18 Burst results for "Tom Wagner"

"tom wagner" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

08:48 min | 7 months ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Myself. I think the distinction is that hybrid you're not able to say the seeds from that and maintain that variety in many cases are Ellen varieties have come about through. Hybrid breeding practices where you mix the genetics of more than one variety together so that you know that That's the key thing there, though it becomes open pollinated when the genetics could stabilize get the stabilization requires, you know several years of breeding out and selection to make sure that The year. You're maintaining the variety that is best going to be productive in years to come. Good example of that is the green zebra tomato. Man by the name of Tom Wagner in Washington State developed the Green Zabel probably about 35 years ago, and it takes the genetics of four different Um, tomatoes. He was looking for a green tomato that wouldn't crack. It was good for canning of all things, and he started working on the genetics of this when I was about 10 years old, so Goal smarter than I am when it comes to Garnett, but that green fever it now today isn't open pollinated variety. The jacks have been stabilized. You could say the seeds from the green zebra called them out next year. You're gonna get green fee, brah. So in in terms of your sort of jewel, call it participatory preservation. When members of SSE save their seeds, distribute them, sell them exchange them. It's really a benefit for the entire planet. And, of course, this this awareness Thank God is going on worldwide by individuals. And yet there are also some enormous Seed banks tell us a little bit, if you know about the USDA seed Bank in Port Collins, Colorado. Well, he favors a Zen mentioned earlier. We maintain Well, we have records of more than 25,000 varieties. But we way also back that up at the, uh, the USDA and Fort Collins and their seed bank, and it's called black box storage in essence. We send our seeds T 04 counts of the backup in the event that something you know catastrophic might happen to our seed bank. We know that there are seeds that Backed up on BC's While that Fort Collins belong to us, they are not redistributed by USDA on but are there other other seed groups who are seed savers that also store seed through the USDA in Colorado? I'm not sure. But I would guess that, yes, that that would be the case now when they store them. Obviously, they have a different set up than the normal householder who might put them in their closet. And if it's a back up against something catastrophic, God forbid they obviously consistory them for more than a few years. Yeah, they pretty much the standard is you're maintaining these seeds at about 18 Blow Celsius. So obviously cold slows down with generation now that said I had mentioned earlier. We do germination testing to determine Whether or not the germination rates of our collection are still viable, Then we also replenish for the purposes of evaluation and to increase feedstocks. It's actually changing in and out of our seats that we haven't four counts based on The latest grow up preservation this year is growing about 400 different varieties. The way in the gardens we haven't areas Farm Preservation department has identified about 400. Some of that is done for value took purposes. Was making sure that we're you know up to date on the characteristics of each variety on by some are growing up for Germany germination purposes, others to replenish the seed stock. So germination really determines pretty much what we grow. Make Sure now there's also another global seed vault in Norway. Yeah, fell by global seed vault is, uh, also known as the doomsday vault and that it's the Norwegian government, Norwegian Gene Bank and Global Crop Diversity Trust organization. Um, manage that as kind of a, um back up feed vault for the entire world. There's about 1400 seed banks. On the planet, of which seat saver's is one on Dwight have about, I think, 1600 varieties that we are storing their well and again. The seeds that we store it that vault They belong. Tow us. They're not redistributed. Anyway. Um, sort of like depositing your golden. You're safe back for a lot of developing nations that might not have the resources to maintain. Multiple seed banks in their countries. I was going to say it reminds me of people putting their gold in the safe deposit box and the seed really is the gold of the planet. I mean, oftentimes because we live in this sort of 24 7 world of going to the grocery store and getting what you want in this country. It's not often in the modern ear's mind that without seeds, we don't have food and the problem for those that haven't really focused on this GMO organisms. Is that the seeds or not fertile And the farmers can't seed take seed from their crop and replant. They have to keep buying. This kind of poison seed Franken Foods is what I think we used to call it, and it makes the seed company entirely in charge of the food of this planet. Who will get food who won't get food who will get seed to grow food and who won't. So this isn't just Zohar having another one of her environmental fits. This is looking at the reality of the planet, and what free will design is for and why God gave us It's incredible bounty, So I think what you all are doing is so incredibly vital for the future of the world. That was one of the reasons I sought you out to find out who in the United States was doing this work. So it's seed Savers Exchange and your heritage Farm of almost 900 acres. I was curious with the numbers of gardens you grow. How many gardeners you have. Oh, wow. We've got well again. You know, if you count the different members who are gardeners and who participate with us, Some of them also do evaluations for us. We have about 90. Members now in different parts of the United States who are growing out. I think six different varieties so they can tell us of any changes characteristics. They're different. For example, does this let us go very well in Oregon versus New Mexico versus Florida? Versus the KORA, Iowa, right, So they play a really significant role, not just in giving us seeds for the collection for us to maintain, but they are. They are very, very much involved in testing that our preservation effort and so how many? How many people? I mean, besides the membership of 13,000, or so how many hands are actually involved in your land we have about 52 regular staff. Wow. Higher about 20 to 25 seasonal staff. That's enormous. What an organization that is enormous. I'm involved with a very small, sustainable farm here and in Reisterstown through the pro stone retreat center. They have a farm and, you know, maybe 10 to do five acres or two acres or something, And I know just from myself and Laura. We do our garden here and It's really involved in terms of just time. There's no shortcuts by the time we got to go quite frankly, up until this last week. We've we've had kind of Ah, mild drought s O Z Heritage Farm. We've had two crews. We've been doing nothing but water, right? So, um No, it's it's put a lot of stress on our workload. That without question, But you know when you're right when you're when you're growing a variety specifically, um, you've got ice like them. We grow carrots and isolation tents because Queen Anne's lace which grows in our ditches would cross with it. We hand pollinate all of our squash, we hand pollinate all of our corn with all the obviously look and we hold that thought. I want to come back to that because the demise of the B Has many people concerned and hand pollination I've been told is going on in India widespread, so maybe we can talk about that when we return our guest, John Tor Grimsson is the executive director of Seed Savers Exchange. You confined them online it triple w dot seed savers dot or and folks If you.

John Tor Grimsson Laura USDA Tom Wagner Colorado Oregon Norway 10 Seed Savers Exchange New Mexico two acres Florida United States India next year Zohar five acres Iowa Washington State Germany
"tom wagner" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

08:38 min | 1 year ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Mom and dad loved him, and I'm staring. Actually, we have it. We have a visitor in the studio today, Baby, Billy. Maybe Billy is so quiet today. He's doing a great job. It's got this beautiful blond hair. His big blue eyes. And me. He's doing well. So thank the Lord. He's alive. He had a tumultuous start to his life. 30 days in the Nick you but he's doing great. And so who do we have next? Matt had a question on trust. Go ahead, man. A jazz. Someone recently reviewed our financial situation. My wife and I, and we realized that we have a network of about a $1,000,000. Right now. We're here in New York and We are thinking about ways going forward. We need to consider a trust for things that we own. We have a boat. We have the house, which is almost nearly paid on Do we start to transfer these things to a trust? Is that inappropriate move at this point. Trust is a great way to divorce proof. Creditor proof and value proof your heirs. Too many of our Our clients and people we know in dear They just want to leave their money to their kids, and then they get split up. And then the government could decide or crazy. People could get it. Predators, creditors in laws outlaws In a trust if done properly, and I'm not giving legal advice. But you may want to look at dynasty trust and trust that are out of the states that you reside in. Particularly because some of them have benefits if your heirs inherit them, and they live outside of a high tax state. Like New York or New Jersey. So yeah, definitely big advocate in trusts. Just watch the fees and I mean generally have a good one. You're going to be paying significant fees, but Trust could could provide creditor protection. Predator protection in lawn outlaw production. So if you want your money to go to your blood Relatives when you die. That's another benefit. So trusts are a something definitely to consider as part of the financial plan. And also one of my dear listener, friends. Send a nice picture of herself. I believe And she said, 100% right 5 20 nine's are awful as scholarships and financial aid. Can be affected. So Yeah, that's another thing. If your if your kids are really good student And if you have so much money in the 5 29 it may hinder that, But hey, you know Congrats on saving in 5 20 nine's is better to say than do not save And I'm sure you know you can put it to good use so Tona. Don't be discouraged. It's just to me. It's more of a shift. We're right now. In America, you know, plumbers and electrician's and things like that are making more then. The average college graduate, and they have less debt. Now. I'm not against college education for sale of money of a couple degrees. So But I did it without hurling myself into debt. And I don't you know, it has to be a financial decision just like anything else, you know, And the best lesson If you want to teach your kids lessons about money's right now, so now it sounds like you did great and call us at 88988 Josh, we would love to give you a second opinion on what you're doing. And how to incorporate a plan for retirement savings and the legacy. Also any other questions on that. No, we'll do. Thank you so much for your time. Wonderful. Thank you for calling. Made it 8988 Josh 88 9 at 856 74 So call us if you have any questions on stocks. Bonds, annuities mutual funds. College planning don't want to be clear. I'm not against educating your kids for educating My kids learn. Latin. They're learning the classics, so they don't even teach anymore Unless you get a degree in the classics, they learn grammar. All thanks to my wife's diligent home schooling at a fraction of the cost. And taxpayers should thank me so Give us a call. They did a nine it a Josh 80 88 90. Josh, This is funny. She says. Hi, baby. Billy, I got an email from somebody. I have a girl for you, but my granddaughter needs a college graduate. Oh, that's great. That's a good one. Baby building. Well, baby, Billy is going to be brilliant because All those brothers and sisters are so he's already you know, Think about how quiet he is. He's one years old, and he's just sitting there. Nice. He's a good boy. Hello to do, Um, and he's just listening to his dad. So give us a call 88988 Josh 889 and a 567 for if you want the 27 point ultimate financial game plan for retirement Did somebody say this was a week or two ago? Wire all the the guests lately Gu gloom and doom or doom and gloom. Well, I I don't know I can't help that. And I said to the guy will if you have a good Suggestion for a positive and uplifting Yeste. Give us a call. 8889 Today, Josh, if you want to uplift us and enlighten us, but if you look at the data, it's not that great. So I guess that's why they're all kind of negative and dour. So, Gordon, go ahead of my being too dour too negative or am I just tell him the truth telling it like it is? I know Josh, I I don't think so much. Ah, rather hear Ah, reality than you know, Rosie Fantasy outlook. Yeah, but everything's all these businesses. On the Jersey shore where I am They're running it, You know, 25% capacity. Imagine how many businesses will close. I was in the Poconos a week to 10 days ago on the guys. It's a lot of summer camps. Gonna close. So It's It's craziness. What's going on in the world today mean both covert related and Economically, you know? We have You know, my state of New Jersey Now they're mandating outdoor masks. I thought we were supposed to be outdoors. And now You can't even eat a hot dog. While walking along the Jersey boardwalk. You have to eat in these heated dining areas, and then you're allowed to not wear a mask so You're allowed. Not socially distance, then so things there are quite crazy in the world we live in today. Go ahead, Gordon. Yes, I heard yesterday Somebody mentioned that Restaurant owner mentioned that is this is my rage of the question. But since we're throwing about restaurants, I just like to say that some well known restaurant on said that you needed least 80% capacity to keep the restaurant going. So 25% or even 50% ain't going to do it. I don't think Now you can expect a writer restaurants as you say, to go out of business. Anyway. Last week, you had a great interview with Tom Wagner. It was definitely an annuity. And, yes, I remember..

Josh Billy Trust New Jersey New York Gordon Tom Wagner Nick Matt Restaurant America writer Um
"tom wagner" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The sixth worst airport in America what's the worst of the worst Newark Newark celebrity and getting customer orders in and out of the warehouse as fast as humanly possible key word human WBZ Jeff brown tells as robots are stepping up as we are stepping out these machines are doing the Monday aimed warehouse jobs that we simply don't want anymore put sort ship because companies are falling behind they have made and for labor that they can't sell that's Tom Wagner he is CEO of robotics company Berkshire gray robots can pick up an item recognize it and do something intelligent with us from getting those products in processed and then out the door it takes a coordinated dance on the factory floor larger amounts working with small robots in a coordinated orchestrated tradition so humans can focus on higher skilled jobs human workers can work side by side with the automation Bircher gray of Lexington just loaded up to with a quarter billion dollars an investor money and it's growing as well looking for you to fill some of those highly skilled jobs Jeff brown WBZ Boston's newsradio Wall Street landed up today across all three major indices more than eighteen hundred items related to hang up and others south shore town sold at auction by a Bellingham family that's been doing this for years fifty four seventy five five hundred for some big Bucks here at Trudell's auction house in Bellingham a miniature wouldn't firkin bucket made by cotton Hersey Addis toy shop in him in the eighteen hundreds ended up selling for a thousand dollars every Monday the auction house sells off antique furniture paintings Glasson dish where old toys and military garb things that owner guy Trudell finds in people's homes we go into a state or.

America Tom Wagner Lexington Boston Trudell Bellingham Newark Jeff brown Berkshire gray Hersey Addis Glasson guy Trudell
"tom wagner" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"In the Hamilton County jail after pleading guilty to battery van Fossen initially told police she talks to the girl's face in may but surveillance video from the bus shows her slapping the girl across the face van Fossen was also ordered to spend six months on probation Ashley Fowler ninety three W. I. B. C. mobile news the first time since nineteen ninety eight in Indiana patient has died of something called eastern EC wine and several lighters that's a rare brain infection carried by mosquitoes not all cases are fatal only about five to ten reported each year nationwide some parts of the impeachment hearings don't make any sense to congressman Jim banks like the hearings being taken up in six house committees what in the world does the financial services committee have to do with impeachment what is the ways and means committee have to do with impeachment so these other committees are taking up impeachment in query hearings against the the normal process banks on a deal at large as he and all other members of the house deserve a chance to vote on impeachment real police don't take payments in gift cards that's why you're getting a warning from police in fishers John Herrick explains they were using a legitimate name for a an illegitimate purposes Fisher's police department public information officer Tom Wagner says scammers are calling people and pretending to be a detective with the Hamilton County sheriff's office they were telling people that they had an outstanding warrant because they missed a court date and they needed to make restitution in the form of gift cards or green dot cards when you're says police will never ask you to do that.

"tom wagner" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Is what I estimated just in giving back to credit groups while, therefore. And the staff so that stayed out on, on national, that's amazing. That's amazing. We do more than that, of course. Yeah. We give back where we can we did a fundraiser last year to a member that passed away. So we help the we raffled off a bow came up with a couple of thousand dollars did a meet and greet it a good. But just laid out in Mesa at his pizza place, pizza mart on main street there. We sat down and everybody came and drink. Beer, pizza, and. Donated a after also done just under three thousand dollars to the marks Mark's wife might Mark. The pests away any TV accident. We had a good member of his son passed away. Tragically five year old son. We had guides that were raffling off or auctioning off just live option, right there on the Facebook page of enough, hunts. A bear hunt. Hawks and off all the proceeds went to it. We pleaded raffles. We had items come up. We ended up generating twelve or fifteen thousand dollars for the various son. We've had folks with cancer that fell behind a house payments are getting ready to be visited and other house before closers, let's come up with another raffle here. That's here's two thousand twenty five hundred bucks to help catch up on your house payments. Yeah. How many times have we said it that we're, we're giving you are. We really are. We're very, very generous group and this started this just blows me away. 'cause you rattling all this stuff. All right. No, I love it. And it's good here in good to see because it's, it's a Facebook or like. Oh, it's a Facebook group away to second. It's a Facebook group that does this does that does gives and gives gives those time and donate time and donates, money and resources. And I it became something. And if you if you don't understand the power of social media, even in our outdoor world, because we, we talked trash about social media, these kids off the screens and get them outside. They shouldn't be on the Facebook. They shouldn't be on Twitter and all this should be outside doing stuff. But it's now part of our world is part of our society, and it can be a force for good for outdoor. Good. Absolutely. It's, it's promoting hunting. It's, it's, it's promoting more people in the field. We gotta have people by hunting licenses and yet inefficient licenses in order to keep the revenues up with the game fish departments. We try to do that through our kids if we can my daughter doesn't want to hunt. That's okay. It's still by hunting license every year. Yeah. We. We put him for a tag for every year. She doesn't get it great. We the donate it back or donate it to donate it to a veteran organization, right? For here is I think it's one of the ASA women most amazing programs going at Tom Wagner, overdose on society runs at hunts for heroes. And I donate a deer tag to him two years ago. There's lots of in my good buddy Dale, he's, he's received his wounded warrior received milk tag last year. Antelope tag do before. Oh, yeah. No, it's, it's, it's, it's good to see. It is absolutely good to see. I it's, it's funny that I last year, I had a pig tag and I and I called I called Steve Clark up in eight. I can't I've zinc weak left on this thing. You wanna you wanna you want it. He said can't take it. Why were that fuller that fool? How cool is that? That's awesome. I mean that just comes with once again, it's, it's the it's the society's your organizations the that what you call the critters. Fiscal. Well, okay. All right. I like to crew the current groups. The critic groups are the ones that are doing the most for wildlife. Conservation following the model of wildlife conservation as game and fish doesn't working hand in hand with game and fish. I've even seen one I think is while Turkey federation Turkey federation donated they donated an employee to game and fish when they're on a hiring freeze. Well say they hired someone donated them to game and fish. And by the way, he is absolutely. Every kind of awesome. Salmon fish swooped him up, quick, quick. One of the things we did. When I was part of foundation is with, with the help of Terry Herndon out here before they, they broke off. There's meal deer is we got biologist dedicated to mule deer from money raised fears mule deer foundation. It's unbelievable. Yeah. In these, that's a game, fish, biologist and L works and specializes in Bill here in Arizona alone. And that's what I'm trying to do. I'm trying to get you all to, to really dig into these organizations really do some homework. It doesn't take much. It's a quick Google search or it's going on onto Facebook. Here's the to Facebook dot com Ford slash broadhead nation. Join the group and just ask the question. So hey, Arizona people where can I get involved? Good luck sorting through all of those comment. Yeah, there's, there's so much to do in so much to get involved in. And I it's, it's right there. Even if you don't have a whole lot of money to donate, and you can put fifty bucks worth of gas in your in the thank you, Gasser truck, go up and do service project. Yes ATS as the long meadow product project, coming up again in June writers. Yes, is doing their things. There's always out there cleanup barb wire on, on federal land that shouldn't be there anymore that Bart wires, what trips deer and critters in, in that wire. And they ended up dying there. They dented legs all tangled up in it water projects. Putting in well water. Yeah, absolutely. There's always something. There's always go on. You can always find something to do in. I, I really appreciate what you're doing with Ed nation, because he gives them it's another resource for that. Now, one of the first times I bumped into you. You're, you're throwing your hands in the air on a live auction. Yeah. And I want to talk to you about that because I did read an article in meat eater about banquet tags. You're a fan he's not. I want to have that I want to have that discussion. It's coming up next right here on the go show. It's Mike Broomhead. If you're thinking of selling a rental home, and you wanna keep it peaceful and quiet for the tenants in that home then call my realtor.

Facebook Arizona Mesa Mark mule deer foundation Twitter Turkey federation Turkey feder cancer Hawks Tom Wagner Mike Broomhead Google Steve Clark Dale ASA Terry Herndon Gasser truck fifteen thousand dollars three thousand dollars
"tom wagner" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"To music while you sweat. That's something that's enjoyable, right. In the moment Willie says, so that's what I love to is that now we gotta go back to your values. Right. If you were value, is is friendship and your value. Is you enjoy music or whatever those values are played those because here's the deal that thing where somebody's going to say, well, I need to go to the gym. I need to take classes and need to do whatever. Those are what you're using to is the those stories so if your gold in with this day. What if you realize I can't get to the gym? I've only got fifteen minutes. Now, your brain's going to say and fifteen minutes isn't enough for workout. So if your brain fuses of that guess what you don't have to do. You don't have to work out for fifteen minutes. There are people that I know actually, I do this all the time in my office doing sets pushups between clients or you can do air squats or you name it. You can do anything you in unless silly. But you know, go use the restroom upstairs and use the stairs every day. Some people are gonna say that's not a big deal. We'll guess what? If you're using the that's not a big deal that doesn't do me any good story. Then you don't have to do it. So you know, here's what we're trying to do as this work toward these these goals. He's value-based goals. So for get your value in their if it's the values fund for your workout, then have fun. It's okay. It's better than fusing to some my workout isn't supposed to be fun story. Because if that's the case now, you're going to do some work on the like, and you're going to be more likely to not continue change your find a buddy. That's another one number. Three. Having resolution buddy doesn't make a lot of difference right away. Norcross says social support starts to make a big impact around February. I love that or you know, about a month or so in the research informed explanation is that virtually anybody can get through a couple of weeks with a neutral or even toxic environment. But that begins the way heavily. He says having a friend or family member who's going through the same thing may give you the strength to stick to it. And even that concept of who somebody through the same thing, there are groups on Facebook. There are other groups online where people have a shared experience with exercise or with diet or whatever those goal. That's why you know, people told me a lot about Weight Watchers weigh ins, you know, if that's great one for acceptance and commitment therapy, if it's the I don't want to be embarrassed. But it it one of those guess what if your if your brain can get you to fuse to that. I don't wanna be embarrassed story. Then you don't have to go there. You don't have to have the some accountability, buddy. You don't have to put yourself out there. You don't have to do that uncomfortable work. So that's why love acceptance and commitment therapy in any of these kind of things. So find a buddy man, I ran for years shout out to my old friend, Tom Wagner, who is now living in rexburg, Idaho. Tom and Iran together for years and years and years, and there were many many times that I just knew Tom's gonna be out there at four thirty..

Tom Wagner Willie Norcross Facebook rexburg Idaho Iran fifteen minutes
"tom wagner" Discussed on Orbital Paths

Orbital Paths

05:52 min | 3 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on Orbital Paths

"You're talking about since the nineteen. We've actually seen about an eighty percent decline in the amount of the mass of the ice there. Greenland alone for like the last ten years has been losing about two hundred billion tons of mass. We measured each tons. That's incredible. So one thing to consider though, right is that we also need to know the flux that is how much comes in and how much goes out. Let's take the Arctic ace for minute right there. If you took all the oceans around the world, just picture them in your head. Now take seven millimeters right off the top. That's how much snow falls on an article every year. Even though it's, you know, it's still considered a polar desert and things. It's a tremendous amount now that as that, you can think of the ice sheets, like if you were pouring Honey onto a table, right? The Honey builds up in the middle and flows out to the sides. Snow builds up in the center of the ice, and then it flows out to the sides. Now we want to get at the processes controlling it because that's the only way we can really do forecasts. So one of the things we find is that coastal areas are losing a lot. We think driven by the ocean interior areas may be gaining a little bit, but with ice that too, I think we're going to be able to pull it all together and we're going to see very, very precisely where changes occurring and that a, let's do a better job with our forecast. It's just it's a wonderful story of how you design like the best leaser ever built basically, you know, and you've got, you've got this really interesting new technology. There's all kinds of wonderful things like the accuracy in the Star Trek, but then what's coming out of it is we're gonna try to understand. How our planet is changing. We, you can think of earth like a giant machine and the parts are all connected to each other and work together. We need to know how the atmosphere works, how much snow that's bringing the ice, how much win there is that's blowing the around. We need to send the ocean how much heat it's bring to the ice sheet and causing it to CAF. And with a mission. Like I said, we think we can pull those things together so we can do a better job forecasting changes in the fact is you need satellites do it because if you want to understand how the earth is connected, you need to make measurements all over the place. But you need to make them very, very precisely. And this is where a satellite is perfect. It's up there in the environment of space. It lasts for a long time. It covers the whole planet and you go over and over again making the same everywhere. And that's what really allows us to pull it all together to get this picture of the earth that lets us understand how it is today, but also how it's going to change tomorrow. And then finally to, and this is it's dismal, but exciting. At the same time, as we lose is from the Arctic Ocean, we are sensually seeing the spin up of new ocean for the planet. The Arctic Ocean right now is highly stratified and the ice forms a platform for a lot of creatures to live. As we remove that ice now winds can stir the ocean, so it's no longer. So stratified and the species that live there change. A lot of the species that live in there. It's Pola regions are very, very long lived. And consequently, they're very nutritious. They built up a lot of fatty acids and things. So Wales come through and eat certain kinds of plankton will. What's happening is shorter lived species from the Pacific are now able to live in the Arctic, and it's more like popcorn, you know, then healthy meal. So to me, it's fascinating is a scientist to see with the changes in the ice, the changes in the ocean, like you mentioned, even even the chemistry of the ocean because the layers are getting mixed up. You have different species that are moving in. It's a fascinating scientific problem, huge amounts of data to be taken. It also kind of. Is scary, and I think a lot. I mean, I've children, you know, and I think a lot about the future, what their future's going to be. Like. One of the things that I'm hopeful for is that by doing this kind of research, we can put bounds around the problem and help humanity better mitigate the changes that are going to come. But what people have to realize is the change is already here, sea levels already rising and has risen, and we're getting coastal flooding even around the US will. My hope is that with measurements from things like that, we're going to be able to better job with projections and help humanity better prepare for what's coming. Tom Wagner. He's Nasr's program scientists studying the Christ, fear the coldest parts of the earth. So let's go back to that moment of the launch. Their crowds cheering outside emission control. Everybody busy with the business of the rocket monitoring everything. And I'm sitting next to Tom Wagner. And I have to say Tom Wagner is a hero of mine. This is one of the most brilliant people I've ever met. He's not getting rich working at NASA. He's doing something that's his passion studying the ice, studying the way the earth is changing, and there's a combination of emotions as we watch this rocket lift off. There is the incredible triumph of building the world's greatest space laser sending it up on this amazing rocket. There's all the technology. There's all the science data, and then there's this little bit of catching your throat when you think about what it's going to reveal and the fact that it's revealing that our plan is changing very quickly. And honestly, we don't even understand what those changes are going to be yet. Expediting

Tom Wagner Arctic Ocean Greenland NASA Arctic Pacific US scientist Nasr Wales two hundred billion tons eighty percent ten years
GSK pulls out of $20 billion race for Pfizer consumer assets

01:39 min | 3 years ago

GSK pulls out of $20 billion race for Pfizer consumer assets

"Hundred twenty countries this is bloomberg thanks nathan now with our other top stories i'm pat carroll it's a deal that would further up end the supermarket industry there's a report that target and kroger are discussing a possible merger according to fast company the talks began last summer about a partnership now the report says the companies are trying to decide if a merger is the best option but other media reports say there's no truth to the fast company story glaxosmithkline has dropped out of the bidding for pfizer's consumer healthcare business bloomberg's patrice sikora has an update pfizer's advil centrum are not as desire arable as a us drug giant expected the company was left without a potential buyer for its consumer health unit today after uk drugmaker glaxosmithkline withdrew from bidding record ben keyser dropped out earlier this week the development has left pfizer with dwindling options to dispose of a business valued at as much as twenty billion dollars in an emailed statement pfizer says it's evaluating potential strategical turnips for the business which include a spin off a sale or other transaction or retaining the business patrice sukur bloombergradio night head capital management the three billion dollar distressed debt hedge fund firm is said to be planning on raising its first drawdown fund we get details from bloomberg's steve potisk according to people with knowledge of the matter the new york based company which was founded a decade ago by eric cohen and tom wagner will begin fundraising and the second quarter of this year and aims to raise as much as seven hundred fifty million dollars the night head distressed opportunities fund will focus on global stressed and distressed credits head has told investors that it expects a variety of destroy rest situations to crop up within the next three years with trades that will be less.

Pat Carroll Glaxosmithkline Bloomberg Patrice Sikora Ben Keyser Pfizer Steve Potisk Eric Cohen Tom Wagner Nathan Kroger Advil UK Patrice Sukur New York Seven Hundred Fifty Million Do Twenty Billion Dollars Three Billion Dollar Three Years
"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Sometimes you gotta shrink um but you know and one of the other amazing things that i think people forget about in the problem with the earth is we got this great atmosphere with clouds you know that protects us in a lot of ways but it's tough to see through see get a little lucky with some of the other planets which don't ask those things but at what i'm always amazed that is up like when i worked in antarctica and i was in the drive alleys we would go out a map some of the local rock glaciers you know that is places where there was rock held together with ice that was slowly flowing and i met some of the scientists who worked on mars and they got some of their ideas for interpret pictures we had of mars from working in the drive alleys with some terrestrial scientists now you're right of earth analogues are just so important for planetary scientists and um uh i know they ah they haunt some really exotic places just to do that what are your what's your favorite image of the earth from space oh so i think that my flat out favor one is we had we combined some land sat images together to produce a map of antarctica that showed all this amazing blue ice flowing around rocks and you could actually see the deformation structures in the ice it was really amazing it's also one of the heirs we found um the meteorites it we think came from mars were actually found not far from there is a good planetary connection to but that's one of my favorites yes indeed from planters science perspective the an arctic is just a fabulous place to look for meteorites we go down there every summer why nova siri's a snowmobiles tracker crossed the glacier and it's blinding white because of the reflected light of uh off the snow uh but indeed these black areas you go to him and there's a meteorite and so we we tagum and bring him back in.

antarctica siri
"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We found this weirdlooking volcano on penis heck made that how would we go about that you know what kinds of things would we do in the laboratory what kinds of places on earth by mu explore to sorta understand that and then a ultimately what kind of mission can we fly to a place like venus to try to understand so what's coming up next on earth science in terms of the satellites or the mission's or the or the real important themes to study so we get a couple of great missions coming up even later the just in the coming year or so the grace followon mission is going to occur in the grace mission was a pair of satellites into orbit the earth that very precisely map variations in maths and they'd been used to do everything from figure at how much ice were losing from the big ice sheets t even understanding how this is cycle to the way water is stored on the land that is so great it even effect sea level and so that mission will fly think is gonna launch in may of this year and then later in the year uh towards the fall we're gonna launch istat too which is allied are think of it as a laser out timid are in space it's a very special one though it's going to have six beams mapping the height of the earth all over and we're in particular going to look at the thinning of the arctic sea ice will looking at the change in the height of the ice of red glaciers in ice sheets around the world and we're also going to map the height of all the trees on earth with an idea figuring out how much carbon is tied up in all the terrestrial biomass if those kind of things that that are fundamental measurements that can provide us an enormous amount of information about the global earth itself and an understanding its biosphere and howard changes over time so i'm really excited about those upcoming missions you know in the technologies that that are developed for earth science missions can indeed be in very important for planetary missions to oh he added you know it's a lot of the same kinds of sensors you know it and is the same technologies that you apply to both places you know i think with planetary we have this additional challenge right because it's far away and so.

"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"The scale of that process it's so profoundly slow compared to what we've done as humans like that operates on that beano tends to hundreds of millions of years compared to what we've done in a pretty short time you know the volcanoes here on earth and the release of co 2 and and other particulates in the atmosphere remind me actually of venus and what we think may have been happening on venus for so long and that is it is very volcanic there are still some hot areas on it and it may be still release an enormous amount of co 2 so what's the difference between venus unearth when you look at that yeah i one of the things i love about venus has also you see these funny volcanic structures right legs haystack things and you know and as i understand it even you know some of the fundamental ideas for thinking of the earth of this greenhouse came from studies of places like venus um so i it's another case where i think you know the planetary scientist given us kind of a wonderful example but also to you know the tereshchuk planets a lot of the processes that run on those on the earth and on mars and on venus are and even the moon are pretty similar like the fundamental processes by which you create and what the composition of that magma is a now the planets have slightly different histories because of their different compositions but the overall principles that govern them are the same and that's why you'll find a lotta time scientists who work on volcanoes on the earth also work on the other planets too yeah you know we constantly being reminded that what's happened on venus can happen on earth and so we need to study these terrestrial planets and understand their revolution because we're all evolving an even today yeah good points and i you know i also think to some times would i think that i would i want to say to kids in people who are listening is at earth sciences planetary sciences they really fun detective mysteries you know and they're just kind of inherently interesting like hey.

scientist
"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"And changing a temperature of our planet and i think that that's probably that profound shift is one of the most important things that we've learned through our study of the earth in the last hundred years you know while you work at mit were you graduated was on volcanoes of not only the earth but the moon now how to vote kano's play a role on the conditions here on earth yes suit volcanoes but are really important you know in some simple ways right volcanoes refresh the soils you know they bring up all those nutrients and things they have an eruption and as they whether they create great soils to grow crops in um you know they're kind of that are um returning recycling of the earth that's going on but on top of that too they play a large role the aarp affect us through things like natural disasters volcanoes there are a lot of times great places to live because of the soils a but on top of that they also really fundamentally affect our the composition of our atmosphere and some of the other characteristics they consi released c o two into the atmosphere which can cause the to warm and on top of that volcanoes can throw particles in the upper atmosphere which causes the planet to cool and for us that are trying to understand the earth is a system we have to include the effects of volcano is are so great that if you wanna do something like interpret the earth's temperature record you have to understand with the input of volcanoes were you know in every couple of decades we get a massive corruption that really changes the planet might even make a cool for a couple of years will it also generates a lotta co two isn't that right they are constantly releasing c o two into the atmosphere and they are if you think of the billion years cycles that go on on the earth they are the component that dr co two up and in its weathering of rocks as rainfall comes down at scrubs co two from the atmosphere that co 2 reacts with rocks and it actually produces things like critters secret like the bahamas banks and other processes do that and the volcanoes can bring it back up when it gets drawn down but one thing to understand is that.

mit kano aarp bahamas billion years hundred years
"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Actually been developing robots that will drive the great distances across the ice in make measurements like drag radars behind them to map the surface underneath the ice and we've got some ones that have even gone like a thousand kilometers are ready and there it's really a promising area for us because these areas who just so remote and so challenging and so dangerous to work in and you need precise accurate high resolution information that only like a ground survey can provide in some cases so robots ever real great potential for us but we also work in the air and you know unmanned aerial systems are things that were using now over seaice in land ice at all scales in some way some of the most amazing research is going on with small aircraft where people using those to map service in a whole range of ways and then finally undersea exploration or under ice exploration is really one of the next big areas where what we need to do is understand the flux of heat between the ocean and the ice to understand why it's breaking off in melting and go into the ocean so fast and some of those places you can't go up next some of the boat because an iceberg the size of the us capitol building might cav off on you and one of the only way to do it is with submersibles that are autonomous and so and also under the sea ice in the arctic you need to be able to go great distances and make all kinds of measurements and so just like in the planetary science case where you need to operate in a remote location something that's got some autonomous behavior that's what we really need to you know what have you learned as an earth scientists that would surprise most people i think what the number one thing for me is that i think people view the earth is this incredibly huge thing and they don't understand that we as people really have the power to fundamentally reshape it and we have you know we've really affected the earth as an environment for everything from you know changing the landscape changing the ecosystems through to changing the composition of our atmosphere.

us thousand kilometers
"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"In those and then they're even projects have places like the ross ice shelf which is the size of france with a massive glaciers of antarctica flow into the ocean and float and i knew the planetary science community is joining with the earth science community to make a probe that will go through that you know many hundreds of feet of the ice get down to the ocean and sample ed and then come back to the surface and that's exciting for planetary science as a prototype but it's also exciting for urged science because you know this place you know no one's been there before we have almost no exploration of and i think it's a really good joint effort yeah i do too you know the arctic is such a special place in wound you've been down there many times so what is it like yes oh for about five years i was the program director for its sights as in what was need about that job was if it didn't fitted another programme it was definitely earth sciences so we got to cover everything from ancient dinosaurs to modern mummified seals two earthquakes which antarctica has plenty of and volcano he knows and magma in all kinds of fun stuff so go in there was great you know on one hand you're kind of going through the land of the unicorns right you know hardly anybody gets to get there and the things that you see you know you're touching ice that we used to talk about was late of thousands of years old you know like from the times of the pyramids and things and then the the life there was amazing you know you have um benthic environments that are dominated by soft body creatures and then eaten by seals and you have penguins hopping around and you know penguins are these amazing thing one time i landed in a helicopter and a whole troupe of emperor penguins started sliding in walking towards me and they surrounded ilic optin we a wait up till like a board and left so they were just exploring through they are they really like people it's funny what are some of the new modern tools that are being used in studying the poor environment said this kind of three different flavors that i think really cross over two with planetary applications right now we.

france program director antarctica five years one hand
"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Was drawn down so low that the plan occult but now the big thing is once you freeze the planet over and we have good evidence of that from things like glacial stri asians that we find on rocks from those periods and other things had he get the planet out of it because ice reflects almost all of the sunlight bet hits it back into space it's like a perfect mirror and so one of the theories though is that eventually volcanoes generate enough co 2 to begin the warm the planet up so that died at ice actually melts but it's a good example of how we can apply the same principles we see operating on the earth today back in time to understand how the planet changed and about you know that snow ball earth era reminds me of several objects in the solar system now that we're trying to study one of which is europa you know you rope us got this fabulous icy crossed over the whole moon and underneath perhaps as marches twice the volume of water than this here on earth so the study of ancient earth during these phases might actually inform us as to what's happening in some of these other planets and moons out in the solar system more at other solar systems yeah and another thing is the techniques that we developed a steady highsea ice here on earth also apply to europe like the scientists that work on radars that a gonna go to europe it a map the structure of that ice there some of the same scientists that work in antarctica today to help us map the ice and the bed underneath the ice some of the theories we've to bail for how the ice changes how a cavs how it breaks they also apply on europa you know it's colder and it's a little bit different but it's the same basic principles and some of the what i think is some of the most exciting research going on today are people that are drilling through the end arctic ice to tap the watery bodies that are underneath them some of those are locked on land and they're not in connection with the ocean and they've been separated from the atmosphere for many millions of years and some of the even the astrobiologist in origin of life crowd is inch.

solar system solar systems europe antarctica cavs
"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"A quick response capability we get access to the data and we get it distributed and in a gets a to the right places are so important how do we do that you know right away win as it action like that the um messages come into nasa headquarters to the person who is the disasters program manager and right away they rally the scientific community and that's people from the nasa centers but also for macadamia to figure out what are the best things we can do to help one really good example was the nepal earthquake that happened last year where they got together particularly even to look at things like landslides because it's not just what happened during the initial shaking but later on when you get rains have you change the landscape and where you're likely to get landslides you know your your area of expertise is in the criollos fear what does that mean and what do you do exactly yet kind of a fun job title you know it's nice to be in charge will technically emma charge of all the ice on the plant yeah and i were probably grossly would colleagues at other agencies like nsf but we're trying to understand how the earth is changing as a system one of the biggest ones is how are we losing ice from places like greenland in antarctica and how is that contributing to sea level rise and then also how is the sea ice changing in the arctic in antarctica and what does that mean for us as a planet and then we're also doing things like looking at ice and snow in the himalayas to understand how water resources are going to be affected for the billions of people who live there as the planet continues to change one of the things that we've uncovered is that in earth's passed it's gone through various stages in in in one of the stages we've call snowball earth what can you tell us about what happened during though that stage in our evolution yeah that's pretty exciting time you know you're talking about going back you know hundreds of millions of years ago to win the planet is frozen solid from the polls to the equator and you probably would happen was you had a time when carbon dioxide.

program manager greenland arctic himalayas carbon dioxide nasa nepal antarctica
"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Is that used to be thereby volume and it's an amazing change it's like turning one of the big knobs that controls the earth as a machine you know that that water scout ago somewhere what are some of the missions that look at that and what are they telling us about where that water goes so this is a bunch of different things that we do what it means we use satellite radars to look at how fast the ice on the land like in greenland in the alaskan glacier says flowing into the ocean we you satellites like grace which measure variations at mass at the earth surface and then we have satellites like i sat an ice at to which we are going to launch later this year which look at the height of the ice and how it's changing you know in addition to looking at our water resources and in other things we really look at uh the atmosphere and in that means it's dynamics in all the kinds of things that happened to the earth with natural disasters how does nasa steady and provide information about earthquakes in hurricanes floods and wildfires yet so one of the important things nasa does his try to develop the nextgeneration tool so we can better forecast those events and when they happen so we can do a better job figure out what the impacts are and the kinds of work takes all different kinds of approaches so with hurricanes will look at those with satellites will also fly of them with aircraft that map the structure of the ira gain so we can figure out its power in the direction will go in and we were closely with no on work like that when there's something like a terrible oil spill in the ocean we have special radars will put on planes to grab a map the extent of the spill because that's really hard to do and when it comes to even things like earthquakes we use satellites to map the motions of the played so we can get a better understanding of how the earth moves and where it quakes might happen next um but it it all comes together we even have a program that specifically looks at natural disasters.

greenland alaskan glacier oil spill nasa ira
"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"tom wagner" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Our solar system is our wondrous place with a single star our son and everything that or rid surrounded planets moods asteroids and comets what are we know about this beautiful solar system we call as part of an even larger caused with billions of other solar system by i'm jim green director of planetary science at nasa in this is gravity assists if them i'm with tom wagner today it's about our own home planet earth you know i think many people don't realize that nasa really is not only exploring space beyond earth but we're studying earth is of planet in its own right and we're doing that because it allows us to make life better here on earth so tom tell me much more about what earth science is all about here at nasa yes so the biggest thing with earth science advances were trying to understand how the war earthworks is a big system that is how old up parts in it together and to do that you need things like satellites in aircraft that can cover the vast distances that cover the planet so you can see how change in one place is connected to change someplace else you know the earth is done nothing but change over time you know from a planetary scientists perspective it's uh can be billions of years that's how we look at at sometimes but you know in reality nasa senior earth them looked at it from space in its changed even over the last fifty and sixty years what are some of those changes uc yes you know one of the biggest places and actually some of the first satellite data that was collected about the earth was about the arctic sea ice with the eu's rockets to take pictures of it back in the '60s and now what we've seen is that over the past thirty forty years we've lost something like eighty percent of the.

solar system director nasa tom wagner eu thirty forty years eighty percent sixty years