17 Burst results for "Tom Zaki"

"tom zaki" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

05:51 min | Last month

"tom zaki" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

"That doesn't meander anymore, You see, but it's been straightened channel ized comet clothes through the south half of the city. Which, like in many cities is our lower income part of the city. It's where most of our immigrant communities live. It's where most people of color lives, you know, it's kind of a classic case of environmental injustice here in Seattle, because the most polluted part of our city is is exposing people who have the fewest resource is inability. To get proper health care if it does impact their health, so that's kind of what happens with the water. But there's something else that happens, Which is you have to remember that. It's pollution doesn't just carry human waste, which it does. You know it does at times, but it also carries all those heavy metals We were talking about right. It carries those PCBs that cause cancer. It carries a lot of oil products from our cars, and that stuff doesn't just flush out with the river flow. That stuff actually sinks to the bottom, and it contaminates the mud. The sediment at the bottom of the river, which is the base Of the food chain that just for the river, but for the entire Puget sound in our case for entire bays for other people. So at the base of the food chain, you now have sometimes be deep contaminated toxic sediment. That's coming up through the fish and the fishermen and you know in Puget Sound. We have these iconic orca whales all the way up to the top of the food chain, and it's making people sick. On last week's program where we talked a lot more about oceans, one of our researchers, you talk to us a little bit about food chain and explaining what that Woz and I think in general addressed that. The larger sea animals or seafood animals or the top of the food chain and the smaller one or towards the bottom, and the smaller ones tend to be the ones we eat. In some cases, we eat the smaller ones in some cases with the larger fish that he's them. Okay, but at the top of the food chain that's and pollution for many of these kinds of chemicals actually get, um, accumulated by by accumulated or stronger as it moves up the food chain. The people at the top of the food chain, or the animals, including us at the top of the chain are getting the biggest dose of those toxic chemicals. There's that was preparing. I did run across an article that talked about the effect of pollution in our waterways on the human endocrine system, and I'm sure you had to come across some of this in your study about the Duwamish Ward away when you all investigated and talked about the health Impact assessment of Golden Waterway decisions. Talk to us about that briefly about your findings and recommendations as they apply globally to these waterways. So there's all kinds of health impacts. I mean, we mentioned cancer, right? But if you're thinking about heavy metals, some of them like arsenic also caused cancer. But they have other impacts. Some chemicals like lead we know actually impact your neurological system and your brain. Mercury is another one that impacts you know how your brain works. The Mad Hatter in Alice in Wonderland, you know, had had mercury poisoning. That's That's why he was quote unquote bad. So and then endocrine. That's that's your whole hormonal system. So folks, particularly for for young girls, and for people of reproductive age, and the chemical that's impacting your endocrine system is is a really big health concerns. It's a little scary. Can you tell us about other findings that you all saw in your study and other recommendations that can perhaps help to God and inform others in there? Open waterway decisions. Yeah, we took a look at the cleanup plan or the Duwamish River, which, because it's a contaminated site listed under the Superfund law has to be cleaned up. On draft a lot of questions about what both intended benefits would be and how it had to improve on that and also unintended kind of health consequences. If we didn't do the clean up the right way. So we were looking at things like impacts on fishermen, you know, And if we don't do enough clean up what's gonna happen to the fishermen that used this river as the river gets cleaner? And there's gonna be some things that don't affect their health quite so much like some of those heavy metals, but also if we don't go far enough, then thin. What do we do to protect those folks health, do we? Tell them they shouldn't be fishing here, in which case he wind up with Milner's families right because they need to put dinner on the table, so the health of the health effects can be both directly related to the chemicals that were trying to prevent people from being exposed to, but also could be much larger issues. Nothing to do with, you know, with food, security and on cultural survival and people's spiritual connection and family connections. You know, to a fishing culture and how that can how losing those can also Really dramatically impact in individuals and communities. Health Thank you, BJ. We're going to go to break now. And on the other side of the break. I just have two questions to wrap up with you, B. J that I think a very important From the standpoint of our urban waterways, and then we're going to go to our next guest, Tom Zaki. So we'll be right back on the other side of the break. Thank you. Right now. It's probably just $6 Papa dear, Plus any side fist side that side all the sides for just $6 even That's a lot of things get $6 property deals and $6 size only at Papa John's dot com Wow,.

Tom Zaki Seattle $6 Duwamish River BJ Milner Puget Sound Puget sound Alice in Wonderland last week B. J both two questions one God Papa John Mad Hatter benefits Superfund law Duwamish
"tom zaki" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

03:34 min | 2 months ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"That's loops co founder and CEO Tom Zaki, partner. With 100, major global consumer product companies, everything from Procter and Gamble, making things like Pantene or tied in loop Nestle, making things from hugging dogs all the way to Gerber products and Luke Pepsico, Mars, Unilever, Coca Cola and 100 companies of that scale, and we're now adding a brand roughly once a day. Then on the retailer side, it's just a big, you know, the U. S. It's Kroger, Walgreens alter Beauty and then in six countries around the world, you know similar leading retailers, even including retailers. Like McDonald's and Burger King. Soon select Burger Kings will ask customers if they want their food in loops, reusable packaging. The customer pays a small deposit that they get back when they return it to any loop drop off location. Tom knows that in order to get people to make more environmentally friendly choices, it has to be convenient and they need to see familiar brands. If you think about what consumers want, it's three things and I'd say in order of priority convenience, convenience, convenience, then its value and then its features and benefits and for some sustainability is a feature and benefit. And, frankly, for some, it's not. We really at loop are striving to make every usable experience. Feel like a disposable one. We aren't focused on. How do we get the person who lives in Vermont or Berkeley? We imagine gonna like it anyway. We're focused on how do you get? You know the gentleman who lives in the middle of the country? Free, who maybe even still wears a red hat and doesn't believe in climate change. And that's the person we want to love this because if we can win his heart than we really can't affect change at scale urgently Since the pandemic started, people have been ordering boatloads of take out, which means bo loads of plastic containers that people might use for 15 minutes between picking it up and throwing it away. In Portland. Justin Quarrel owns Go box are reusable container subscription service that currently has 75 restaurants and 2200 members on board. Customers download the go box app. And when they order food from a participating restaurant, they request a reusable container. From there. We collect all of the returned reusable containers and cops from our drop sites. We transport them to our commercial kitchen, where they undergo a very thorough quality control, washed standardization and air drying process. And then they're ready to be reused again. Unlike loops deposit system go box charges customers an annual subscription starting around 20 bucks a year. You know what Luke is doing is great because they're working with the really big brands. I want to do it on hyper local level. So many of our local businesses here in Portland wants to be more sustainable. They're also contracting out there washing facility to other companies who want to keep plastic out of landfills. Just forge a partnership with them. Perfect foods that gel packs summaries. From the previous week are now being collected on we're washing and sanitizing and then providing those back to 10 perfect foods. We've just been doing that for the past two weeks. The volume and the mass of weight that we have already prevented from going to the landfill is extraordinary, and we're just getting started. So that's that's really, really exciting loop still isn't available in many stores, but you can order products from their website and have them shipped to your home. And they'll pick up the empty containers. I do see a future a very realistic future because we don't have to look that far in the past were plastic didn't exist. It wasn't but a few generations ago where we were not dependent upon this go to my northwest dot com slash Rachel bell to find out more Sounds like a good idea, and that takes us to 8 54 real time traffic..

Tom Zaki Luke Pepsico Portland Kroger Burger King Burger Kings Coca Cola Unilever McDonald Vermont Rachel bell Justin Quarrel Procter partner co founder CEO Gamble Berkeley
"tom zaki" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

05:01 min | 2 months ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"And the cycle then starts again. So that is the founder and CEO of Luke. His name is Tom Zaki. So how would work if you would just go to? For example, Kroger, which is a participating store that they're working with, and buy the products that you normally buy things like Tide. Pantene, Coca Cola Mars. Let's see. There's Haagen dogs just all of these big brands, and instead of it being in plastic, it would be either in class or like some kind of stainless steel, and all you would need to do is pay a deposit. And then when you return it, you get your deposit back. And you can either bring it back to any participating store or they have this system where they'll even pick it up from your doorstep. But the owner knows that in order to get people to make more environmentally friendly choices, it has to be super convenient and people need to see the brands that they love. If you think about what consumers want, it's three things and I'd say in order of priority convenience, convenience, convenience, then its value. And then its features and benefits and for some sustainability is a feature and benefit. And, frankly, for some, it's not. We really at Lou part striving to make a reusable experience feel like a disposable one. We aren't focused on. How do we get the person who lives in Vermont or Berkeley? We imagine gonna like it anyway, We're focused on how do you get? You know the gentleman who lives in the middle of the country who maybe even still wears a red hat and doesn't believe in climate change, And that's the person we want to love this because if we can win his home Good. Then we really can affect change at scale urgently. So since the pandemic started, of course, people have been ordering take out like crazy. Which means all of these plastic containers even more than before, And in some cases, you know you go pick it up. You bring it home. Maybe you put it in your own bowl. It gets used for like, 15 minutes before you throw it away. So in Portland that there is a company called Go box and they've been around for about nine years. It's owned by Jocelyne quarrel. And this is a reusable container subscription service. There are 75 restaurants that are participating, and then 2200 members, just people in the community. So you have a nap. And then when you order food from one of those restaurants, you just request a reusable container and then you bring it back when you're done, and then they have this place where they just clean all the containers and they bring it back to the restaurant for you, So it's kind of like a small scale version of what loop is doing for local businesses. But this is really smart. So they're using their washing facility toe. Let other companies pay them to wash things like whenever you order something that has those, you know, like freezer gel bags in it that you just throw away. We just forge a partnership with him Perfect foods that gel packs summaries from the previous week or not being collected on We're washing and sanitizing and then providing those back to 10 Perfect foods. We've just been doing that for the past two weeks. The volume and the mass of weight that we have already prevented from going to the landfill is extraordinary, and we're just getting started. So that's that's really, really exciting. I think that loop is genius. I know there are a few in Seattle alone. Just he's a little boutique, zero way shops you could go to and you can fill up your shampoo and your laundry detergent. But it's actually could be quite expensive and they're not brands that the average person would use. So I feel like this is the equivalent of sneaking vegetables into your Kids dinner like people go to the store anyway. It's not a different story. They're not having to buy special products, but it's better for the environment. If people don't mind doing the deposit thing, you get it back if you go to the same story over and over again. So just some practical questions. How much more So if I buy, you know the container of Tide detergent. Is it like a dollar more? And then I get a dollar back. Is it like $3 Maura's a 10 cents more. He said. Every product is different. It just depends on how durable the product like container they're actually using is and how big so I'm not sure for each thing. Yeah, but you know, if you if you always go to cover stories, you always go to Fred Meyer, like you're not going to really have a problem bringing it back and getting your money back. Yeah, It's just it sounds like it's doubling up on what we do with recycling. I mean, we put all of our plastic and recycling, you know, it gets picked up every year every week. This is a way to make it more direct, I guess. Yeah, well, instead of being recycled, though, it just gets reused. So we all learned a couple years ago that recycle it doesn't always work like China started protecting our recycling, right? Yeah, No, not using it all or they're just gonna put these back into production. They're not melting them down and making my God. I just don't see how the guy with the red hat who lives in clear Elem is going to be you know, taken by this and it I think it makes sense of you are like you are. You are very concerned about recycling and environment. All this If you don't already come with that kind of, I don't know It's a political stance with the environmentalists stance. I'm not sure how How does Luke convince The skeptics or the people that are antagonistic Radio Rachel, You know what to do with the garbage out here. What? Burn it. Burn it. Burn it. Pilots are but I've seen you people doing your weird stuff out there Since I set it on. I've seen you. Hicks can used to be a better incentive. You know, there's the the Iowa just.

founder and CEO Kroger Tom Zaki Pantene Jocelyne Portland Lou Seattle Vermont Hicks Fred Meyer Go box Maura Iowa Berkeley China
"tom zaki" Discussed on Rotated Views

Rotated Views

09:13 min | 4 months ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on Rotated Views

"Their personal adam but like that was never. I'm never gonna forget that. Yeah i mean holy smokes so much so much so much. I think it was a little bit of everything. But i think most the had to do with like my my my son jeans. I think we did so much to prep him for school. he was in kindergarten. Everything was going so well. he's just getting. He's getting into team sports and like everything and he was old enough to understand. That's what's happening. The everything pulled from him and it was hard to see that in kind of even navigate him because we there's so many unknowns. We didn't even know what was next than what was going to happen. So are you going to play soccer. I i'm not sure buddy or you playing i. I'm not sure how this is going and rushing everything Me and my wife worked for companies that are affected by this but are actually are needed even more so it wasn't like work down even busier. Now we're super-busy over here but then the work you know home soon slow and so you come back when a crash. But you can't because now your kid who's been home all day wants to just hang out and play and have some interaction and just watching him everyday. Basically asked for his friends are one. Can you hang out with his friends. When you're gonna see his friends get that. Hit me harder without me. Even in the most subtle way. Like i we took ells on like a of stuff but on like a a way that i didn't realize how really thinking about a day and an uptick my wife and i i'm looking through our tax on my. I just feel bad for james and i kept saying michael. God feel better than other thing with. Tell him he can't do but we're work in virtually and the end of the kindergarten like we were saying it was a complete disaster. The whole virtual experience compared to the point word that it was like a trigger. We said you gotta do this again. Starting your what's he just stared at music. You can't be doing this to be this care. yes. I didn't do anything and so that i think that's what in my mind. Of course there's a million things Saturn you know. I'm not saying that's the only thing i'm just saying that that hit me more than i thought it was going to kind of one of those unexpected things so work wise last question. Basically work wise. What do you see as an awesome achievement in two thousand twenty four for me like going back from a negative to a positive wall when i was shut down. I had like an amazing team. Like you like you. Jim my brothers you guys got. There's new financial income you started selling like do sweatshirts for from the blessed line started a fundraiser and had a set goal to to to raise and stuff like that and that was like huge it and it was like You you've now on the previous podcast when the time happened but like raised like eleven hundred dollars and gave it to the shop like that helped depit debt like help. Pay that rent for that for that one month that i wasn't open you know and like when we physically couldn't get together to do things like virtually innocence still got together to make things work you know so it's like like that's like a positive literal mayan like like there. There's people in botany from like sushi media you. How can i help. How can i do this. I knew you're in like it's opposite of what. Jim said like his him and his way their their jobs got busier. Should have more for me. My i got shut down saint lawrence. She's in the hell like her she. She's at a spa. Same thing shut down so we were like in the opposite end of that and like to watch friends or family kind of get together and help us out in a sense to like. I just feel blessed. That's like another thing that will never forget and like and not like we owe back to you guys but like it's like that's like a huge thing like when no one had to do any of that like we ever got together and just helped out like i. I don't know how else to put it in other words which is like that was a huge thing like they will never ever ever leave. My just stuck my head. I'll never knew the And that was. That was one of the big things that i said in a bunch of times. But that's the power of obviously rotated us podcasts and our listeners blessed lifestyle brand just everyone coming together as a so much support when we announced we're going to do a little fundraiser. Or whatever and keep it moving it would no. It wasn't like people thought twice about it. You know it was like we almost couldn't even keep up with the initial order with things and And how it all came together. It was so smooth. Everything was so smooth. It was like It truly was a blessing. Everyone listen to this podcast friends and family who reacted without even thinking about it Obviously whether it's a text message social media people reaching out left and right Is amazing sec- the the power of honestly what we do here the power of actual real true love. And you know you realize how much of an impact you really do have on people And i'm so happy that it's positive and you know honestly that's what it's all about that. Just that alone was it was proof that what we're doing is right and we're we're we're on the path even bigger bigger and better things and so. I don't know that that was completely. That was so dope again in my opinion and same thing that was one of the most rewarding moments of my entire life just to see the reaction. You know what. I'm and then got the result that we wanted. Plus some you know And enter top it off during the pandemic Every year every november we raise money for pancreatic cancer awareness And it was weird because they reached out we raise the most money. We've ever done an any previous year. One simple idea that i had from someone up from last year. I saw someone else. Did not four pink. Now for pancreatic cancer awareness. It was something that was a fundraiser. They did for something totally different. And i was like. I'm using that idea next year. Remember saying that flat and twenty nine thousand nine hundred twenty twenty do and we raise the most money we've ever in it was like i said it's a in seventy in under seventy two hours three days it was. It was a quick small thing. And i remember just getting. I got an email from them. I've got a letter from them. Phone call that a voicemail i can. I can actually play the voicemail for you. It's shout thanking. They're thanking me. Because i did it but it was through everyone else and it was the first time we did something like that. And it was like holy smokes you would think would be the weakest year sir ended up being. There's so many strengths that you can draw out of it So anyway that was dope so anyway. So i'll switch it up to the actual podcast. I mean read this list. Off as a podcast. What were some of your favorite episodes slask guests including virtual just to name what we've been through this year which is amazing We had our first hang out session. I don't know if you guys remember. We had tom zaki and tom. Roussel here. and that's day we found out. Kobe passed away so that that whole vibe completely changed We had george perdomo us on jorge vasquez on is a mechanic. We had fed five. We had come waters. Andrew ditman here from bristol. We had the creators found We had ronnie palmeri expert podcast. We had karlova. Tally kona compost. Silly spoons alan connor. Marlin anderson not seed gifted. Who's a cartoonist. Jason peters angel eyres. Who's an author harry ca. Mesa von matthew informal thomson from the visual hub. Daniel instead musician dylan hail jomar. Saunders from lost a sauce. Mike later jeff green from out detailing Musician aaa and a bunch of other people who made sophomore appearances here and like i said i just ran off. What twenty names or so there was a whole slew of other people who have been with us updates on their business updates on things that they're going through One guy. I think in fact we had mike. Who'll miss three times on and he either broadcast on by himself. He put me on. Hooked me up with other people..

ells Jim saint lawrence buddy adam soccer pancreatic cancer james michael sec tom zaki george perdomo jorge vasquez Andrew ditman ronnie palmeri alan connor Marlin anderson Roussel angel eyres
"tom zaki" Discussed on Startup Stories by Mixergy

Startup Stories by Mixergy

07:31 min | 7 months ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on Startup Stories by Mixergy

"Like we WANNA get out of bed either dead missing Hiller die. Yeah. That's the time. There's no, there's no rationality. It's kind of a romantic. V of living and. If the outcome is money the money can be met and. Okay. So you didn't you continued create a guest turned from this social network around immersive photos into what was next for the business. I think at that time. Be Bhagat into a program and she laid called startup June. So the emotionally. Chile and that's when I decided that you're not going down bench opera wrong I think we realized that. As much as I would want. To build a large company, I wanted to do on my terms I realize that. There is a certain. Kissing rain counting breezy low rare. It's not very metro where there is a little bit of. I'm usually I'm sure you emphasise clean. I'm talking about and. I'm just not that I'm just not GonNa guy and so I said, okay. How do we get to a stage variability phenomenal prod ops. Technology products and also being sustainable. So bent down the half there on. From twenty fourteen to me a sustainable to revenue-generating company. So we and so he did that able to generate revenue Monterey some. Seed funding not seed Fund Lake Equity. Equity Money. From starchy late on currently teeing these programs. And the were doing really well to and to. became, really big and to lead then lost a product for delivering. VR experiences. Vigil got a lot of attention bendy arrows getting big? We ran ads for some large companies V. At that point from gave us perspective in be our or in three sixty, three, sixty videos earner for narcisse facebook Google and us. You're what type of VR experienced will you? So if you go to our APP, you'll see that on three sixty videos at our APP and so at that point, Google trying to say to sixty videos that people trying to distribute three sixty context. I don't if you remember but New York Times and Samsung, all these people were doing. New Century Sixty produce because VR was very hyped up at that point, it will companies raise one, hundred, million dollars Looking at it. Okay so people were willing. So companies are willing to pay you to distribute that content and also to to use our technology to distribute videos on their sides. How did you get them? I email him. Okay. Yeah I mean, obviously a woman tour go link dead find someone's connected to them home them. Yeah. I mean. I'll take you back to this. This is a good story I'll tell you. So I was working. So offer, I graduated of Cornell I work off record my. PhD At mit I joined the company Tara Cycle I don't under the founder has been on your show, but China cycle is. Yeah. We'll manage. Guy. I want to turn cycle do. You remember interesting experience where someone is coming after me and I and I went to Tom Zaki and he got he got really protective of me and so he got he introduced me to his lawyer. His lawyers hang on Tom is a little bit too protective here. Talk rationally here but us really a good person I. Wish I'd have to him sooner when I had the issue, his whole thing is I can't talk about I hate saying I can't talk about it but it was someone who sued Jimmy Ranch ranch of. The, rain was a seriously the rain was like a few thousand dollars less than five hundred but it was I got you can't start Sumi. I got all angry about it really seriously angry about it, and then only person who's angry about me getting sued with Tom, Zach? So we just go. Back and forth with this person over nothing but I refused I refuse to give in for a few hundred bucks. I. Got I got the fighting for this I got. WAS ON. This is your pockets was bare. I'll tell you what it is exactly what it is. I took a phone I actually sent me a photo of himself. Once the interview was done I, posted it on the site somehow somebody else's photo of him was on my I don't know how. I'd knowledge that I could have made a mistake contractor made a mistake. I don't post anything I just don't want I don't Wanna I don't want to shove the blame somewhere else acknowledges my fault if it was on. I don't even know how you even have gone on. Anyway, I get sued for this thing. I I. I said the seems ridiculous I'm not making money off of this is clearly mistake in the Guy Anyway. We'd go back and forth the only person angry on my behalf is Tom Zach. I appreciate it. Took Guy. I kept going and fighting myself and I'll continue to fight till I. Die I think. Or maybe I'll have a rational moment. Go Andrew this is not an you don't need to fight everything and. And I should say for people who are listening the beautiful thing about Tom Zaki. As he said, look I wanNA see a world where people recycle and more importantly than recycle recycle is where you break apart old stuff and you Material into something. He wants upcycle where you take old containers and you make new things out of them like new bags. Anyway. That's his thing and he said no one. No one's GONNA care about my mission to save the world the environment unless I make a product that's better for them than the thing that hurts the environment they're not going to buy because it's from purity of heart they're going because a better product I respect so much what he said you work for him continue with your story I, guess diverted US and. It helps to ask a question a couple times 'cause I started off by saying I'm not gonNa tell you can't talk about it's a lawsuit whatever, and then you asked inch comes out so. To all your interviews I know exactly what ask the how? I got better woods. At one time. So I went to work busy I was I went to a program and. Tom's Atkin came to speak in there and I told him that his company was a PR show. And he's like, do you want Jolla said, yes, and so I went to work in his company as a B. D., guy and till. Then I was purely it technology I was a nerd nine hundred was like I was I think more into. Engineering and biology and chemistry. They're actually making any sales talking to customers and he hired me. To be the assistant to the CEO..

Tom Tom Zaki Tom Zach Google Hiller Monterey New York Times Chile Fund Lake Equity Bhagat Samsung Vigil US Jimmy Ranch Sumi Jolla CEO founder Andrew
"tom zaki" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

01:48 min | 7 months ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on Mixergy

"I got. No was on. This is your pockets was bare. I'll tell you what it is exactly what it is. I took a phone I actually sent me a photo of himself. Once the interview was done, I posted it on the site somehow somebody else's photo of him was on my I. Don't know how. I'd knowledge that I could have made a mistake contractor made a mistake I. Don't post anything I just don't want I don't WanNa I. don't want to shove the blame somewhere else acknowledges my fault if it was on. I don't even know how you even have gone on. Anyway I get sued for this thing. I I I said the seems ridiculous. I'm not making money off of this is clearly mistake in the Guy Anyway. We'd go back and forth. The only person angry on my behalf is Tom Zach. I appreciate it. Took Guy I kept going and fighting myself and I'll continue to fight till I die I think. Or maybe I'll have a rational moment. Go Andrew this is not you don't need to fight everything. and. I should say for people who are listening the beautiful thing about Tom Zaki. As he said, look I, WanNa see a world where people recycle and more importantly than recycle recycle is where you break apart old stuff and you. Material into something. He wants upcycle where you take old containers and you make new things out of them like new bags. Anyway. That's his thing and he said no one no one's GONNA, care about mission to save the world the environment unless I make a product that's better for them than the thing that hurts the environment they're not going to buy because it's from purity of heart they're going because a better product I respect so much what he said you work for him continue with your story I guess diverted us and It helps to ask a question a couple times 'cause I started off by saying I'm not gonNA. Tell you can't talk about out. It's a lawsuit whatever, and then you asked inch comes out so..

Tom Zaki Tom Zach Andrew
"tom zaki" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

01:39 min | 7 months ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on Mixergy

"Okay Yeah I mean obviously a woman tour, go link dead find someone's connected to them home them. Yeah I, mean. I'll take you back to this. This is a good story I'll tell you. So I was working. So offer I graduated Cornell I work off record my. PhD At mit I joined the company Tara Cycle I don't have the founder has been on your show, but China cycle is. yeah. Oh Yes manage manage. I want to turn cycle do. You, remember interesting experience where someone is coming after me and I and I went to Tom Zaki and he got he got really protective of me and so he got he introduced me to his lawyer his lawyers hang on Tom is a little bit too protective here. Talk rationally here but us really a good person I. Wish I'd have to him sooner when I had the issue his whole thing is I can't talk about I hate saying I can't talk about it but it was someone who sued Jimmy Ranch ranch of. The rain was a seriously the rain was like a few thousand dollars less than five hundred but it was I, got you can't start Sumi. I got all angry about it. Really seriously angry about it and the only person who's angry about me getting sued with Tom, Zach. So we just go. Back, and forth with this person over nothing but I refused I refuse to give in for a few hundred bucks. I got I got the fighting for this.

Tom Zaki Jimmy Ranch Sumi founder China Zach
"tom zaki" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Executive heather Crawford holds up a pint of ice cream if it's stored around negative forty degrees and when you feel it most of the time you need to work a lot here's how it works a customer buys products through the online store UPS drop them off in a loop coat and when the customer is done UPS picks the packaging up again the products tend to be a little more expensive a pint of Haagen Dazs is six forty nine from loop seventy cents more than at my local Walgreens loop also charges at deposit of five dollars for that special double walled container I still think that this is a relatively new issue market claimed owl studies company's environmental performance at Cornell he says decades ago reusable packaging was common for a lot of products thank milk bottles but that's faded away as consumers have moved towards disposable packaging del things asking people to pay more for mouthwash or razor blades it's a tough sell it takes a long time to get people to change behaviors and it's really hard if that new behavior is less convenient than the old one but loop thinks it can rise to that challenge Tom Zaki is the founder and CEO we're not asking you to clean the packaging we're not asking you to sort it we're asking you to have a completely disposable experience Jackie says loop will be introducing its products in the stores next year customers will be able to just drop off the empty packaging and Jackie says even if you don't care about the environment looks packaging is worth the premium these packages are the most beautifully designed versions of the packages in these categories you know the tide laundry containers incredibly beautiful so you get this huge elevation of design and function in your home it's currently only available online to customers on the east coast next year it will expand into Kroger and Walgreens stores on both coasts.

heather Crawford Haagen Dazs Cornell Tom Zaki founder and CEO Jackie Kroger Walgreens Executive forty degrees five dollars milk
"tom zaki" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Differentâ„¢

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Differentâ„¢

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Differentâ„¢

"They've gone in serious made serious investments zero waste in taking everything that they're creating and using it for a different purpose. I'm by the way that's a circular. Lean manufacturing loves circular ideas because this is just like you're using everything <hes> i was talking to colour by the way tile manufacturer about like like the waste scraps of tiles and how now they've created entirely product line out that i mean that's me what do they do with the waste scraps of tile they just take they. They've basically put them. They dave melton down. They take the stuff this quote not quality that would make make it in one line and it would be normally thrown out just taking it in create a new. It's a crackle line <hes> they use like byproducts of smelting to make the colors oh yeah i mean it's pretty cool. What do the tom zaki point of view which i had never thought about which may be makes me dumb but but as notion that the idea of waste is a human creation that of course in mother nature you know i see with our hands right henze food they <hes> it's interesting talking to gardner about this recently in the value of having hands you know they they eat bugs that are invasive and they tended we eat so they of course you gotta buy food and shit too but anyway so they do all this stuff and this should they do is generally good thing in a garden and then of course they shit like crazy and shit you put back into the garden and it all works together in this virtuous circle and it's kind of a fascinating thing and i had never really thought about it until tom said that yeah lettuce idea of waste is a completely human invention that in mother nature everything gets used you and i when we die we go into the ground and then we get used up right in a way we go were part of this cycle and so this idea of applying that mother nature a circular concept is is is very fascinating one net and all that you're of manufacturing well. They call that bio mimicry bio mimicry. I'm surprised you haven't turn the term. That's the idea of looking to nature for design ideas and <hes> done. Maybe mother nature's got some shit figured out that we don't yeah like how is the line like you know. People gosh now. I'm gonna blackout on all the examples but the bullet.

tom zaki dave melton gardner
"tom zaki" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Holly all do we do we this comes from out Sherman adds another chemical it's a two step process like mixing epoxy as a catalyst and blends of all in the mechanical spinner the final step pour the stuff into a mold and bake it for twenty minutes or so then try it out and you've got a flip flop so Mayfield says there's some traditional petroleum based polymer in there as well but all of the shoe will biodegrade into harm's materials it just needs the right bacteria and moisture to break it down you throw them in your compost pile and they will disappear in about three and a half to four percent per month meaning that within two years that she will completely be gone two years potentially as trash isn't perfect but Mayfield says it's better than decades or even longer but the real problem he says is that new technology is a tough sell manufacturers are reluctant to take a risk on a new unfamiliar product so what about changing people instead of the product changing their behavior that is I think the evil isn't plastic it's using something once Tom Zaki is founder and CEO of TerraCycle in Trenton New Jersey there's advertisements in nineteen fifty that talk about your of the washing dishes anymore simply take the whole thing the cutlery the dishes the table cloth itself and throw it all out Zaki wants consumers to abandon the throw away mentality and learn to re use things in particular packaging the largest source of plastic waste TerraCycle is running a pilot project called loop here's how it works a company puts its products a shampoo or toothpaste into custom made sturdy containers glass metal or plastic loop packs them into a picnic basket sized tote bag and shipped it to you you use up the stuff then you PS picks up the tote bag full of empties and shipped it back to TerraCycle the containers get washed refilled and sent out again Sacchi calls it unconscious behavior change in loop we're trying to say it feels like throw away but instead of throwing it away into a landfill but throwing it away to a recycling center it's going into a reuse facility that facility is in a warehouse in Trenton boxes of consumer product line the walls marketing director heather Crawford pulls out a few snacks trail mixes Ron not six address but not in the usual plastic pouch instead packed into a cylindrical metal container and this is talk of balsamic vinegar yeah they're shampoo hand lotion juice this is a a an interesting one this is our ran prestige skin care and glass bottles there's even ice cream in special insulated metal containers frozen down to minus forty one degrees the very last thing to go into the toe loop says the ice cream will stay frozen for up to thirty hours well it's being shipped big companies like Procter and gamble Nestle and Unilever are participating in this experiment they refill the containers of loop handles the transport and cleaning Crawford says loop has tens of thousands of customers signed up they pay a deposit on each container which they get back when they turn in consumers are so.

Sherman forty one degrees twenty minutes four percent thirty hours two years
"tom zaki" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on Here & Now

"Stainless steel. So it's an elevations of design. It's like the most beautiful ice cream package out there. But it also because of its double while nature keeps your ice cream frozen from multiple hours on the go. So if you take it. Out of the freezer. It'll look beautiful on the kitchen table, and you can have it out there for the whole dinner, and it won't melt now that may seem like a trite innovation but in the world of ice cream. That's quite game changing. Now, I imagine another upside for the companies that are involved in this is that it kind of locks consumers into a specific brand. Because if you're going to be using this container over and over again in its Haagen Dazs ice cream, then you will send it away and come back with more Haagen-Dazs. You're not going to switch over to Ben and Jerry's. In the meantime, while you're absolutely right. One of the neat. Things about reuse models is we have a sense of what comes back and so in the online systems you can turn on a function that allows your empty product. Let's say you're empty Tropicana to trigger an order of a new one, and that is incredibly convenient for consumers. So they don't have to worry about ever buying their orange juice again, nor do they have to worry about having too much which is one of the challenges with traditional subscription models that it's like a box every month. And then if you've turned on your orange juice and locked in the Tropicana, the chances of you staying with that brand, or of course, elevated, and that's good business from the companies who adopted what is the biggest challenge for you in all of this though. I mean, we've talked about a lot of the different things that make it difficult to change consumer behavior to change something that people have been doing forever and make them do something different. But what's the biggest one for you? What's the biggest hurdle? You know with loop. It's a re-imagined nation of the entire way products are made. So I think there's like an inertia challenge where companies when they develop these packages have to invest quite a lot of resource to develop them, and then build the entire operational capability to be able to fill them have them. Go around those are quite big challenges to surmount. And then when it comes to the consumer the biggest thing, we've learned is that we and I say this even as myself, really as consumers, we prefer things that are cheap and convenient. And so for us to scale what we've realized is the easier we make loop and the more it feels like disposability the more it will succeed. And so we're really trying to make it feel like, hey, you can just throw out your container when you're done don't even have to clean. It was just throwing it into a reu- spin at the end and not a garbage bin the part. I'm optimistic about is the suppose ability has only been around for seventy years. So I think there's a really good opportunity to. To look into our past look for the wisdom in the past. But then to think about how to modernize it and make it something that really is first century that is Tom Zaki, and we will link you to more about loop at here now dot org. Tom, thank you know. It was my pleasure at great the Chattan look for to chatting against some time. And Luke plans to start testing its products in Paris, London and parts of the northeastern United States in may, you can see what these containers. Look like adhere now dot org. Well, as people like TOMS Aki, try to bring us into the future native Alaskans are sticking with traditions that have been around for generations on the far northern coast of Alaska. Preparations for spring wailing are in high gear that includes making a traditional thread called Eva, Lou from caribou tendons, which are used to sew together the seal skin boats, which are basically canoes that can slide on the ice. Ravenna Canaan of Alaska's energy takes us to an evil workshop. Diana Martin is the first to arrive at the new Piot heritage center for Neva Lou workshop that will be going on most of the day. I have my sinews on the floor because then needs to stay cool. So you've got a plastic bag in what is that? It's a caribou tendons..

Tom Zaki Alaska Haagen Dazs Piot heritage center Diana Martin Ben Eva Lou United States Jerry Luke London Paris seventy years
"tom zaki" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on KGO 810

"That's exactly right and you know what's been interesting is all around the world the world's largest garbage companies have balked parts of terrorists cycle so i'm i'm actually speaking to you from geneva today and here in europe suez which are the largest garbage company in europe bought a third of our business and these and it's happened all over the world and they do that because we look at garbage in a completely different way than normal garbage companies do you know normal garbage company they're basically looking at what value they can get out of your garbage it's like urban mining and we call it recycling and that's you know things like aluminum cans and paper fall into that category and everything else they look at what's the cheapest way to get rid of it which in the united states is lamb selling here in europe it's incineration or depends on what country you're in germany is a huge incinerating country as i as i seem to relax of germany recycled a little more than the us not much more but everything we landfill in america is incinerated in germany oh wow okay so this is really important joining me for ceo spotlight is tom zaki he is ceo of tara cycle and before we run out of time then this is like the hardest ceo spotlight but i'm so fascinated by what you're doing and and really you're winning me over with everything you're describing because i'm a little like i said cynical because of some of those past experiences seo though i've i've a tough question for you you know if you if there was such a thing as a time machine and you could go back in time and change something that you've done ceo fix a mistake we're human we all make mistakes what would that be wow this is a tough question here's why it's tough is because i think any success and especially any foundational innovation is built on a mountain of failure so i mean man is like we're the failures from yesterday or the week before the year before it's like i would of course you know if i could meet my fifteen year younger self i would've told him every you know thing i learned and i would hope that that younger self would acknowledge that and not repeat the mistakes but i think the more important piece here is.

geneva united states europe ceo germany america tom zaki fifteen year
"tom zaki" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on KGO 810

"Diapers cigarette butts all the way to plastic gloves and pens and you name it second with make things from recycled materials that you've never been able to make the force like we make shampoo bottles from ocean plastic and so on and then third we help companies move from disposable packaging into highly durable packaging so that you never have to recycle to begin with now okay so you're dealing with so in other words you're not replacing like our local recycling group or whatever here in san francisco or oakland or whatever your augmenting that is that is that how i'm interpreting is that correct you're absolutely right so if you think san francisco you know it's got a great recycling program and has a greenway program we there those programs with a wonderful and we hope they say what we focus on everything you can't put into your recycling bin or your compost bin so in other words the only the stuff you have to put in your garbage then that's what we invent recycling solutions for and in other words that way you never have to put anything in the garbage men at all either you locally recycle and if you can't you can use terra cycle so help me understand this seems like maybe like the most possible safely you know you're not gonna share proprietary secrets with me today tom zaki ceo of tara cycle how in the world do you recycle cigarette but i don't understand i mean because i know like oh i grew up in minneapolis and i remember when they built a giant garbage incinerator right they're like well we don't know what to do with the stuff that can't be recycled they did a great job of recycling and then we'll burn the rest of it's at least we're not feeling plans but that has problems with like dioxins and and other kinds of pollution i'm assuming you don't just have a giant no that's absolutely right we never incinerate because that's not recycling that's effectively burning for energy and is of course even worse so here's the thing every type of garbage is like a unique animal a cigarette but it's very different than a dirty diaper so i'll compare and contrast these two because both of them were recycling today in the us so the first thing we look at it in a.

san francisco minneapolis us oakland tom zaki ceo tara
"tom zaki" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on KGO 810

"That's exactly right and you know what's been interesting is all around the world the world's largest garbage companies have balked parts of terrorists cycle so i'm i'm actually speaking to you from geneva today and here in europe suez which is the largest garbage company in europe bought a third of our business and he's and this has happened all over the world and they do that because we look at garbage in a completely different way than normal garbage companies do normal garbage companies are basically looking at what value they can get out of your garbage it's like urban mining and we call it recycling and that's you know things like aluminum cans and paper fall into that category and everything else they look at what's the cheapest way to get rid of it which in the united states is lamb selling here in europe it's incineration or depends on what country you're in germany is a huge incinerating country as i as i seem to of so germany recycled a little more than the us not much more but everything we landfill in america is incinerated in germany wow okay so this is really important joining me for ceo spotlight is tom zaki he is ceo of terra cycle and before we run out of time then this is like the hardest ceo spotlight but i'm so fascinated by what you're doing and and really you're winning me over with everything you're describing because i'm a little like like i said school because of some of those past experiences seo though i've i've a tough question for you you know if you if there was such a thing as a time machine and you could go back in time and change something that you've done is ceo fix a mistake we're human we all make mistakes what would that be wow this is a tough question here's why it's tough is because i think any success and especially any foundational innovation is built on a mountain of failure so i mean man is the failures from yesterday or the week before the year before it's like i would of course you know if i could meet my fifteen year younger self i would've told him every you know thing i learned and i would hope that that younger self would acknowledge that and not repeat the mistakes but i think the more important piece here is you need to innovate and to grow.

geneva united states europe ceo germany america tom zaki terra fifteen year
"tom zaki" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"The organic pieces the ash tobacco and paper compost that and then the filter which is made from cellulose acetate we make into everything from cigarettes ashtrays all the way to a park bench wanna make one important point here is that the real solution to cigarette waste is not recycling your cigarette but that's a great thing to do but the real solution has stopped smoking a cigarette butt on the ground so just wanted to point out that all this is linked to our consumption right so recycling is a great ben date right to put on art addiction of disposability and are addiction of consumption but the real way to stop almost every environmental issue on the planet whether it's waste or climate change your air quality or species deterioration it's all about consuming less and consuming things that help the environment versus hurt it out of business basically i would love that that would be thrilled to me made a relevant i'm made a relevant every day tom zaki thank you so much for joining us today again tom from tara cycle and we do have new cigarette recycling program here in atlanta so if you're walking down the street keep your eye out for a terrorist cycle cigarette recycling bin and by the way just stop tossing your cigarettes out when you're driving because that's a huge problem as a smoker have a water bottle in the car happen every time i get out of the car and toss it in the trash usually have a water bottle in the car it'd be really interesting i wish we had kept him on the phone because it would be really interesting if they came up with something for people to put in their car that you could fill up with your cigarette butts that didn't stink would have to not stink.

tom zaki atlanta
"tom zaki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

"Ton ezaki was much more interested in aesthetics in a lot slightly weird of you of japanese life when he certainly been an big inspiration on someone might murakami for instance for soldiers just briefly just give us a sense what the stories about accounts amounted to win so a cat a man and two women begins with a new wife sue cocoa receiving a letter from her new husband's exwife shinozuko and shaiko is writing to for cocoa to say you know you have you have the the man i love you have the house that i was living in you have all of my possessions all i want in return is the cat and she who writing she's writing to to try and get this cat lilley at fa cocoa and her husband shows is household and how motivations and not entirely clear i mean does she really want the cat does she really care about the cat as she just trying to score points or she in fact trying to destabilise her exhusband's knee marriage and the novel goes from here and it's so delicate and so subtle and so intensely intimate but it it it just shows these these four people one of him as a cat kind of circling each other and shows the the intricacies i think has relationships and and the human heart that you know we don't necessarily know what we once and all of his of tanezaki is characters a capricious that quite often selfish the or being driven by a mixture of of message that they can't fully understand and at the center of a is this cat lilley his incredibly beautiful and sort of sent to us and moves between them and they all of their relationship spark of harming the cat is the kind of the catch the kind of god of military through the is the thing that center the pla i mean i wonder is it written is a standard pros novello here because i i remember tom zaki did an amazing boat which was called the key works whose about a diary that a wife kept in full awareness of the husband was reading it as she had various affairs with all the man and that was all part of this sort of strange love triangle i mean is this written an in an experiment wel or is this qantas standards pros no valet.

Ton ezaki sue cocoa the house tom zaki murakami qantas
"tom zaki" Discussed on Successful Dropout

Successful Dropout

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"tom zaki" Discussed on Successful Dropout

"All that matters is that you resonate with the successful dropout philosophy and that you enter the group with the intention to provide value to the other members and not just receive value yourself again go to successful dropout dot com forward slash group to request admission once you're part of the group introduce yourself and get involved and i'll see you there what is up successful dropouts get stoked because today on the show we have tom zaki tom is the founder and ceo of tara cycle one of the world's leaders in ego capitalism and the reuse of nonrecyclable pre and post consumer waste in two thousand two he left princeton university to spend all his time growing tara cycle which began to the two men outfit out of his dorm room since then tom antiair cycle have experienced a lot of success amidst many challenges i'm sure that will get to hear about but a two thousand ten to recycle was named the two hundred eighty eighth fastest growing privately held company in america by inc magazine and in two thousand sixteen a fortune magazine listed tara cycle as one of the seven world changing companies to watch among many other awards and publications and successes i'm serb but tom men that's the interesting afria but tell us a little bit more about yourself and what you do yeah absolutely amazon for real pleasure to be on the show with you so aluminum back when you know i was born in europe in hungary originally than we left their effectively trying to escape communism which are hungry was under a back in the eighties and moved around europe a little bit than ended up in canada's of actually you know basically as political refugees so now really had that's our immigrant story and then from canada went to some of belem entry school in all of high school and that ended up in the us for college.

tom zaki tom founder and ceo inc magazine europe canada us forward slash princeton university tom antiair america hungary belem