35 Burst results for "Toma"

Brighton beats 10-man Wolves 3-2 on late goal by Gross

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

Brighton beats 10-man Wolves 3-2 on late goal by Gross

"Pascal gross scored in the 83rd minute to get bright in the three two victory over ten man Wolverhampton KO rheumatoid leveled the score at two in the 44th minute Shortly before Nelson tomato received a red card for hauling gamma toma just outside the box Wolves kept the score tied before running its winless streak to four games Adam lalana scored the first goal of the match helping Brighton move into a 6th place tie on the table and three points behind fourth place Newcastle Wolves are tied for last with ten points leading Nottingham Forest on gold differential I'm Dave fairy

Pascal Gross Nelson Tomato Gamma Toma Box Wolves Wolverhampton Adam Lalana Newcastle Wolves Brighton Nottingham Forest Dave Fairy
Making America Godly Again With Pastor Chris Thoma

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:16 min | 4 months ago

Making America Godly Again With Pastor Chris Thoma

"Pass your toma is the author of several books, including one I had the honor of endorsing. He's also the senior pastor of our savior, evangelical Lutheran Church and school. Pastor toma, thanks for joining us. Hey, thanks for having me. I'm glad to be here. Well, pastor toma firstly, I want to thank you for being here with us today and also I had so much fun with you recently in Michigan. We were at a pro life event, which was awesome and you were so kind to facilitate some Q&A with me that was really insightful. So thank you pastor toma. But I now want to play a short clip because pastor toma actually recently got to speak at a Trump rally, which is so exciting. So take a listen. If you are able, let us rise for prayer. In the name of the father and of the son and of the Holy Spirit, I'm in. Almighty and most merciful God, your holy word teaches that all authority begins and ends with you. And so you are the divine author of earthly governance. Your word reveals that you do this as you employ men and women for service within the three estates of the church, the family and the civil government, not ordaining for anyone within these domains to use them as tools of self privilege or tyranny, but instead for the well-being and protection of those they serve. Continue to raise up among us servants who are mindful of this, namely those who will stand as president Trump has stood. Let them seek to preserve religious liberty, desiring to maintain the freedom to live peaceful and quiet lives, according to the doctrines of faith. Use them to impede all attempts to burden godly consciences with unjust laws. Employ them as ramparts against anyone who would confuse the objective truths of your natural law, demonstrated quite clearly in human sexuality. Restore among us the authority of parents and the admiration of family, reminding all in our nation of this holiest state's role as the most powerful agent for a free society's stability and longevity.

Toma Pastor Toma Evangelical Lutheran Church President Trump Michigan
"toma" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:55 min | 4 months ago

"toma" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"That I only discovered later. But in the last ten years, I see that it's very different. It's evolving very fast. It's still not on a level that you will see in the U.S.. Or I would say Western Europe, but at Croatia, as well as the other parts of Eastern Europe in last decade, it's very, very different story. Younger people, they have this mentality of entrepreneurship and socializing and they do meet ups. They do events. And now it's much, much better than 20 years ago. Yeah, I mean, I agree. I mean, I can't speak for ten years ago because I was not alone. Which grade not even high school, but I think with really the development community grows each time. I mean, we see conferences popping up in a couple of cities each year. And meet ups as well. Especially in Zagreb, like the president really nice tech scene, you can probably go to meet up every day. And we have I don't know, I think two unicorns would mean Croatia currently. And I think if any developers shouldn't even have a problem finding a job here, I don't know, you can just probably walk in to any company because everyone is looking for developers currently here because every company is growing and what developers are still catching up, but I think even amongst my peers, I can see that everyone is actually working while studying essentially. And even some high school I started in high school as well. And I think that shows some trend of the development community growing actual equation. Yeah, and I think the Internet and all those things that we have available to us to sort of stay connected and also tapped into different areas of the world has really sort of democratized the idea of entrepreneurship. You're seeing a lot of entrepreneurship in the tech scene in parts of the world that are not typically associated with that, whether it's Eastern Europe or there's a lot of growth in Africa as well. There's a lot of FinTech companies that are coming out of parts of Africa. So I guess what's next for code anywhere is there are things that you can share in terms of future road map items or things that you're really excited about. Yeah, we are going to definitely keep moving in this direction at the moment we just have a new business to business product that can be installed on prem on your environment. The plan is to offer this product for our B2C customers by the end of the year. We will also keep supporting the old product ID will still be available for all our existing users and if they don't want to make a shift. It's fine. We are not going to kill the product. But the company itself will be a 100% focused on a new product from now on. And we'll be adding more and more features we plan to support their container standards to its full extent. So at the moment, we support a major features, but there are still configuration options that we need to support, we also have inbound for supporting OpenShift widgets, kind of hard, but enterprise companies are manufacturers companies are using platforms. So that's also one of our goals for B2B product. And it's really to say, but we have serious plans for open-sourcing products of that also on our map. Well, that's exciting. I guess is there anything else that you would like the audience to know as we start to wrap up here? Well, I mean nothing major, I just want to say that we really are invested in we think that development environments are moving to the cloud because we see a lot of benefits and we just hope that more and more developers will continue with this shift towards the club because we see it as something that will provide more seamless flow and allow developers to basically just focus on their work and basically just be developers and that's our vision and what we're invested in moving forward out of that also at the end of local host doesn't mean that you're not going to use a local environment. It's just the way that you can use it in a different way that you can utilize containers to really boost up your development experience and make it easier. And then cloud component is just an add on to that workflow. So yeah, I mean, I think it's something that makes a ton of sense. And if you look at some of the biggest technology companies in the world, Facebook and Google, they've made this move internally with their own versions of these types of products. And I think a lot of times looking at those really huge companies is a good way to sort of triangulate on where the tech scene is moving because they are typically hitting a scale problems much, much earlier than other tech companies not that many tech companies have a 100,000 engineers like they have at Google. So I want to thank you both for coming on the show. It was great to be able to do this in person and I really enjoyed the conversation. I'm excited to see where code anywhere goes and see how it continues to develop. Thanks for having us. Yeah, thank you. I'm hoping it talks sometimes

Croatia Eastern Europe Western Europe Zagreb Africa U.S. Google Facebook
"toma" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:00 min | 4 months ago

"toma" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Any scale. It doesn't get bigger than that. Smartsheet. Power your process. Visit smart sheet dot com slash power your process. Yeah, and I think one of the points that Sean Wang made in his talk was that you don't need the highest end laptop to do development if your development essentially exists in the cloud because then you're not depending on all the resources of the laptop essentially run the code locally. So I think beyond the efficiency gains that accompanies getting, you're potentially getting essentially cost savings because your not having to give all your developers $10,000 machine that you have to then replace every single year. So how does a company go about making this shift, I guess? What's the process? Is there downtime, what's your recommendation for someone who's kind of moving from, essentially, it's like a movement from on prem in the cloud, but they're moving on prem development environments to that cloud based development environment. I think the first requirement is to have this mindset of that you need to package your application and if you are already using containers in that process, I don't believe there is a blocker for moving to FMRI environments. As long as you already have those pipelines set up, those can be translated to development environments. And then if you implement those in development environments, you make that process easier for your devs, guys, because you already create a lot of configuration in your development environment that they can look into. You don't need to communicate with them by emails or writing documentation or instructions. Many, many of these dependencies are already included in your development environment configuration. But if you have some other ways of deployment, it might be a problem. So I think having containers as a part of your workflow is a requirement to move this way. And then does it help if someone's already using an infrastructure as code type of deployment through terraform or something like that to make this migration to using code anywhere?

"toma" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:42 min | 4 months ago

"toma" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And did you know burrowing owls Hiss like snakes to scare off predators? If you think you know nature, think again, Supernatural, now streaming on Disney+. So how is I guess adopting the dev container standard rather than doing your own version, transform the products? Is it just made essentially your development life cycle much easier because you're following the standard or what were some of the advantages that you got from using the Microsoft standard versus doing your own thing? Our standard was we could describe pretty decent and complex environments and still it was very similar to docker compose. But we figured out it's missing code editor configuration that you could configure your preferences and extensions and so on. It was missing so much stuff and we were looking at the container JSON and we saw it. Okay, they have it all here. It's transparent it's open-sourced. So it is kind of no brainer. There's no point to trying to promote another standard, especially we are a company that can't be compared to Microsoft. But we don't believe that we don't even need our standard. We just need something that can be useful. And you can use that to describe your development environment. And we are just to support it in our product. And from part of what's happening when someone's using code anywhere is you're creating these ephemeral environments, right? So I guess what makes that different than just local dev environments. So with ephemeral development environments, the idea basically is to spin up the environment whenever you need to contribute to the project and then when you're done, you just please all the resources. And the main difference is that every time you do so you start from scratch, basically. And when you start from scratch, there's no way for the environment to be different from anyone's machine, because if you start from scratch, you follow the same steps to get to that environment, you should end up in the same environment whereas locally, you're not sure if you want to start over. Yeah, maybe I can set you up again. So with code anywhere, creating these ephemeral environments. So how is that different than just a regular local development environment? So the thing is with ephemeral development environments and the idea is to whenever you need to contribute to a project like opening a pull request for such, you spin up a fresh environment from scratch. And when you're done, you basically destroyed environment or the environment destroys itself, and that's it. And the difference between that and local environment is that you basically start from scratch. So you always know what you're going to get set up with, whereas with local environments, you're not sure what teach machine has because I don't know if maybe I installed Java 18 on my machine, you had Java 11. Those are environments are very different than going from those environments to the same point. It's not the same journey. So with ephemeral environments, you're always guaranteed that the environment you're going to end up with is exactly the same. Does that still allow, I guess, like personal customization, a lot of people developers like I want my IDE to look a certain way or I want certain combination of keystrokes that do certain things. Can I still have that level of customization? Yeah, of course. So the dev container standard, as we said, actually includes configurations and customizations for IDs currently for VSCode and code spaces. And those preferences are meant to be set for, let's say, project specific preferences. So I don't know if you're developing in python, you need a python extension. And you would set up the python extension preferences just for that project. But personal personal preferences like I don't themes, key maps or such can be, again, personalized and they can move with you because from code anywhere's perspective, you can configure user preferences from your account specifically that will just be for your account. And they'll be basically waiting for you each time you spin up an environment and those preferences aren't shared, whereas those let's say dev container preferences are shared in our project specific. Yeah, and I guess one advantage of that is that just like my email or something like that, I can basically move from machine to machine and I'm going to have the exact same experience. Was I guess the fact that you're spinning up these new environments, you chime in and tearing them down, is that inefficient process for someone, I guess, because you're essentially booting up this entire environment each time, and then it goes away when the person is done, whatever that they're doing. So it would be inefficient if it would just so literally like setting up a laptop and then destroying the laptop. So that would be an efficient but when talking about this technology that users containers will containers can be spun up and destroyed pretty fast and easily. And it actually is more efficient to spin up the environment each time and destroy it each time because first you're basically saving resources, you aren't using them when developers not really contributing to the project. And again, we're moving back to the ephemeral workflow where you need to start from scratch. Each time to get to the same point of the environment. So if you keep reusing the same environment in the cloud, let's say for a couple of weeks, you end up with the same problem of different environments because you're going to install something in it and such, but when you're starting from scratch each time you create a committer or anything like that, you are basically guaranteed to end up in the same environment. Right. And I guess even if there is some boot up cost in comparison to the kind of technical debt that the company is taking on each time someone makes a library update that then breaks other people's code when they do the check in to their local environment and they have to do the updates. You're saving that cost significantly by essentially building all these things in the cloud. So beyond some of the challenges that you've mentioned that you're essentially helping development teams with essentially the standardization and essentially everybody can kind of get the same infrastructure regardless of the constraints of their machine. What other challenges are you helping teams solve over a traditional way of developing software? As Thomas said, onboarding is a very frustrating for developers and it can consume so much time and it can drive energy and it's very demotivating for. Developers, especially if it takes so much time. Also, when you're working on a project and you need to check out to a different branch, for example, if you have old version of yourself that you still have to maintain and you change so much in your infrastructure, development infrastructure, for example, database version, a language runtime and so on. You need to make all those changes on your local environment usually and those can take again so much time and cause another set of problems. You then apply a fix or make some changes to your code, then you have to move back to your current version and you still have to, again, repeat all that process. And you do it again and again, and it's just a waste of time. And I think for developers time, the time is money and also not just money, it's how they feel, it's about their happiness. So I think if you provide them with a way that they can just work, that's enormous benefit. And there is, of course, some tradeoff, as you said, you need to wait some time until that environment is spun up, but there are ways to compensate. So we can talk about it later. There is a pre made environment that can be created in the background. So when you commit something to your branch, who can be triggered and environment can be created and is just waiting to be start. So that reduces a time from, let's say, minutes to milliseconds to spin up a fresh environment. So I guess just kind of similar to how front end code does pre fetching you're essentially a prefetching the environment beforehand setting it up so that's ready to go in the background.

Microsoft Disney Thomas
"toma" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:51 min | 6 months ago

"toma" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Bring the word out about lung cancer on a local level. I think the first podcast I've done, but I've done a couple of other things interviews. You know, there are a lot of wonderful people out there with great stories, mine's just one of many, but nothing else if it brings more of a vision for our program and for other people to get enthused about something as awful as lung cancer, it's kept me busy. I understand that you're now a judge, so without telling us too much, what has struck you about the nominees this year? Yeah, the judging, it's hard because almost, well, every single one of them, to me, offered great resources or did wonderful things. I mean, I really had a hard time because everybody was deserving. They really were. Just sort of reflecting on your own cancer journey and all the interactions you've had with other patients. What would you say to someone else who is going through a similar journey? Is there any advice or counsel you would offer? Here's what's happened with me is being able to do what I'm doing at the hospital and I go into a room and my nurse navigator will say there's someone else in this room who's had lung cancer, and they're looking around because I mean, look at me, I look pretty healthy. And so she'll say, well, she did. And their eyes get really big, and then I'll say, yeah, 15 years ago. And then their eyes get really big. And so I always say to them, you can never give up hope because somebody's got to be in that 20% survival rate and at might as well be you. So that's what we try to encourage. It's hard though. It can be very, very depressing, and I remember having some major pity parties through treatment. It's hard to be positive when it's not a really well funded or well understood cancer. So that's what we're working towards. Tomahawk graves, thank you so much for taking the time to talk with me today. It was a real pleasure. Thank you, Megan. It was wonderful seeing you. Toma hargraves is a volunteer for the lung cancer initiative of North Carolina. In 2021, she received the catalyst for change award from the cancer community awards, part of the AstraZeneca, your cancer program. Your cancer brings together the community that is working to drive meaningful change in cancer care. Visit your cancer dot org to learn more about the C two award winners and the your cancer program. This podcast was produced by scientific American custom media and made possible through the support of the AstraZeneca your cancer program.

lung cancer cancer Toma hargraves Megan AstraZeneca North Carolina
"toma" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:33 min | 7 months ago

"toma" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Rob Nye's founding partner at tech investment firm hoxton ventures, rob. Thanks so much for joining us. This kind of thing not props to this degree. It's already happened this year about toma bravo backing out or at least renegotiating renegotiating a deal to buy Anna plan the tech firm. Their valuations had tumbled in toma bravo said and continues to say it's because they reached a covenant. Is this becoming more commonplace with the destruction that we've seen in tech that investment funds are trying to sort of chip away at these deals? Does this go beyond a Musk specific problem? I think it's a function of the market for sure that when there's a falling knife, no one wants to really catch it as prices go down. You clearly want to re trade if you think the deal is going down in value. So across the board, that's a common tactic for any kind of buyer is to say, look, things change. I want a lower price. It's not surprising. On both sides of the deal with Twitter, I don't know if Disneyland really wanted. And frankly, this Twitter really wants to be acquired. I mean, if you look at the reports of coming out of the company, I'm not really certain that Twitter folks actually want to be acquired by him. There's a lot of political misalignment across the board, employees are quitting because of his politics. It's a real mess across the board. So here, more conversations like this one on Bloomberg television, streaming live on Bloomberg dot com and on the Bloomberg mobile app or check your local cable listings. Markets, headlines, and breaking news, 24 hours a day. At Bloomberg dot com, the Bloomberg business app and at Bloomberg quick tape. This is

toma bravo rob Nye tech investment firm hoxton ventures rob Twitter Anna Bloomberg
Putin Made His Intentions Clear Back in 2007

The Trish Regan Show

01:27 min | 1 year ago

Putin Made His Intentions Clear Back in 2007

"Because I remember back in 2007, it was June 2007. I was at the G 8 summit in hey weekend, Germany. And that was one of the first times Putin really came out and made it very clear what his ultimate aspirations were. And there were people that understood this, including Julia toma, who had been the leader during the orange revolution there in Ukraine eventually went on to become prime minister. She really understood that she articulated it well. I encourage everybody to go look at this. The foreign affairs journal, which is run by council on foreign relations, they put out a piece from Yulia back in 2007 in May of 2007. And I remember reading it and really being blown away and then talking to numerous people who were very familiar with Putin's thinking, he always aspired to this, right? He always wanted to basically conquer the world. He wanted to assemble the Soviet Union and felt that that was the most important thing that he could do in his life and he's got a kind of backwards approach while you or I, and if in China, by the way, because they're way more logical, while we might say, well, the key to do that is through economic success. We want to build our economy, build our businesses so that they're so strong that we become the dominant force, right? You can't mess with us, so to speak. He never really took that tact.

Julia Toma Putin Foreign Affairs Journal Council On Foreign Relations Yulia Germany Ukraine Soviet Union China
The Rich Got Richer During the Pandemic and You Can Blame the Government

The Dan Bongino Show

02:17 min | 1 year ago

The Rich Got Richer During the Pandemic and You Can Blame the Government

"Falls So the government liberals do this all the time They institute these big government policies They never do what they say they're going to do Matter of fact they always do the opposite They do significant damage to people who don't have power and money and elite connections And then they run around and they go back to the same people and go oh my gosh look what happened Life is so bad who's going to fix it us And the reason life sucks in a lot of these big cities Run by liberals is precisely because of a history of instituting liberal policy I've never seen a better example than this So these researchers piketty and these guys like I was in lucasian Sean Sal they're obsessed with inequality That's all they do They are heroes and icons on the left You should know the names because the left sights these people all the time Toma Tomas piketty And Lucas Shawn Sal They have these names are cited all the time And their life's work is proving somehow that inequalities worse than it's ever been in human history and it's dastardly conservatives and economic freedom that's doing it If we only had bigger government people would be more equal and they'd all love each other and sing kumbaya or whatever The research is generally garbage a lot of it doesn't take into account government transfer payments It's a long story beyond the scope of the show today But they've come out with a new piece of research showing how the coronavirus pandemic has led to a spike in not only the number of billionaires but the wealth of the billionaires who existed before coronavirus You may be saying wait wait wait what Through an economic lockdown and all of this stuff there was a spike in the collective net wealth of billionaires Yeah they're not wrong He can T is not wrong And his researchers the rich did get richer and here's what I'm talking about with the broken leg fallacy on the left The irony of this whole thing is the journal Wall Street Journal did a deep dive in this piece about those pandemic billionaires Thomas piketty shows how government stoked wealth inequality The reason the rich got richer during the lockdowns was precisely because of the lockdowns and big government spending Two initiative pushed initiatives pushed by the left as the left is now complaining about how billionaires got super wealthy during the

Piketty Sean Sal Toma Tomas Piketty Lucas Shawn Sal Thomas Piketty Wall Street Journal
"toma" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"toma" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"Toma, how are you? Good to see you, man. You too, man. Long time no see. Yeah, you keep him well? Yeah, absolutely. I've been so busy writing and creating content and meditating on Bitcoin that I may have lost my mind or been enlightened or one or the other things. But something's going on. Actual Bitcoin meditating. I mean, it's hard to think about anything else. So when I'm meditating, usually some integrations come up that have something to do with Bitcoin, especially since I'm spending all my time writing about Bitcoin. And creating content about it, it becomes an escapable. Are you like neo in the matrix? Are you seeing Bitcoin how other people don't? I think I have I'm having I think a lot of people around the world are having interesting insights about Bitcoin that are new and fresh. And I think I'm having some of these insights too. And we all have them in our own unique personal way. And that's why I try to write about some of these things because it may light a path for someone else to have a similar experience. Again, they were on unique one. But it's like leaving breadcrumbs and saying, oh, this was an interesting path down the rabbit hole I took. You might want to just pay a little visit here or there. Did you're in deep man. I know. Listen, tomo, you were known for writing these very nice short, easy to digest Bitcoin snacks. And now you've written a feast. You wrote a thesis, honestly, I think it's your best work. Thank you so much. I haven't really you're talking about this article. How Bitcoin is like a giant cybernetic meta brain? Particularly? Yeah. Honestly, blew my mind. Like you told me about it last time..

Toma
"toma" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"toma" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"It's wonderful to have you here. This is your first time. Welcome and if you have been here before you're supporting the show. Thank you very much for for that support. It's making all of the difference nine that the show is making a difference. Fear now on today's show i'm with the wonderful tump stead. Welcome to the show. Good to be here. Yeah looting you. I've never done that before. But maybe the international flavor you're one of our allies absolutely day is some sort of mission and never. It's never been on. Were important time to be a good ally. That's for sure and certain i just Just for some context toma going to share with the audience that you are a former actor. You're a comedian. A writer-producer producer talk show host comicstrip author and author of the book fearless. So more and we're going to be talking about how you found your way into south and had to make that creative and expressive experience where you can be of service to other three or book and the way we can hopefully make some money has that all sounds great. You did neglect. And i say that without reprimand. Probably the single most important component to my experience. Vis-a-vis this book. Which is it for thirty. Two years i've been in executive search twenty-seven run my own firm. So part of my story is that i had all of this creative exposure and education and experience and then that was translated without my knowing it really into professional success as a recruiter where i pretty rapidly rose to the top one percent in the world of sole proprietors do what i do which is to place high level individuals in corporate and consulting environment. So fantastic you know. I am deconstructed. My success in the book as a means of trying to share with anybody out there who's invested in communication persuasion professional track of sales some ideas and approaches and philosophies that might help them to be more effective and that set stern executive left to take a deeper dive into that a little bit later on if we could but customarily speaking we..

toma
"toma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"toma" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"Average holding period has remained at three point. Three years even asked deals have a larger and valuations have gone up. It just hasn't changed one of the reasons for that. And one of our really smart limited partners about fifteen years ago when he we weren't an advisory meeting he mentioned. this said. Your value added approach. Happens very quickly. You can tell quickly how much value will be added to each company. And i thought that was so insightful. Because when you're backing existing management you can go to work before you close the deal in that period between signing close when you have to change people people need to learn the business you need to recruit him. They recruited people that they like and it takes a while to come together. That's a key reason for our children here. We can accomplish. These three things are whatever. Priorities are very very quickly at a company. Now in hindsight based on where software has gone. We should've held all the companies. And if we would have done that we would have been much larger than sap and to return the multiples of money would have been just so much greater. We had to prove it and we had to sell to continue to deliver money back so that people could invest more with us. We continue to reiterate on that. Now are bias as well give you. Another one has been as follows. When a strategic approaches you look to sell because they want approaching again they'll build the product internally or by somebody else and by backing existing management if you can get the changes done early. You're more ready for that. Approach ellie mae. We sold that eighteen months after we bought it put. It was a different company. Eighteen months after we bought it and the buyer had a great deal of. We got a great deal. It's really working for the buyer. Sonic well we also sold. After eighteen months since cyber security the company was a different company. How do you stay in touch with the businesses. The management teams of portfolio companies that you then exit afterwards given that you're really still in the same ecosystem. It's such another great insightful question because we have noticed is when we sell these businesses if they are sold to private equity we can track them. Whatever we did together they continue to do for a very long period of time so all that initial work that went into it we have almost set these companies up to become private equity assets for long periods of time. We see them trading from one private equity firm to another and everybody does well in with the same team we keep in touch with them as friends. We may by a competitor. We may by company that partnered with that most likely and at some point in their career we actually get many of them to be operating partners toma problem and that's the best candidate because they've implemented our plan. We've made money together. They know us. And we're not taking risks with anybody new. Imagine this has come up in the past. And i'm just kind of curious. Have you ever had a business that you owned bought and sold and then looked at down the road again. We've done that. We had an have.

ellie mae sap toma
"toma" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"toma" Discussed on Food Psych

"The sometimes my grandfather would take me to the big freezer and then he would allow me to choose an ice cream. And i remember one day looking into this huge freezer and then all of the ice cream and i said oh. I don't actually feel like having an ice cream right now. And then he did this massive big sigh and i ha and then he just like retracted and went into this other room and just sat and stat out the window like one tier rolling down his cheek and i. My grandmother was immediately like you have to make it up to him. You've made him very sad. you have to. Oh god you've made him sad. So i would hurry in and say i want the ice cream on the ice cream and then i you know i finally got him to give me the ice cream against and then he was happy. And i think that was the first time i remember activity squashing my intuition and my actual desires and boundaries and everything to do with food was just that was how it was basically removed from my consciousness. God that's heartbreaking. I know that's what i meant about. Starting with the doc stuff this is. He's rim stuff isn't it. It is it is. But i mean it seems like it has later in life. It's it seems like you've come around to a place of being more at peace with food and mart peace with your body to so we're great now. Yeah that's that's incredible. I feel like that's such a testament to the resilience of human beings. You know that we can go through such darkness and have like you said your intuition with food just totally squashed and your ability to set boundaries. Really with. I'm sure other things than just food. But you know especially especially food too and have be able to come back to that later in life. That's a fucking miracle. Yeah it's one of the things. I think about it a lot especially recently. This is one of the stereotypes about fat people. As often that we're weak and i find the more i learn about the my live a fat person the more i read about and write about it. The more hilarious and weirdly ridiculous. That seems to me. Because i mean a lot of people wouldn't be able to function a day as a fat person because it is so had and it is so constant and it is. I mean it's hot cost stuff. You know some of the comments. We hear on a daily basis. Not just from you know people who are mean but from friends and family and the media is not a. There's no place where we can feel accepted and safe so the things we've lived through his children if we were when we were children. The resilience is such an important word because my god weakness is the last thing the last thing. That person has a totally agree. I it's been just amazing to witness people in the fat acceptance movement sharing their stories and also working with clients. I mean i myself have always had thin privilege and like when i say that a lot of people are like how dare you being thin is not a privilege you know i. I've heard you talk about this on your podcast to about how you know the people sort of get up in arms about this but the reality is that our society is geared to oppress fat. People like that is the systemic oppression that you face in a fat body is just un believable and yes thinner people like have this internalized fat phobia as well. My friend virjee tovar friend of the show. Oh she's amazing so amazing. Yeah she has this amazing sort of way of framing it. That i think is super helpful where it's like. There's the interrupt personal level of fat phobia that basically everyone living in diet culture has because we've been conditioned to fear fat and police it in ourselves and so yeah like thin people have that to everyone on the weight spectrum basically has that and then there's the interpersonal level which is like between people which is what you're talking about your grandfather and like other people in your life from doctors to family members to society at large policing you and something people experience that if you have like a parent or caretaker with disordered relationship with food in their body of their own they can like foist that onto their child even though the child is actually thin. And that's you know a tragedy but it's always a tragedy when people fat shame anyone but then there's the third level which is like the institutional level of fat phobia and that's what only fat people face you know. That's like not being able to fit into airplane seats and not being able to find close in your size and having daily abuse hurled at you when you dare to just leave your house and walked down the street that stuff and i feel like. That's the part that people don't get they get defensive about. The idea of thin privilege is like yeah we all have these sort of interruption on to some extent interpersonal levels of fat phobia but like the institutional level and just the oppressive nature of it from every faction of society is something that only fat people face. And that's where we have to start if we're going dismantle fat phobia at the other levels to. I'm nodding so much knowing can see it just nodding along. It's so great. It's such a definition of what it is. And i think it's hard for. I think it goes so deep in most people. I don't think i know anyone who has a disa- completely. I don't like to use with healthy but you know non-destructive or non toxic relationship with the bodies with food or in a so. We're all struggling in some capacity. And i think it's very difficult to hear that. Maybe you're not the one who has the worst. Maybe you know privileging thin and all of these words and a so loaded because this goes so deep within everyone and i get it. I totally understand. I understand it. Oh my god. I understand it. 'cause disincentive toma privilege. In any other way you know it's never nice to be called out on your privilege to be made aware of the way you participate in oppressing people but this is part of the journey. We have to go on in order to fix fix everything. Yeah the journey of social justice is a an uncomfortable one in a lotta ways. Yeah an o embrace it. That's you know. I'm i'm really where i think. We spend a lot of energy saying no you know. And you're saying that. I'm not privilege and i'm not racist and i'm not fat phobic an i'm not an i'm not and i think the the only way we can really actually get through this spy going. We are all you know. We all have all learned these things. We all encompass them in some way. We all do it in some way that we can't fix that unless we acknowledged that we all have it and i get this fear of saying it out loud you know. Of course this is within me but it's so important to acknowledge and then that's how we can move on absolutely. It's really powerful when we acknowledge that too. Because it's like we're on this together. Nobody is superior to anyone else. Nobody is looking down on someone else for their. It's like we all have a responsibility to help each other. Overcome this and come out of this and we're all gonna struggle and we're all going to stumble and hopefully we can be there for each other and sort of push each other forward along the way. Yeah exactly we'll so going back to your story. Then how did things unfold from there. I mean it sounds like your relationship with food was very toxic from a very young age yet. It was and that developed into then moved away from my grandfather. When i was ten things started to get better. But i think because we got away from him than the healing stocks then the processing stats and then it starts manifesting itself and all whatever things happened all the trauma then started becoming kind of part of my every day so i had a depression when i was fifteen..

phobia virjee tovar rim un toma depression
The Magic of Bitcoin With Tomer Strolight

What Bitcoin Did

02:14 min | 1 year ago

The Magic of Bitcoin With Tomer Strolight

"And i have. Bitcoin author toma strobe. Light on toma has written a bunch of amazing articles a medium and they're pretty short in the two to four minute range and they are written in easily understandable. Way said become an absolute go-to for me. This kind of aligns with me as i'm always asking people to explain these complex topics in a way. That's easier to understand. So i knew had to get on the show to go through some of his articles. He covers so many topics from why choose bitcoin to why bitcoin the world's most inclusive institution and they are definitely worth a read and i'll put some links to them in the show knows in this one we get into the magical properties of bitcoin on wiser care about it and a few other bits. Now i know you're gonna love this but as ever if you want to reach out to me if you're gonna questions. My address is what bitcoin did dot com. I do replied to every email. I've had a lot today. So i'm going to have to spend some time getting through them but i appreciate your feedback so if you do some and you want to reach out to me please do okay over time. I hope you enjoy this toma. How are you man. I'm great peter how are you. I'm doing very well. It's greg on the podcast. We collected over telegram. As i remember it. That's right yeah. Yeah you're a prolific writer. Yeah i i. I used to write a lot in. When i was in business and then i stopped writing for quite a time as i was doing a number of other things but i've written a lot lately in the last month month and a half or so. I decided about. Bitcoin and i couldn't stop start stop. Is it you a fulltime on bitcoin. Now you to this really I you know. It's funny. Even when i was working fulltime. I was kind of distracted. Fulltime bitcoin for about eight years. But i When the cova crisis hit the company i was involved with Was really badly impacted. And i left at that point in time and so since it's been a little bit over a year since i've had a salary job and i really focused on my on my on my enthusiasm for bitcoin lately Through through this time and have started sharing my knowledge writing about it trying to offer perspectives to newcomers and experienced people. And so i'm full time. Bitcoin

Toma Strobe Toma Greg Peter
Is There Life After Death? With Dr. Jim Tucker

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Is There Life After Death? With Dr. Jim Tucker

"Dr jim tucker. Welcome to the podcast. It's an honor to have you here. Wonderful to be here while. I'd love to start off with a story and i was hoping if you might take one of the stories slash case studies that you featured inside of your book which is excellent by the way and start us off from their well one well known. American case is a little boring. James line anger. Who around the time of his second birthday started having terrible nightmares multiple times a week in which he would be kicking his legs up in the air screaming airplane crash on fire. Little man can't get out event during the day he would take his toy. Airplanes and repeatedly crashed them into the coffee table. saying airplane crash on fire. And all this going on he really. He looked like had been traumatized that he had not been through. Any sort of plane crash in this lies and there were several times for his parents could talk to him about these things while he was away in what he described as being a pilot who had been shot down by the japanese and He said that he flew off of a boat and the parents asked him the name of the boat and he said in a toma which seems like an unusual name for us aircraft carrier but his parents who were quite opposed to the idea of pass lies at the beginning Did it online search. Discover that there was this. Uss matola bay that was stationed in the pacific during world. War two

Dr Jim Tucker James Toma Uss Matola Bay
"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"And he says what he says the other two persons of the trinity have to participate this in any you know. He's got some controversial ideas but just bear with me. He says the other to purchase trinity. Have to pair. Have to participate this in certain degrees that you can't assume that just the second person is they're taking this all by himself and the other two are disturbed passively sitting by doing nothing he said. No god does not suffer. He says there's a sacrifice he says he like. He likes to say. There's a sacrifice in god but that it it's not in the terms a suffering you know he says i'll love is paired a sacrifice even as highest forms. He said there's no suffering again. We can't say that god goes through Munition god doesn't change but he says nevertheless and he says what is the quote unquote the sacrifice of the father. He says the very giving a son now to get to your answer. I think the very beautiful idea again. It's back to the holy spirit. He says what is the sacrifice of the holy spirit. And this gets the idea of i think a very beautiful idea of how we can work with the idea of evolution not necessarily throat up working so he says christ came down an inflictions that says though he was in the form of god he did not deem equality with god something to be. Grass became the form of a servant. Taking himself became all things but sin so kris gave up his glory. He says when the holy spirit comes down and pentecost or from taber he does not give up his glory. that's very evident you know from from scripture. You know that there's the there's the glory of taber and then pentecost you know the moving through the room with tons of firing of the glory and he says the sacrifice of the holy spirit is that he will not force himself about creature creature and tell us the until. It's the right time. He won't sanctum. So he's the sancta fire and he won't sanctify the creature. Until it's time for the creature to be until the creature is properly disposed in the byzantine vespers particularly for the transfiguration. Repeat this idea over and over the apostles beheld as much of the glory of christ transfiguration as as they were permitted to behold as much as they could you know based on their their development their spiritual development they beheld as much of their glory is is they could anything beyond that they would simply be you know that they held the full glory of god instant they would be destroyed it. They couldn't handle it and so the holy spirit he says the sacrifice of the holy spirit in creation. He's he comes down in pentecost but he has to stop. He wants to love us. One hundred percent infinitely and he has.

two persons two second person One hundred percent kris tons of firing christ byzantine
"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

05:55 min | 2 years ago

"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"All come from from table the holy spirit moves out and infuses all a creation you know before and after him and So it's it's it's the ungraded lighted vanity moving into creation and the holy spirit and if everything and if fits sort of speak with the notion that we say the holy spirit is the form of the church you know in in the way that the soul is the form of the human body the organizing principle of human body the holy spirit is. The is the organizers principal and form of the church. You know the church as it exists. You know christ obviously the founder of it. It's the mystical body of christ but at the holy spirit is the is the sort of the cd organizer and the completer of that in that's surgical idea. And we say that creation. As i've said before in the book creationism structure so it makes sense. And then genesis said god created the you know the the spirit moved over the waters which are chaotic and so it's notion that the thrall of history there's this idea of the holy spirit this moving through this you know the in moves out from even back when you see it backwards toward jess and going forward in time with development of the church and the integration of the whole universe into the church into the kingdom of god and the holy. It's it's the light of taber. That spreads everywhere. I is a very beautiful idea. Well when i've been trying to pray that the fourth luminous mystery app and feel like i'm coming up with nothing so that definitely helped me out a little bit of help so before we go. I wanted to ask about your take on mike revolution and mac revelation. I read this book. I can't remember the title. But it's by a dominican polish dominican priests michael chang barack on kind of to mystic critique of evolution and while it's part of it anyway and there's this kind of debate in in terms of the to- missed crowd asks to weather like the special.

michael chang barack dominican christ mac revelation fourth luminous mystery revolution mike
"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"Themselves off so they can have an interior type process. You know the very no you have to separate yourself from the outside in if you extrapolate that all the way to. Let's kick the extreme degree the mystical life. I mean you have sort of wall yourself off from from things that are bad outside of you. You know from sin and fight in sinful ideas and sinful acts. You have to sort of wall yourself from that. Niche like saint theresa the interior castle. And so you take things as low as a bacteria and on the opposite extreme in the material universe a human being and there's a certain analogy with with interior already to have a living thing most basic idea you have to wall yourself off from the outside and we even we even speak of the mythical life we say the word interior life you know like having interior castle and make a temple of the holy spirit and we wall things off from us. You know like like you know sin in you have to fight to stop putting yourself in the occasion of near occasion of sin and so to speak from the united catholic morality and mysticism. There's also kind of a hierarchy and you talked about the hierarchy of developing forms of knowledge. But there's also a hierarchy of kind of like personal interrelations and of love. Can you talk about specifically the hierarchy of how sex difference and kind of the manor of reproduction ascends from lower to higher life forms. Right so this. This gets into the knowledge of development of personality and everything so as as as we go from lower to higher organisms in a bacteria. A bacteria is is a cell in an lower. There's two generic types of cells is what's called a pro chaotic cell which is a primitive cell like bacteria. And there's a more advanced type of cell that you and i and maple trees and insects are are made out of an s called a eukaryotic cell and so eukaryotic cell has has as much greater compartmentalization organization that appropriate excel. But a precarious excel has. What would be recalled. One chromosome in other words it's dna it's biochemical instruction manual so to speak is one circular chromosome and.

one circular chromosome One chromosome excel two generic types united catholic
"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"So let's dive into the fossil record here. You talk about how it can illuminate the steps from lower to higher forms of life in various ways so your purposes not to question the data. That science gives us as much as its interpretation. The interpretation de the inference that stran- is that these forms of development of forms of higher life are developing with survival as the kind of the final cause of these these steps from lower to higher forms of life. You suggest that we can actually look at it and see the development of intelligence as the final not. I guess the final cause the right the right cause to save ours at work so i'll use an example from the book the notion of symmetry and organisms so a sponge for instance is what's called an non-symmetrical animal. It doesn't have a front or back. A top or bottom assemblage of cells. Then you move up from that to something called radio. Lisa metrical organisms which are like jellyfish or hijras and in. They're they're like a you know sofa jellyfish like a you know. It's a rounded. Things got the tentacles hanging below but the idea of a jellyfish or a man of war in the water. And so you can cut these a piece of pie in other words if you if you look at the structure of an organism. They have a nerve ring going around the outside perimeter..

"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"That was put forward by archbishop fulton sheen thinking about sukanya until these four eleven of saint in his dissertation was that science. Phd dissertation or was that in his book on philosophy of science. It was in one of the two and remember which i think. It was in his dissertation. Although it's i haven't. I used both of them in my book to sign. They were this. I thought they were one in the same but could be known other. I think it was in his phd thesis. Yeah but the idea is is that is that the lower the bean is for the starting from that standpoint. The more it has to break things apart so everything needs to be. Nutrition has to have nutrition so to speak in order to survive of some sort and so and so a plant breaks things to you know when it when it draws in things that feeds on. It'll or earn animal. Even they'll they'll break things apart into pieces so you know an animal attacks and other animal it rips it apart and then is adjusted chemicals. Break it down into chemicals. And then the then the the victim the thing preyed upon is is assimilated into it and that would be the vegetative aspect and so the sensory aspect is not quite the same. The sensory aspect is not quite as violent the sensory aspect. You look at something and you see patterns of color and patterns of sound and you take those in so you are pulling it apart and sense. You aren't taking the bean itself inside of you. You're taking certain sensory aspects but you're not decomposing it like like a carnivore with its prey. You're not ripping a chunk of it off breaking it down to its basic chemicals and then re-assimilating the backup. You're actually taking coherent patterns. Coherent sound patterns coherent visual patterns coherence a sensor smell patterns and so forth. And so you're not as quite as destructive to the thing that you're that you're sensing is eating it and so you you bring those in and then you reassemble a minute in a composite picture in your in your mind and then beyond that is the intelligence you know. The the intelligence is in. The classical sense is a structure that assimilates being so removed. What's called the formal aspects so as a material aspect the formal aspect of something silly like use example of a glass triangle. The triangle is the formal shape and then the glass is the is the matter the material aspect of it and so the the mind understands the form formality of something so it does. It's not a destructive is not pulling pieces of sensory aspects out of it but as taking the whole formal organizing principle and unites itself with that and then beyond that when you get even higher it proceeded an increasingly simple way creates a more simple way in other words. The whole is is drawn in more and more incompletely example of this would be in the catholic idea of communion you know when you receive the body and bought a christ. You aren't torn to pieces. You don't experience that you're it's an act of love where you come in union with god and it's it's it's not something violent at all you know. It's your whole bean as easy..

one both fulton sheen four two philosophy of science sukanya god christ a minute eleven
"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"So looking at the the existence of hierarchy itself equality is something that is really kind of an idol in our in our day and i'm very interested in smashing it to some extent why is total equality incompatible with order broadly speaking in any given instance not necessarily politics or anything like that but the whole the whole cosmic order. Yeah so saint. Augustine says that hierarchy is the arrangement of a lesser in the graders. And so but the very fact you have differences means that there is a hierarchy in something. So you've got the very notion of order means means the ranking of lesser to the idea of second idea of an orchestra so an orchestra. You have since again. You're musician will stick with that analysis. A good analogy so in in orchestra you have the the all the other musicians put together. But you have a lead violinist. A lead cellist. In a lead whatever you know in their someone that has been selected out as a sort of the best among them to sort of keep them in sync and then you have the conductor of the orchestra and so there's the individuals in the orchestra which are have their talents. But then they're sort of subservient to like the the lead musician the lead violinist or lead whatever and then in turn their subservient to the to the conductor and so in so the organization organizational whole is much in so this this union of all these lesser in graders in. There are what you appreciate when the music comes out so there. That's that's what produces the fine piece of music and from the standpoint of an individual in there who who may be one of the less skilled violins male. Maybe you'd like to be the higher one but for the greater good of the whole there there. Is you know the the higher one is. There's a ranked place there for the the organization in order that she that comes out that you appreciate and it's it's it's the it's the fine tuning in interaction of all these greater and lesser that produces the music that comes out and pure homogeneity..

Augustine second idea one
"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"toma" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"Is the more it is alive in that sort. That is our experience. We you know you. You can see a rock or something assists there in does nothing. And you don't call a rock living thing and and you know yourself in in you initiate actions you do things for yourself and so these arise from your interior motivation interior stimulus and so the more interior. Something is the more. It is alive. The more intensely alive at his side. Note this pertains also to the way. We create a hierarchy of the natural sciences themselves. Now in the book. You mentioned somewhere that you know something. Like physics would be considered a higher science within the natural science it. Yeah in terms of yes of physics would be phys which would be the the modern physics which would be the study of of the of the motion of a of of things. in general in terms of its scope. it looks at living and non living things. So it's more general but in terms of higher in terms of hierarchy in terms of you know something more in biology psychology or sociology would be at the highest of that because they're studying living things and then psychology studying certain actions of living things and then sociology being the the social group dynamics of living things and in there's a there's an argument to be made like even very secular scientists like l. wilson from harvard. Who the founder was called socio biology. He says if you look if you look at the history of their Planet earth than the in all different types of organisms in his famous book sociology. If you look at the history of the planet earth and in how what all living things doing he says the over time we can see that living organisms are starting to move toward groups in a living in social groups and they sort of develop into a hierarchy of a social group.

l. wilson earth harvard Planet earth
"toma" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"toma" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Helped save people money. Well, I hate to break it to you, but I still got it from Shakespeare. Geico 15 minutes could save you 15% or more video said they, Errol von. You. Hola, Soy doctor Eduardo Kata, You know, rather go in Kissimmee. Those symptoms Deva, he get a proactive it there. Hence CIA frequency or pretty today or in a point and stare Division this perilous, possibly after Neruda Solo Toma, unos me noticeable or consume medical deaths to affects your knee last procedure. This upset Jonas. That's not to me and don't but instead was too familiar. Present other Paula Stella's looks. You're going to want to sing way better fix about Lando, what you're saying. Yeah. Just 60 bucks the last Sunday something you know nothing about the soul that stole something. Maybe I'll be paying you a fixed about 40 Lindo. Inform us young. You think you're supposed to be honest way Single. Yeah. When did time guy Monty.

Eduardo Kata Jonas Geico Toma Paula Stella Kissimmee Lando CIA Monty Neruda
Life on Estonia's 'corona island'

BBC World Service

02:53 min | 3 years ago

Life on Estonia's 'corona island'

"Our European island off the coast of Estonia has been labeled as corona island after becoming the hot spot for the virus and being placed into strict quarantine the first covered nineteen cases on the island of Saaremaa and emerged a month ago after sports event was held there with the team from Italy now health officials estimate that Harvey island's population have virus it's the story of what is going on from a Europe reporter Gavin lake this is the sound of a volleyball match on the island of Saaremaa in the beginning of March one and a half thousand people packed into the island's only sports center to watch the local men's side against an away team from Milan the power volleyed Malone who scored and it was a short time after that that some of the some remote team fell ill in the island's first coronavirus cases were reported this game is widely seen as the main reason why summer mall has become a hot spot for comfort nineteen cases in Estonia and what the population of thirty three thousand have been quarantined from the mainland no one can travel in a leaf obviously we can't get to the island because of the restrictions but the islanders have been recording for us how they're coping hello Susan here from Saddam Susan Ryan who used to work in an office for cooperative selling the items produce now she's delivering food and locally made produce due to do so we are now one of the neighborhoods hearing thought I Massa capitalize we can say and waiting for our clients to come downstairs and then on the back pressure is said to have safely without any contact with all nonessential business yet many of Susan's friends lost work after the outbreak but she says they've quickly found it elsewhere people who have to change for example from my hairdresser is now the one labeling the packages in the local meat factory and nobody sitting at home thinking that okay let's see what tomorrow brings people are taking actions hi I'm new here all recipes dining into the daily crisis intermediate conference he's on the team set up by the local authority to work out how best to help islanders get through life in quarantine she says they've been through a locked down before the very first time since of interpretation people need permits to enter at this time it is said because of our free well to protect our people and their health another Islander Toma Vicky recalls for us as he walks around the capsule Carissa all he tells us how his hometown has changed in the background is the main square grandson usually bustling around mid day like now today there are of course

Estonia Corona Island Saaremaa Italy Gavin Lake Milan Malone Saddam Susan Ryan Toma Vicky Carissa Europe Reporter Volleyball Massa
HOF defensive end Doleman dies at age 58

Steve Cochran

00:08 sec | 3 years ago

HOF defensive end Doleman dies at age 58

"All the defensive end Chris Doleman best known for his time with the Vikings has passed away Toma battling brain cancer passed away yesterday at the age of

Chris Doleman Vikings Toma Brain Cancer
The Story of Food Fights

Hungry In Nashville

05:05 min | 3 years ago

The Story of Food Fights

"The day. There was a guy named soupy sales like so many before him the three stooges Harpo Marx Charlie Chaplin soupy was known for sight. gags one particular gag. Getting Pie in the face was his trademark mark. He said he's been hit by a pie or thrown apply twenty thousand times in his career. It's a joke almost as old as comedy itself and it never fails to get laugh. So how do you beat classic you amplify it make it explode. Yes ladies and germs. I'm talking about a food. Fight in Nineteen seventy-four Bell Brooke started a fight in blazing saddles that began in the studio commissary spilled onto a movie set and made its way out onto the streets of Los US Angeles in nineteen seventy eight. The John Belushi who fired the shot that started one of the best known food fights ever filmed. Today we examine Zaman food fights where to go. If you WANNA be part of one how you can stage your own and what. The best foods are for creating your own masterpiece at home. The idea food fight isn't hard to grasp. Is people throwing food at one another for fun. It's fun because it's so socially wrong. And it makes the best. These types of food food fights are fun but they don't always turn out the way you planned for instance. Ten San Antonio high school students were arrested after starting a fight in the school cafeteria because there is some nine hundred students in the cafeteria at the time and most of them are trying to get out. The students were charged with inciting a riot in two thousand sixteen gene. Another high school prank took place at Monarch High School in Coconut Creek Florida. The day began normally enough students using superglued seal lockers classroom doors then. Lunchtime came around the trumpet. Blue and students began to hurl as you could imagine. It took a lot of time and money to clean up leading one football player to say. I hope that doesn't affect our football program because we work hard to get our new stuff like New Jersey's and stuff like that how precious but what if you want to be part of a food fight in stay outside the prison cafeteria. Have I got some places for you. Probably the most famous one is law. Toma Tina held each year and billion Spain. It's here that friends. Neighbors tourist pitched tomatoes at each other. It happens in late August and about one hundred metric tons of tomatoes. Go flying for about an hour. I'll put a video link to it in the show notes. Moving up the road to Italy. You'll you'll find the battle of oranges. It began after a woman killed a ruler. WHO said he had the right to sleep with any bride on her wedding night? These days that Murderous Act Act is celebrated by soldiers in period costumes riding through the streets and chariots with people hurling oranges at him as a symbol of the people rising up against unjust rulers. I it's messy and fun with a hint of citrus. Charlie Chaplin inspired the World Custard Pie Championship in Cox Heath Britain teams of five work work against one another to land pie strategically on their opponents. A pie to the face gets the most points in reality. The pies are not made custard just flour power and water mandatory springs Colorado hosts a fruitcake tossing contest. It's designed to get rid of all those edible fruit cake to get. During the holidays. There are two classes one for two pound cakes and another four pound cakes and there are the automated divisions that include catapults and slingshots and As you would expect there are great throwing fights along with lots of other varieties. You could do some research it easily come up with more however if you prefer to. Diy Your own food nick. I've got some helpful hints. I attacked from the rear. If you're staging your own fight be sure to think about cleanup I because the whole point of this is to make commits if it's outdoors. Make sure there's a garden hose around before any one goes into the house. This is made even easier if you have a nude food fight. One in group of Pranksters plan their fight in a public park just before a major thunderstorm. They also had a friend with a pickup truck so they could ride in the bed. After the fight it has also been recommended to Rub Petroleum Jelly. All over your body before the fight to keep smells and colors from getting into your skin again. If you plan a new food fight right this can add another fund dimension. Apparently food fights are popular for children's birthday parties the kids can be divided into teams that use a progressive list of ingredients ingredients to vanquish their foes. One suggestion was to start with water then progressed to flower. Add a little butter some baking powder and you're ready to make biscuits as is an after battle tree. So what are you going to let everyone toss a balloon filled with fruit juice. Cookies with applesauce beings popcorn mashed potatoes. Pasta Pasta and marshmallows are all good choices. Some of those are good for spearing. So you can add insult to injury so now when it comes to food fights your smart Cookie

Charlie Chaplin Football Monarch High School Harpo Marx John Belushi Bell Brooke Toma Tina Spain New Jersey San Antonio Coconut Creek Florida Los Us Cox Heath Britain Italy Colorado
7-year-old boy had 526 teeth removed

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

7-year-old boy had 526 teeth removed

"Little boy in India doing well after having more than five hundred of his teeth extracted that's right police Izzy has the details the seven year old was complaining about mouth pain and when doctors took xrays they found a sack in his jaw filled with abnormal teeth a total of five hundred twenty six teeth were found ranging in size from point one millimeters to around a half an inch doctors confirm the boy was suffering from a rare condition called compound composite Odin Toma they don't know what causes the condition but they say it could be anything from genetics to environmental factors like

India Izzy Seven Year
Iran And One Day discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

05:02 min | 3 years ago

Iran And One Day discussed on Morning Edition

"What europeans do now that iran has begun going beyond the limits of nuclear deal or says that it will iran has been enriching uranium activity that is allowed but sharply limited under that agreement from two thousand fifteen today is the day when iran said it would go beyond the amount of enriched uranium it's allowed to have on hand remember this deal the united states withdrew from that other world powers and iran would like to keep the u._k. is still in the deal and we've called the u._k. ambassador to the united nations karen pierce on the line from new york investor good morning good morning do you regard iran is going out of compliance with the deal today i haven't seen anything new york that suggests that that is actually happened but of cools that's what he said he would do today twenty seven june but the next step in any case would be for the international toma kenny g. a. thirty to confirm what if anything iran is actually done well let's suppose they go beyond that limit then we got to figure out what to think of it seems obvious that means they're out of compliance with veal they're not following the deal but iran's united nations investor told us in this program the other day wait a minute actually there's a provision that allows us to start going out of compliance exceeding the limits in this way if other signatories to the deal are not keeping up their end of the bargain and you're not do you agree that europe is not keeping its into the bargain here to provide economic benefit to iran no europe is trying very hard to stunned up it sends the deal i went disguise from new it's difficult because of the u._n. sanctions and we said in the security council yesterday that we greta did the fact that the deal couldn't be implemented in full but the europeans have set up a special purpose vehicle to get humanitarian and other supplies that too bone and we believe very firmly around should stay in the deal that's still enough in the deal and it's important for global non-proliferation as well that the deal is held and that he doesn't get a nuclear weapon would you explain these special purpose vehicle embassador you've got some kind of banker institution that's going to try to sell stuff to iran without running afoul of u._s. sanctions is that right it's more a vehicle that money goes into goods can be supplied under it it's not intended to contravene you a sanctions on the country it's intended to provide a line financial supplies to be run but i just want if i may steve to go back to this point about compliance you're the veins often make the argument that because x has done something that entitled to also not do something that they ought to under the deal we don't accept that argument at the deal it self did visage a circumstance in which he run might full out of compliance and the mechanisms in the deal itself web by the participants get together on trying to figure out a way to bring your own back into compliance so it's the end of the story even if iran has beached but obviously that would be a very webbing development oh so you're saying that there are provisions that would be like mediation or going to court and you could press iran to go back with incompliance if in fact they go out today is that right the similar provisions to that don't actually going to court it's more about the deals participants working this out themself but as i say it was sitting the visage that one day we might face this situation and they dispute resolution mechanisms within the deal it self would enable us to get together discuss with your own trying to work out how to bring back into compliance as you know very well investor the united states keeps adding more sanctions on iran and tightening oil and other sanctions on iran and their goal well we could argue about the goal but it certainly to undermine this deal in every way possible do you think this deal is still survivable that sustainable when i went disguised need the is tricky to keep the deal going in the second stone says you describe nevertheless we main committed to it the other participants who include russia china france germany as well as around remain committed to it it's vital for european it'll say regional security and it's a really important commitment to help global non-proliferation so we want to do everything we can to keep the deal intact that's not to say we don't agree with the american administration about he rose behavior in the region in sylvia in lebanon yemen and also in the gulf but for you paeans those two separate things and easier to tackle the second if he is in the

Iran One Day
Milky Way Warped and Twisted

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

08:27 min | 4 years ago

Milky Way Warped and Twisted

"Accurate three dimensional map of Milky Way. Galaxy shows that it's warped and twisted. A report in the journal nature astronomy claims this woop spiral patent is being caused by talk of spinning of the milky way's massive in disk of stars than you observations of based on the positions of one thousand three hundred thirty nine syfy variable stars, which will use to map the milky ways real shape. They found the milky way's disk of stars becomes increasingly warped and twisted. The further away the stars are from the galactic Santa one of the study's authors. Professor Richard de grace from MacQuarie university says people usually think of spiral galaxies as being flat discs. The problem is trying to determine the rue shave avow. Galaxy is bit like standing in the middle of the woods trying to determine the exact size and shape of the hull forest. It's also the touristy difficult to determine distances from the sun to some parts of the milky ways. Gaseous disk without having a clear idea of what the disc actually looks like however of the past fifty years or so the have been some tantalizing hints that hydrogen clouds in the Milky Way could be warped from a great distance. I'll spiral galaxy look like thin disk of stars that obits roughly once every two hundred and fifty million years around the central region where hundreds of billions of stars provide all the gravitational glue native the whole the galaxy together. The Pat from dot matter that is, but it now seems this pull of gravity is far waker in the galaxies fi outta disk there. The hydrogen atoms making up most of the galaxy's gas disk no longer confined to a thin plane. Instead, they give the disk and s like a wolf to peerages coast by the huge man of toll coming from the spinning the milky way's massive in a disc of starves the Katie developing. This new three-dimensional map was recently published catalogue of young variable stars, none is classical Cepheids located in the wool Milky Way. Disc. Data on the east is was provided by Nashes wise wide field. Infrared survey explorer spacecraft the authors rebel, use a thousand three hundred thirty nine of these had variables to help them develop. They Matt and this allowed them that attempt that twisted appearance of the galaxies fire out a ragions classical Cepheids some four to twenty times as massive as the sun and up to one hundred thousand times as bright syfy at variables pulse. I that. He's expanding contract at set rates based on their intrinsic luminosity. And so that can be used the standard candles to measure cosmic distances because strana is no hang trinity luminous syfy variable star is because it's Paul sation. Right. They can determine how far away it must be. It's exactly the same. As looking at a row of straight lights down the road. You know, the vocal at the same brightness for the ones further down the road will appear dim it than the ones near it to you. This allows very accurate distances to determined for the stars with an era. Of only three to five percent. Then you research provides a crucial updated map for studies of the Milky Way, still emotions the origins of the milky way's disc. The grace reminds us that most of the matter in the milky ways dot matter, which is an intrinsic part of a universe. But the grace also points out that not only decide to not have any idea. What dot matter is not even sure exactly where it is. The new research the roszak of the Milky Way could help scientists better determine how dot matter is distributed around the Milky Way galaxy built those role surprised to find that they three dimensional collection of one thousand three hundred thirty nine syfy variable stars and the milky gas disk shared the stars tended to follow each other closely. The grace is that a scullery off his new insights into the formation of the Milky Way. He says perhaps more importantly, you found that in the milky way's outer regions the s like still a disk is warped in a progressively more. Twisted spiral Patton. Astronomers have observed dozens of other galaxies which have shown similar, Pat. Tens degrade says that means the milky way's twists rare. But not unique what we found is that towards the outer regions of anarchy by galaxy galaxy starts to DVI Toma flat bag shack without that was known for longtime in its distribution of gasoline by gossiping hydrogen atoms of which we knew for the last five decades or so in the region. The hydrogen gas would deviate from the plain become higher on bumps on one end and lower on the other end. Now, our study under the results have found fun for the first time that the young stars in the QA Trist by so-called seat variable stars, which are quite massive there for quite young followed that same kind of warped distribution where there is a clear deviation from does flatbed geic shed. But that's not everything also found is that the main direction of this war is not a straight line. But it starts to Marlins chase a spiral structure Espy go further for that. In the sense that this war becomes twisted at greater and greater radio as this. Anything to do at all with the total on stars within the galaxy coast by the galaxy's rotation. Yeah. So our interpretation of this result is not the massive disc of star king up. Most of the milk is rotating around the center of the galaxy. Every tune is sixty two three hundred million years, and it's dragging behind it the outer layers, which are less strongly gravitationally bound to the milky right because I've much further is and so that rotation the warped. Our two disc is slightly lagging behind is there any connection between this this warped structure in the thick and thin disks of the Milky Way is the correlation. And that's a good question. But we haven't actually looked up. Now having said that the dole cough the stars in. By are distributed into thin disc. That's ready to device majority of stars the thick disk is puffed up somewhat and it tends to extend to greater radio. But at much lower numbers of stars than the thinness. The the works distribution of stars would deviate from this thing this in the into the realm of the thickness. So there might be some dynamically. Action. But I would say about the warp itself is originates from the thin. That's probably must less associated with Findus. I don't think this has to do with the spiral structure of the milky QA such because it's quite well known by now death, the the longevity of the spiral arms is due to something called density Reich Swiss stars move around the center of the Milky Way, and they get attracted by the higher density of potato in despite alarm today that move faster towards spiral. I've spent more time there because of gravity and they move out slowly between his firearms that don't spend much time. That's that's the density by feary. I think there's a difficult. That's that's a completely different dynamical process in in this particular case, we believe that we really sees graft national torquing dragging behind of material by the inner massive disc. What do you need to do next for your research? Well, there's a couple of things that we can do first of all we looked at about thirteen hundred or so of the variables that's sizable sample. But it's know. You can always be improved one of the problems with our sample is that all of these stars were located on the near side of the nookie right centers on our side of the center. It would be great if he could get similar quality data on the other side of the QA center. So that we could see whether or not the features out. We have found are symmetrical, and that is more than just an academic exercise. The idea here is if the warts distribution of the seats in the twisting, this symmetrical either side of the Milky Way center, then we truly have a process here that works across the galaxy. Comex have suggested that what we we've seen might have been caused by the info of dwarf galaxy towards the region stuff, I'm Yukio. And if that's stick as you would only expect your side. So that's one thing that we would like to explore another thing, of course, is probably not very well. The European Space Agency is currently operating its guy satellite, which is meant to determine positions and distances to about a billion stars nuclei galaxy the first data released has has come out in the second releases Jew soon, but the full date. Percents will not be released for another three to five years by that time accurate three d map of nuclear galaxy. At hopefully, result will serve as a benchmark to hold those guy results against and I finally the other quite exciting prospects here is that by concentrating distribution of stars in our Milky Way. More a better more carefully before we may have a fighting chance of determining all the doc metro is located and that's still a big open question. That's professor Richard grace from Corean versity in Sydney,

Galaxy Milky Way Center Professor Richard De Grace Cepheids Nature Astronomy Macquarie University Hull Forest Comex European Space Agency Marlins Nashes Peerages Strana PAT Matt Professor Richard Grace Paul Sation
Milky Way Warped and Twisted

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

08:27 min | 4 years ago

Milky Way Warped and Twisted

"Accurate three dimensional map of Milky Way. Galaxy shows that it's warped and twisted. A report in the journal nature astronomy claims this woop spiral patent is being caused by talk of spinning of the milky way's massive in disk of stars than you observations of based on the positions of one thousand three hundred thirty nine syfy variable stars, which will use to map the milky ways real shape. They found the milky way's disk of stars becomes increasingly warped and twisted. The further away the stars are from the galactic Santa one of the study's authors. Professor Richard de grace from MacQuarie university says people usually think of spiral galaxies as being flat discs. The problem is trying to determine the rue shave avow. Galaxy is bit like standing in the middle of the woods trying to determine the exact size and shape of the hull forest. It's also the touristy difficult to determine distances from the sun to some parts of the milky ways. Gaseous disk without having a clear idea of what the disc actually looks like however of the past fifty years or so the have been some tantalizing hints that hydrogen clouds in the Milky Way could be warped from a great distance. I'll spiral galaxy look like thin disk of stars that obits roughly once every two hundred and fifty million years around the central region where hundreds of billions of stars provide all the gravitational glue native the whole the galaxy together. The Pat from dot matter that is, but it now seems this pull of gravity is far waker in the galaxies fi outta disk there. The hydrogen atoms making up most of the galaxy's gas disk no longer confined to a thin plane. Instead, they give the disk and s like a wolf to peerages coast by the huge man of toll coming from the spinning the milky way's massive in a disc of starves the Katie developing. This new three-dimensional map was recently published catalogue of young variable stars, none is classical Cepheids located in the wool Milky Way. Disc. Data on the east is was provided by Nashes wise wide field. Infrared survey explorer spacecraft the authors rebel, use a thousand three hundred thirty nine of these had variables to help them develop. They Matt and this allowed them that attempt that twisted appearance of the galaxies fire out a ragions classical Cepheids some four to twenty times as massive as the sun and up to one hundred thousand times as bright syfy at variables pulse. I that. He's expanding contract at set rates based on their intrinsic luminosity. And so that can be used the standard candles to measure cosmic distances because strana is no hang trinity luminous syfy variable star is because it's Paul sation. Right. They can determine how far away it must be. It's exactly the same. As looking at a row of straight lights down the road. You know, the vocal at the same brightness for the ones further down the road will appear dim it than the ones near it to you. This allows very accurate distances to determined for the stars with an era. Of only three to five percent. Then you research provides a crucial updated map for studies of the Milky Way, still emotions the origins of the milky way's disc. The grace reminds us that most of the matter in the milky ways dot matter, which is an intrinsic part of a universe. But the grace also points out that not only decide to not have any idea. What dot matter is not even sure exactly where it is. The new research the roszak of the Milky Way could help scientists better determine how dot matter is distributed around the Milky Way galaxy built those role surprised to find that they three dimensional collection of one thousand three hundred thirty nine syfy variable stars and the milky gas disk shared the stars tended to follow each other closely. The grace is that a scullery off his new insights into the formation of the Milky Way. He says perhaps more importantly, you found that in the milky way's outer regions the s like still a disk is warped in a progressively more. Twisted spiral Patton. Astronomers have observed dozens of other galaxies which have shown similar, Pat. Tens degrade says that means the milky way's twists rare. But not unique what we found is that towards the outer regions of anarchy by galaxy galaxy starts to DVI Toma flat bag shack without that was known for longtime in its distribution of gasoline by gossiping hydrogen atoms of which we knew for the last five decades or so in the region. The hydrogen gas would deviate from the plain become higher on bumps on one end and lower on the other end. Now, our study under the results have found fun for the first time that the young stars in the QA Trist by so-called seat variable stars, which are quite massive there for quite young followed that same kind of warped distribution where there is a clear deviation from does flatbed geic shed. But that's not everything also found is that the main direction of this war is not a straight line. But it starts to Marlins chase a spiral structure Espy go further for that. In the sense that this war becomes twisted at greater and greater radio as this. Anything to do at all with the total on stars within the galaxy coast by the galaxy's rotation. Yeah. So our interpretation of this result is not the massive disc of star king up. Most of the milk is rotating around the center of the galaxy. Every tune is sixty two three hundred million years, and it's dragging behind it the outer layers, which are less strongly gravitationally bound to the milky right because I've much further is and so that rotation the warped. Our two disc is slightly lagging behind is there any connection between this this warped structure in the thick and thin disks of the Milky Way is the correlation. And that's a good question. But we haven't actually looked up. Now having said that the dole cough the stars in. By are distributed into thin disc. That's ready to device majority of stars the thick disk is puffed up somewhat and it tends to extend to greater radio. But at much lower numbers of stars than the thinness. The the works distribution of stars would deviate from this thing this in the into the realm of the thickness. So there might be some dynamically. Action. But I would say about the warp itself is originates from the thin. That's probably must less associated with Findus. I don't think this has to do with the spiral structure of the milky QA such because it's quite well known by now death, the the longevity of the spiral arms is due to something called density Reich Swiss stars move around the center of the Milky Way, and they get attracted by the higher density of potato in despite alarm today that move faster towards spiral. I've spent more time there because of gravity and they move out slowly between his firearms that don't spend much time. That's that's the density by feary. I think there's a difficult. That's that's a completely different dynamical process in in this particular case, we believe that we really sees graft national torquing dragging behind of material by the inner massive disc. What do you need to do next for your research? Well, there's a couple of things that we can do first of all we looked at about thirteen hundred or so of the variables that's sizable sample. But it's know. You can always be improved one of the problems with our sample is that all of these stars were located on the near side of the nookie right centers on our side of the center. It would be great if he could get similar quality data on the other side of the QA center. So that we could see whether or not the features out. We have found are symmetrical, and that is more than just an academic exercise. The idea here is if the warts distribution of the seats in the twisting, this symmetrical either side of the Milky Way center, then we truly have a process here that works across the galaxy. Comex have suggested that what we we've seen might have been caused by the info of dwarf galaxy towards the region stuff, I'm Yukio. And if that's stick as you would only expect your side. So that's one thing that we would like to explore another thing, of course, is probably not very well. The European Space Agency is currently operating its guy satellite, which is meant to determine positions and distances to about a billion stars nuclei galaxy the first data released has has come out in the second releases Jew soon, but the full date. Percents will not be released for another three to five years by that time accurate three d map of nuclear galaxy. At hopefully, result will serve as a benchmark to hold those guy results against and I finally the other quite exciting prospects here is that by concentrating distribution of stars in our Milky Way. More a better more carefully before we may have a fighting chance of determining all the doc metro is located and that's still a big open question. That's professor Richard grace from Corean versity in Sydney,

Galaxy Milky Way Center Professor Richard De Grace Cepheids Nature Astronomy Macquarie University Hull Forest Comex European Space Agency Marlins Nashes Peerages Strana PAT Matt Professor Richard Grace Paul Sation
Milky Way Warped and Twisted

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

08:27 min | 4 years ago

Milky Way Warped and Twisted

"Accurate three dimensional map of Milky Way. Galaxy shows that it's warped and twisted. A report in the journal nature astronomy claims this woop spiral patent is being caused by talk of spinning of the milky way's massive in disk of stars than you observations of based on the positions of one thousand three hundred thirty nine syfy variable stars, which will use to map the milky ways real shape. They found the milky way's disk of stars becomes increasingly warped and twisted. The further away the stars are from the galactic Santa one of the study's authors. Professor Richard de grace from MacQuarie university says people usually think of spiral galaxies as being flat discs. The problem is trying to determine the rue shave avow. Galaxy is bit like standing in the middle of the woods trying to determine the exact size and shape of the hull forest. It's also the touristy difficult to determine distances from the sun to some parts of the milky ways. Gaseous disk without having a clear idea of what the disc actually looks like however of the past fifty years or so the have been some tantalizing hints that hydrogen clouds in the Milky Way could be warped from a great distance. I'll spiral galaxy look like thin disk of stars that obits roughly once every two hundred and fifty million years around the central region where hundreds of billions of stars provide all the gravitational glue native the whole the galaxy together. The Pat from dot matter that is, but it now seems this pull of gravity is far waker in the galaxies fi outta disk there. The hydrogen atoms making up most of the galaxy's gas disk no longer confined to a thin plane. Instead, they give the disk and s like a wolf to peerages coast by the huge man of toll coming from the spinning the milky way's massive in a disc of starves the Katie developing. This new three-dimensional map was recently published catalogue of young variable stars, none is classical Cepheids located in the wool Milky Way. Disc. Data on the east is was provided by Nashes wise wide field. Infrared survey explorer spacecraft the authors rebel, use a thousand three hundred thirty nine of these had variables to help them develop. They Matt and this allowed them that attempt that twisted appearance of the galaxies fire out a ragions classical Cepheids some four to twenty times as massive as the sun and up to one hundred thousand times as bright syfy at variables pulse. I that. He's expanding contract at set rates based on their intrinsic luminosity. And so that can be used the standard candles to measure cosmic distances because strana is no hang trinity luminous syfy variable star is because it's Paul sation. Right. They can determine how far away it must be. It's exactly the same. As looking at a row of straight lights down the road. You know, the vocal at the same brightness for the ones further down the road will appear dim it than the ones near it to you. This allows very accurate distances to determined for the stars with an era. Of only three to five percent. Then you research provides a crucial updated map for studies of the Milky Way, still emotions the origins of the milky way's disc. The grace reminds us that most of the matter in the milky ways dot matter, which is an intrinsic part of a universe. But the grace also points out that not only decide to not have any idea. What dot matter is not even sure exactly where it is. The new research the roszak of the Milky Way could help scientists better determine how dot matter is distributed around the Milky Way galaxy built those role surprised to find that they three dimensional collection of one thousand three hundred thirty nine syfy variable stars and the milky gas disk shared the stars tended to follow each other closely. The grace is that a scullery off his new insights into the formation of the Milky Way. He says perhaps more importantly, you found that in the milky way's outer regions the s like still a disk is warped in a progressively more. Twisted spiral Patton. Astronomers have observed dozens of other galaxies which have shown similar, Pat. Tens degrade says that means the milky way's twists rare. But not unique what we found is that towards the outer regions of anarchy by galaxy galaxy starts to DVI Toma flat bag shack without that was known for longtime in its distribution of gasoline by gossiping hydrogen atoms of which we knew for the last five decades or so in the region. The hydrogen gas would deviate from the plain become higher on bumps on one end and lower on the other end. Now, our study under the results have found fun for the first time that the young stars in the QA Trist by so-called seat variable stars, which are quite massive there for quite young followed that same kind of warped distribution where there is a clear deviation from does flatbed geic shed. But that's not everything also found is that the main direction of this war is not a straight line. But it starts to Marlins chase a spiral structure Espy go further for that. In the sense that this war becomes twisted at greater and greater radio as this. Anything to do at all with the total on stars within the galaxy coast by the galaxy's rotation. Yeah. So our interpretation of this result is not the massive disc of star king up. Most of the milk is rotating around the center of the galaxy. Every tune is sixty two three hundred million years, and it's dragging behind it the outer layers, which are less strongly gravitationally bound to the milky right because I've much further is and so that rotation the warped. Our two disc is slightly lagging behind is there any connection between this this warped structure in the thick and thin disks of the Milky Way is the correlation. And that's a good question. But we haven't actually looked up. Now having said that the dole cough the stars in. By are distributed into thin disc. That's ready to device majority of stars the thick disk is puffed up somewhat and it tends to extend to greater radio. But at much lower numbers of stars than the thinness. The the works distribution of stars would deviate from this thing this in the into the realm of the thickness. So there might be some dynamically. Action. But I would say about the warp itself is originates from the thin. That's probably must less associated with Findus. I don't think this has to do with the spiral structure of the milky QA such because it's quite well known by now death, the the longevity of the spiral arms is due to something called density Reich Swiss stars move around the center of the Milky Way, and they get attracted by the higher density of potato in despite alarm today that move faster towards spiral. I've spent more time there because of gravity and they move out slowly between his firearms that don't spend much time. That's that's the density by feary. I think there's a difficult. That's that's a completely different dynamical process in in this particular case, we believe that we really sees graft national torquing dragging behind of material by the inner massive disc. What do you need to do next for your research? Well, there's a couple of things that we can do first of all we looked at about thirteen hundred or so of the variables that's sizable sample. But it's know. You can always be improved one of the problems with our sample is that all of these stars were located on the near side of the nookie right centers on our side of the center. It would be great if he could get similar quality data on the other side of the QA center. So that we could see whether or not the features out. We have found are symmetrical, and that is more than just an academic exercise. The idea here is if the warts distribution of the seats in the twisting, this symmetrical either side of the Milky Way center, then we truly have a process here that works across the galaxy. Comex have suggested that what we we've seen might have been caused by the info of dwarf galaxy towards the region stuff, I'm Yukio. And if that's stick as you would only expect your side. So that's one thing that we would like to explore another thing, of course, is probably not very well. The European Space Agency is currently operating its guy satellite, which is meant to determine positions and distances to about a billion stars nuclei galaxy the first data released has has come out in the second releases Jew soon, but the full date. Percents will not be released for another three to five years by that time accurate three d map of nuclear galaxy. At hopefully, result will serve as a benchmark to hold those guy results against and I finally the other quite exciting prospects here is that by concentrating distribution of stars in our Milky Way. More a better more carefully before we may have a fighting chance of determining all the doc metro is located and that's still a big open question. That's professor Richard grace from Corean versity in Sydney,

Galaxy Milky Way Center Professor Richard De Grace Cepheids Nature Astronomy Macquarie University Hull Forest Comex European Space Agency Marlins Nashes Peerages Strana PAT Matt Professor Richard Grace Paul Sation
Voicea Eases Your Need to Attend Every Meeting At Work

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

06:41 min | 4 years ago

Voicea Eases Your Need to Attend Every Meeting At Work

"Voice here, which is a voice collaboration platform is launching a new offering to help you attend few meetings. And anyone spent any time in corporate land will just a big. deal that he's the one thing that I do not miss ease meetings. Especially me institute, discuss Bating's. Don't get me started. So voice is attempting to solve all those problems. And it's powered by an enterprise voice assistant named either. An even uses to highlight key takeaways in meetings and create actionable recaps in real time with ADA voice command life tap on the dashboard or simply powered by the and your keywords that you set. An Eva can also joined conference lines on Cole's in-person nap. And actually just allowing meeting goes to focus on the conversation knowing that the highlights automatically being captured. The end goal, of course, is to turn talk into action and half smarter me in to help us get more accomplished at work. Well, that was more than enough to get me on boats book elope and hold on tight. So I can be meal is all the way to California. So we can speak with. Toma, and he's the founder and CEO at voice here. He's gonna touch wadis technology is such a game changer for businesses. Massive warm. Welcome to the show. Can you show them? This is about who you are. And what you do. Yes. Good morning. My name is Marta Cole. Am the CEO of voice. And we built an enterprise voice assistant that helps make your work. They particularly your meetings much more productive. So that you just speak and our actions and takeaways that you can share with others voice. It is voice collaboration platform is launching a new offering to help people attend few imme- ins, which is sufficient that we all with a brace. Can you tell me more about the story behind it was he wanted to many meetings Tichy over the edge? Inside voice. So, you know, before this those running a company called blue kite was acquired by oracle, and it became the oracle data cloud. And from that position. I had the privilege of meeting with great leaders, I met with people like Sasha who's running Microsoft, Larry Ellison, of course, at oracle for Martin sorelle whole bunch of really good leaders. And the interesting thing about them is IBM meeting with them if it was one hour or two hours. The we're looking at you, the whole time ring gauging with you the whole time they didn't have their laptop open, you know, supposedly, taking noise notes, and then being distracted by like Email Facebook updates. They were with you completely present. I even had an experience with one of them where they left the meeting with me, and they're running like, huge company. One of the biggest companies in the world. They leave the meeting with me and within an hour and a half. There's an Email my inbox with the follow ups and the takeaways and having their lieutenants take the next steps, and what was embarrassing. They actually beat me. Me in terms of speed of follow up. So I was inspired by this idea of democracy is in the executive behavior of some of the best leaders in the world, you know, who generally had, you know, an army of assistance around them, even if they're not really an army of assistance, but they had people on their team that were helping make their life smoother. So I thought we could democratize that by doing the things that allow you to elevate and kind of be the best executive you

Founder And Ceo Marta Cole Oracle Bating Executive CEO Facebook IBM California Larry Ellison Microsoft Sasha Martin Two Hours One Hour
RoboThespian, The Acting Humanoid Robot

Your Weekly Tech Update

00:51 sec | 4 years ago

RoboThespian, The Acting Humanoid Robot

"The next couple of years, a team of British engineers are building lifelike, robots that can dance talk in several languages and even scare London pub goers engineering arts founded in two thousand and four is a world leader in life-sized commercially available. Hugh. Annoyed robots with prices ranging from thirteen thousand to eighty thousand. The high end robots are used for entertainment information, education, and research. The company currently offers three commercially available products robo thespian. So she bought and these. So she bought many, it's top of the range, Android, the fully interactive and multi lingual. Robo thespian has been sold in displayed around the world's quite a few times. Now it even succeeded in giving a fifteen minute long. Ted talk recently, you could check that out on YouTube in many places. It has been joined by these smaller. So she bought it science centers, theme, parks, and visitor attractions. Now, many academic and commercial research groups are also using the robots as research and development platforms. Engineering arts is also developing new robots. It's been developing a range of lifelike bio mechanic. Messmer robots that builds on the sensors and the extensive software framework already developed for the robo thespian Messmer robots offer some of these smartest animatronic on the market, giving extensive interaction, but can also move very smoothly quietly and naturally to last month. The company developed Fred a one off a Toma ton that frightened punters in a London pub, the robot described as indistinguishable from humans was created as part of a stunt to promote TV series, Westworld, the hyper realistic robot modeled to be an exact replica of London based actor Ted ROY Newell sat down for a refreshing logger out the prince. Alfred pub recently engineering arts built Fred in twelve weeks. Fred's human, like interactions were controlled by engineered arts Tele presence systems, which uses inbuilt sensors, cameras, and microphones. To track help people interact with the machine, Fred was funded by streaming service. Now, TV to promote the return of Dirk science fiction show Westworld and wasn't spire by the show's artificially intelligent hosts, Fred is the next generation in human like robotics. And so it seems fitting to him the show's promotion over to him. Needless to say, there were some stunned reactions, especially when in true Westworld style.

Fred Ted Roy Newell London Westworld Alfred Pub Hugh Dirk Science Youtube Fifteen Minute Twelve Weeks
Will Power fills in major blank of his career with Indy 500 victory

Indy's Morning News with Tony Katz

02:17 min | 5 years ago

Will Power fills in major blank of his career with Indy 500 victory

"I'm c j miller here's what's trending at eight oh two great megan toma black smoke out there and it's a pretty good size that's forest calling in from the west side into into the ninetythree wibc newsroom this morning and those trucks from the wayne township fire department on their way to help put out several homes on fire in brown's berg at least three homes inflames on james blair drive not far from west fifty second and raceway road in brown's berg the fire department says those homes are now outs and no one was hurt the end of danika patrick's racing career after crashing a lap sixty seven yesterday during the indy five hundred patrick says she was done i don't i don't really know exactly what happened obviously that's nothing you you're targeting so just came around on exit finish thirtieth but it was willpower whose face will be next to go on the borgwarner trophy kirk darling i just went for it and i got i got nothing left exhausted screaming willpower in victory lane after taking the checkered flag in the indianapolis five hundred he's the first australian ever to win the race it's also roger penske's seventeen five hundred win as a team owner teen wins i guess now you gotta worry about eighteen so i'm going to not look back there look forward we'll be back next year power is also the first driver ever to win both the indycar gp and the indy five hundred in the same month cart darling ninetythree wibc mobile news shot and killed while on the job police say a man working at the dollar general near fifty six than emerson on the northeast side of india was murdered during a robbery yesterday afternoon you could find the photos of the accused killer wibc dot com president trump calling him a hero now jason semen is out of the hospital and ready to talk about what happened friday at noblesville west middle school police say seaman saved the lives of students when a boy came into the school with two guns stephen tackle that boy to the ground but was hit three three times he's talking to the media this morning at nine o'clock thirteenyearold ella whistler is critical yet table after that shooting and four who's your service members who lost their lives this past year were remembered in washington dc this week you're being asked not only to remember.

Ella Whistler Noblesville West Middle School President Trump Emerson Ninetythree Wibc Indianapolis James Blair Washington Dc Wayne Township Fire Department Seaman Jason Semen Robbery India Roger Penske Danika Patrick Brown Fifty Second
Delhi, Martin Luther King and La Toma discussed on All News, Traffic and Weather

All News, Traffic and Weather

02:21 min | 5 years ago

Delhi, Martin Luther King and La Toma discussed on All News, Traffic and Weather

"He's driving a car when it rolled over on four ninety five north last night also injuring a passenger a nineteen year old woman from who boston police are investigating two deadly shootings in dorchester a man was shot and killed friday on quincy street another killed yesterday on evans street wbz news time three nineteen there are conflicting accounts of the protests are being hit by a sheriff deputies suv in sacramento california last night jeffrey shaab reports it happened at a demonstration over the police shooting death of stefan clark witness told cbs tv station koa vr that he saw two sheriffs vehicles make their way through the crowd at a rapid speed struck her violently with county sheriff's department issued a statement saying that the two marked vehicles were traveling at a low rate of speed and that prior to the collision protesters had begun yelling and pounding and kicking the sheriff's vehicles cleveland told a local newspaper that the sheriff's kept getting never stopped and that it was a hit and run the california highway patrol is formerly investigating the incident the woman who was hit was treated for bruises to her upper body and head in new hampshire six people including three kids are in the hospital after being overcome by carbon monoxide in their home two of the adults are in serious condition one of the victims woke up at five am to a co alarm going off state trooper call to the home in thornton new hampshire found a fifty year old woman who had collapsed and others suffering from co symptoms than hampshire fire marshall is investigating wbz news time three twenty one sounds of the aftermath of the four story hotel collapsed in central india at least ten people have been killed the hotel is located in a city about five hundred sixty miles south of new delhi crowds is searching through the debris for survivors police are blowing whistles to clear a path for those carrying injured people away on stretchers wbz news time three twenty one seven police officers have been killed in a mexican prison riot officers entered the la toma prison today to restore order and move some dangerous inmates prisoners apparently sets mattresses on fire the smoke may have killed the officers investigators are trying to piece together what happened it's a painful chapter in american history and it's being remembered this week wednesday will mark fifty years since civil rights leader martin luther king was assassinated in.

Delhi Martin Luther King La Toma Cleveland Stefan Clark California Sacramento Boston Dorchester India Marshall Thornton New Hampshire Jeffrey Shaab Nineteen Year Fifty Years Fifty Year