26 Burst results for "Toni Morrison"

Stanley Crouch, contentious man of letters, dead at 74

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 7 months ago

Stanley Crouch, contentious man of letters, dead at 74

"A popular and influential critic has died he was a true renaissance man with an attitude Stanley crouch normally cross lines he shadowed them his writings both fiction and non fiction were inspired by his knowledge and love of blues and jazz during his career crouch was a columnist for The Village Voice and New York Daily News and was a frequent guest on NPR well he was a mentor to jazz great Wynton Marsalis he was no fan of artists like Toni Morrison Spike Lee and Amari Baraka dismissing them and their work in often harsh terms crouch has died at a hospice in New York City his wife says he had been in poor health after a stroke he was seventy four years old I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Stanley Crouch NPR Wynton Marsalis Toni Morrison Spike Lee New York City New York Daily News Amari Baraka Oscar Wells Gabriel
Stanley Crouch, contentious man of letters, dead at 74

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 7 months ago

Stanley Crouch, contentious man of letters, dead at 74

"A popular and influential critic has died he was a true renaissance man with an attitude Stanley crouch normally cross lines he shadowed them his writings both fiction and non fiction were inspired by his knowledge and love of blues and jazz during his career crouch was a columnist for The Village Voice and New York Daily News and was a frequent guest on NPR well he was a mentor to jazz great Wynton Marsalis he was no fan of artists like Toni Morrison Spike Lee and Amari Baraka dismissing them and their work in often harsh terms crouch has died at a hospice in New York City his wife says he had been in poor health after a stroke he was seventy four years old I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Stanley Crouch NPR Wynton Marsalis Toni Morrison Spike Lee New York City New York Daily News Amari Baraka Oscar Wells Gabriel
Cristina Jimnez: DACA Trailblazer

Latina to Latina

09:05 min | 1 year ago

Cristina Jimnez: DACA Trailblazer

"Christina so good to see you great to be here with you big so much. Thirteen years old. You immigrated to Queens with your family from Ecuador later found out your undocumented. So much of your work has relied on telling your own story. What aspects of the story had you been holding back on right really appreciate that question because in the work that I have been doing an immigrant rights so much of the work. It's my story. It's my experience and relieving the experience of growing up undocumented and as I knew that Don more storytelling which have learned to love. I am tapping into aspects of Hoyer. Lift experience that. It's not the typical. Perhaps story that the media has created around but an immigrant. Young person is or a dreamer for example one of the things that I am talking about more. Now it's my own journey of self lawf- For US people of Color as Latina's as immigrants. I think there's so much in the countries where were born and then when we come to the US like so much that tells us that we don't quite fit there were not enough You know you're not pretty enough. And I had all kinds of complicated feelings and shame about the color of my skin and my indigenous features and I remember this one moment. I was in college and I sign up for these women's Literature Class and my Professor Media Florida's who still teaches in the cuny system in the City University of New York starts walking US through the Syllabus. And she mentioned how we. GonNa realtor from black women and letting us and indigenous women and she looks at me and she says Oh. You have such a beautiful indigenous face and that moment was so impactful for me because I actually took it as offensive You know I'm a nineteen year old explorer my freshman year in college and I had grown up in the country in Ecuador in in a family where the wider that. You log the better looking. You're and he no comments about like. Oh we have to better their as they give me her. Larisa where things that I grew up. You know hearing and and so you develop this sense of like shame about my skin you know ten and Brown and so when she says this to me I wait until the end of the class and say to her. Why did you say that to me? This is an offensive comment to me. And she looked at me a little bit surprised and then said like. Oh let's have coffee. And my conversation with her and the books that are reading her class which included books like Voter and Kana Writers and also many other writers like Toni Morrison I entering to this journey of like decolonizing by understanding of myself and recognizing that we come from such a rich painful and complicated history of Komai -sation and of believing in valuing whiteness so much so that I had so much shame and I'm proud to say now that that journey has let me to like love. Why am be proud of who lamb how I look and with such too sick ownership and pride of my history and where I come from so those are some of the things that I am actually really excited to talk about more In Our community. Because I think that we need to have more of those conversations did you when you came to the US no you are coming undocumented or did you learn that later we came with my family in nineteen eighty eight and the context for how things happen. I think are so important. Ecuador is going through this political social turmoil. The president is kicked out of office. There's well guys like every day. Schools are shut down. My parents lose their jobs and for months they keep looking for jobs than there are just no jobs that leads to over three million people leaving the country in the late nineteen ninety s and my family was one of those fleeing poverty. And so we come here with big dreams. What I knew Was that we were coming to work because family was already here. Having on that had already settled in Queens in New York. And you know she says there are jobs here and so. That's one thing that my parents are looking forward to write like eager to work to to to support their family. We came here with visa. You know we were very blessed to even have at that time gone through. A process of getting a tourist visa approved The tourist visa is given to us for six months and we come in July. I remember because he was like a few days away from my birthday her fourteenth birthday and they find jobs and we decide to stay at the moment that we decided to stay which was closer to the moment where the visa expired. I knew that the day in October when the date when the visa will expire that will be the beginning of being undocumented in this country so I knew but what I will say Alycia is that I when you are at thirteen year old. You know something's in context like okay. Yes you know we're GONNA BE UNDOCUMENTED. But what does that really mean how that's going to impact my life? When was the first time you realize what it was going to mean for your life? There's this moment where I remember my dad. Give me a call out of my room like I need to talk to you in your help. You know as the only English proficient person in my home. My Dad is having problems with his employer. He was working at a car. Wash and Queens Boulevard in Queens and the employer doesn't WANNA pay waitress to him and other undocumented workers and he tells me can you please come with me and talk to him so that he can pass. I'm fourteen and I don't know where I had to just find the courage when I think about that. This probably resonate with many immigrants is that you end up. Having to become an adult real quick I could only think about like look how much sacrifice my parents are making and the left their entire lives and their families behind for me and for my brother. Jonathan delete that I could do is to find the courage with a me and use the fact that I know how to speak English. Now you know a little bit better than they do and do this for them. Although I was terrified I was terrified about showing up to this. Why Guy who was Italian. Who owned the car wash and ask him to pay the workers but had to you know. I did it because I think for me was like this the least of things that I can do for my parents and their sacrifices and when I spoke to him he said he will not do it and that if they didn't like it they could leave what ultimately embolden you tell your story a meet other undocumented young people and some of them are courageously shared their stories and then are feeling like. Oh my God. They're doing it and I'm not doing it like being such a coward Thought about it a lot when I started to see. The young people like me who had grown up in this country would also getting deported. Especially after nine eleven. Nine eleven happens when I mean my senior year in high school and immediately after my parents can have a driver's license anymore because the policy changes there is small some kids in my school that are being targeted. Nypd police officers are like subway stations. You could be. Surgeon asked for questions at any moment and so. I remember going through the point of being

United States Ecuador Queens Hoyer Christina DON City University Of New York Kana Writers Toni Morrison Professor Media Florida Brown Alycia President Trump Komai -Sation Jonathan GUY New York
"toni morrison" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Let's get back to my twenty fifteen interview you with Tony Morrison who died last year. So the opening quote in your book and it stands on a page alone before the book begins is suffer little children to Komo Yanni and forbid them not and it's It's what Jesus says Luke Jew Jesus wants to bless the children so he's basically saying let the children come to do not yeah they will hold him. Come back yeah the disciples onto yeah right so I mean it just made me wonder if you have spent a lot of time reading the Bible I through your mother's religion when you were. She was very religious or as a Catholic literary person. I think as a scholar because it's gone through so many hands so many translations even the people who were riding in you know the scribes were changing things numbers changed what was seven now become six six etc.. So it's an interesting project but that's the way I approach it now but in my mother's church judge everybody read the Bible and it was mostly about music. My mother had the most beautiful voice I have ever heard in my life. She could sing anything classical jazz blues opera. You know many people have commented on the musicality of of your writing. You think you try to emulate her music in your in your pros. I didn't do it consciously or deliberately okay but if it's there then I am positive that that's part of it. You know part of it for me is the sound. I'm aradio child. You know what the ear of against the Gauze where you hear stories you know those little stories to play on the radio for fifteen minutes so for me. The sound of the text is very important so so important that I read all of my books for audio books so that the reader can hear you. Would I hear so just one more question you. You didn't start writing till you're thirty nine or forty s because you didn't have the time or didn't I know you had it in you like what was the point in which you said I'm gonNA write a novel. What changed when I was teaching at a Howard University and was gully my twenties and I joined a group of faculty and Writers who commit I think once a month to read to each other and critique each other some of them were professional riders and some were not so I brought to these meetings little things I had written for classes Cisse's as an undergraduate something in some not and so on and they had really good lunches really good food food during these meetings but they wouldn't let you continue to come if you were just reading old stuff so I had to think of something new if I was going to continue to have this really good food in really good company outside of the my colleagues so I started writing and I remember very clearly? That was writing was a pencil a sitting on the couch writing with a pencil. Trying to think up something and remembering what I just described and I was the tablet. It was that legal pad yellow with the lines and I had a baby My older son was burleigh walking and he spit up on the tablet.

Komo Yanni Tony Morrison Cisse Howard University
"toni morrison" Discussed on The Nod

The Nod

11:55 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on The Nod

"Welcome back today. We're hearing stories about discovering Toni Morrison and for some of the women we talked to after finding Morrison for themselves. They wanted to spread the word Glorieta remember. Doing I mean just that. She's the founder of well red black girl and she is also a big sister. I had a habit of like readings my little brother a lot. I would read in books that I didn't didn't understand and I read to him. Beloved is like Oh my Gosh I was young. I was probably like twelve or thirteen years old and there's five years younger so he was completely terrified but I remember like released him stop. This beloved is a ghost story. It's scary as Hell beloved tells the story uh-huh Mother who escapes from Slavery Chooses to kill her daughter rather than let the baby be taken by slave catchers years later. The daughter haunts her family as a literal ghost. Just as the legacy of slavery continues to Hong America. It's a lot for a seven year old or a twelve year olds to take in like going into like what is slavery with your little brother. There is just Kinda like well. I don't really know either but right. let's just keep going and does she makes me. WanNa move your. You're it even like the hard part. She makes you read through the struggle and understand what she means because she is so. She's worse than so even as a young person. I knew that I wanted wanted to like take this on. I wanted to have this experience in doing that. With my brother was really was really fun for him. Maybe not so much but for me reading out loud him and being like carrying him captivated by Morrison to bonded is it was our thing so we did together at the same time. Did you like scaring your little brother. Author high did of course online. We're five years apart so I do come up very very big sister and so I did love the fact the he believed everything I said sometimes when I was quoting things like he just thought he didn't know that was more than he thought I was making. You don't even you. It was just like my my movements of feeling like I'm in charge and I have a command language. Even though that's not the words I would've used at that point but it was just like if felt very adult and very refined l like I understand this. How do you think your life would be different now. If you're not read Tony Morrison how fuck I mean oh I mean so much of my identity is built around Morrison's fortitude and in her ability to make you not question yourself before it Morrison for sure lives in self-doubt. I didn't know if if I had permission or is allowed to be outspoken and as bold as I wanted to be even within the creation of wall red black girl saying well red black girl in itself a statement and I don't know if I could came to that conclusion without Morrison to feel just really uninhibited and free to be myself when you're reading a Kid. It's easy to grab onto whatever seems most sensational in an adult book. Maybe it's sex are ghost. You come back to it later though and things shift aft- Ghost Stories and Jessica Story. It's a different way of thinking about death Caitlyn. Greenwich is a writer a few years ago. She was teaching a literature class and she decided to make it about ghost stories and of course everything that she writes has a ghost. There's always a haunting. There's always a dead person in it of the many things that she writes about one of the things that she's really interested in is is this sort of like moving back and forth between these worlds between the living and she never calls it the dads imagine living and so. I started to think about her work in those terms as well. When Tony Morrison writes about death she doesn't treat it as something final and Caitlyn says that's drawing on a larger tradition and that sort of other way of thinking about what death means is very familiar to anyone who is familiar with death in African American cultures or just the African African diaspora in in general It's an understanding of deaths. That's based on this idea. That death is not a finality and the dead are with us and our our passes with us in a in a very real way and hunting is not something that is frightening aiming or a curse or a bad thing if another back it's a existence and you're sort of existing on these multiple claims and multiple layers and you move through those things and they can affect your daily life your material life your spiritual life depending depending on whether or not you are willing to reckon with listening writers reckon with ghosts all the time anyone who writes a book has to confront all the books that have come before decide how to claim a place alongside them years ago. Caitlin was a kid who pulled the bluest eye off her parents bookshelf now. CAITLYN's a novelist herself she and all the other writers we spoke to have just begun under reckon with Morrison's ghost. We die that may be meaning of life but we do right. That may be the measure of our lives. That's from the speech. Tony Morrison gave gave when she won the Nobel Prize and people of eulogized her in the last week. Those are lines. They keep coming back to but the part that comes next is worth remembering to comparison used your speech to tell a story she describes a wise old woman who's blind and a group of young people who approach her with what sounds like a trick question they tell the woman that they're holding a bird the NASCAR whether it's living or dead the woman waits a while before giving them an answer. She says the bird is in your hands Once upon a time visitors asked an older woman a question who who are the these children. What did they make of that encounter. What did they hear. In those final words. The bird is in your hands. A sentence that gestures toward possibility ability or one drops a language. Perhaps with their children heard wise. It's not my problem. I am old female by what was my have. Now is knowing you cannot help you. The future of language is your all the women we talked doc to settle their encounters with Morrison had opened the door to their own work how she had told them in one way or another. The future of language is yours. I went to an event that that she was at and I just sat close to the front row in grand at her like an idiot but I didn't try to speak to her because I was shy this. This is Angela Flournoy novelist. Angela saw Tony Morrison onstage just a few years ago at that. Point Morrison certainly could have rested on her laurels. She had all the laurels in the world to rest don but what she did on that stage was she pulled out a legal pad and it was something she had written like very very recently and she read it. She was still working. You know she was older and she was you know in the wheelchair and probably had various ailments because she was still working and that was something that was kind of like a kick in the pants remained confined any reason for it to not be the right time you know to work Angela. I read Morrison's work when she was a teenager and it sparked something in her then years later still sparking something morrison is a writer to discover discover and rediscover and even now that our work is everywhere reading it for the first time can still feel like finding something. That's just for you back when the writer Ashley See Ford was in junior high she she was always getting in trouble it wasn't she didn't care about school. It was that no one at school seemed like they cared about her. She was always frustrated with arbitrary rules and lessons. I was sitting sitting in classrooms reading books of long with my teacher and being ferociously board the because the books just didn't in have anything to do with the lives. Any of us were living because she was always questioning the teachers he was always getting sent to detention but when she was there all she wanted to do was read and one of the few black instructors in my middle school was also the detention coordinator donator so he you know seeing this was like you really don't belong here. You know I'm GonNa send you to the library and the library and actually was superman and not like any of US keeps. I still don't know why should it came a school librarian because she clearly eighty. It's but I was in there. You you know and I'm going through the bugs that she's like. I and me and I just I'm like let me just find a buck and set out so I went and I saw this book and on the cover was a little black girl and the way her hair was parted and the darkness of her skin essentially because at that time every book look like a steal from like the scene from Dawson's creek or something it was always just it was always like book covers for teenagers or young adults were always just like white kids dressed like they listen to a lot of Kurt cobain and so I pick up the bluest eye and it it just looked familiar at the bike looking at a picture of my grandma when she was a kid you know or or even like my mom when she was a kid and I sat down and I started reading. It and I didn't look up for for the rest of the hour like I just didn't look. I didn't look up until the detention. Coordinator came to the library and was like hey it's time to go and I was like can I check out this uh-huh and the library goes no and he was like way what she can't check out a book from the library the issue like well. It's not her library times and so like he was like okay. Let's all calm down. I'm pretty sure she didn't check out the pot and she let me check out the book. Finally I by took the book home and I finished it that day which was not uncommon for me. I've always been a fast reader and love to read what was uncommon was that after I finished it. I went back to the front and started it again. Here's the thing about that book. At twelve I read it and couldn't really understand it. I couldn't really understand the emotions and the depth and the depravity and and all of those things that were built in into this gorgeous novel I couldn't see them all clearly but there was something about that book that told me like this is what riding can be and it just opened up this world for me about not just finding good stories but also the interesting ways that stories could be told and the powerful way that stories could be told and before. I read the bluest eye to be perfectly honest S. I don't think I knew that anybody cared what a little black girl fought.

Toni Morrison Caitlyn writer Coordinator founder Angela Flournoy Hong America Nobel Prize US Jessica Story Greenwich NASCAR Caitlin Kurt cobain Ashley See Ford Dawson five years thirteen years twelve year
"toni morrison" Discussed on The Nod

The Nod

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on The Nod

"Shame it was somebody who was very close to our families who was abusing me but this book was a place that I could dive into to really just like to to process. I just kept thinking like Oh. This is the thing that happens to people and and it's obviously very bad but also it will not destroy you like I think that for me. That was the overarching feeling. It made me feel like less alone. Every time I pick up that book. It's something that it hits me like a ton of bricks. Every time senior life mirrored that way in a book it's a powerful experience and as I got older older and got to know the rest of Morrison's work. She realized it was bigger than anyone story. It was a whole way of thinking about what stories could be and they were for you know just how much pleasure and pride and urgency she took in the fact that she wrote about black people for black people. I'm thinking about the interview that I like. I watch should all the time on Youtube and now I can't think about who the interviewer is but actually who cares interview whereas the Clippers Muniz talking about from an interview Tony Morrison did in Nineteen Ninety eight with the Australian alien journalist Yana vent vent who was white looks very serious as she turns to Tony Morrison and says this. You don't think you will ever change and right books. That incorporate wide wide lives into them substantially. I have done in a substantial. You can't understand how powerfully raise the question any as you could never ask a white author when you're gonNA write about black breath he did or not or she did even in curry comes from a position of being in the center and being used to being in the same gene used to being and saying you know. Is it ever possible that you will entered into mainstream. It's inconceivable that we're I already am and she really just like flips the question on its head and she's it's always like you never like all of the questions. I got sent her white people and actually like no like yeah like that's racist and I she's like I center myself and I sent her black people in my work. There's nothing wrong with that and I was like this is true. It's like I think about the you know. The cannon that I read in college on High School and and Tony Morrison pointed the she's like you know like nobody's he's asking tolstoy like writing for like. Are you writing for you know like for young. Russians is only for Russian. I it sounds and so I you know like I'm obviously making light of it and being a little flippant but I think that for so many of us that was that was game changing you know and she she never shrank. She wasn't provocative. She wasn't you know she was just telling the truth about who she was and and I really appreciate about it. Always seems particularly unfair that when someone dies they're not around to help you through their death the one person you don't get to hear talk about. Tony Morrison dying his Tony any Morrison but death something she came back to again and again in her writing after the break a ghost story this up so the nod is brought to you by borough with the cold weather starting to creep in TV shows returning. There's no better our time to cozy up on your couch with a remote in hand and I got a little routine. I organized my like snacks. I kind of like lay them out on my coffee table. Usually after I've eaten this next feet go up on the coffee table. Kid is asleep so I have to worry about anybody. Repeating that behavior yeah not I just lay back and settle in and usually like I emerge with Spring mid spring even after the is the railway springs yet and if you're like Eric and you plan on being glued to your couch all fall along why not do it like a pro borough sofas are made with durable fabric. That's both scratch and stain resistant plus. You can customize the fabric color leg finish or length to meet your specific needs. Don't settle L. for your same old. Couch settle into a new Comfy Borough Sofa. Get Seventy Five dollars off your New Sofa.

Tony Morrison Muniz Comfy Borough Sofa Youtube Yana vent Clippers Eric High School tolstoy Seventy Five dollars
"toni morrison" Discussed on The Nod

The Nod

10:35 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on The Nod

"It's a a little crazy to listen to this. Now you hear the name Toni Morrison and you think of the literary legend a Regal Nobel laureate whose books are a fixture on family bookshelves enlists of great American novels. That's the version of Tony Morrison that a lot of people my age and younger grew up with and she helped create a world where more people could imagine themselves doing what she'd he'd done to this week. In the wake of her death we wanted to hear from women who grew up in that world about how they first made their way to Morrison's work and what it's meant to them over the years she was a deity already before I was born like it was understood with a human people like Oh. This woman is she's everything we'll start with Britney loose. She's Co host of the not my mom she stayed at home with us in so oprah was always on four PM at least in on the east coast. It's four PM after school and Oprah was is not shy about choosing Tony Morrison for her co picks. Britney's mom watched Oprah and Britney's. MOM bought those books so they were always around the house and they felt familiar long before Brittany had actually actually read them even just a picture of Morrison on the jacket. She'll start a grandma. She looks like she looks like a like. A cool auntie grandma when she also has such a I mean Tony is is like such a Tony Rhonda Rosalyn like these are all good like auntie sister cousin grandma friend name like his name Rosalyn. Tony Rhonda like this is somebody who is going to be on the phone with three o'clock in the morning laughing. They always have the T. like she just had. I didn't mean that was just so like Tony Morrison. It's like it's. It's a complete sentence. I read the bluest eye. How old are you I. I was probably fifteen or sixteen 'cause it was around the house and it had an Oprah's book club. Pick at any of those that were in the house. I read them. The bluest eye was Morrison's first novel came out in Nineteen Seventy but she'd started it years before in a writing group at Howard University and for a lot of the women we talked to the the bluest eye was their first taste of Tony Morrison. It's a book that might catch your eye. If you're ten or thirteen or sixteen years old it tells the story of an eleven year old girl growing up in the nineteen forties ladies. She thinks she's ugly and what she wants more than anything is to have blue eyes like a white girl. I was growing up in the mostly white suburb Robert. I felt like I was sort of out of step with most of the other people around me but I didn't have the language for it and so when I I read the Bluest I I was reading it for the plot and that was like this is sad. I hadn't understanding in the like situationally in the book that she thought that Whiteness could save her from her life but like I didn't have a sophisticated understanding of how that same same sort of system of oppression was making me feel a certain way probably because maybe it was like two combination too obvious in too painful from the vehicle to connect that back to my own experience in a way that like really would have made me feel like totally like oh man. I'm fucked when she first read the bluest eye. Brittany wasn't focused on what Morrison listen could tell her about her life right now. She was more interested in what Morrison had to say about her possible. Future about all the things she didn't know yet when it came to being an adult the mother and the a father began having sexual relationship and there was some way that she described something like about feeling all of the colors or something like that which is basically euphemistic for hanging orgasm or at least experiencing some sort of like carnal pleasure. Let's say and like it was just the most delicate L. A. Cat but most tawdry like I was like. This is a door habit hit yet yeah. I haven't had experience with somebody else yeah. I'm like Oh my God is. This is like something interesting. There's also knew it wasn't just about the feeling or the event it was about put how that relationship drew her to this bound to this man yeah and it felt like real grown women stuff and shit a gave me a window into this idea that something else transpired when you had sex with. Somebody wasn't isn't just like this. this physical experience there was so much. There's so much else attached to it. It was like you and another person really working together or just not where it was collaborations I will yeah it was just sort of piqued my interest and it made me like Oh there's more here so that was what corporate attention the first time around but a few years later she read the bluest eye again and this time it hit her in a new way. It was the first semester of my freshman year at Howard University which is where I went and also where Tony went. I was in an all girls dorm and so the first semester we're all in freshman composition like our English class and they have us read the Bluest Eye uh-huh and reading the bluest eye among all those black girls at Howard where she went and where she taught and teaching this book I didn't think about how deep that was but that was a pretty deep experience at night they sit around the dorm talking about Toni Morrison. I had never really been around that large group of black women at once hearing black women from a variety of shades brown skin dark skin light skin like you know different types of hair in all different types of facial features and everybody's sort of opening up about how they hit experienced color them or how they hadn't realizing that they hadn't and and realizing what sort of like what was insidious about that yeah and not fair about that and so it was like that book was an entryway to so many conversations that I had that I cherished with so many women who are so close to me now. I think I felt pity when I read the book the first time I think that the second time only three years later I think I felt understanding. I think that was always the magic of Toni Morrison's books. How do you think it would be different now. Were it not for your experiences reading. Tony Morrison thing out Tony Morrison is I think for every black woman especially every black American woman she she made you feel like you deserve to take up space like there was a like. I don't know it's like there's this quote that she has. She is a friend of my mind. She gathered me man the pieces I am. She gathered them. She get them back to me and all the right order. It's good you know when you got a woman who is a friend of your mind that is that is how I think She's like the best friend. The smart friend like the most like the friends like reading. Her books felt like just having somebody. It just makes sense of you. Tony Morrison wrote books that got passed from hand to hand. Maybe from your mom or your cousin or are slightly older cooler friend so I I encountered her through my older sister who he's seven years older than me so we hey lock is a news writer at falter less week J- actually wrote up the blog posts that broke the news of Toni Morrison's death remembers I taking Morrison Offer Sister Shelf so when I was about eleven I remember just sort of hanging out in her bedroom while she was doing something completely different not really paying attention to me at all that I was just sitting around and to try to get her to talk to me. I was like Oh which book from your bookshelf. Should I read. I'm pretty sure she was very blase. It was very much. It's like do read the Bluest so I just decided I'll read the book and then we'll have something to talk to my sister about and she'll notice me and it'll be great although he was trying to impress her sister the book itself snuck up on her reading how Morrison's protagonist felt about Shirley temple recognize something she felt herself like the books and the TV shows that are filled with white heroes. I really desperately wanted to be but couldn't couldn't fully see myself in who'd you remember wanting to be or who who was like that to you when you were eleven when my immediately is Rory Gilmore more like I love Gilmore Girls. It's a good show but I remember wanting to like go to a boarding school in Connecticut and have her hair. Her hair would like being in a braid down her down her back. Sometimes I remember being like a liquor hair so beautiful and those Alexis del is Liz. There's a big blue eyes yeah yeah so for me reading it was like two main lesson one racism bad and I sort of already become very familiar with that so I was like okay that but then also the idea that these characters in books and TV shows I wanted to be so bad weren't for the solution solution to finding who I was as a person. A friend and I were talking about this recently. The question was what is a book that you know you are way too young to read and for me. It was the bluest eye I'm not too so as co host of call your girlfriend she discovered Morrison through the bluest eye to and even though it's a book about a kid it's dark not just because it's dealing with racism internalized and otherwise it also tells the story of a child who's raped and who becomes pregnant with her father's baby. I ran the Bluest I probably I wouldn't say I was nine or ten. I was a very very precocious reader so I just picked up everything around the house and Yeah I remember very much realizing as I was reading it that this was not something my parents now. I was reading and I just I remember just feeling so both this feeling feeling of like wow these are really adult themes but also these are things. These are things that are happening to me. I'm a survivor of childhood sexual assault and and reading this book was really It was really eye opening. I remember just feeling really affected by the by the story and saying like okay. This is not a thing I can talk talk to my mom and dad about because I like grab Muslim. There was like a lot of.

Toni Morrison MOM Tony Oprah Tony Rhonda Rosalyn Tony Rhonda Howard University Brittany Britney assault Howard L. A. Cat Rory Gilmore Connecticut Gilmore Girls Shirley temple Liz
"toni morrison" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"It could have been in a ah. There's so much more there but we had to make decisions about what was important. I think <hes> her family. You understand her family in this you understand her where her grandparents come from her. You know all of the travels of her family. The migration great migration. You know the use of art art in the film is something i'm very proud of as well you see jacob lawrence's paintings in and that scene there when he talks about leaving coming to ohio so we try to incorporate other there's twenty two african american artists who gave us work for the film the the opening is by nicolini thomas who chad is here my producers who's a big fan and i. I didn't know mclean. I i loved her. I've always liked her work very much so i just called her and said you know we're doing this. Film on tony morrison jews consider doing a kind of collage opening waiting for us and she said i'm in you know and and that was the reaction of everyone who we reached out to from kerry james marshall to cara walker to all loran is simpson all of the different artists and and the music about ninety eight percent of the music is one one composer catherine bostick who's a musician from los angeles who we found on the internet and is just a brilliant brilliant composer imposer in the song. The end is hers. She sings it and she composed almost all the music. It doesn't shy on the wall where secrets burn brighter walk to the edge and dance with the duty free here in this conversation you serve of established. You're bona fides with your long history of tony morrison and she felt comfortable to have you do this film <hes> yet. Still people must look at this listened and thank you know. How does he get to be the guy who tells the tony morrison film and i wonder if you can talk about how you've come to answer that question for yourself. You mean the the white band who tells the tony morrison story <hes> you know i think it really comes back to trust that tony was very <hes> <hes> familiar with what i had done in film the blacklist series of course the latino list the outlets the translates the women's list all of those films about identity and she for the women's tony wrote the introduction and read it for us so she's she's very aware of these films and i think she knew what kind of filmmaker i am. I am and i also made it very tony had kind of been with me and other film home in the film. She saw what my crew was. How diverse was how much that meant to all of us to do that. <hes> tony makes decisions. It's kind of that kind of comes down to that and i think she i hope she saw the film and she's her comment. Was i like her <music>. I want to thank timothy greenfield sanders for speaking with me his film tony morrison the pieces..

tony morrison jacob lawrence timothy greenfield sanders kerry james marshall los angeles mclean catherine bostick nicolini thomas ohio cara walker chad ninety eight percent
"toni morrison" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"And tony trusted me early on i think in the picture show it you know we were a very collaborative portrait work that we did together so she had given you the inspiration to do this series at you embarked on with elvis mitchell the blacklist. Can you talk about how it went from the seed of an idea that she planted to what became attorney wanted to do. Black divas and i'm not an opera lover particularly enough that i would wanna. They do a whole project on opera but it started me thinking about just sort of african american talent in general that there was more than just oprah and barack obama they were all these other people that we could maybe interview and my idea then which now everyone does but was to do this sort of direct to camera <hes> talk where the where the subject is looking right at camera and it's just a very powerful way to do it. In those days earl morris was doing it. A couple of other filmmakers used it but it was rare and it was also my portraiture come to life so if you look at my portraits they're always director cameras single light source and it kinda gray backdrop so i wanted to turn that into film and one of the tricks. It's not a trick. One of the ideas here was that tony talks to camera. Only everyone else hilton ails right here. Second-row talks off camera <hes> they talk about tony and and i thought that could work. I've never seen it in documentary but the the main subject is looking at us and we have a kind of connection that way and then the others are talking thing about her and <hes>. How did you convince johnny morrison if it took convincing to do this film devoted to her you know i think when when the first blacklist film came out we all sat around thinking everyone in this film deserves a feature film this you know there's so much there's so many interesting stories and talents but tony was always the first in my mind tony was the first is set for the blacklist so oh it also a couple of years ago i realized tony was eighty four eighty five eighty eight now that if i'm gonna do it this time and i reached out to her and we talked about it and she you know she didn't say no and that's always a good sign in with tony and that really gave me the courage to cut it fine the funding and go back to her and say i have the money to do it in this was it's gonna be on television or the american masters was the idea back then it became because of sundance film that will now be in theaters. We're very excited with magnolia <hes> but i think tony you trusted me to do it. So what was the the process of interviewing her like. Sandra guzman who is credited in the film did the interviews didn't feel that i i am enough of tony scholar to do the interviews sandra drives a car that says soula on the license plate so at in love's tony deeply and really <hes> <hes> was very very eager to do this film and supportive and <hes> you know you who director you kind of create a space where everyone feels comfortable <hes> we. We did that the interviews the tony at her home so we set up apple studio. They're essentially a backdrop and did them there where she was more comfortable..

tony elvis mitchell director Sandra guzman earl morris attorney barack obama oprah johnny morrison apple
"toni morrison" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Toni morrison the pieces i am profiling the nobel prize winning author her novels include the bluest eye soula sawn of solomon and beloved in the film. She talks about her motives to right sometimes uh-huh you nudged and sometimes you're just searching to make the writing interesting to me. It's not just writing. It's i. I don't know what this means that i have to find out timothy has a long history with morrison. He photographed her multiple. Times comes over three decades in two thousand six. She inspired him to undertake a film series called. The blacklist. Timothy directed three blacklist films in collaboration with elvis mitchell interviewing distinguish black figures from different fields. We hear the phrase blacklist or is that not you. Blacklists blacklist mean people to list that don't work anymore. Get treated like black people mothers others with his stories his cool. This isn't history to me black culturally. I had to fight. Virtually every single thing writing for me is keith. Who are we and what are we doing. Here just wanted to be somebody. I'm not the ambulance chasing the ambulance and never thought that i was only worth what they said. You get what you're caller event. Somebody else's problem. It's never been on really can be persuaded to think differently often identity human identity gone pimples. They talk about it. There's always going to kind of be an overreaction one way or the other for timothy's tony morrison film he collaborated with interviewer sandra guzman she was previously the editor in chief of latina magazine and conducted interviews for timothy's these films the women's list in the latino list the heart of tony morrison the pieces. I am is a long interview with the author. It's bands her childhood al`thood in lorain ohio her first career as a book editor and her effort to become a writer as a single mother of two sons. The film also includes testimonies from her friends and admirers like oprah winfrey. One of the characters says at the end of song of solomon and she was loved and she was does loved that is the anthem for any life. You can come to the planet and do whatever you do accomplish accomplish. Whatever you accomplish award no awards degrees no degrees successes no successes i think she captured the essence sense of what it means to be human to be alive and to have done well here on earth and we can say the same anything for her and she is my interview with timothy took place in may at the i._f._c. center enter before a live audience that included writer hilton ails who's interviewed in the film less than three months after our conversation. Morrison passed away at age eighty eight to begin. I asked timothy how he first met morrison in the early eighties that was <hes> <hes> when tar baby had just come out so <hes> song of solomon soula and bluest i had been published and tony was doing some press. <hes> i shot it for the cover of soho news which was kind of hipster weekly <hes> back then and you know we. We got along immediately lianne. We we talked a little bit about literature but particularly talked about the neighborhood. I lived in and i remember kind of walking tony to get a cab at the end and and we stayed in touch and then i started to do pictures for her for books <hes> particularly <hes> later on on a lot of the jacket covers and press stuff and <hes> i alluded to the time in two thousand six that was from the opera she in britain libretto for margaret gardner and we were doing pictures then <hes> for that and this beginning of the blacklist and so what were those sessions like come on what was the session with a photography session with her like compared to other authors that you think that it's always about getting the subject to trust you. Oh and that was something that yeah. Tony said to me a couple years ago. She said i. I let i let you see me you know and and the subject allows you to to get in there. It's never the other way around. You can never break down a subject really. I think i think the subject has to kind of let you in and.

Toni morrison timothy Tony oprah winfrey margaret gardner nobel prize writer solomon elvis mitchell solomon soula latina magazine lorain sandra guzman soho editor in chief editor ohio britain three decades three months
"toni morrison" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on What It Takes

"The academy of achievement lost two of its most beloved members in the past few weeks but more significantly america lost two of its most revered voices toni morrison and how prince as it happens in two thousand seven at the international achievement seminar washington d._c. Tony morrison presented how prince with the organization's highest honour the golden plate award earlier that same afternoon these two giants won a novelist and nobel prize winner won a broadway producer director and twenty one the time tony award winner stood at the podium and talked about their lives to the student delegates and the dignitaries sitting mesmerized before worth so on today's episode. We're taking a little bit of a different approach by letting you listen to the talks. They gave unedited that stunning day in the two thousand seven. This is what it takes a podcast about passion vision and perseverance not to mention inspiration from academy of achievement. I'm alice winkler at this child is gifted and i heard that enough that i started to believe if you have the opportunity not a perfect opportunity and you don't take it. You may never have another child. It all was clear. It was just like the picture started to form itself. There was new which ally could prevail over the truth darkness over light their life every day. I wake up and decide today. I'm going to love my life. Decide size is if they're going to break your leg or it's when you go in play stay out of there and then along companies differential experiences that you look for you. Don't plan for the boy. You better not miss him <music>. When tony morrison died several weeks ago on august fifth two thousand nineteen generations nations of readers and writers stopped in their tracks to take in the difficult news she was eighty eight so it could not be called the premature death but her work over the past five decades had such power that it was hard to believe she would no longer stand as a truth taylor among us before we get to her speech to the academy of achievement in two thousand seven a little more about her toni morrison was the author of eleven eleven novels including the bluest eyes song of solomon and of course beloved she took african american women's stories which had been silenced and marginalized and put them front and center where they could no longer be denied and she did it in poetic prose that mingled single magic with the unbearable weight of racism and sexism. Here's a tiny excerpt from beloved her most famous novel the story is based on a real life captured runaway slave who decided to murder her child rather than have her return to slavery in toni horny morrison's telling the child lives on as a ghost who haunts the home where her mother and grandmother live. We couldn't move. She suggested adjusted wants to her mother-in-law. What'd be the point as baby sucks. Not a house in the country impact to its rafters with some dead negro's grief. We lucky this ghost is a baby. My husband spirit was a comeback in here or yours. Don't talk talk to me. You lucky you got three left three pulling inches skirts and just one raising hell from the other side be thankful why don't onto a head eight every one of them gone away from me for take for chase and all expect worrying somebody's house into evil. Tony morrison won the pulitzer for beloved and she went on to win the nobel prize in literature and the presidential medal of freedom one of the many tributes poured in after she died came from michelle obama who wrote for me and for so many others tony morrison was that i crack in the levy the one who freed the truth about black lives sending it rushing out into the world she showed us the beauty in being being our full selves the necessity of embracing our complications and contradictions and she didn't just give us permission to share our stories. She underline ability to do so. She showed how incomplete the world's narrative was without hours in it. I had no reason in no encouragement to be a writer. I didn't think about it until i was over thirty and i only thought about it then because there was something i wanted to read about part and i couldn't find it. I thought everything i needed to read or wanted to read had probably been in written by somebody somewhere and at some point i discovered there was a silence <hes> absence of vacancy about somebody. I knew intimately tape which was young black female. Now there were are books in which such character appeared but she was always a joke an instrument of somebody's pity or to add comic relief of their characters could work out their own generosity on her but what i thought at that time if she you were center stage and held all the attention and the whole text was about her two things occurred to me that it would be about her vulnerability and her absence and her inability to speak for herself and that is the writer would speak for her with other characters or by some skill. I imagined imagine at that time that i had when the book was published it received the kind of <hes> tension that i thought it would which is about two hundred people bought it. Although i have to say i was thinking king four hundred but the company that published it was even more optimistic they printed fifteen hundred and then they decided did you to go out of print. <hes> although they did get a paperback license and then an extraordinary jordan every thing happened <hes> some universities public universities in new york and elsewhere had begun at that time to offer courses in women's studies and they were changing the curricula gala and a lot of places and re organizing what was required reading and some group in new york city. I decided that the bluest eye which is the name of that book would be required reading for everybody who went to the city college of new york forever.

tony morrison nobel prize tony award writer america new york alice winkler new york city murder solomon michelle obama producer toni director five decades
"toni morrison" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Without hope Toni Morrison has long had the respect of her colleagues at Princeton University close to a solution and thank you for being one of us there is deep appreciation from her readers who celebrated her prize at a bookstore in New York when I read her stories you can pretty much get lost you can close your eyes and be there Toni Morrison is the eleventh American writer to win the Nobel Prize for literature she knows what it means to black Americans in her hometown in far beyond its borders to critical for me as a writer is really the writing the next book doing it better and better every time I now ABC's David Moore remembers the life of an American icon Toni Morrison was born Khloe Wofford in Lorain Ohio the daughter of a steel worker and a singer she told us the memories of her home town in the Midwest inspired her writings even when I'm writing about stories that take place in the West Indies or in New York City the matrix for my imagination you know the sort of wellspring of which all of these companies all of that comes out of the race in honor student in high school she attended Howard University where she got the nickname Tony she became a book editor there were few black women at the time in publishing a divorced single mom with two boys should work on her novels at their kitchen table after they went to bed it came out of being a hungry reader and not finding some things in the library and in the bookstore that I wanted to be in nineteen eighty seven she published beloved later turning it into a movie starring Oprah Winfrey.

Toni Morrison New York writer Nobel Prize ABC David Moore Khloe Wofford Lorain Ohio Midwest West Indies Howard University Tony editor Oprah Winfrey Princeton University
"toni morrison" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

13:14 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on Fresh Air

"For you for more information visit each raid dot com slash n._p._r. We are e-trade securities l._l._c. member sipc. We're remembering raider. Toni morrison who died monday at the age of eighty eight terry gross spoke with her again in one thousand nine hundred to about her novel jazz her sixth novel and her first book since beloved jazzy said in harlem in nineteen twenty six and is about african americans who moved from the rural south to the urban north. It's also about love jealousy. Violence and aging a woman named violet finds out her husband has been having an affair with a younger woman whom he has killed at her funeral. Violet takes revenge on the corpse. Here's tony morrison morrison reading from the opening. I know that woman she's to live with a flock of birds on lenox avenue no her husband to he fell for an eighteen year old girl. One of those deep down spooky loves that made him so sad and happy he shot her just to keep the feeling going. When the woman her name is violet went to the funeral to see the girl and to cut her dead face they threw it to the floor and out of the church she ran into all that snow and when she got back to her apartment took the birds from their cages and set them out the windows to freeze or fly including the parrot that said i love you the snow she ran through with so windswept. She left no footprints in it so for time. Nobody knew exactly where on lenox avenue she lived but like me. They knew who she was who she had to be because they knew that her husband joe trace was the one who shot the girl. There was never anyone to prosecuting because nobody actually saw him. Do it and the dead girls aren't didn't want to <hes> throw money to helpless lawyers or laughing cops when she knew the expense wouldn't improve anything besides she found out that the man who killed internees cried all day and for him and for violent that is as bad as jail tony morrison reading from her her new novel jazz. You know the the woman who cuts the face of the dead woman. <hes> a character later says to to the woman who who does the cutting. I don't understand women like women with knives. Do you understand women with knives kind of crimes of passion like that not entirely early. I think part of the reason i was interested in the story and in that period was some way to figure out <hes> the impulses for you're violence as sort of notion of solution and how it plays into notions of license and freedom so it was a quest really on on my part. I'm not quite sure. I understand that kind of excess. Was there a particular crime that you wanted to understand or a particular woman with with a knife who you wanted to understand. The woman i really wanted to understand was darcus. <hes> the young girl who is based on a historical figure actually a young girl who died in harlem at party shop by her lover with a silencer and who refused used to let anybody help her because she wanted to give him time to get away and waited so long that she bled to death that was extremely provocative to me that kind of romance that probably is representative of song that young wow her acceptance of his violence the way in which a young girl or woman deals with assault under certain circumstances stances and certain ears and periods. What's the closest. You've seen to this in real life. I've never seen any other. I i mean i don't i had seen it or participated in it. I probably wouldn't be so interested in writing about it but <hes> it was sort of outside. I wanted to own personal experience that is compulsive no family legends or neighborhood legends from when you were growing up not about women about out men yes <hes> who were championed because of their endurance and their response to violence associated with them but the women even that i knew were <hes> <hes> i suppose in a manner verbally able to deflect violence. There's there's a passage in jazz about the kind of women who needed a certain kind of protection. There were those who had <hes> raises taped to do their hands. There were those who are willing to boil <hes> lie and those who are willing to put ground glass food but there is a secondary passage acids which explains what a large majority of black women did in terms of trying to protect themselves the church. The club movement the acquisition of property <hes>. I think the line goes any black woman in nineteen. Twenty six did not share some of those protective protective gestures was silent or crazy or dead tony mars and is my guest. You have the sense in your algiers of people coming to harlem. We're coming to the city and feeling more like themselves. They're more like the people they always believed. They were is the way you you put it. That's obviously something we're really interested in developing story just what what it meant physically emotionally for people move to move moved to the city <hes> you must have stories about that in your in your family history though i do yes that move from the rural areas where i think in literature sometimes we romanticize into the freedom of the countryside you know the sort of ability to commune with nature and b. ones <hes> <hes> transcendent self and there is that <hes> mythos in richard and there's an accompanying one which is the freedom of a city on the one enhanced certain kind of anonymity but more particularly for an especially for african americans it was moving into an area where there were so many of you you could see yourself in your number and there was a certain kind of protection in that as well as some license also it was. I don't know the idea of a city as being a place where there is a mix where there are many classes many kinds of the people and however eccentric you are there. Are you know at least a hundred other people who are eccentric in precisely the same way so that one has solitude solitariness individuality and community in a city. What would you sheriff us. One of your parents migration stories yes <hes> i think one of the ones that i remember best with when my mother's parents left left the south left alabama <hes> my grandmother's husband my grandfather had gone to a large city <hes> to earns some money playing the violin as a matter of fact and she was alone on their farm with these children who were very very young. I think my mother was five five and there was some danger about it was the time when a woman alone with several children was <hes> kind of target and her words were that when she noticed white boys beginning to circle that house she had to leave immediately so she sent word to her husband to my grandfather by by somebody who was on route to tell him that she would be on exchan- at x. time and that <hes> if she wanted if he wanted to see them again he should be there and so they left in the middle of the night <hes> in the middle of the night because there's always debt in that sort of share cropping situation that most most <hes> post-reconstruction black people found themselves and and <hes> went to birmingham and got on the train and as the train pulled out there was no papa and the chiltern all began to cry and a few miles outside the city he appeared hurt but he hadn't felt that he could show himself at the station and get on with them because they were escaping that cycle of debt. You know that round that you never really escape because you know the commissary of the general store you need for the feed and that takes the crops etc so it was a happy <hes> event for them and then the subsequent stops on that route to where they were headed looking for work for mines that we're asking for laborers for mills for women who could work in service is an interesting and very typical story and the ended up on the shores source of lake erie where i was born in ohio. Yes what was lorraine like when you were growing up what kind of neighborhood <hes> we're we're. We're you growing up in. It was an interesting place. I still think it's remarkable in that part of ohio and i think in a large and many of those states i never lived in a black neighborhood <hes> <hes> because what we were living in we're really just poor neighborhoods so that i grew up with all of the other immigrants who are coming to this country <hes> <hes> i'm thinking as i speak to you now the house where my mother lives <hes> at this moment and the people on the street are named her shack and golini and my mother are there any black woman named mrs ross and so on that's always been the case in that town because it was the steel town and people were coming from mexico from eastern in europe from scandinavia from everywhere as well as black people coming to these centers just after world war one and someone in some instances before in order to find work so we had a kind of town that was <hes>. I don't know all the ideals there are probably purely rhetorical existed in that little town however everybody whether they were polish people or what what they used to call slovenes in those days <hes> had their own halls churches and <hes> you know family life that was not mixed. You know you didn't exchange on those areas in those days but this one high school four junior high schools and we all went to the same school so what was the african american cultural center was at the church or was it something else the church absolutely the church part of it was sunday part of it was sunday school but a lot of it was taking taking care of each other and what i remember most is the impetus and the necessity for my mother and her friends and for all of us to take food to people who need it or to go oh clean somebody's house if they were bedridden <hes> all sorts of chores are taken for granted when people got old they didn't have a place for for them to go and if their families were indigent or couldn't take care of them that was the responsibility of the women of the church or of the neighborhood it was just a constant constant distant <hes> part of one's life. I think in the bluest eye recorded something similar that really happened which is my sister and and i would sleep in the same bed and we might wake up and there might be a child next to us. Somebody who was in difficulty or the parent was set or gone and women in the neighborhood take them in and there might be some children living with his you know two weeks or months or what have you you know kind of violation of <hes> what everybody seems to sink is important which is intimacy and privacy but at the same time it was kind of sharing of <hes> other of responsibility social responsibilities was we never no one ever talked about it and said you know you ought to be responsible member of society but everything people did was like that in your new book of literary criticism playing in the dark you write about how until recently american readers there's were assumed to be white and you wonder what that assumption has meant to the literary imagination in america. Were you when you started reading. Were you conscious of <hes> <hes> reading books in which there were <hes> few if any black characters no i was conscious of of there being a sort of disruption in some books when black people did occur and there was a kind of embarrassment.

harlem tony morrison morrison Toni morrison ohio terry gross algiers lake erie joe trace tony mars alabama assault america representative birmingham mexico europe mrs ross
Toni Morrison's Contributions to Literature and Society

1A

01:37 min | 1 year ago

Toni Morrison's Contributions to Literature and Society

"Of the late Toni Morrison the author died Monday night and we're making the space to honor her contributions to literature and American society at large we're speaking with Paula Giddings professor emerita of the of africana studies at Smith College and Dana Williams chair of the English department at Howard University Toni Morrison did eventually split her time between editing and being a mother of two and then also to write her own work but there was a time when her work did not receive awards forty eight black writers including the likes of my Angelo the car Amir baccarat and Alice Walker penned a letter that the times book review then published chastising the literary world for not recognizing Morrison either for the National Book Award or for the Pulitzer Prize beloved did to then win the Pulitzer Prize that April in nineteen eighty eight critics talked a lot about the absence of white life in her work which she pointed out as a deeply racist sentiment there's a moment circulating on Twitter right now from an interview Tony gave back in nineteen ninety eight with a journalist cheta went went pushed her on why she didn't give more attention to white experiences in her novels let's listen and you will maintain this safe place for yourself for your account you don't think you will ever change and write books that incorporate white white lines into them substantially I have to in a substantial way you can't understand how powerfully races that question as you could never ask quite often when

Toni Morrison Smith College Dana Williams Angelo Alice Walker National Book Award Pulitzer Prize Twitter Tony Cheta Paula Giddings Professor Howard University
"toni morrison" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on 1A

"This is one a. I'm kimberly adams from marketplace sitting in for joshua joshua johnson in washington this week. The world lost a seer. I have a place that is mine. That's my work. When i write that's mine. It is free on. Nobody tells me what to do and i wouldn't listen if they i did that was author toni morrison the legendary writer died monday night at age eighty eight in new york state of complications from pneumonia morrison and was the first ever african american woman to win the nobel prize in literature. She authored eleven novels along with children's books and essay collections. Her novel beloved won the pulitzer prize in nineteen eighty eight. She made an indelible mark on american letters and america's understanding of itself through the lens of the black american experience agreeance she wrote from within the culture about the culture culture and for the culture and her work has affected the world. We asked you to tell us how toni morrison's work work had an impact on you. Here's some of what you had to say. This is jan from colorado. I was introduced to tony's writing with the boost die when i was in college college and i thought her writing was d- most exquisite i had ever which then years later i read beloved and i thought that was the most exquisite novel i had ever read years later. I worked in the film industry and my last film was the love it. I had the honor to meet her <music>. All i didn't get to speak to her. She came to that and i got to be around her for a moment and i'm really really sorry at her. Passing there was none like toni morrison. My name is jodie and i was devastated to hear of toni morrison's passing her body of work is transformative formative and meaningful impactful and when i discovered her writings and james baldwin writings ratings if it changed my life and career riding reaches people across all race religion and creed everything there she just was an interesting magnificent person i will miss telling him more and i and her legacy of literature will live on. That's how we keep living. I feel guilty. See i'm a teacher. I read every summer. I try to read one of her books. Every summer and i didn't this year but i will continue resting tease. The world has loss of great laureate but her literature your stories and your.

toni morrison joshua joshua johnson pulitzer prize kimberly adams nobel prize washington new york america pneumonia tony james baldwin colorado writer jodie
Toni Morrison, Publisher And Montefiore Medical Center discussed on New Jersey First News With Eric Scott

New Jersey First News With Eric Scott

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Toni Morrison, Publisher And Montefiore Medical Center discussed on New Jersey First News With Eric Scott

"Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison has died publisher confirm Morrison died Monday night at Montefiore Medical Center in New York she was eighty eight the first black woman to receive the Nobel literature prize in nineteen ninety three Swedish Academy held her use of language and visionary force or novel beloved in which a mother makes a tragic choice to murder her baby to save the girl from slavery won the Pulitzer for fiction in nineteen

Toni Morrison Publisher Montefiore Medical Center New York Swedish Academy Murder Pulitzer Nobel Prize
"toni morrison" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

13:24 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"I'm anderson and this is the studio three sixty podcast. This is evan chung from studio three sixty toni morrison the author of books including beloved and song of solomon died on monday august fifth at the age of eighty eight. Toni morrison's novels won her the pulitzer prize and the nobel prize and in two thousand twelve barack obama awarded her a presidential medal of freedom her work inspired countless readers and writers like hilton. All's the new yorker critic when hilton guests toasted studio three sixty in two thousand fourteen tony morrison was his first choice of interviewee. They spoke at morrison's home and she started by telling him about about her writer lee habits. I recently been sleeping the lead like seventy. That's the way okay for you because you're up at four before the light and wannabes air with it so that's depending on the season and then i can uh-huh really smart in the morning. You caught me at the edge john downs but you work. You still work in the morning depending. Is it a fixed schedule or is it. I don't know i don't do it every day because it's not there every day. When i get the first draft i can work every day because it's it's something to work law. That's right exactly so when i'm still you know moving in. I started something about to go. I have no idea where it came from but it's infectious. Just this kid says i put the cup on the window sill to catch the blood. I can't talk but i hear everything everything he sort of. I i am excited. Not only whatever that plot is which i think i know about now but i am so excited about writing from the foreign view of a mute <music> who can here. I am the voice when i first discovered toni morrison's song of solomon i was seventeen and it knocked me for a loop. The protagonist reminded me and my father a black man of some privilege. Recently i reread song of solomon and i was struck by the friendship between the two male characters called milkman and guitar that deep affection between the two men and is something i feel have been missing literature before tony voted down and i wanted to know where that came from the impetus really was that my father died right and i had decided to write a story sort of in the area of the pre civil rights movement and i thought i don't know a thing about these men i wish i knew what my father knew and when i said that thought that there was this feeling of serenity and confidence and competence as though i knew he would let me now so of course we had no conversation between the living in the dead but that's serenity that i felt that i could enter tune into that. World with confidence happened after i asked that question. Can you tell us a little bit of boat you for the yeah he he was born in georgia carter's ville georgia and although i never knew while he was alive why he laughed. I knew he was about fourteen years old when he left but he had seen two black. Men businessmen lynched lynched on his street hanging from trees so he left he had a half brother in california and then he became where many people were coming lorraine ohio which was a steel town and there was a lot of work. They're married. My mother worked worked at some times three jobs. You know washing cars doing this and that until in fact the war came a lot of black men and older men got jobs in these factories that probably they would not have.

Toni morrison solomon barack obama pulitzer prize evan chung nobel prize anderson ville georgia lorraine ohio writer california lee georgia tony fourteen years
Remembering Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison

WBZ Afternoon News

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Remembering Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison

"Was the nineteen ninety a Nobel Prize laureate in literature and the first black woman to be awarded the prize author Toni Morrison has died she was awarded the presidential medal of freedom in two thousand twelve and CBS to Jim Taylor tells us Orson approach the issue of race from a unique perspective may be surprised to learn that Toni Morrison who brought so many heartbreaking books about the black experience in America grew up in Ohio surrounded by whites most of my writing about the black topic the black families by community is part of my life but a lot of it was in query I never lived in a black neighborhood still her novels had much to say about the complexities of race and gender she also became the first African American woman to win the Nobel Prize for literature and when president Obama awarded her the presidential medal of freedom he noted talking Morrison's prose brings us that kind of moral and emotional intensity that few writers ever attempt Jim Taylor CBS news in all Morrison published eleven novels and taught creative writing and literature twenty Morrison

Toni Morrison CBS Jim Taylor America Ohio Nobel Prize Barack Obama Orson President Trump
"toni morrison" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Appreciation of author and Nobel laureate Toni Morrison who died last night Jeffrey brown looks back at how she helped to transform modern American letters distribute as part of canvas our ongoing arts and culture coverage as editor teacher and most of all writer Toni Morrison changed and enhanced American literature in twenty twelve on the campus of Howard University where she'd been an undergraduate she looked back to her younger self just starting out in the world also confident and capable the future was you know right there and is your fingertips and I was so happy to be among what I hadn't had when I was in Ohio African American intellectuals and that was a company I wanted to keep she worked as a book editor first and was nearly forty when her first novel the bluish die was published followed by sue lower the song of Solomon and other books eleven novels children's books and essay collections it made a reputation for bringing to the fore a distinctly African American story rooted in history and the legacy of slavery written in a powerful voice like no other south of us trying to make up for the hand so beloved was making her pay for beloved widely considered her master work was published in nineteen eighty seven and won the Pulitzer Prize could stay the night if you have a mind to a nineteen ninety eight film version start Oprah Winfrey as a mother who escaped her Kentucky master and upon capture in Ohio killed her own daughter rather than have her forced back into a life of slavery Marcin spoke to the news hour Charlene hunter Gault when the novel first came out I read an article in the nineteen sixty newspaper about a woman whose name was Margaret Carter it was an article that stayed with me for a long long time and seem to have in it an extraordinary idea that was worthy of a non which was this compulsion to nurture this for our city the woman hands to be responsible for children and at the same time the current tensions that exist in trying to be a separate complete individual in a recent documentary film Toni Morrison the pieces I am Morrison spoke of her goals as a writer I do want to speak for people I want to speak to and to be among its US so first thing I had to do was to eliminate the white daisies give me a call them the sick topic about the little white man this is our new shoulder check said if you take do and say not the law ends here you're free now I own the world I mean I can write about anything to anyone for any Morrison was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in nineteen ninety three the first African American woman to win praised by the academy for her quote visionary force and she was given the presidential medal of freedom the nation's highest civilian honor by Barack Obama in twenty twelve version was on the best seller list again in nineteen ninety seven for her novel paradise centered in Oklahoma town called ruby and the news hour's Elizabeth Farnsworth talk to her Edwin freedman left plantations sometimes under duress the isolation the separateness is always a part of any utopia and it was my meditation if you will and interrogation of the whole idea of paradise the safe place the place full of bounty where you're a no one can harm you but in addition to that it's based on the notion of exclusivity all paradises all utopias are defined by who is not there by the people who are not allowed.

Toni Morrison
Toni Morrison, Solomon And Publisher discussed on Michael Medved

Michael Medved

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Toni Morrison, Solomon And Publisher discussed on Michael Medved

"There Nobel laureate Toni Morrison whose works include beloved in song of Solomon has died at the age of eighty eight publisher Alfred a Knopf announced that Morrison died Monday night at Montefiore Medical Center in New York Morrison's family issued a statement through not saying she died after a brief

Toni Morrison Solomon Publisher Montefiore Medical Center New York Morrison Alfred A Knopf
Toni Morrison, Pulitzer Prize And Oprah Winfrey discussed on Dave Ramsey

Dave Ramsey

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Toni Morrison, Pulitzer Prize And Oprah Winfrey discussed on Dave Ramsey

"Award winning author Toni Morrison has died Morrison considered among the world's great authors Morrison won the Pulitzer Prize and the American book award in nineteen eighty eight for her novel beloved which was adapted for film in nineteen ninety eight starring Oprah Winfrey in nineteen ninety three Morrison was awarded the the Nobel Prize in literature and in a twenty nineteen documentary the pieces I am she talked about her writing first thing I had to do was to eliminate the white daisies Jimmy Baldoni Saqqaq about that the little white man this is unusual and here you're free now I own the world I mean I can write about anything Morrison was eighty eight years

Toni Morrison Pulitzer Prize Oprah Winfrey Nobel Prize Jimmy Baldoni Saqqaq Eighty Eight Years
Toni Morrison, author and Nobel laureate, dies aged 88

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Toni Morrison, author and Nobel laureate, dies aged 88

"Paso claimed offer Toni Morrison's died at eighty eight Toni Morrison once told an interviewer she wanted to be remembered as trustworthy as generous but she may be best remembered for her words Morrison road prize winning novels about the black American experience I do want to speak for and when you speak to and to be among its US for historical novel beloved won the Pulitzer Prize Morris and then became the first black woman to win the Nobel Prize in literature president Obama presented her with the presidential medal of freedom in twenty twelve to listening to

Paso Toni Morrison United States Morris Nobel Prize President Trump Barack Obama Pulitzer Prize
"toni morrison" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

13:13 min | 2 years ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on Backlisted

"Without Maternity Morrison's voice in what Tony that's why for me I think she she is the most important riser of of the Second Second Half of the twentieth century to write a great modernist novel is not many people who've done it and and she's she's done at least three times beloved was the one the one I read first and then I when I read jazz when it came out and I've I've read some of Solomon but beloved is still the one that I go back to. I just might read a tiny little bit from allowed to you know what she can do and I love you know I'm always interested in how people use nature and relationship with the natural world in fiction. This is as good as I think. honestly gets in infection. This is after is has just given birth to the baby that that we later know as as Denver with with amy the white go helping the baby whimpered in south looked twenty inches of cord hung from its belly and it trembled in the cooling evening air amy raptor skirt around it and the wet sticky women clambered ashore to see what indeed God had in mind great sentence spoils of Blue fern growing in the holidays on the riverbank flow toward the water and silver blue lines hard to see unless you're in or near them lying right at the river's edge when the sun shots are loewen drained often they mistook for insects but they are sees in which the whole generation sleeps confident of a future and for a moment it is easy to believe each one has one will become all of what is contained in the spore will live at its days as planned this moment of certainty last no longer than that longer perhaps than the spore itself on a riverbank in the cool of summary evening to women struggled under a shower silvery blue. They never expected to you see each other again in this world and at the moment couldn't care less but they're on a summer night surrounded by blue and they did something together appropriately and in well a patroller passing would have sniggered to see to throw away people to lawless outlaws as slave and a barefoot white woman with unpaid hat. Ah wrapping a ten minute old baby in the racks they will but no paint roller came and no preacher the water sucked and swallowed itself beneath them. There was nothing to disturb them at their work so they did it appropriately and well exclusionary descriptions of what Sisterhood should be I've ever read. It doesn't matter about race. It doesn't matter about background who's free and WHO's unfree spoils sports generations to write about nature. Yes the whole that whole thing about having a plan which is central inch to the book everything. You won't fiction to everything you want. You hope it can do ever that what you're saying about the art politics the sixth thing that she was writing about that that she can dissolve that into into into language like this into storytelling this. I think he's worth making the point as well. The when beloved was first published it was perceived as being an important book Toni Morrison's Best Book if you look at the reviews at the time that they are l. mostly extremely positive describe as mouthpiece as we pull away from it. Though you think you can see the the effects of this novel you know for a classic to be a classic. We can debate. What makes classic you you know what's interesting about this as you can see that it has a political and social effect the ripples beyond the literary world you know it takes on properties and qualities that one would aspire to as a Roy Sir who has set set herself that project but to watch it go out in the world and change the historical narrative of the historical view of slavery which is unquestionably beloved has done. Is An amazing social achievements says amazing but it is. Also you know when when you were talking about Faulkner's thing he no. I haven't read faulkner actually to be honest and it's not a it's not something I'm going to seek out. I I will eventually but I would never think she's doing as what is folk ner. I would always think is this is Terry Morrison. That's my center the more anti she makes but yet Morrison would put herself in that lineage as if to say. Why shouldn't I do the right so this is what I mean about her work. Being a literary project as much as a social project stopped point Antonio Violent makes exa about the re writing the novels of the Great American novels written by White Men in the nineteen th century that's quite a thing to take on to Wrestle Melville and win ploy to someone he wrote in lots of ways in which her centering her self on her to think she wanted to say and the way she sees the world in in this book inspired me not not just sort of she is a tree in a way thank the tweet it said writers. Doing things want to descend things can take takes strength from can shelter from in the that. She's that she's put down have have yielded so much. This is Toni Morrison talking about the what the starting point for beloved was. What was the seed of beloved. The question was cou is the beloved who is the a person who lives insiders those the one you can trust who was best thing you are in that instant for that segment because because I had planned several books around that theme it was the effort of a woman to love her children to raise children to be responsible for her children and the fact that it was doing slaving made all of those things impossible for her and there was this interesting historical incident you know the Marg regarded Gonda story in which that actually happened there was a great deal of enshrined in order to prevent her from living a life. She believes it'd be intolerable. But that's her clean kind of control as she was trying to exercise in order to be simply a mother and that the best I think she was was this lovely child or these children and of course that set her on very complicated self destructive attorney but the question was still there and the answer is the other question. That's delivered is when somebody asks her. Oh Oh tells her no. No you are your best. You are which is what you were saying. It's amazing but when I listened to that I'm actually thinking about something else which I have Moldova in the last two three years and it's interesting to me that this book cuza quote from Oprah Outrage on the buck because the things happen to these women these women who have been enslaved are a true fact act that women's babies were taken away from them that they were used as ways of making families they didn't say in how they were to bring up their children absolutely absolutely horns safer and that's why she is so determined to do what she does so no one else will wade had children. I like to say something if I may about and so when we do about listed I normally try and read or reread the we're talking about by also read at least one other book by the author because because I cannot not have this opportunity we have the opportunities to just steep ourselves for fortnight in arises work so I read the Bluest only for the first time I read Song of Solomon and Subaru as well and I read the the Blue Vest on might wish to the blue. I'm glad talking about beloved because it's fantastic and we're and is so rich for discussion but what's incredible about in watching how Morrison develops as a novelist is and she doesn't publish till she's he's thirty nine forty that she says she has been editor. is this something nothing really visceral about. The Blue is star. We talked about Gail Jones and her nor correggio door on about listed last year we search will Tony Morrison editor Correggio the difference nobles but they have a similar kind cloning of energy about the need to be born actually if the bluest was published on its own and she'd never have done anything else will still be a really significant book the difference in craft between the bluest which is almost like kind of Pinta vomiting of that something needed to be said by the time you get to beloved. She's become this incredibly sophisticated narrative storyteller storyteller. Just let's get on the record the opening paragraph the bluest because as a pros is it hard to beat. This is how this book Stoltze nuns go boy has gone as lost I am I thought even the rest of the pirate off right but anyway nuns go by is quite as lost and drunken men with it's sober is sitting in the lobby of the Greek Hotel Moreau's Revilla Nucci our next to a friend who lives above her father's cafe sits in nineteen insist buick eating bread and butter. She rolls down the window to tell my sister freedom may that we can't come in we stare at her wanting in her bread but more than that wanting to poke the arrogance out of her eyes and smash the pride of ownership the curls her chewing mouth when she comes out out of the car we will beat her up make red marks on her white skin and she will cry and ask us. Do we want her to pull her pants down. We will say yeah. I know we don't know what we should feel do if she does but when ever she asks us we know she's offering something precious and that our own pride. Loyd must be asserted by refusing to accept. That's just the opening of the book a book incidentally that still appears every year in the top ten list of books novels schools in the United States America. We're trying to better yeah well because there is something so subversive about a project of love like this and I feel like all of her work. Is this project. A to make us heal wounds to make us be honest about our interconnectedness and our histories. It is such a subversive project to say this. A heart is a story about love but I I'm going to make you feel pain and the pain that you're responsible for society and in yourself. We have a clip pair. I think this is the last one this is clip number five now. This is quite long but stick with everyone is just been asked. You've won the Nobel Prize for fiction. Do you still encounter encounter racism and the issues of race in your life. Yes I do Charley but let me tell you. That's the wrong question. And how do you feel not you charlie were but don't you understand that the people who do this thing who practice racism awesome are bereft. There is something distorted about the psyche. It's a huge waste and it's a corruption shen and a distortion. It's like it's a profound roses that nobody examines for what it is. It feels crazy. It is crazy and it leaves. It has just as much of a deleterious effect on white.

Toni Morrison Maternity Morrison Solomon Faulkner Denver Tony amy loewen Nobel Prize editor. White Men pain Roy Sir Gail Jones United States Blue Vest charlie Marg Subaru attorney
"toni morrison" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

15:10 min | 2 years ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on Backlisted

"Which one of those things is making the has on the back of my neck stand up on end. Is it both at the same time it probably is and and one of the things I think about beloved specifically and I suppose Toni Morrison's writing in general it is that she manages through Croft and genius. Yes to create a voice acid several things that shouldn't work together that she makes work together. I think one of the most important things that she does is she remembers. How naming can be subversive you know and in every way that she gives us an idea of something she uses that idea to to find the uncanny in its own self so so when we hear that paragraph we hear here that it's not because this young woman looks sleepy or she's dozing. It's not because she's Pale. She's wet it's because she's smiling and the smile is that thing that brings the horror to that paragraph because we are trained socially to think of smiles welcoming. It's something that we want to be part of this this judge Roy but it's it's. It's intensely private. It's a smile saying I know more than you at. I'm coming to get you so you know it too and there is no escape from that and by you. You will also mean the reader we do. You know this idea that she since this about lungs as well. I think is really important. The pain and how long's is the worst pain of all and so I'm thinking when I'm hearing that is oh it's because because she's been gasping for breath because she's trying to tell this story that is just submerged under layers and layers of history and silencing in censorship and this is a kind of metaphor for the whole but creedy passage catches it beautifully. The simplest scenes are as you say these multi-layered right so you the book never relaxes no way. You can't read this book. You simply cannot read this book quick tree. I've read a lot of criticism of it which is people haven't liked the beloved character because he it gets to supernatural and then I've read other criticism saying oh no. It's perfectly possible that this is a case of mistaken identity. That doesn't seem to me to be what the what she's doing doing is creating that space that charge space where you you can't choose because she's not letting you choose making both possibilities simultaneously. Ashley Happen. It's both as you say it's both the horror but also the sense of the feeling that you have towards beloved of wanting to wanting to love her wanting to mother I'm wanting to is at the same time. I'm going to read the blur yet from the back of the film tie in edition the issue with Oprah Winfrey. It's Jonathan Demme's Johnson. It is the mid eighteen eighteen hundreds at sweet home in Kentucky. An ear is ending a slavery comes under attack from the ABOLITIONISTS. The worlds of Halle and pull cul de ought to be destroyed in a cataclysm of torment and agony the world of Sethar. However is the term from one of love to one of violence and death. The death of Cephas baby beloved whose name is the single world on the tombstone who died at her mother's hands and who will return to claim retribution retribution. Wow thank you very I facing society. It actually says whose name is the a single world on the tombstone so it's not even GonNa copy edited that's three and a half to four out of ten blurb swear on his airway because it was fucking old but I mean just going back to this idea. Reversal the reversal. She affects very easily through language sweet home. Is this save tation that the that the characters in this novel off have fled and we catch up with them decades later when when they've they've had more tumor in their lives that obviously as police as it wasn't sweet and it certainly wasn't home so all the time in every way she subverting these ideas of what we think and of course the idea the sweetness absolutely connects to sugar which is the great colonial colonial slave product so which could not have happened without slave ships the slave ship. which is the books that was from you know if you have if you've seen that impressive cross-section horrific cross section of the slave ship the brooks very famous just sales through this tax folks all the way like a haunting? It's a history of place haunting and time hunting and bodies and that have already suffered traumatic violence. It's delicious. The here's a clip of Tony Morrison talking about most of these clips taken from an amazing nineteen nineteen ninety two interview that she did with Charlie rose for when jazz came under novel Jazz and this is a this is a clip about how how it was to to Royce about slavery and the slave trade slavery stuff was terrible because it's not it's one thing to sort of know historically abstract conceptually generally what it was like but imagining that lie which is sort of intermediate very fundamentally is very very difficult for me and the only thing that made it really possible to stay there. Was this little things. It's knowing that you couldn't see your husband in the daytime only at night only when the son was sacked those people worked from sunup to sundown the only only that made it possible for me was thinking well. I didn't have to do it. I just had to imagine it. Site can't be too self-regarding in in precious about all that if they could do it. I could write about it. I get tough analogy. You pretty booked with you by Toni Morrison Person. She was talking about a company to yourself regarding and you've robocalled the source of self regard which is the US tart for booklets available in the U. K. As love food blog right yes this is the nearest edition of selected essays speeches and meditations that Tony Morrison has made and there's a few paragraphs in which I have a sort of manifesto for myself and in many ways I think it's important for me to say that why beloved meant so much to me not just because of the brilliance of the language but because it reversed the gates I grew up in a very in a in a small town on the white outside of a small town had an Indian population but it was on the other side of town and there's a clause aspect to that it was like lower middle-class new build a state where I grew up in a man on the other the side I was the the working class Indian but when I was at school I was very much a minority and to read this book was was like having permission to realize that was another side to myself because it was the nearest access one hut to thinking talking about how you could claim your own story. It is so powerful because part of the message of the book is that this language can allow allow for critique of racial difference it must make a critique of racial difference and so here is Toni Morrison talking about some of those things it's Mitch Optical the trouble with Paradise. I want to begin my meditation on the trouble with Paradise with some remarks on the environment in which I work and in which many writers also work the construction of race `and hierarchy have a powerful impact on expressive language Justice Figurative Interpretive Language impact powerfully on the construction of a racial racial society the intimate exchange between the atmosphere of racism and the language that asserts raises manipulates or transforms it is it is unavoidable among fiction writers who must manage to hold and unblinking gaze into the realm of difference and so it's that unblinking gaze that can be done so lyrically in this book which really is just something that WanNa spy as to as a writer. Ah I think one of the things that is interesting about Tony Morrison as a writer novelist about beloved as well picking up on what you were saying. There is the way that her project is attempting to reverse black guys walling gauging with the literary Canon at the same time Ryan's. Yes very exciting. I mean for me. This is absolutely modernist misspoke and its modernist because it uses it's sort of experimental in that sort of reverse fault faulkner a love it and you know it's. It's many voices in it. It's got its sort of poetic figurative language. It is not something that you can categorize post colonial novel or slavery novel belongs folks in Canon of Modernism Modernism declarable movement and this is absolutely party that great point really. I've got the last the ending of as by it's review when this was published in the UK is by reviewed it and she said she she describes it. As she says this noble gave me nightmares and yet I sat up late paradoxically smiling to myself with intense pleasure at the exact beauty of the singing pros it's an American masterpiece and one which moreover in a curious way reassesses all the major novels of the time in which it is set. That's true it's Melville Hawthorne Poe wrote Riddling allegories about the nature of evil the hunting of unappeased spirits the inverted opposition of blackness and Whiteness Tony Morrison has with planes and grace ice and terror and judgment solve the riddle and showed us the world which haunted bears printed. I that is over peace with Turkey Morrison's lectures which were collected a book called playing in the dog which he said if you ever read this these sorts of this incredible investigation of particularly Ernest Hemingway saying what defines hemingway's Ming wise work and many White Royces K. through as well is the inability to look at the black element of the society in which they were. I think it's moral fading I actually think it's immoral failing and unethical fading and for writers. It's an aesthetic failing not to do that and you know this book is about something for young women which we just don't let enough for Young Black Black Women Brown women women of colors. We are now known no ourselves as in a wider world that you are your own best thing. It is such a powerful sentence. It is such an exact sentence to say down a lineage of violence. That's been perpetrated traded on the body of the women of color. You are your own best thing and there's a wholeness to that so it's actually very hopeful book. I think we have ten yards and commenting on you're finding out answers to these incredible questions that seem to me had never been put subtly and if they had been they had never the language had not manifested. I wanted the language to be what the question was I. I wanted the language to simply hold it. I started my career with the Blue Star of putting the entire pot on the first page. Wjr The whole story for you so the reader read the first page. He knows exactly what happened and if he turns the page is because he wants either to find find out how it happened. He loves the language and you hope for both of those now for both right right I mean are we just going to ten inches recalled play. If you'll allow me I'd like to meet for yourself guards and and this is what she talks about the aesthetics of what she's doing. I'm so powerfully she says I suppose I approached the politics versus art race versus assist aesthetics debate initially way an alchemist would looking for that combination of ingredients that turns dross into gold but there is no such formula Mila so my project became to make the historically raced weld inextricable from the autistic few that beholds it and in doing so encourage readings that dissect both which is to say I claim the right and the range of ownership to interrupt journalistic history with a metaphorical one and to impose on a rhetorical history and majestic one to read the world misread it right an unrated to enact silence and free speech. Wjr In short to do what all writers aspire to do. I wanted my work to be the work of disabling the art versus politics argument to perform the Union of Aesthetics and ethics at that is what she does in beloved June. When did you ask you. When did you first read it. I read it about twenty years ago. I read a lot of twentieth century. American male writers particularly absolutely what my rises reading Tony Ernie Morrison was the Fulton was the one that I was most interested in because he was I think he was modernised and he was what he did with form was so interesting and he is his language was but it was that moment when you realize that he would somebody doing something as well as altman but just the resonance and the the precision of her language what it was exactly what you're saying I can't go back now and read those writers tour's.

Turkey Morrison Toni Morrison writer Tony Ernie Morrison Paradise Oprah Winfrey Roy Croft Jonathan Demme Kentucky Canon of Modernism Modernism Justice Figurative Interpretiv Union of Aesthetics US Young Black Black Women Cephas Ashley UK Ernest Hemingway Halle
"toni morrison" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

12:04 min | 2 years ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on Backlisted

"Dinner table. We were till those slow boats from China promised cheap. Cheap sheep can't grow a bloody teapot for toffee anymore. Four thousand kin's gone later and it's gone dark over bills mothers. Is You realize just how much daylight kilns it's letting it's just it's just lovely. He's the whole additions and it's gone dark over. BILLS BUILDS MOTHERS Andy. What have you been reading well when we went on our Guernsey many break. I felt like I was on holiday. I although we working I'm working hard but I did feel like it was it was really exciting to be backing Guernsey and so I thought I wanted to read was something that would be a a contrast to the we were there to discuss and also with Tony Morrison how is reading in preparation for this episode and so I chose a book that was published last Austria and which has just come out in paperback by Porac O'Donnell called the House on vesper sands now. Do you know anything about this noble. No right it sent in the winter of eighteen ninety three and as it Stoltze unclear what is going on what you know is that a seamstress mysteries has been invited into house in Mayfair that something isn't right that she has stitched something into her on skin and that before the chapter is out so spoilers on the first chapter she's committed suicide cranky and and this. This book got me within about six pages. Really you know I'm a fan on this podcast grunting away about the things he's having too much plot. I have a slightly queasy relationship with how I feel about plot. This is just the right amount of plots. You can put that on Makamba. House presents has just the right man. I thought it was absolutely wonderful a fantastic mixture of a detective novel and and a Ghost Story and a horror fiction and it seemed to me very consciously Porac O'Donnell is bringing in Wilkie Collins and Dickens and CONAN doyle not just in Sherlock Holmes Not GonNa read a bit in a minute with detective detective but also CONAN Doyle's interest in the paranormal in spiritualism is reflected in this book. It reminded me of the woman in black by Susan Hale it reminded me of the TV series Ripper Street John Young Roy so he has that really real energy and Sousse of Victorian Baroque but it's thrilling and stylish and it's also really funny. It has some really wonderful set pieces and then he manages to do that thing that I think lots of people trying to write this kind of noval would like to do but perhaps is more challenging than one might think that he's able to shift gear from the modes of storytelling quite brilliantly. I must say that you go from something which is making you laugh and then two pages lacy. I say you're absolutely horrified by what you're being presented with and really. It's a wonderful wonderful but never goes what you think is going to do it. Warden is a kind of Victorian Victorian so so so here's a little bit. This is a discussion between inspector cutter and a servant in the house where the seamstress has committed suicide. He is called Karoo but first we hear from Inspector Cutter Inspect Custody says now will you be an obliging obliging fellow and show us to the particular room in the upper part of the house where this misfortune occurred it was a room I take it and not a chimney or nest in the eaves for the good inspector inspector but I hope you will refrain from any further levity for you. Find us all greatly saddened. Waters occurred levity inspector cut his face darkened and and he clamped his hand for a moment over his jaw for an instant Gideon imagine that some predatory creature looked within a might burst from him at any moment like an unrooted Hawk from its perch levity. Will you tell me Carroo. Do you keep an eye to the newspapers tool on occasions as my duties permit it. Did you ever read the case of the children of doctors and John. The slow through the Jones carries is widened but he checked himself almost at once. I believe I saw some mention of it and do you recall how many children isn't Jones had and what ages were not to an exactness inspector. I would not have had the leisure to five there. Were five since John Children. The eldest was Antony a boy of thirteen and the youngest was Matilda. Matilda was a babe of fifty months and was still nurse at the time per day. Do you know how it is that I come to know that Noah inspector how could I you could naught and I will do you the kindness of keeping it from you for sure you it is a thing that would never leave you but I will tell you this much. I know their names and their ages I know the color of each one's hair and I could give you a litany of every scrap of clothing that was on them. It was I who made the photographic plates that was shown to the jurors. Since the Frenchman we depend upon in the normal course would come no further than the head of the stairs. Did you know carry that the adult take a small child of formed in her jaw long before the milk teeth and lost. I did not inspector yes. It's a remarkable thing they hidden away until recall for in a tiny imperfect ray the workings of nature a puzzle and I suppose I have been fortunate to have glimpsed them as others have not it but you may be certain of this much Karoo if I had any great store of Merriment when I went into that house and I suspect I had note if the truth be known then it was gone for me and Tali when I came out and it has never troubled me again so I I thoroughly enjoyed that. That's out in paperback. Many of you might be able to have a holiday this year if you do. I I strongly recommend the House on Vespa Sans Bright but now we have to move onto the main event which is beloved put by Toni Morrison. I thought maybe we would hear from Tony Morrison herself. We're going to hear from her a few times but I thought maybe she could read to us. This is from about fifty pages into the novel and it's where the character of beloved makes her first appearance. A fully dressed woman walked out of the water. She barely gained the dry bank of the stream before she sat down and leaned against a mulberry tree all day and all night. She sat there her head resting on the trunk in a position abandoned enough to crack the Bram in her straw hat everything hurt but her lungs most of all sopping wet and breathing shallow. She spent spent those hours trying to negotiate the weight of her eyelids. The day breeze blew her dress dry the night when wrinkled it nobody saw her emerge or came accidentally by if they had chances are they would have hesitated before approaching her not because she was wet or dozing or had what sounded like asthma but because middle that she was smiling it took her the whole of the next morning to lift herself from the ground and make her way through the woods past giant. Temple of Boxwood to the field and in the yard of the slate gray house exhausted again she sat down on the first hand he place a stump not far from the steps of one twenty four by then keeping her eyes open was less of an effort she she could manage it for a full two minutes more her neck. Its circumference no wider that policy service saucer kept the bending and her Chen brushed the bit of lace edging her dress prissy. I mean we're all sitting here. sleigh stunned by actually hearing that read aloud what are the qualities of Toni Morrison's pros that you can hear just in that one paragraph well when I listen to that power groff. I'm listening for all of the things make her work and her sentences in her language so exciting and you know what she's doing that is she's compressing language and distilling language to multiple meanings in every sentence so when you have this idea of the trunk then you're thinking not just about the tree trunk but you're thinking about the body parts of the body that we call the trunk so then you imagine that this young woman with this huge effort drags herself to this. House this mysterious young woman she sits down on the first thing she sees an. It's a tree stump so that part of her body which is trump actually becomes the next part of the tree and it's done so carefully and soaked easily and so beautifully it just happens at the back lack of your brain as a reader you just take that in and you just read. Is that somehow this the writer who can vote how much how much the human world and the natural world just few fused together then this will say this idea that this trunk has been that she's sitting on a stump a trie and that is his just exactly what her own story is. I don't want to ruin it for readers. You haven't read the book but it's a ghost story and this young woman has has had a violence done to her. She's grown out of into the ghost which has to do with axes and cuttings and of course the tree is very resonant in the context of this novel. It's the slavery novel. It's a place where a tree can be both the site of great an awful violence against is black bodies where bodies hung and it can also be something very sheltering and that idea of the tree and reclaiming the shelter the tree becoming something that takes nurture is is part of this book. It's ingrained in this book so it's got a lot of the layers of meaning Tony Morrison never ever straight from connecting the body through its experiences what she shows us to material objects either so when she talks about this neck as the size of a saucer we're in the parlor with something balancing really eighty gently and this such dread in the idea of the axe and this trembling and it's all there in that tiny paragraph that we just Harry I I read this novel in two thousand six and I read it as one of the books for for my uh-huh dangerously and I can remember reading that specific paragraph which is one of the reasons why we heard it. They're thinking how in a way preceived just explained it really anyway anyway was how is she doing that. How is she marrying lyricism and horror horror.

Tony Morrison Porac O'Donnell House China Makamba CONAN Doyle Jones Susan Hale Matilda Guernsey John Children Sousse of Victorian Baroque vesper sands Austria John Young Roy John Mayfair Noah
"toni morrison" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"toni morrison" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Toni morrison said i thought is today all the function the very serious function of racism is distraction it keeps you from doing your work it keeps you explain it over and over again you're reason for being somebody said you have no language so you spend twenty years proven that you do some ice age your head into shape properly so you have scientists working on the fact that it is somewhat stage you have no arc so you dress data somebody stage you have no kingdoms so you dress data none of that is necessary there will always be one more thing the correct are um let's do something else he would yet i must get trash hung on yeah yeah i got enough transferred at ain my task handful and i'll i'll say this about the trash because i don't feel i read these articles to y'all in is really not worth it but um people have already started with the light as these azaari is a victim in this and johnny to stop a home be as a hard on again keep in mind a woman who wrote that they didn't say we need chasm have blacklists town nobody said that um he was uh boycotted or he needs to pay money ties up nearby sitting of that but the defense that has basically been like yossi less kill is seasons ari anna that's not what happened that's not what happened and as we come about the legal definition of sexual assault which i find very interesting 'cause i will feel morally none of us should want a person to.

Toni morrison yossi assault johnny twenty years