17 Burst results for "Tom Wood"

"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

The Babylon Bee

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

"How huge part of a man's life is the same under assault and in the senate and he goes on but to me. I love that sentiment. But then i'll go posted on social media and people are like you know as a christian you have to be involved in in the political discussion all the time because we have this societal responsibility to do it so i don't know what the balances they're interesting but the thing is that what they're mixing up is society and politics right right. Can't can't we resolve matters among ourselves without politics. We're always has to be one size. Winner-takes-all one side takes everything. So the the of the there's a mean that's going around right now where it shows. Here's the marketplace and here's ice cream. There's a million flavors you pick the one you want everybody's happy. Then you have american politics you have two flavors and a fifty one percent chooses this flavor. Everybody has that flavor. How is that improvement. And so why would i want as few questions as possible to be resolved in that kind of way. I want as many as possible to be resolved in a matter of well. Maybe we can't agree among ourselves. Now there's no grou- grinch there are some issues. That are so important that we just have to fight them out. I'll grant you but not all of them and sometimes you do more damage even to your own side by fighting it would. It would be much better for me not to try to go to san francisco and make them all live like me that that's never gonna work and meanwhile be neglecting my own children. It'd be much better if san francisco. When i declared a truce and you live your way. And i'll live my way. And maybe by the force of our example one of us want to emulate the other but instead but instead we're just constantly either every four years every two years or now it seems like constantly. We're gonna civil war with each other all the time. And i can't imagine that it's healthy for people for our mental health for our social health to be constantly at odds with each other ripping each other apart with our with our incompatible worldviews. I want these things resolved outside the realm of politics where where more than one side can win and we and we can have peace. Hey you are you enjoying this interview. I am oh i- serum and actually probably sweating trying to think of new questions this very moment. But if you're enjoying it you should become babylon subscriber because the interviews are much longer. Yes and we also have the most fun because the portion of the interview. That does not go up here on youtube. Publicly can't be googled. Sar guess kind of kick back a little bit and get a little looser. They tell us what they really think. And we always do our ten questions which for everybody intends to be the funnest part of the show. Yes so become battle on beat subscriber babylon dot com slash plans. And you get the full interview show and you also get it a day early to now so my the other thing that i think a lot of christians got hung up on and i don't know where you stand on these things but when they hear the word libertarian. I think of a lot of them get hung up on the idea of legalizing drugs legalising prostitution. When does it seems like. That's like the libertarian. Stance is generally like that and there was an assumption about abortion to and also working out that you're teaming up with pro choice people and those are the biggest hangups. I think for christians when it comes to the idea of going full on libertarian. Lib live my approach in these. I'm pro-life so that that resolves that question and there are plenty of prolife. Libertarians as libertarians for life has a great website with some great articles on it and they actually make although they don't have to. You can be religious and be a libertarian. But they they make secular arguments against abortion that. I also find very persuasive that respond to a lot of the common arguments that you hear that. The fetus is an unwanted parasite and so i have the right to expel it. They take care of all those sorts of arguments. Just the way i look at the state is i. Don't want this thing defending my values because five minutes from now it's going to be attacking me and it's going to be assaulting everything i value so i don't want to depend on it i. I'll build my own society with my own values without its help but but right now i mean what more needs to happen before you realize this thing. This thing's not going to be reformed in your lifetime. There's no is just no way it will ever be your friend. It might be your friend for ten minutes. And then you're going to hand over to it all these powers that will then be turned against. You know this is going to. I wish the problems that we face could be solved by a political argument and a vote. These problems are going to take rolling up your sleeves and working and proselytizing and teaching and countering the wrong ideas and making videos and teaching people and explaining things. It's going to take that and it's going to take one soul at a time. I wish we could just have a vote and it's all resolved but it's not now in terms of the other two issues that you mentioned. Well i know that. Thomas acquaintance won't appeal to every viewer but we can at least agree. Thomas aquinas was not an atheist. Let's say right. He spent his entire life contemplating god and theological questions and it was his view that when it came to something like prostitution it could in fact be tolerated because there are there are some situations where when you ban something the outcome could actually be worse and so for example with the drug war. I think the outcome is worse. Because i don't actually think it is possible by the way people could use more drugs if they were legal. That's possible there are countries where they've done this and they haven't had that effect but think about somebody in your life who has a drug problem and ask yourself is imprisonment. The best approach for that person and and what we surely know is going to happen to that person in prison. Is that honestly. The christian approach to this issue is just lock them in a cage with with people you wouldn't want to be within a thousand miles of. That's the best approach. You can come up with. There has to be a more compassionate approach and by the way those are the only two options. Those are the only two options some compassionate approach where we try to get people to help they or we locked them in a cage. And the libertarian. Position is simply saying. Don't want them in a cage. Do whatever else you want. Give them all the resources you want to give them. All the education all the therapy whatever it is but just don't put them in a cage and likewise the way it's not like banning prostitution makes it go away they don't call it the world's oldest profession for nothing somehow it's been evading all these regulations for thousands of years but the way it used to be handled would be well. It went on in the bad part of town. That you that you keep out of but pretty much everybody somewhere along. The line has some moral foibles and we don't necessarily think that these solution to it is. She is to humiliate him completely but rather to to provide for his moral education. But so just because you tolerate. Something doesn't mean that you want it to be shouted from the rooftops everywhere or available outside a school house or whatever. Private property in a in a society of of entirely private property would resolve this because nobody nobody would want to live like that. Nobody wants a school. That has a heroin dealer outside the door. Nobody wants so that that doesn't happen. That this resolves all these kinds of questions about who gets to protest where and who gets to scream and whose face. Well it depends on who owns the property and that tends to result again peacefully peacefully. Resolve these problems. Yeah you mid wit out all right. Well let's move into our subscriber portion. All right we'll ask the real steamy questions real down into some more. Geez they're going to get harder than these are questions will ask the other twenty questions for michael malice.

san francisco senate youtube Thomas aquinas Thomas michael malice
"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

The Babylon Bee

08:44 min | 1 year ago

"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

"Trolled and also audience. You should buy tom's books. Yeah also by towns book which apparently are not as good as michael's books if you've had a lobotomy. You might think that all right. Well i think okay so now. Actually interviewing that was michael got twenty minutes or interview. We did a huge solid on that one. So i'm i'm a amid. Would that count. Because i'm so. I'm not like super. I became more libertarian-leaning recently but i'm not like a guy who's read books like dan back here. In fact i was saying during our interview. We should each kind of like on. Who wants to be a millionaire. You get one lifeline to dan. Because dan reads a bunch of like amid it would be somebody who in the middle of a discussion about mitigation of the virus. Comes along and says well. You know what's really important. Social distancing social distancing consists of trying to stay like six feet. Apart as a way of. Now we've been through this for fifteen blankety blank months. How could you possibly think. I'm unfamiliar with the term social distancing or think that an argument that i've obviously heard a million times answers me or you know what's really important masks. Okay maybe you believe that but if that's not an original everyone's already been talking about that for fifteen months so that's not actually an argument. That's just you repeating something you heard on television. That's amid wit okay. So it's not me. No you're not a bit but now with our our audience is largely christian and their faith is a big deal to them. And i i'm interested in your. I'm sure you've answered this a million times every question because you do a lot of this stuff. How do you connect faith to libertarianism. Your views on economics. What is the case you make to. Somebody like that. Who just goes well christian. I don't get so into economics and politics and stuff like that all right well. We'll just start with politics more. Generally i mean. I don't really care for it. I find myself drawn to it. Because just as a matter of self defense i have to be involved in it but i would say that particularly in this day and age. There's just no possibility. The state has ever going to be your friend even if you thought it might possibly be. That's just not going to happen. The kinds of people who are drawn to it and who remain in the permanent bureaucracy or people who cannot stand the sight of you and they broadcast this to you almost daily and even if somebody manages to get into the white house who kind of likes you a little. He's going to spend his time fighting against an entrenched bureaucracy. That wants to resist. Every is every move so far better to try to build a parallel life apart from the coercive of structures of the bureaucracy. Build something build up your community build up your church build up your friendships build up all these beautiful small voluntary arrangements. That really are what america's all about alexis de tocqueville. All the way back in the eighteen thirty said that that was his impression when he visited the united states he said in europe. You have all these problems and the government has always trying to fix them. He says whereas in the united states instead of that there's always some voluntary association that comes together to try to make things better. And i think just as a matter of plausibility the especially since the french revolution. The french revolution granted was aimed at the religious aspect of it was aimed at the catholic church but that wasn't because they were protestants. Okay that was because they the fact that they read they started the calendar all over again and they dated the the year from the when they killed the monarch and they made the weeks into ten day weeks instead of seven which would make it almost impossible over time to remember when sunday was. That's not like they didn't accidentally do that. You know they. They didn't accidentally enthrone a statue of the goddess reason in the cathedral of notre dame just because they had nothing else to do. This was a pretty obviously anti-christian movement and the idea of a single indivisible almighty irresistible state was at the heart of the french revolution and that's been the heart of almost all regimes in the western world since then is one single irresistible power center and when that power center is aimed against you. You're gonna wish you had a little patchwork of of tiny little jurisdictions of the kind that i'm describing so i think in order to build the kind of life we want. We need to stop trying to build some some some gigantic tower of babel and instead build wants all around us be humble and not not try to fashion the world into into a vision that we have when when our own our own kids are struggling just to not be corrupted by a crazy world. I mean we have to get a priority straight. You have your family. You have your your neighbors. you have your church. These things will take up enough of your time without trying to build some giant empire something or or have a single irresistible power center so and then which when it comes to economics economics is not just about money and profit like these are things that are beneath us that. We're we're too sophisticated for that. That that's for i for stupid materialistic people. That's all wrong. The economy is how we cooperate with each other when there are more than ten us in the world when there are ten of us we all know each other's names and we can all hand out assignments to everybody but when there are billions and billions of. Us is impossible to do that so we have to figure out. What's the best way for us to all work together. So that as many needs as we have can be satisfied and so that people can lead flourishing lives. People are not going to be able to have a study group reading kelvin's institutes if they're on the verge of starvation. They're going to be thinking. They're going to be extremely materialistic. If they're on the verge of starvation okay guarantee you that's not gonna make them purer and more spiritual it's going to make them radically materialistic so so to me then the economy. It's it's understanding. The economy means understanding. How it's possible that the smallest thing like a ham sandwich or a book that requires a vast number of inputs. I mean the book is you got to grow a tree and shot and chop it down with an axe and the act requires steel. Then you gotta do mining and all the who knows how to do all those things and who could possibly coordinate everybody doing them in just the right amounts at just the right time so as to bring together this this consumer item. That costs us two dollars. That's like a miracle if you're not sure about how that happens i don't know what to tell you. That's a wonderment. it's a miracle and so what it's showing us is how it's possible for us to flourish and live together peacefully peacefully where no one steals from anybody else. Nobody aggressives against anybody else. Nobody harms anybody else. But just through our own natural activities of providing for our families which we have an obligation to do Because if you do not provide for your for your own household you're you are worse than a heathen then to me. This is like one of the most beautiful things in the world. Is that when you when you get bureaucracy. Out of the way when there's no guy shouting orders of people through a bullhorn and extraordinary order not chaos but order spontaneously emerges and. That's a very appealing world to me where we treat each other as i treat you as an end in yourself. You're not a means to my ends. I don't issue orders to you to satisfy my desires. You are an end in yourself. And i treat you that way. I don't just grab things that belong to you. I don't interfere in your plans. You are an end in yourself. And i think that's the kind of society we should want. It's a it's a real struggle with politics and religion. I think because for me. It's like i want to chesterton wrote. We tend to make politics. Two important g k chesterton..

dan michael cathedral of notre dame united states alexis de tocqueville tom white house catholic church europe kelvin chesterton
"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

The Babylon Bee

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

"Can feel downright overwhelming and it could be beneficial to speak with someone who shares your faith and values online counseling from faithful. Counting dot com. Is there for you. They can it professionals christian counselors safe private online environment super convenient. You can do it through the app through video chat texting and i think just about any way you can communicate with somebody you think of it. They have smoke signals not not an actual guaranteed but they do have a lot of stuff and they have licensed counselors who are specialized in depression stress. Anxiety a crisis of faith issues to which you don't always get with counselors if they're not christians. You don't want no atheist counselor or financial aid available for everybody who qualifies anything. You shares confidential. Just like with a regular counselor. If you're not happy with your counselor for any reason you can get a new one. There available worldwide can text chat phone video. You can start communicating in under twenty four hours. It's available on desktop mobile android. I o s wow blackberry. Maybe not but if you go to faithful counseling dot com slash. Babylon listeners will get ten percent off their first month. That's right so why not get started today. Go to faithful counseling. Dot com slash. Babylon be follow the questionnaire to help them. Assess your needs and get matched up with the counselor that you're gonna love faithful counseling dot com slash. Babylon be another question from superfan. Am i really supposed to trust the views of very failed. Podcast her over duster fauci. Every single one of these questions is.

"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

The Babylon Bee

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

"Of the answer is well. If there's if there's power to be had and money to be made by doing a particular thing people are going to be drawn to that particular thing and right now. They've got a pretty good scheme going whereby they educate the kids into thinking that it's good and right that they should be ruled over by why's overlords who know better than they do. What's best for them. And by coincidence those people get to collect taxes and lorded over them and enjoy power and privilege and wealth at the expense of the rest of the public. That's a pretty good gripped you know. Kind of griff. Ter- approach so. It's very very hard to resist as an i essay there are. There's a reason and this would take the entire episode. But there's a reason that people who tend to be in education support this arrangement and so kids grow up thinking. well look i remember all the presidents. Were looking down on me from the school room. Wall all the presidents from george washington all the way up to the present. We're looking down on me with their benign visages as i did my work and so they're inclined to look at them as people who were just innocently pursuing the common good but if instead if walmart ran the schools and ascended the president's they put everybody on the walmart board of directors up there and the kids went home and said well. There's no questioning walmart. I mean i see. They're nice faces up on the wall and they're paying for the school. They must be good. We would all think that was really creepy. But if the kids come home and say oh my goodness where would we be without these great presidents. I'd probably be dead in a ditch or earning ten cents. An hour or my computer monitor would be exploding in my face. If it weren't for these people we would think well. Yeah he's just being patriotic. Say.

walmart griff george washington
"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

The Babylon Bee

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

"Crap. I look in all seriousness. I love the honest to goodness. I love the guy of so. I'll say i actually asked this question. I had matt welsh on my podcast now. That name might not mean much to some of your listeners. But matt welsh has been associated with reason magazine for a long time and there was a little bit of a spat between reason magazine and me and i i don't i don't wanna fight with people i honestly don't and so michael said you know you two should should hash this out. So we both went on michael's podcast and then we each went on each other's program. So i had matt well. John and the very first question. I asked i said now. Look you and i have been tiptoeing around this and we have to. He's thinking i'm going to ask him about rothbart. Some controversial figure and i said but we just need to get this question on the table. What do you like best about michael. So he's off. Okay that i am but what he said was was quite similar. My own answer. Which is his loyalty malice again. If you don't know michael mouses follow me on twitter you'll never be the same again. Your brain will be more but in a good way. It's a good kind of warping that occurs when you follow malice. But he is a. He's a very loyal friend if he's your friend he's your friend through thick and thin and i saw that the very first time. I met him very first time. I met him when you would think you know you're trying to be friendly very first time. You you know you wouldn't really try to open up pandora's box or or cause controversy. Just want to become friends. And i made a comment about somebody. It turns out he likes respects very much and instead of just letting it pass. It's just in the interest of of keeping our first meeting pleasant whatever he gently but firmly pushed back against an explain the merits of this person and i remember thinking. Wow if he'll do that for this person you know. I guess he just does that for his friends. And that's that's how he's the kind of guy some terrible is happening in my life and he'll get on the phone for an hour and a half with me and we'll work it up and there just aren't that many people in this world like that and he doesn't always give away his softy side online and he seems like he's tough as nails sometimes but he is deep down a softy tree at twitter michael malice in real life. Michael mauser. not exactly the same person and say you've talked about michael malice longer than ron paul. I don't know. I had a self because over the course of my career. I've trust me. I've talked about ron paul. Another question from superfan. What's with all the books.

matt welsh reason magazine rothbart michael michael mouses matt twitter John michael malice pandora Michael mauser ron paul
"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

The Babylon Bee

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

"Question that they asked him all right. You know what. I'm going to give an honest answer to that question when a time it ahead of time or nearby. Put a little clock here. Maybe do one minute all right. Now ron paul. Let's hear are so ron. Paul was a multi term congressman who first entered congress in nineteen seventy six served until eighty four then left for a while and came back in ninety six ran for president twice as a republican. Once as a libertarian and unlike everybody else he managed to bring up issues like the federal reserve. What causes boom bust cycles. Whether it's a good idea for the us government to have a military presence as far flung as it is but beyond that he would say things to audiences that didn't wanna hear them so he'd go down to florida and say we shouldn't have the embargo against cuba he'd be in south carolina and say we need to end the drug war so he didn't use focus groups or whatever he just appealed to people that their natural sense of what's right and wrong and what. We ought to find appealing a politician. Somebody who just tells us the truth regardless of what we wanna hear and he made he got young people to read thousand page economic treatises. Whereas if you try to ask yourself. What did rick santorum accomplish. No one even remembers who he was. It's been sixty seconds. You're done i did. I was mentally counting the seconds. Because i actually didn't have a clo- okay. Well we have Question number two from super fans nullification. Didn't we settle that issue with the whole civil war thing. okay now. i don't know if these are meant to be like questions that they know. I've answered all right no problem i'll do it well. I what is nullification. Because i don't want to assume. I don't like when people just use crazy lingo as if the whole world knows what it means. This happens all the time. I don't know well when the fed buys securities. Okay you've already lost half the country. Why are you talking like this anyway. So nullification is the idea that the states have to be able to challenge the federal government if it violates the constitution that if the federal government has a monopoly on interpreting the constitution it will interpret it in its own favor and that the entire history of the early republic demonstrates that the united states was not meant to be a single indivisible blob it was a collection of societies each with its own rights and liberties that's why the constitution refers to the united states in the plural. The united states are and we see this in fact in my book nullification. I go through all this forgotten early. History of the sovereignty of the peoples of the states and that this was understood by everyone north and south alike northern states appeal to the principle of nullification if anything even more often than the southern states did the northern states referred to it to fight against thomas. jefferson's embargo eighteen. O seven to nine. We see daniel webster. The consummate northern unionist saying that if during the war of eighteen twelve the federal government should attempt to the mad project of conscripting men into the military. It would be up to massachusetts to resist that so this this is just normal talk. This was normal. This is how you keep. The federal government in check is not by waving a piece of paper and its face. Oh look it's the constitution. It's a magic amulet. This will protect our liberties. This is not plausible. There needs to be some genuine pushback now in terms of whether the civil war settled this well. First of all the civil war was not fought over nullification. Secondly the northern states used it. If from what. I can see from what i've chronicle more often than the southern ones did. And actually if you look at jefferson davis farewell address to the senate. He's complaining about nullification. He's complaining about the northern states nullifying the fugitive slave laws which indeed they did in multiple forms so that not only that i don't think it's a civilized person comes to the conclusion that intellectual arguments are settled by violence. So you're telling me that. If the nazis had one world war two then i guess. The whole question of antisemitism has been settled. Who would think that way right. Or who would look at the indian wars and say well guess. The question of the plains indians has been settled by that. No one thinks that way. If you came home to your parents after getting beaten up on the playground they would not say. Well i guess that settles that right. I guess you were in the wrong. No one thinks that way except here we feel like well our war settled that's throng way to think about. Don't get mad at us. Get mad at the superfan. No i'm speaking to a hypothetical hypothetical superfan asks. What do you like. Best about michael malice. No not this. She can't that guy. Leave me in peace. Everywhere i turn. Jeez i don't know how he's done this to me. And if you don't know who michael malices. He's a celebrity ghost writer who was made famous by me. His multiple appearances on the tom would show and who now thinks he can outshine me.

federal government federal reserve united states ron paul rick santorum ron cuba south carolina congress Paul florida daniel webster jefferson jefferson davis thomas massachusetts senate michael malice michael malices tom
"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

The Babylon Bee

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

"Why this question my wing of is doing great. It's growing and full of energy and youth. I think i'm the oldest guy in it. At this point. I used to be the youngster. And now i'm you know. I'm like the elder statesman at this point. But that's the way. I want it and of course then. We have the the libertarian world. That is desperate for approval. And i'm telling you if you are a heterodox if you have a heterodox perspective and you're desperate for approval that's a bad combination because something's gotta give their and it won't be the desperation for approval so that's a bad thing and we've had some libertarians. Who have not been as sound as you would think. Libertarians would be during lockdowns. So that's all bad but the silver lining of this is that it has awakened the sleeping giant. Which is all the normal libertarians around the country who are trying to read. Reclaim the word libertarian. So you're the godfather of libertarians. Kind of. I don't know that i'd use that term but let's just say i've been around a while all right. Well do we want to start with our superfan questions. Get some superfan questions. We yeah we let our fans know that the you were coming on and we got questions from some super fans so question number one. Who is ron paul. Are you kidding me the.

ron paul
"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

The Babylon Bee

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"tom wood" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

"Hickory. Yeah be part of the community. The in crowd the be crowd thomas woods. He's a frigging celebrity and libertarian land. Already tom does anybody call me would would stone. He's a senior fellow of the institute. Yeah he's a historian. A libertarian commentator. And he's written twelve books and he's got all these like e books incomes goes count as books. I don't know if that counts are not their free. He's all these books that so he's suckered me in. I hooked me into the okay. Tom woods vortex free book. And you sign up and then he's got your email forever and then he'd just blasts you all the time i mean i'm saying this in a good way but he sends you good information all the time so my email every morning is like he's got these very provocative email titles like your facebook friends are idiots and then it tells you you know. I don't know that true. That's provocative accepted. So yeah. tommy does he needed in iraq introduction. Well if if you're not in libertarian. Lend maybe you don't know tom. He's like the john. The baptist of libertarianism. Make straight the way of ron paul. Walk us through the wilderness. He's a podcast or he's got the. Tom would show which you can check out all over tom. Woods dot com and on all the different podcast stuff. He's a roman catholic and does the latin mass thing which we didn't really dive into. I'm always interested in the latin. Mass thing libertarian almost anarchist very. He's like michael malice. But also not as willy wonka. Maybe okay let's really want. We let them in the thing we do in this episode so that they know they're in on the joke. Sure so our friend. Michael malice Gave us a list of questions to give the tom and so we presented these questions to tom as if they were just from fans writing and questions but there were all silly michael mouse questions which he told us at some point during ask them he would realize. This was all coming for michael mouse. I don't know if the actually figured that out you figure that out we'll find you guys. He said something like yeah. I think he started ilise realized that some of these were he said said. Michael mouse has hijacked another interview. Okay that's true so maybe michael does. This must do it a lot. I remember last time. He he gave me questions. For like dave rubin. We didn't do it though. Never again never again all right. Well that's enough of introduction right the jump in come on it. I mean abundance and everybody. Let's do appear to be mind blown and you will. Now be libertarian. After this let's go into the woods All right welcome tom. Thanks for coming on my pleasure how you doing. I'm great glad to be with you guys. Yeah cool cool. What's the state of libertarian. Land these days. You guys doing okay. I.

thomas woods tom michael mouse Tom woods Hickory michael malice Michael malice tommy ron paul willy wonka Michael mouse iraq facebook Tom dave rubin john michael
"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"First and foremost after. Take care of yourself in your own personal situation that includes of course finances for a lot of people I would say for younger people. Oh especially if you don't have kids or you know particular set of attachments. I would look very strongly at getting a second passport. I mean I you know you have to if if you can Diversifying yourself politically is probably one of the most liberating things you could possibly do. Because you're going to have an exit potentially for what I think is going to be a very nasty sort of conflicts of debt and problems with the dollar and political problems and maybe even a Cultural or or you know sort of a cold civil war here in the United States so I guess that would be first and foremost and and don't don't just listen to people about what you need to do with respect to college. I I mean one thing that has changed is life expectancy and absent some sort of real calamity. How many hopefully that's going to continue? And so we can expect the many of us to live into our nineties. Whatever which means you're going to be working probably well into your seventies and not retiring? Let's say in your sixties ABC's lie your grandparents might have and maybe retiring. Never so as a result of that I I would counsel younger. People take your time getting to college. It's better to get through in college at at thirty with zero debt. And I know that sounds old versus rushing through at twenty two with a bunch of debt and then some people compound that by. Let's going to med school. And so they're they're eating up their whole twenties and they're borrowing hundreds of thousands of dollars and they get a school at twenty eight or so and then two years later they discover that they don't like being talked to right. I mean I you know. I think we're we're entering an era where people don't work the same job their whole career they certainly don't work with the same employer their whole career. The GIG economy is probably growing whether we like that or not and so I think the ability to be Nimble and to turn quickly we is probably going to be valued in the future. So maybe knowing a little bit about a lot of things going to be better than knowing going all in on sort of one subject and devoting your whole life getting a PhD in economics and trying to find a tenure track job somewhere which is increasingly a unicorn. And that's what I call going all in so it's an interesting time and there's four since to be made there's you know there's little kids out there making millions of dollars on Youtube. I'm not saying that's easy. But it's like any crisis there's opportunity if you wanna find it but You know it's You boy I'll tell you what you can't count on on government to be there for you. That's that's for sure. Can we close by just saying a brief word about a project at the museum. Students doing features Fella named Hunter Hastings and it has to do with entrepreneurship. Because that's something sorta practicable to that. You don't have to be an academic you don't have to commit yourself getting PhD. It's another half us and I'm just curious about that. Particular Measles Institute project. Yes we have. A project called E. E. which means economics for entrepreneurs which is very sort of a separate track. It's a project of the institute but it's housed elsewhere. You can go to Lincoln for example and look up nieces for business or economics for entrepreneurs and find a lot of great content content there so the goal here is to take what is basically the big lessons of the big takeaways of Austrian economics and apply them to entrepreneurship and as we found over the years and talking to a lot of people in meeting. A lot of people is that people were already sort of applying these things in their business. Lives almost unknowingly that they had absorbed these lessons. which are may maybe conclusions that one can draw from studying Austin economics as well so if we dovetailed the two things together hopefully we might help create people who were more successful more skillful at making decisions about their about their business lives or even their career within an employer's business so there there are so many things which just seem obvious to us which does seem intuitive like the idea that consumers determine value rather than the Labor Theory Korea value or the idea that you know costs Determine how much something should be priced. Well that seems so obvious to us. No of of course apple apple builds IPHONE and they hope people will buy the next generation and what it costs it depends on on how much consumers value it in supply and it doesn't it doesn't matter how much you know each the individual units of each iphone cost because That's just not how the world.

Hunter Hastings ABC United States Youtube Measles Institute Austin Lincoln apple Labor Theory Korea E. E.
"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Look at the future of the sixties and seventies and how wrong they were about everything. It's it's If you like markets and I'm sure your listeners I do than those markets get up and assemble themselves and go where people want to go as result of where they're inevitably destined ago. I read a couple of lines from the peace. He says rapid increases in state capacity can be very dangerous earlier. Japan Germany but high levels of state capacity are not inherently tyrannical. And then he goes on to say. A strong state is distinct from a very large or torrential Michael State. A good strong state should see the maintenance and extension of capitalism as one of its primary duties in many cases. It's number one duty and this kind ed recalls at least indirectly a theme that came up earlier in this week about the libertarian. Centralist they're going to bring about liberty through oversight of society through the courts or something and likewise here. We're going to have the state. The state is going to guarantee capitalism for us but of course I would say a pretty pretty good if not entirely public choice response to that. Wouldn't that be the same state that can effectively. Whatever enforce capitalism apple isn't say enforce contracts or whatever other institutions need to be upheld for capitalism can also turn against capitalism and looted and bilk? I mean so. Is that just just a risk we take or why is that not mention. I mean I. I don't even see that as a concern. It's like people who are concerned about that are just backward. rubes not sophisticated enough to. I understand the value of the state Friday. Where do we find these bureaucratic experts? Who are not subject to the same self interest in response to incentives? I mean that's would. Public Choice teaches us is this this applies to the government sector as well as the.

Michael State Japan Germany apple
"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Was just something. I dashed off on facebook. Doc very quickly as sort of a knee-jerk reflective reaction to Cowan article on. I'm sure you'll post both his article and my response and the show notes so people can take a look look at it but it was something that I guess normally I mean. Obviously I know who he is. I know several professors at George Mason. I know that he also has gigs with the Atlantic and places like Dad Adam and I have a very different sort of perspective on. I guess libertarianism than most people at George Mason and that's fine but nonetheless I probably would not have given it much. Thought if he didn't have a Little Jab at Ron Paul. At the beginning where he says well. Libertarianism is more abundance. Basically got the two branches. One is this Ron Paul Ism. which is just a bunch of all right and worse than the other is the George Mason view? But that's not gaining many new inherits so that's how he starts off so that Kinda thing just gets to me a little bit. Because it's so dismissive and I don't think Tyler Cowen is in a position to be dismissing Ron. I'm Paul I just don't it's and it's not about the relative name idea of the two manner comparing their careers like that it's just I'm Rhonda friend and I defend. Yeah my friends. And that's it. I mean even Ron was wrong. Defending against someone like that. Because he's my friend. So that's first and foremost and you know so. I sorta dashed this off off as a response and basically the gist from my perspective of tight accounts. Pieces that libertarianism needs. If it's going to actually hold any sway in the world is it needs what we call state capacity it needs to be able to recognize that while markets are very powerful. There are certain things for which which we need. Government and government needs to do those things sort of these big picture projects whether that means in in technology or whether that means in defending the the rights of the downtrodden and minorities and so he sort of goes on to consider all the great things. That state capacity libertarian is a might eight might effect or might get work out for us and so it's just kind of a homily of sorts to what we may call pragmatic.

George Mason Ron Paul Ron Paul Ism. Ron facebook Tyler Cowen Cowan Atlantic Adam
"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"All right what I always want to know when I talked to people who worked in his office. And I I did a Ron Paul Week early on in the history of the show I did NORM MM SINGLETON Steve. Beer felt and several other people who worked for him at one time or another and I just wanted to get something of the texture of what it was like to be in his office. I wanted to get anecdotes anecdotes I wanted to. I wanted to know stories because I think that's not so much. What bills did he vote? No on but what was it like to work in. Ron Paul's Office compared to the Office of Congressman Schmo. Down the hall. So what can you share with us. Maybe that people haven't heard before It's so funny. Because he's such nice guy you really is. What you see is what you get? There's no different rod behind the scenes or something in most members of Congress a really lafley mediocre in terms of what they've they've done in their lives and they're mostly self important. It's unbelievable even the staffers. Some of them become self report. I mean it's just they say is Hollywood for ugly ugly people You know it really is Hollywood. In the sense that their status and there's hierarchy and you're the chairman of such and such and that's higher than someone who's just a ranking member of such and such you know so that stuff is just endless. And of course Ron had no interest in any of that he came from being a medical doctor had never run for office or held office before. Or he was in Congress in the in the nineteen seventies and so most members of Congress. Have you know they've gone to Tuesday evening. Zoning meetings in their county for five years first and then become a state rep and then ultimately it got in their name out there and run. For Congress they tend to be sort of the Tracy Flick's people have seen the movie election Which is a great great movie which I recommend so the the Tracy Flick's of the world and Ron was nothing like that and you know just a very nice warm guy and Carol would come up to the office and You know his personality demeanor very unlike rand he he is very very sort of salt of the earth in his approach. And there's so many times I remember. Remember things they just they just stick out to me Twenty twelve I guess during the second presidential campaign and I didn't organize is campaigns. I worked in his congressional office two very separate things but nonetheless there was a CNN debate and it was held at the Constitution town hall which is run by the daughters of the American revolution. And it's a very nice venue in DC and so-. Ron was in town for votes and was going to attend this Republican primary debate. Of course Mitt Romney was still riding high at this point as the front runner in that primary and Wolf Blitzer happen to be the host and so this was going to be a big debate. And I'm sure that Mitt Romney arrived several days in advance check into some giant hotel suite with about twenty handlers and sat there in front of a mirror testing out different phrases and figure out which necktie he was gonNA aware and and how how much real cream to putting his hair or whatever and contrast this with Rod. We're still in the office about four caucuses. Well I'm going to run home to my condo and then we'll come back arena. Wanted to come with me of course Roz just wearing his same old sort of inexpensive suit. That doesn't fit quite right and whatever tie he doesn't worry about these sort of things and we. We go over to his condo in in northern. Virginia which is very modest. I've eighty was the seventies condo that he'd bought the first time around in Congress. And you know he's just in there. I heat up some Campbell soup for something and we're about an hour for this debate starts. He just wasn't worried about it because he felt like whatever they asked him he would have to answer it. He wasn't going to particular worry about what he was going to say and that his answer would be the same whether that was a CNN audience or constituent his office or speaking in front of the prisoners Or speak in front of a church group just just didn't matter and so that just struck me that and then of course just. The two of US went over the debate newest no big deal and and he did his usual style so I really enjoyed things like Dad Dad and the you know the idea that he I think suffered somewhat is interesting professionally. He had to give up being a medical doctor He we all ultimately sold the building he owned for his medical practice. I think he made less money Certainly being a member of Congress than he did being a medical doctor you know just the idea that he held onto.

Ron Paul Congress US Mitt Romney CNN Congressman Schmo Tracy Flick Hollywood Constitution town hall Wolf Blitzer Virginia chairman state rep DC Roz Carol
"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:33 min | 2 years ago

"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Gotten a huge advance for this. There was big demand for it and he just US couldn't believe that anybody gave a damn about any of the details of his life. He just could not believe that and his heart wasn't in it so he decided no no. Thanks so the money didn't matter it was. He just couldn't bring himself to people cared. And I know you're kind of the same way but Dogana Jeff diced there are some details that I want to wring out here people do care about. GimMe Your if you don't want to give me too long of a story. I WanNa know how somebody did. You grow up in California. Mostly yes okay. You start off in California. And somehow you have a successful career in things having to do with the financial world. And then somehow your Ron Paul Chief of staff and somewhere along the line you become an Ostra Libertarian. Teheran this is not the normal career path for most people so we are curious about. What were you reading? who were your influences? How did you because I didn't? I mean I I knew you existed. But we didn't have any mutual friends all of a sudden you just came out of nowhere. Who the heck were you? Yeah that's interesting. You know. I come from mostly mostly a background of libertarianism. I never went through a phase otherwise and that's mostly attributable to my father and to my older brother so when I was a kid in high school junior high. My Dad had some copies of books. Like the road to serfdom laying around My older brother Steve was getting a nineteen eighties. Eighties version of reason magazine in the mail. So I had some influences like that and of course I had some Ayn rand books that came into my possession which are very dog-eared which I still have today and my mom was probably not as thrilled about the randy and stuff because she thought it would make me an atheist or at least inclined me that way and I probably did go through a little bit of an obnoxious objective EST atheist phase to be frank in my late. Let's say late teens early twenties but for me you know. My Love was always literature. I thought I was going to be an English professor. Oh my God thank God we saved you from the. Yeah that's really what motivated me and I particularly liked Twentieth Century British Satire Evil in Wa. Graham Greene stuff like that. So my plan was hey. I'M GONNA go become a university professor and teach literature and and that sort of thing and at this point you know we start to get into the early nineteen nineties and I started to become aware that there was a PhD glut especially in California. And so I was going to school school in San Diego at the time and I started to rethink path and I said you know. It's the idea. Being a refresher appeals to me but I have to be realistic. And I don't WanNa be poor and and and Yada Yada Yada so at that point I thought about going to law school and ultimately did and from my perspective it sort of dovetailed with my personal interest because I was already a budding being libertarian. And felt that you know as a lawyer I might be able to help defend people against the state whether that would be criminal where I think you know rather regardless of whether the purses versus factually guilty of the acts the alleged to have committed. That doesn't mean the state has any moral ethical legal right to prosecute them and you know I ultimately went into tax simply because I felt like the tax payer was always in the right. There is no such thing as a just tax. There's no such thing as lying on your taxes or cheating cheating on your taxes that sort of thing and so in the early nineteen nineties I had a good friend Joe Becker who was a graduate who at student at UNLV because Murray Rothbart and Hans Hopper were teaching there at the time that was the reason he was there. So I was living in San Diego and he would occasionally say. Hey come on up to Las Vegas you gotTa see this guy. Marie Rothbart this professor so I said okay. I'll come up and drove up a few different times and Rothbart courses were always at night. He was very much a night owl so he taught his graduate sessions at night and afterwards they would all go to a little place not on the Strip by any stretch. This is way off strip. I think it was on Sahara Avenue. A little place called the stakeout which is a little sort of Gripe Video Poker Burger joint and I think it's still there actually and Murray would come and talk to his students and hop I think would sometimes come so I didn't really realize in those one or two times that I might have met rock that I did meet Rothbart. I didn't really realize what he was. I knew he was a libertarian. Professor and I had heard the term Austrian economics but I was still at that point very much in that sort of you know generic libertarian camp. I thought things like legalizing pot. That was still A. That was still edgy. Back then at taxpayer-funded stadiums are bullshit. You know that was. That was the sort of level. I love my libertarianism. And if you know we still find this today in other words. Libertarians who aren't rooted in economics generally bad libertarians and so thankfully thankfully. I found out through my friend Joe about the Austrian school inserted reading that heavier denser stuff which I'm now in retrospect glad to have have read but As far as Ron Goes Dr Paul just a few years earlier when he ran for president in one thousand nine eight I was just getting into undergraduate. I guess second you're an undergraduate. Maybe and so I went and saw him and back then of course you had to know that he was coming. He came to a little Ramada. OUGHTA in in Santa Ana California. Believe it's no longer Ramada in the building still there and so I think through my local Libertarian Group headed newsletter or something and I mean physical newsletter newsletter and I found out about him coming in I went and saw him. And that's where I met a couple people with whom I would stay in touch over the years. And so I have in a sense sense known ron for that long and then stayed in touch with him but My intention was was very much just to be a lawyer and I never imagined edge and I would be doing anything else with my life. I I got into mergers and acquisitions which is a very particular area of tax law. All the stuff dealing with buying and and selling companies which as you can imagine. There's a lot of complex tax structuring and a lot of cross-border international elements to this stuff. And so it gets very complex and as a result all especially from well a little bit in the nineties with Alan Greenspan and the early two thousands and then especially with Bernardi up until the crash really of two thousand seven The manet market really really went crazy in the United States will actually worldwide but especially in the United States and so oh it was a it was Lucrative at the time it was very easy to have a job you got a lot of calls from recruiters so it was good ee. No strictly from that perspective effective is a good place to be and So it was really just a call from a friend of mine who worked for Iran later on that sort of convinced me to end up working for him in his congressional office. And then through Ron Meeting Lou Rockwell not only coming to the institute so all of that is kind of a I guess a quick quick and dirty version of how I came to be sitting here where I am today in this room and Musa's institute. She's there's a lot of stuff that I could riff on but I WANNA on a pick out one in particular. You're kind of offhand remark. That people who are not rooted in economics tend to be bad libertarians. And here that I think some people in the audience here and that can't be right. You know economic system for everybody but there are very few exceptions to this rule. It turns out it's very strange range. I mean it and I think I have a theory as to why it is but when I think of people who are kind of squishy in their libertarianism. Or they're more interested in appearing appearing chic than they are and being really principled. Almost none of them are rooted in economics because economics. We were looking at private property and the Division of Labor and all these clear cut things that were if there's nothing mushy about it. There's nothing flighty about it. And it routes you in something. It's not that libertarianism is about alternative lifestyles I mean. Obviously Libertarianism says. You can't use violence against people because you disagree with their lifestyle. But that's not what fundamentally it is. It's fundamentally non-aggression peace and all these other things that I think flow naturally from economics but also I think about some of the people I have to deal with who are sniping keeping at me from the sidelines and almost none of them are in the Fed people. Almost none ever talk about the Fed. It's always the same three or four issues.

Ron Paul California professor Murray Rothbart San Diego Joe Becker Fed Marie Rothbart Dogana Teheran Ayn rand Rothbart United States Las Vegas Jeff Libertarian Group Graham Greene Steve
"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

11:55 min | 3 years ago

"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Up is the churches are enemies of the people we need to take their their their valuables and there are stories of priests trying to bar the doors so that the valuables could be you you have photographs of russian soldiers walking out holding statues and stuff taking them from the churches but let it is going to spend this for disaster for famine relief relief. The famine relief will come from herbert hoover in the west. He's going to spend it on on weapons and stuff. I mean it's just like out of a out of an straight is straight out of an or one of oh my favorite thing by the way that's in the in the <hes> the richard pipes book is the they tried to to really really make the culture her be a culture of the working man and so instead of the old fashioned orchestra with the wind instruments and the string instruments instead they they would have orchestral oh productions of of a factory whistles and factory noise and so they tried to do this but the problem was no one could tell what the hell music. It was like no one. Could i mean it was that's stupid. I mean it was really that ideologically bizarre will yeah i mean you can't make this stuff up but of course it it office and i i would say that if you look at western civilization it all goes back to the french revolution. It all fits with that because it was. It was happened in the french revolution. We're just gonna. We're going to radically restructure everything. The church is going to be now. The and france it was the church of reason right and then of course in russia the churches become the museum of atheism awesome right so you've got to have that but i think it all makes sense. We're gonna we're gonna restructure entire in society entirely and the the thing i love about it is that when people talk about these things today and it's all that's just slippery slope analogy. It's never going to happen here. That can't happen the united states because we're just so against communism. None of that stuff would happen. Are you sure i mean you look at what's going on in the arts and other things you can see that there is our strains of this in the united states and it's all ties back to that that revolutionary revolutionary period but when you talk about the lenin marching off with these with these with gold and i mean essentially a roman policy enrich the soldiers and scorn and all others i mean that was the point of the roman empire by the time you get to the severn dynasty <hes> so it's all to terrorism. I think that it's just a modern manifestation of it and it's fascinating as you said to see how this stuff goes from. <hes> you know incremental change and then just i mean it's just overblown. Everything just gets blown up and then you have this horrible government. Nobody knows what to do with and it takes eighty years or so for it took off all the part there are some really really blood-curdling blood-curdling quotations from lennon that you can find where somebody says <hes> which which person it was it was speaking to him but there was some institutional some institution within the government or some agency and it was like the commissary at four blah blah blah blah but basically its purpose was to execute dissidents and so so an adviser of some sort said to lennon we should call it the commissary for social extermination and lennon said we should but we you know obviously we can't. I mean just very very blunt about all this and of course the the rage he has. He's like like marks in this respect the of anyone who disagrees with him even even marginally i mean you know half. Most people wouldn't even be able to tell the difference between lenin an and half his opponents and he would denounce the just the way mark steyn. Mark spent so much of his time instead of spending his early years writing his systematic treatise rita's he spends it responding to complete. Nobody's like it's like he's so sense hypersensitive. He has to respond even to a complete. Nobody who's who's tracked against marxism. Nobody read or who was disagreeing with him ten percent and so he'll smash these things lennon was very much the same way i mean he cannot not bear criticism and it's not just that will we have an honorable disagreement. It's that these are just are absolute enemies and they need to be wiped. It's it's <hes> it's just blood-curdling. Yeah i mean <hes> when you look at ideology and i think this is something that's important to wildlife the russian revolution in because because of the interest in ideology and how dangerous ideology can actually be in. I one of the things we we we talked about talking about on this this week. Was you know where where do i fit politically and one of the things that i've always thought was dangerous as ideology in general i i'm not an ideologue. I simply like tradition. I like <hes>. I like the things that have come before. We have examples. I mean this is so you look at examples and you say okay <hes> where show me where <hes> lefty you talked to the lefties the the progressives or the show me where this thing has actually ever worked out well. Is there any example anyone and of course they all say what about scandinavia as as you pointed out many times that that doesn't even work there but show me where <hes> this this ideologist you have actually works an example <hes> in in practice and we can talk about it but they can't and so it always has to go to that point where you start really oppressing. People are abusing people to get what you want and i think that's one of the lasting effects of of the russian revolution and and we should be looking at that but we don't <hes> so if if we could get anything out of it it would be that the danger of ideology <hes> in in politics and why tradition should be much more important when we're talking about things <hes> and and ideas in society i mean this is what patrick can reset the experience with my only guide <hes> or i'm sorry john dickerson experiences my only god reason renee may miss <hes> lead us or patrick henry and his you know his losing up hope when he pointed out and he said i but one lamp i wish my feeder got it and that is experienced so we have experienced versus russia which is ideology which is awful and ah that that's always been a draw to me as well you could say though that maybe the problems in russia were just so entrenched that you couldn't have an evolutionary berkey and solution. You needed some kind of dramatic rupture. Maybe somebody could say that possibly but i mean look when there was attempt at reform before nicholas the second and the and the idiots who blew 'em up right. I mean <hes> <hes> nicholas's. <hes> grandfather was trying to <hes> to institute a duma. He was trying to do things and they blew up on a bridge. I mean so this is the ideologues working against. I mean ultimately. They're going to get what they want but i mean this is. This is where are you could have had a solution. It was there but when you get ideology and it becomes so blinded by what you have to maybe have an incremental change here in there <hes> it. It creates that kind of environment so <hes>. I think that <hes> you know russia. Maybe it took something like that but i mean are we gonna. I find that to be a hard to believe that something could have been done to make it better me. Look nicholas was willing to advocate and have a have a constitutional system. We had that are the mensheviks for a time. The mentioned mentioned mix made the mistake and keeping world war one going if they didn't this is where we get back to work again to if there's no world war one the way it was working then there would have been. I think think the russian revolution never happens. <hes> so war is a disaster. That's the other part of this thing that i like about it too and and maybe that that <hes> that duma with the mensheviks in charge charge when available to keep the the bolsheviks at bay <hes> and not allow them to take our. I don't know if that will never know it's interesting that edmund burke burke <hes> talks about the problems with the french revolution and having been a radical break instead of an organic evolution from the past and contrast that with the history of his own country but it's like he was there. No english civil war where the king was executed. There's a small detail well sure but i mean at the end of the day what happens though i mean that that government only lasts for a very brief time and then it's booted out again because the people they want want to be able to dance and listen to music and they didn't like a pure the puritans can the no puritans now controlling everything in society so <hes> i think that in that way you know you had that reaction to conservative reaction they got rid of those people and you went back to what it was before but with of course then you had the bloodless revolution in in the glorious revolution of sixteen eighty eight which did change things so i mean it's possible <hes>. I don't know i mean this. We're this. This could be a big topic. We talk about have very high without without bloodshed yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah and bloodshed just <hes> you just never know where it's gonna take now. We're we're getting to the end of brian. Mcclennan weakened and i haven't really asked you even though we did do an episode about you. I haven't really asked you to just just flat out. Describe your politics because you are not like you know you. You don't come out and say i'm a libertarian. I'm a conservative. I'm of this or that. <hes> you seem like somebody who just believes in the system established by the framers and and you know you'll take that where it takes you but i am. I'm curious because apparently even some of your own. Listeners sometimes have trouble trying to pin you down on exactly what and who you are. So how would you describe your politics. It's used to say and this is something. I try to do on purpose <hes> because i don't want to be pigeonholed one way or another i i like to have some intellectual alexa flexibility <hes>. It's not that i don't believe in things. It's just that you know <hes>. I'm not someone who <hes> will. I like to talk about ideas but <hes> i've always said that i'm an american traditionalist and i remember years ago. I said that in goodman's piped-in what the heck does that mean kevin guzman that is that's kevin right there. Yeah what the heck does that mean so. I believe as you said in the end the tradition that was established with federalism <hes> i do believe leave in republicanism with a lower case r <hes> and that would be how i would describe myself..

lennon russia nicholas united states lenin herbert hoover mark steyn patrick henry kevin guzman france scandinavia edmund burke burke rita goodman Mcclennan brian john dickerson
"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

11:18 min | 3 years ago

"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"But you also believe in not run yourself ragged and maintaining -taining your mental health and you need the self taught ron paul curriculum for which i made four hundred videos on history and government get it from me and i'll throw in three exclusive suv unbelievable bonuses. You can't get anywhere else. How do you get it through me. Head over to ron paul homeschool dot com everybody. Tom woods here very glad to be carrying on with brian mcclanahan week. Brian is the author of many books as i've told you this week holds a p._h._d. In history from the university of south carolina very knowledgeable right right off the bat. I knew i wanted him teaching me at liberty classroom dot com where you can learn the history and economics. They didn't teach you and today when we're talking about the south. This is the forbidden topic. If you are interested in the south you probably support slavery and segregation that is the level of discourse you can expect even in parts of the libertarian movement where there are libertarian movement where i fully expect to hear the leftist conventional wisdom repeated without irony and with <hes> without any skepticism so thought today we would talk with this. I mean after all liberty fund which is the great organization that holds academic symposia and also <hes> helps to keep a lot of great and important libertarian and liberty related works in print in inexpensive editions. One of the books they published was called the southern thirty s as of richard m weaver. They didn't think to themselves oh. It's libertarian rehearsal buca boat too so because that means we look slavery back then you know there were more more libertarians than today who had an. I q above seventy five so it was possible. Release a book like that and that's a great book by the way of course it is. I mean what liberty fund would never released that it's a great book and it should be read but what is the deal with the south. Is there anything valuable. In the southern tradition or is all tied up with slaves brian mcclanahan <hes> basically spent and at least half his childhood in delaware so not not really in the south but nevertheless <hes> came to have real interest in the subject so i thought as part brian mcclanahan week let's talk about the south and what we might say four the south and is there any benefit that comes to us from studying and perhaps even appreciating the south brian right welcome back. Thanks very much. Tom appreciate it all right. We're right in the middle of brian mcclanahan week so let's talk about the south. We talked about your background. We've talked about some lesser-known presidents but let's talk about the south because of course today if you say you're interested in the south will what reason could you have for that other than you want to oppress. Black people like this is the level. This is the level that you are at. This is a and it's so funny. There are people who <hes> go after me and they really think they're zing in me on this stuff and right. If they had any idea that utter contempt i have for them and how absolutely stupid i think they are. They have no idea you are not hurting me in anyway anyway. I i would want to be disliked by people who are frankly that dumb right so so we did talk a little bit about how you as a guy i who would say grew up. Let's at least half your youth was spent in delaware. <hes> nevertheless came to be a southern historian and not explicitly southern historian but one when you are with the abbeville institute so that is obviously part of who you are <hes> when people hear that again as i say you know perfectly well they. I think the worst now they don't. They don't think that if you're interested in any other area even though in any other area you can also find aspects that nobody likes you know you can eh but they just think that the bad parts of southern history are the only that's that is what the south is and there's there's nothing else to be set so that's what i thought when i went off to college of course horsa. What else would i think right. There's no way to have any exposure any other way of thinking so the thing that i know i'm asking you and yet here. I am telling you my story but the the thing that made me think well. Maybe there's maybe the south has something to say to us. Was i was in american intellectual history which was a two semester course taught by donald fleming at harvard donald fleming as far as i know published nothing maybe published one thing then he'd get tenure and for the next fifty years he did nothing other than deliver word for word the same lectures every year and how do i know they were the same lectures because a friend of mine took extra he dictated at the notes or whatever he took the most amazing notes and he said he's going to teach you so much. It's going to be beneficial for you to have these notes as he's talking to you so i had them and he's saying word word for word the same thing that he said the previous year the for that so anyway he but he introduced us to the the book by the so-called twelve southerners called. I'll take my stand dan. I never heard of that. How would i've heard of this. No one's going to teach me that and so. I thought well that's interesting. Maybe they should be fair. I mean it was honest to goodness. I thought i should be fair. I i shouldn't just say these. People were all stupid backwards hicks. Maybe i should read them. So i read i'll take my stand and i thought okay i don't agree with everything this book but that was not stupid and that was not not a waste of my time and nobody knows any of this and <hes> so i felt like i had been propagandized as soon as i read that book thought i've been propagandized and that's just is not right and i resented that now intra interestingly enough and i will i know this is brian mcclennan and weaken the string and tom was weak the more i talk but while i was there eugene genovese came and gave a series of lectures at harvard about the southern tradition and he later published a book which i believe was called the southern tradition yes and and he and every luminary imaginable was there to hear these lectures and they were of course brilliant agenda was an ex marxist but he's still had had plenty of leftist sympathies 'these and yet he was saying there's much value in the southern tradition this guy he's an ex marxist okay but but still with some leftist sympathies and even a he was able to say you know it's actually not all slavery you know there was something to be so he gave this these these lectures and i remember him saying now listen if you go down to some podunk southern college in the middle of nowhere and you start lecturing in the south. Will you better not have a misplaced semi-colon because they're gonna call you on it. He said however if you we'll go up and lecture on the south at an ivy league university don't worry about it. Nobody's gonna know anything and he said that to a group of harvard professors it was so delicious so so are so that to me all right. I mean here's a guy from the left. Who said let me be fair. Maybe there's something here that i can learn from so i so all the low. I q dumb guy people in the libertarian movement. Just don't mean anything to me compared to these people so all right so tell me if if somebody said oh okay you want to comment on that first of all with genovese in just say there's something to this actually said that not denying the southern tradition was a cultural and political political atrocity yes. That's it's an atrocity not just hey. There's something to this. No this an atrocity yeah so i could you imagine you you. You're saying that or be saying that it'll be the end of the world. It'd be end of the world if you said that right well of course because we were just not wanna press black people i mean what other reason could you have right right well. Let's try to be uncharitable as possible in our interpretation of other people right now suppose somebody says look you're there. You are with the abbeville institute which wants to preserve what's good in the southern tradition. Was that me well. I think first of all the institute it was founded about seventeen years ago. Don livingston who is a great philosopher. Donn livingston taught at emory university. He was internationally recognized as a hume scholar. I mean he he was known. All over the world as the foremost hume scholar in the united states <hes> so he's not again. He's an intellectual lightweight by any stretch of the imagination but the idea is to explore what is true invaluable in the southern tradition. So what does that mean. What's true invaluable. Well obviously slavery and jim crow aren't these things aren't true invaluable right. I mean it's it's not something that we would even want to discuss but when you look back at american history and you find the things that made america great just use that phrase when used that phrase course now that's politically loaded but if you find what was what was beneficial about america what was something that really when people identify with america well who was the the quintessential american at one time vows ask you the quick. I'll ask you the question in your mind going back to the eighteenth or nineteenth century. Who was the american that all over the world or even. We'll just say the united states. Who would people identify with if you were just a point one person american who would that be. I would say thomas jefferson of virginia. Okay jefferson percents one right or you could say george watson jewish washington also virginian or you could say daniel boone daniel boone. If you look at james spend more cooper right so i'm not from your i know you are but your listeners james damore cooper at the the leather stocking tales for <hes> the the deer slayer last of the mohicans select people both that film oh yeah lasts the mohicans great well <hes> and the film is nothing like the book but the main character is essentially daniel boone and this is why ben franklin went over to france and were a coon skin cap. I mean he's trying to show that. He's one of these frontiers men right so i was thinking politicians yeah well. It's politician recruitment but even there by the way i mean it james madison george mason you just go on. There's so many people just coming from virginia alone. That's right so i mean that was that's the southern tradition and that is when you think about the declaration of independence who wrote that while thomas jefferson who who has called the father of the constitution well james madison so you look at all of these things that are quintessentially american and it's southern the the indispensable man george washington is southern and he was that that way because of his cavalier rearing i mean it was that was the southern tradition so that's what drew me into it. It was this my gosh you look at all these. If we want to talk about our aside nullification well we can go back and point the suffolk resolves which i think is fantastic by the way out of massachusetts <hes> and but then you the first major your explanation of that in the united states was jefferson and madison in virginia kentucky and then you've got calhoun and so you've got. You've got this nullification thing. You've got got this this independence thing. You've got all these things that really make america's the american character when we had texas independence in eighteen thirty six what did william barrett travis say well. He's fighting for liberty all things dear to the american character what's that its independence and self-determination so these things are southern and it's not that of course new englanders didn't get involved this stuff either they did of course but <hes> when you think about who really defined america in the first eight years of american history history it's the south. It's southerners. So that's the tradition we want to talk about the political tradition which is important for us today of course even parts of the culture tradition are rich. I mean southern literature southern music <hes> southern art i mean there's so many things to talk about their that really make up what it did this fabric of the united states and as you said if you just say i like the south if you're going to study the south you're gonna studied as a specimen..

brian mcclanahan united states america Tom woods thomas jefferson university of south carolina eugene genovese virginia delaware ron paul Brian james madison donald fleming harvard daniel boone abbeville institute richard m weaver brian mcclennan
"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

13:22 min | 3 years ago

"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"It's very much padding on the head patronizing attitude in the guise of diversity, and I mean, if you're dumb enough to fall for it. I don't know what to tell you. But it is patronising. Now, tomorrow's debate is opposed to or I beg your pardon tonight's debate. Now, obviously has some of the heavier hitters in it, because it's got Biden, Bernie Sanders and so held mayor Pete. And they say that the division into the two debates was entirely random, which is possible. But you may say but on the other hand, Elizabeth Warren was in the one last night. But on the other hand, I think her more recent rise in the polls came after they placed her in this particular one. So this clearly seems like the underdogs Elliott my wrong. No, you're exactly. Right. But I, I must say I thought it was interesting. I mean, I didn't I'd never encountered Jay Inslee. Who's the, the I think the governor Washington. Yes. And he said, you know the world's coming to an end. We have to have climate change is the only issue is number one. Number two. Number three. And I'm the only candidate who says that climate change is the number one issue and the beaches of Miami or flooding already from the, the oceans horizon. They did this course anything make up any kind of baloney, but I thought that he was in a town, you know, very unpleasant guy. And if he'd had a chance and I think he didn't have a chance. He ended it last night. So that, that was good same. Because the Blasio, I think, in the polls is pulling actually zero. Yeah. Maybe after last night, he'll move up to, you know, one or something. But I thought you know, they also talked about immigration that was a big issue and about how everybody had to come in, and, and we why crossing the border illegally should not be illegal, but should be a civil of hats. I guess, like a parking ticket or something. So why? You know, we have to give all kinds of resources, we have to take care of everybody wants to come in, especially people coming in with children and are horrible. The children are being separated from the adults, but of course, a lot of these adults are bringing a renting these children, so they can come in as refugees. Maybe some of them have unfortunate motives worse than that. But I think it's I think the idea that everybody should becoming in. Welcome. Everybody welcomed the whole where we can double the American population everybody. They all go on welfare, and they all have dramatically different cultures, whether they're from Africa or Central America or Syria, where wherever they're coming from. It's I would say the I don't want to see if this all happened continues, and Trump turns out to be like an open borders guy, to at least in practical terms, if not, if not in terms of his speeches. And if this all continues really could be the end of America. As we know it. I not Tucker Carlson has been broadcasting from Japan, where he's going to probably was going to greet Trump when he got when he when he got for the G twenty and it's interesting, he said, this is he said, this is an unbelievably clean countries at the streets of Tokyo, or cleaning, then he was he was in the main train station in Tokyo. And he said, if you look at this place, he said, there's no trash, there's no dirt. He said, the, the trains are shiny. The floors are clean. Nobody begging he said, it's, it's quite extraordinary said, of course, there's no diversity. They, they don't allow immigration. And I thought that was interesting point. Also, I liked it when and culture yesterday was talking about this article about the ten most expensive cities to live in the country. And she said you notice that eight of these ten are Asian, and they're all are. Are non diverse. And so it's, it's she said, that's, that's why they're so desirable. So it's, it's we still have the people who are against open borders. I don't think any of the Democrats last night, by the way, use the phrase open borders, so they may be slightly concerned about that. I know the cokes, of course, the big advocates of open borders, and they, and they say so, and they must want other effigies installed in Wichita and the coca state. No, I guess not. But anyway, it's, it's this is this is a big issue. It's, it's rightly a big issue, and they all assume that all Americans want all these people coming in and going on welfare and changing radically changing our culture with with no with no American ever asked, if they want this and it's, it's like they were all saying that horrible, communist poem on the, the inside of the statue of liberty about, you know, give us your. All your poor and your and your the worst people in your culture. We want to take care of them. Well, maybe we don't wanna take care of them. Well, in particular, Julian Castro kind of gave the game away when he said, we need a Marshall plan for what a mile off on. It is always a shakedown. It's not just a we just we just innocently wants some people to be able to move freely. It's come on now. I mean what what do you think? I'm seven come on. It's always enlargement of the state. It's a here. It is. If you don't want people coming in who we demand, the subsidy of and special privileges for, then you're gonna pay you're gonna pony up some money for these countries. And it might be too pedantic even to point out that the original Marshall plan for Europe was totally overrated in its results. Right, basically, it's countries that got no Marshall aid actually did better and countries that got more their, their recovery lagged the opposite of what it should have been. If it really worked. I actually talk about that in. I have my politically incorrect guide to American history book, get some stuff on that. So I don't even want that Marshall plan even from for utilitarian standpoint, but also because I don't wanna shake down. I mean what I'm going to bribe some other regime, and then how's that enforceable? The I guess the idea is that the, the money will make them more prosperous, and they won't wanna leap when is that were you have my machine and it makes the country more prosperous, never if that is the opposite of how it works that, that really is, as Peter Bauer showed that really is the opposite of outwards with the original Marshall plan. There were a lot of bureaucrats and politicians and people got contracts to supply, the food and so forth in this country made a lot of money out of the Marshall plan. That is a good point that with those were the beneficiaries of the people who got the contracts. Absolutely. Of course, we got from Jay Inslee. We got unions gave us the weekend. I mean, the The face. face if it weren't for slogans like that. So maybe on my show notes page, I actually have an article in this unions in the weekend. I mean that we're then everybody Bangladesh get the weekend, off by just introducing unions, or, or the caveman cavewoman could have gotten the weekends off, if they could just have introduced labourers is there a teensy bit of a possibility that it might be more complicated than that. If the society isn't wealthy enough to support people taking the weekends off. I don't care how much she unionize totally irrelevant. That's nothing to do with it. But, you know, I have to say Lou this, that just even that reminds me that is one thing. I can say about the Republican debates is that they were slightly easier to endure than this thing that for some reason, maybe because somebody was telling me last night. Don't forget, we had Donald Trump giving us comic relief. Right. And so we did have that. But at least sometimes Republicans would at least give lip service to stuff we knew they had no intention of doing that was at least. Lease something whereas this was just a constant assault of catastrophic suggestions all night long. No, it's. It's true. And of course, they're all socialist, and they all want hugely bigger government. I notice that nobody was asked a question about how much is this gonna cost and who's going to pay for it? None of them, of course, volunteered. That is just gonna be like magic where it's the sugar kingdom or something where everything is. So right Sweden eyesight. Yeah. And I jotted down things just for just the little throwaway lines. They had like Cory Booker talking about people working two jobs and can't make a living wage, and so, and that's right out of the Alexandria, Cossio Cortez playbook, because she tried to claim this people are working eighty hours a week. They can't feed their families. First of all, who, who eighty hours a week and you can't feed you can't feed your family. Maybe that's crazy to me. But also this statistic about people holding multiple jobs. It's actually at a pretty low point right now. It's, it's basically moved between four point seven and five point two percent during. The recovery from our great recession, and that's actually lower than where it was over the previous fifteen to twenty years. In fact, it was the peak of the nineteen ninety s boom where the percentage of people working two jobs was at its highest. So this is just a throwaway false line that no one gets called on. But it it's not true. And then they asked everybody or at least they ask some candidates about the, the gender pay gap. I got shop and Tulsi to her credit more or less ignored the question and talked about militarism, but Julian Castro gives his story about his mother struggled. She was a single and mom's getting paid less because they're women, and we need to pass a law saying that women get paid the same for doing the same. We're yeah. They passed that law in nineteen sixty three the equal pay act of nineteen six threes already exists, actually. And that's not what the gender pay gap is about. It's not about women and men getting paid differently for doing the same work. The you're not allowed to do that. That's has nothing to do with it. It's that they take what women earn. They add. Ended up into a big number. And they take what men are they? They ended up in have big number. Then they compare the numbers and has nothing to do with the same where they have different work. They work fewer hours. You know, even looking at the same amount of hours work less experience, and nobody calls them on this less experience, interruption by childbearing me all kinds of different factors. But of course, at a democratic debate. Absolutely. Nobody's going to call anybody on this. And there are no fact checkers around, no stupidest. True. All right. So where do you think things stand after this debate are, are there are there. I mean obviously Tulsi is a somewhat of a winner as a result of, of less. I'm not even talking about in terms of the merits of their comments, but rally who emerges with pluses rather than minds as a result of last night. I mean, Elizabeth Warren seemed very much like a an irritating technocrat but on the other hand the fact that she looks like the anointed candidate doesn't hurt. I mean, it should you would think an American society, people would think, you know, the. I don't know why this, this Lou this view isn't more common, the American establishment hasn't really delivered what I would like for my life, so I'm not necessarily going to automatically go for the people. They recommend because I'm not very impressed by them. And I got I got wars for no reason. I got the housing bubble. I got all this stuff all the things they complain about. Well, they pretty much been in charge for pretty long time. And they still couldn't prevent the very things, they're all complaining about. I'm not really impressed by these people. I'm going to go for the people. The establishment is against why more Americans aren't that way. But apparently for some reason, they're very impressed with how the establishment is treated them. I guess so being anointed, the establishment candidate is not a bad thing for Warren. So, so what do you think happens as a result of this debate? Well, she's the establishment candidate last night on that stage, but doesn't Bernie, and, and, yeah, Biden, and of course, they always include Kamala Harris is in the top renting. Oh, that's true. She's not. No. But I think. You know, I think that I think Elizabeth Warren was hurt last night, even though she was in the center stage even though she got the most time she just was is extremely irritating. And do people want to hear one wanna president of the talks like this? I mean that's a that's a minor point to make. But I, I don't think any of the I mean, the Tulsi Gabbard that was the only one at least the most dignified candidate Elizabeth was just undignified and full of these gigantic socialist plans that you have to participate in them. So that I you know, but she's, she guess you came in second, but then the rest of them were all all lower. And I don't think you know, de Blasios Brian club HR Inslee. Castro. Mean these are all people who were all losers and they showed themselves as losers. Yeah. Last night. So I'll be interested to see what you know, how the polls show after the debate tonight. And my guess is that Biden, I don't want to, I don't wanna be unkind to poor Biden, but is he is he entirely there? Yeah. No, that's a good question. We're going to see that. For me. It's you know, I think that's maybe a problem for him. Bernie, of course, we'll never shut up. And, and it's going to be interesting tonight. So we'll just have to see. But I think last night, the, the media lost not only because of their Mike problems..

Elizabeth Warren Biden Julian Castro Bernie Sanders Jay Inslee Donald Trump Tulsi Lou Washington Democrats Tulsi Gabbard Marshall Tucker Carlson Miami Pete Peter Bauer Tokyo Sweden
"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"tom wood" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Who's just coming out and taking the easiest position that, you know, everyone around you is gonna Pat, you on the back for the Tom woods. It was like a hero of mine. Yeah. He's good. Friends with Michael malices. Great libertarian. He wrote this in his book, the book is real descent. And this always really stuck with me. But he basically what he said, was an I'll probably butcher this, but more or less the point was he said, look, if you're against slavery in the year, two thousand nineteen that's pretty much meaningless everybody's against very I mean ninety nine point nine percent of us. Been over for a long time. There's no real threat of rail slavery coming back in America. But if you were if you were against slavery in eighteen forty. Something that meant something like the abolitionist party had less than two percent of the vote abolitionists were getting lynched regular. You really putting your ass on the line. Right. So the question that's important is, what are you willing to stand for that's unpopular that can put you in a risky position? And he goes for all the people who are jumping on the most popular issues, I can promise you, you wouldn't have been against over eighteen four. That's the thing to me. It's like it's, it's cute to do stuff. Say stuff when it's convenient. Yeah. Comfort is the great maker of cowards. Yeah. Xantia like you like you get it s q as great cool when it's convenient try going into areas, like we do, and I'm not saying just as as the Pat on the back. But yo has to be some sort of pattern of back from me, like, yeah, we work hard to make sure to areas that are deliberately misinformed deliberately kept out of certain conversations. We got raise the money and then go spend. Money and then go find places while not getting shot while we dare. Yeah. And well, I know this clearly from from the positions you take in the work you do that. You're willing to take positions that actually put you in a dangerous situation. You're opposing like very high levels of state power and also just opposing what is the common orthodoxy of what you're supposed to believe? You're supposed to be saying is when did you start black UN's matter? We started ironically going into the twenty sixteen national elections. Okay. We kept hearing y'all we need a licensed of voter registration vibe, and, you know, me, and my friends was like, you'll lean-to license the carry Dr trip. Yeah. You know what I'm saying? And so, again, I say this all the time, it start at, like as like a funny thing, and he was, like yell at me, and my partner Janine was like, yo. Let's do one. Let's just do then. Right. And we call it black guns mad because it was time. We'll black lives matter was doing thing. And my thing was y'all. I don't care if you think my life matters. I don't care. That's in your head. That's you gotta deal with if you wanna look at me. Awesome. If you don't. That's awesome, too. I'm not here to convince anybody in my life matters. I wanna have the means to make sure that I can defend my life because it matters. Right. Right. I don't care what you. So we did that, that way, we had this class people came from Brooklyn to Philly. Right. And was like yo it was way too many people. It was way too many people and on you all live in jersey. I'm like, bro. You got a different set of master's over there. What I'm saying you're paperwork. You're, you know, permission slips are a little bit different. And for us, people was like, yeah, we need that. And so we said y'all what if we did thirteen cities after thirteen? Colonies, we've raised twenty five thousand dollars. And we did this like we did like a mini tour and we've been saying thing, and then it turns into, like y'all, we could. Do we do to go fund me? I sitting tool was Baltimore all talking about dues this comp complacent. Right. All of the gun dudes that we were like, okay. That was there for the classes that class where like, yeah, you shouldn't do you shouldn't do Baltimore the murder rate over this crazy. It's. Yeah. Should do Baltimore, Maryland. Not a gun friendly state. I'm like, duh..

Baltimore Tom woods Pat Michael malices UN America Maryland partner murder Janine Brooklyn Philly twenty five thousand dollars nine percent two percent