think one reason for that is the people already looking to Jeremy Corbin's disappearances leader of the Labour party whether he resigns over there. There's the general election a fails once once again to become prime minister then he would go so a lot of the stuff that we've seen trying to either remove to Watson the deputy leader of the Labour Party or sidelined him. It's all about the succession Jeremy Corbyn and as you say quite rightly the battle for the soul of the Party of what part it really is and the battle lines. It's being thrown who's going to win. That is still clear price. Thank you as ever own monocle twenty four.

Prime Minister Labor Party United Kingdom Jeremy Corbyn Boris Johnson Supreme Court Labour Party Brexit Tony Blair Labor Westminster Paris Lady Hale European Union United Nations General Assembl New York Angela Merkel Thin Paul
Prime Minister, Boris Johnson And Prime Minister Gordon Brown discussed on Hugh Hewitt

Hugh Hewitt

10:56 min | 3 years ago

Prime Minister, Boris Johnson And Prime Minister Gordon Brown discussed on Hugh Hewitt

"Let me catch up on the British election understand that the special relationship matters to us a lot Great Britain has nuclear power. They have gone to war with us everywhere we've ever gone to war, South Korea. Vietnam. Afghanistan iraq. The Brits have been there, right with their nuclear power. They're rebuilding aircraft cares to jump jets. They're buying new thirty five. See, I believe they are important. We want them to leave the European Union. I do. I believe they could be. They could regain their past glory. As a trading company has it trading country opened a deal that everyone unburdened by the bureaucracy out of the European Union? And they put the question to the people three years ago. David Cameron won a majority government on the promise to have a referendum on whether or not to stay in the European Union and the people of Great Britain, voted, very healthy margin four or five percent four percent fifty to forty eight leave leave everyone in the country knew it was being talked about, like the vote for two thousand sixteen Hillary or Trump Trump won the constitutional majority. He didn't win the popular vote. I know that he won the constitutional majority of the way we've elected president since the framing of the constitution, and so Great Britain matters a lot to us. They've had great prime ministers, like Mattie Thatcher. They've had terrible. Prime Minister Gordon Brown. They've had good prime ministers. Tony blair. They've had week prime ministers. Theresa May have had funny prime ministers like the MAC. Mcmillan. They've had Wilson that all sorts of he was terrible. We need a good one right now. Theresa May has been terrible and feckless and they're not out of the peon union yet. So number of conservatives the way that it works over there as prime minister resigns as Theresa May has as the leader of her party. She remains the caretaker, prime minister and the party election, a leader who will in turn be elected that prime minister by the members of parliament. Well, how does a party with one hundred forty thousand card carrying members? I mean, these are the people really work the hustings these central committee people. These are the people who are delegates, you know, the equivalent to delegates at the Republican national convention, the democratic national convention. They are the party. How do those one hundred and forty thousand people pick a party leader interns, becomes the prime minister, will they vote? But there are a dozen. It's like the democratic primary, there it doesn't a fifteen different members of the Tory party who want to be prime minister, and they've all put out their hands. And they've said they wanted to be and they divide into two. Categories beginning, those who were leaving when Brexit was on the ballot and those who were for remaining when breakfast Brexit was on the ballot three years ago. Theresa May was a remainder. Never made a liquor sense to me that she should be the prime minister after David Cameron resigned and he resigned because he said, I was the remainder. I don't think I can leave a government that is committed to leaving and so pick a new prime minister and they did they pick threes. I mean, she she persuaded her colleagues that she ought to be it. She made Boris Johnson or foreign secretary Boris Johnson led the leave campaign with one principal deputy guiding Michael gov. Who doesn't look the part, but he's very smart also believed to be very slippery. So Boris Johnson police to be very Radic and a lot of fun. And former mayor of London, and a powerful personality says, I'm going to become the next prime minister, I'm going to stand, Michael g-o-v, who wants supported Boris Johnson for prime minister then stabbed him in the back fairly famous move and British parliament parliamentary politics and went over to Theresa May wants to be prime minister, one, other major lever wants to be prime minister Dominic Robb, so there are two lever three levers running Boris. G-o-v and Ron. Two of those three say come October thirty one we are leaving deal or no deal. Michael go says we can't leave without a deal. Michael go minute over the weekend based upon reports of a biography about the come out about him. He was something of a cocaine guy back in the day when he was a journalist. I don't know many journalists back in the day, who worked cocaine guys. But then again, I wasn't around London much. I'd have to ask Mark Stein about that. So Mike go by the way, we don't allow admitted cocaine users enter the United States. So it's gonna be tough to become the prime minister if you're we bought Brits before who, don't who had cocaine problems from coming in the United States. We don't want cocaine in the United States. And so he says he's reformed in a lot of time. We'll see how that plays out, but he's daddy that one's done. So from the leave side, there are Dominic Robb, and Boris Johnson. Over on the leave with a deal side, these are the remains who got religion. They stayed in the government. They didn't quit like David Cameron. They didn't fail like Theresa May. They say they can deliver deal to get us out. They want to lead the conservatives into the next election. They want to be the prime minister. There are a lot of the number one is a guy named Jeremy hunt. If you sent out the central casting, and you asked, please send us your very best central casting candidate for prime minister of Great Britain. They would send you back Jeremy hunt. I mean had in the pocket the whole prince of Wales handsome. He's smart. He's articulate president, like him and Boris Joe Boris. Johnson nickname is the rambling wreck from Georgia Tech goodness, the guy hasn't been to Barbara who's competent and a hundred years. And that's part of his charm. It's just kind of disheveled. Birdie Worcester character. And if you don't birdie Worcester is I can't tell you character from fiction. PG Wodehouse anyway. So Joe is going to what the way you get. The two is that all the members of parliament who are conservatives. And I think parliament's three hundred and thirty that got just under half. So what's that add up to one hundred? Seventy one hundred sixty different people hundred sixty members of parliament vote in a series of rounds. They call them crowns and the rounds are where. You've got to get at least fifteen percent of the hundred sixty which would be nine or ten for around one or you don't get to go around to, and then got ten people. They vote again, with one hundred sixty people and the one with the least votes drops off. And so you can give your buddy of I could be nominated for prime minister. So I would encourage if you're listening in Great Britain, I'd like to be on one of those ballots. Throw one my way, members of Parliament, I, I can't serve if nominated I cannot run if elected I cannot serve because I'm a proud American but, you know be fun at any of it. They get down to nine then, again, they get down to eight they get down to seven. They get down to six five four three two and then some people drop out, eventually, they get to, to get to a finalist and a semi-finalist to people, the person with the most votes parliament and the second most votes doesn't matter what order they in. That's the ballot that goes to the hundred and forty thousand. Electors. Hundred and forty thousand members of parliament. So if you get seventy thousand and one year the next prime minister Boris Johnson is heavily favored. I mean I should look up Ladbrokes. There's a. Betting house right in Ladbrokes online betting you can't use it till legal in the United States. But Ladbrokes always has a, a political thing broke prime minister. Let's see where the odds are this morning. I think for Johnson is the prohibitive favorite. But, but you never know until you actually find Ladbrokes in prime minister because they are constantly changing, and there's a big they call them big beasts. Big players. Michael Hesseltine, John Major people have been former prime minister and defence ministers and stuff like that. Right now. Boris Johnson is a five to four favorite. To become the next Tory leader. And that's prime minister Dominic Robb is a four to one favorite. Andrea lead sin is a ten to one favorite Andrea led. Some though, who's a lever remaining, excuse me. She's a remainder. Andrea, led some picks up no. No support this morning. Michael go visit tend to one. Jeremy hunt is at twelve to one and Peggy more. Dan, is it twenty to one saw Javi is at twenty two one. Those are really the only potentials when Jeremy hunt picked up, amber Rudd today, who was herself a sixty six to one player he'll go up. I think when they published the next odds, it'll be Johnson. Rob led some and hunt and it may be Johnson hunt, because the people don't really wanna leave. The people who are really remains at heart who think this is stupid, and I don't think it's stupid. I'm for them people vote. You got to do it people vote, they're all going to rally around someone. The idea is to the final round Dominic Robb just wants to get to the final round because he thinks. That the remains will prefer him to Boris and the contest is underway, and it's going to be wrapped up by July the contest is underway, and the vetting is the market is open, go back. And, you know if you're if it's legal, if you're in Great Britain, you can go bet. But I, I gotta tell you, I do not believe it makes sense to put a nother remainder in his and I'm very impressed with Jeremy hot. So is the president. I just don't think it makes a lick of sense to nominate someone for job when they were opposed to Brexit. I really really don't the timetable, by the way. For the election. I was looking at the guardian new rule one hundred sixty thousand conservative members and they will they will be casting their ballots, the week beginning July twenty second. So we are a good eight weeks away. And I'll bring you up dates on this. But you can get familiar with the names Boris Johnson Jeremy hunt. Dominic Robb Andrea led. Some, those are the ones you need to know. Michael go with the cocaine problem

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Prime Minister Gordon Brown Boris Joe Boris Theresa May Dominic Robb Parliament Jeremy Hunt Cocaine Britain Dominic Robb Andrea David Cameron Michael European Union President Trump United States London South Korea Great Britain
Friend or foe? Unpacking Trump's UK visit

The Heat

05:07 min | 3 years ago

Friend or foe? Unpacking Trump's UK visit

"Joining me now to talk about the ship. And Donald Trump's visit to the United Kingdom is Simon marks he is chief correspondent featured store, new seven great to have you with us lovely to be here. Now we've often heard about the special relationship and to be fed there is much in this relationship that strong, these two countries have a common language. Of course, historic links. They have a strategic relationship, which goes back a long way. But looking at it today. Do you still see as a special relationship? I think there is no question that it is a special relationship. It is not necessarily any longer. The only special relationship, and there is no question that it has been somewhat bruised and battered since Donald Trump became president of the United States. This is a president who has never hesitated to pull the rug out from beneath to recent may at every possible opportunity. During the course of the last couple of years now, the relationship, obviously is only ever as strong as the prime minister of Britain, and the president of the United States, personal relationship. I one of the earliest stories I covered as a journalist was the visit to London by Ronald Reagan in nineteen Eighty-eight speech that he made the guilt all and Margaret Thatcher was there. And, you know, the two of them were absolutely philosophically ideological soulmates. They got. Along like a house on fire. The special relationship in, when, in many ways, was never more special than it was at that point, take a look at another relationship. Tony blair. And George W Bush. They didn't come from a shared political background, Tony Blair labour party. Prime minister George W Bush conservative Republican and yet they forged a relationship so special that ultimately it consigned Tony Blair in the minds of many Brits to the as sheep of history because of his decision to join in the invasion of Iraq. So this is a relationship that has weathered a number of different outlooks and dynamics, but at the end of the day, those shed language the shared language, the sense of shared history, commemorating, the seventy fifth anniversary of d day, President Trump described while he was in London as perhaps the greatest liberation in history. I mean that underpins relationship. That I think, at least for the feast Siebel future will always be a very important bilateral relationship. But as you say, President Trump has pulled the rug from under to resume several times, he hasn't just don't resumes down to other allies. Well is the United States in Britain still trusted as now while sixty seven percent of the British public say that they don't have a favorable view of President, Donald Trump, and that partly fueled the protests that could be seen on the streets of London during the course of the last few days, but look, I, I mean, Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher's relationship was such Margaret Thatcher was often accused of turning Britain into America's floating aircraft carrier in Europe. Tony Blair was accused of being George W Bush's poodle by his opponents. So the relationship is, always a lopsided relationship the size of the American economy dwarfs the size of the British economy. The size of America's military. He might dwarfs, what is now Britain's somewhat tawny armed forces, and yet the relationship endures, and it is, actually a Matic if you're British Prime minister, or an American president the, you still talk in hallowed and revered terms about that special relationship. One of the reasons you do that is from an American perspective. Nothing Americans light more than wallowing in a bit of pump and pageantry that only Britain can can really do the way it, does it. And if your British Prime minister, you know, that Americans equally love going on holiday to the United States, and they love listening to American music and watching American TV shows so there's the cultural aspects to this that also underpin it as you point out lots of ceremony on the Monday of Trump's visit to the United Kingdom and on Tuesday, they did get done some business. The president met with resumes. Cabinet had a meeting with her as well. And I'm wondering how much substance can? We attach to this visit because to raise a may is on her way out. Yeah. I mean she's a here today. Gone tomorrow, prime minister, I mean, yes, there was pumping pageantry on day one. There's only one issue that's at the heart of all of this really and its trade if Britain leaves the European Union, and Donald Trump gave voice to his view once again that he believes the United Kingdom should leave the European Union. The UK will have to strike a trade deal bilaterally with the United States and US trade negotiators. No Britain will be desperate for a trade deal, and that potentially they will have Britain over a barrel in those negotiations. And at the end of the day from an American perspective all the other stuff is background music to trying to advance that trade conversation because the American see a massive opportunity that

Prime Minister Chief Correspondent President Trump Britain United States Tony Blair George W Bush United Kingdom Margaret Thatcher London Ronald Reagan Siebel America European Union Simon Europe Cabinet Iraq Sixty Seven Percent