17 Burst results for "Tom Tango"

"tom tango" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

06:23 min | 8 months ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Reporter and a producer L. Dot Com and Sarah you know there's no question in this era of analytics nobody would try to steal home ordered from bench. Can you just put some numbers on an attempted steal home? Yeah. So I mean talk was a pretty interesting play I. Mean You know obviously so unexpected and you know we know Kevin cash that after the game, but it's fun to see something we don't see a whole lot and to your point we really really don't see this much. We haven't seen obviously still home even in the tempt in the world series two, thousand, two with Brad Fulmer, we haven't really seen a straight steal attempt since nineteen eighty, two with Lonnie Smith. And you know league-wide stolen base percentage with actually like the highest it's been as far as it's been tracked in two thousand twenty but that is because so few guys try to steal these days. There are only twelve attempted steals a poem in the regular season, which if we prorate that over a full season, it would be tied for the third fewest in any season with like twenty fifteen and twenty thirteen and right up there with these years that we've seen lately. But Tom Tango who works MLB DOT COM together, this really interesting sort of comparison with like cost benefit analysis based on the percentage of the play. So when Margot was standing on third the raise win expectancy. They had to win was forty, two point, one percent. If he had been successful on that, it would have gone up to fifty four point, two percent but instead to drop to thirty, five point, six percent when he was out at home. So in total, the cost of the play was zero point, six, five winced compared to a benefit of point one to one wins I know that's kind of weird to think of wins in that decimal, but bear with me. So basically based on cost benefit. So if you those numbers together. And you consider what was worth versus what wasn't the risk would have been worth it. If Margo thought, he had about thirty five percent chance of being safe. So obviously, we're not inside his head. We don't know how likely he thought it was, but he's a fast guy is pretty good base runner. So he must have thought he had a pretty good chance but obviously, that's a pretty complex in we don't see this whole lot. That's why because you need to be pretty sure that you're pretty close to being at least fifty fifty. For being safe and he was almost safe I liked the play you know I'm going to ask him Kirk about that coming up. Let's the numbers game number three. So number three is three two. So that's the lead. The dodgers now have in this series, it's the eighth time in franchise history, they've taken a three two lead at a best of seven postseason series. They're six and one in the prior seven series with the only loss coming in the nineteen fifty, two world series. But then will we get a game seven is The other question. So the sixth series wins for the dodgers looking at it from their perspective in those three to leads to came in game six, nineteen, one world series in nineteen fifty nine world series the other four did coming game seven, the twenty eighteen in the nineteen eighty eight NFC us. Sixty five world series in fifty five world series. So if feels like we're going to get a game seventy nine oh, we don't know today's the day will see what tomorrow feels like but daughters in a pretty good historically number two. Number two is sixty point, two percent. So that's the current percentage of runs. The dodgers have scored. This postseason with two ouston feels like we've been tracking this all postseason but especially lately. So sixty point two percents would be the highest percentage of runs scored with two outs in a single postseason for any team that played at least ten games by a decent amount. You know they at one point were sixty point six than even higher in the midst of games. The nineteen ninety two braves has that record right now fifty. Nine point three percents two thousand red sox are second on Lewis Fifty Point, seven percent. So it feels like if the dodgers continue to play their game, what we've seen from them, they're going to we abyss or at least come close and it's so funny that it feels like you they get to two outs and it doesn't feel like the ending is open obviously at a certain point, it's probably a little bit random, but it's you know it's out this far fifty nine of their ninety eight routes have been to out. Number One. Number one is sixty, six point seven we won't with how the dodgers are scoring around. So onto go with how the razor scoring a lot of runs. So sixty six, point, seven percent, the raise runs as postseason have been scored via the home run, which will be the highest rate in a single season. Again, with that minimal of Chiang Games and wall scoring with two outs seems to be working for the dodgers. I would say that scoring via home runs does not really seem to. be working overall for the rate. Obviously, they've made it this far. We saw them not Hindi home runs last night they still scored two runs. They did not win the game and I think that for them to really be successful here and given the dodgers pitching and everything else that percentage needs to go down a little bit over the potential next two games. If they're going to win this world series serve report ago I was curious about where you would put that game four on. Your list of World Series Games how would you characterize what you saw on game four and compare that to other games all night it's so hard to rank it i. mean I think that you know you almost need to bring out different types of descriptors right? I. Mean it was insane but it was really insane in that final play. There were some games that felt like they were insane throughout the game or so many different things happened but I would certainly put it. Towards the top in terms of craziest most unexpected I mean that happens and I was just sitting in of my computer for a solid two minutes like, wow, like I couldn't even think, okay. What's the context? What should I be doing right now because I was just like did that just happen what what just happened and I needed to see it again like three times before I could really get my brain going again and that doesn't happen a whole lot I mean twenty sixteen game. Was obviously with the rain delay and everything else in the historic nature That was really something. We had the game in twenty seventeen were there were the most run home runs hit in extras in game two in two thousand seventeen We obviously at twenty eighteen, we were there for longer than a cross country flight but I would say that this had a really really strong marking on people even just from that one play. Thank Syria with a lot of fun. It was. Seam.

dodgers Lonnie Smith Kevin Tom Tango Brad Fulmer Chiang Games MLB Reporter Sarah braves Margot Margo Kirk producer Lewis NFC
"tom tango" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

06:56 min | 9 months ago

"tom tango" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"I mean, you could you could go down Who's who's listed the Hall of Fame. And among all the Negro League rates, and they played there because players black and weigh wood Barn storm over those decades in the early years, and it's just terrific walking out there and Standing in the center fielder standing in the box. This is where Willie it is where all the greats hit missile where they feel it. And ah No, it's a tiny ball park in that it would seat maybe 10 to 12,000. But it's a big ballpark of you need to. You need to hit it a long way. And this is this is by the by the way, where Not only the Birmingham black bands Uh, you know, set up camp but also the Birmingham Barons, which was an all white team, a time representing the Boston Red Sox, a double a affiliate. So when the black bear arms were on the road, the white they're the white bear. They were at home and vice versa. And it was just amazing because Willie would tell me and I looked it up and this is The case. That when the black players showed up There was a group beyond the right field wall, uh, set off for white customers. And when the white barons played, there is the same group beyond the right field wall. Where were you know? With black players play? The white folks were out there with the white barons played. The black folks were up there, but you know it, burning him one of the most segregated if not the Most segregated City in America until 1964 so, says Martin Luther King. So when Willie style, and I mean that was 20 years earlier when he grew up there, you know, man, imagine the racism and it was illegal to even consider buying a house in a white neighborhood. If you're black family, and it was just terrible, and obviously we You know the history books, you know, tell us about Bull Connor Bull Connor was police officials who took No water hoses and and, you know, police, horses and dogs, You know, just just attacking all these peaceful demonstrators. And you know O'Connor. His actions were televised and helped ignite the civil rights movement and the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Well, Connor, by the way, When will he was a kid? He was the play by play, man. The damn parents awake, So I mean, it's It's just a crazy, you know, crazy stuff and it it was wonderful to unearth much of it and Write history that really hasn't been written, You know, going into different angles in different years and in different stories, told by Willing and all these other people, Sam, So it's In the pretty significant and amazing experience. Once the first time you saw Willie Mays play Well, I guess I was old enough or young enough whatever it might beats and see him in the late sixties, early seventies Big year. 1971 because they hadn't been to the postseason since 62. And suddenly Major League Baseball divides the leagues into two divisions of peace. And they had a great year. September They struggled and they had to win the final game in San Diego to overtake the Dodgers and win the division and they used carousel. To beat the Padres. I think it was 5 to 1. And then they lost the best of five Pittsburgh team They dominated throughout that summer, and then Pittsburgh went on to play Baltimore in the World Series. And then that was let mazes last year. His last full year in San Francisco, and it was a good year He was 40. And then he led the league in walks and let the league and on base percentage he stole 23 out of 26 bags. Any that 18 home runs, so that's how effective he was all the way till the end. One thing in your book, you actually go and tell us all the Accomplishments the beginning of time with Willy, But then you put them all into today's analytics and his dance pretty good. Well, Bill James, The Godfather of Analytics, whom I interviewed. Has a great quote that is in the back of the book. And Bill James says. Willie Mays is best season is every year. Just pick one. They're all great. You could. You could face Willey honor, batting average R B eyes, home runs and all the traditional numbers, But there's a whole chapter in their basic willy on all the new numbers, all the advanced statistics. And I interviewed Bill James. You know Sarah's Tom Tango, Rob fire all these people. You know everything about history, know everything about statistics and know everything about baseball. And looking back at Willie's career. He won two MBPs and I walked away from those conversations thinking. In today's world, he could have one between eight and 11. If you look at war No. Wins above replacement. It's It's obviously center in today's game. How teams analyzing valued players Mela 10 War 10 Win. Season. It's just outstanding. It's just wonderful. I mean, it's rare that anyone could do it has been the nine or 10 times since 2000 by hitters, and that's not many. I mean bonds did it three times. Trout did it three times and then Three or four other guys did it once. Will Willie Mays in the sixties over a seven year stretch averaged and war perceived it So it just speaks to his athleticism? His Five tool prominence, his ability and durability, you know, being able to stay in the lineup. I mean in that in that time going back to the fifties, there were 13 straight years. That maze played 150 or more games 13 straight years, 150 plus games. And nobody has ever done that, before or since. Can Most of that street lamp during 154 game season. Until 62 did We break out with a longer season of 162, so maybe just didn't come out of the lineup. He played doubleheaders both ends and played every game in spring training. Practically All Star games. You'd see him all nine innings. And He was a workhorse..

Willie Mays Bill James Bull Connor Bull Connor Baseball Birmingham Barons Negro League Hall of Fame Boston Red Sox Birmingham Pittsburgh Padres Martin Luther King San Francisco San Diego America Dodgers O'Connor Willy
"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

08:33 min | 11 months ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"This lulled sense of believing that nothing else is happening interesting offscreen because if it were than the crowd would be hearing. If that makes sense. So it's the the inability to have that nuanced crowd noise is kind of misleading to me in his distracting to make. So that has been a bob that is I e did I convey what I'm talking about? Do you understand what I'm talking about an and so that's been to me. The big letdown of the fake crowd noise is that it cannot handle. It cannot communicate to me what is happening offscreen, which crowd noise generally does. So that sense of anticipation that you're about to see something or that there's more going on than meets the eye you're just not getting that anymore. Yeah you just you watch. Yeah. You just don't know that it's happening you. You can only see a sliver of the game as it is, and so this is taken away a little bit of your kind of quote unquote view of what's happening from home now, seeing it and even smaller sliver because all you have now is visual. Finney, fake crowd noise operators are listening. They can take that into account start building in some site noise for no apparent reason. Yeah. Yeah. At the right time. Yeah. All right I wanna get to some e mails but I do have one thing to Kinda quiz you on or get your thoughts on usually about a week or two into the season you talk about rates, offensive rates, pitching rates things that may be look like they've changed from previous season, and then you force me to predict whether that will stay the same by the end of the year or whether it's just a small sample thing that will regress and we haven't done that this year I don't know if you're planning. To do that this year if this year is just so strange in so many ways that it almost defeats the purpose, but there is one thing that has kind of interested me and perplexed me so far, which is the batting average on balls in play, which is down quite a lot really, and that's something that doesn't fluctuate all that much and I've been trying to figure out why that is. So let me lay it out here. We are recording on Wednesday afternoon and right now the major league Bab is to seventy six. And that is very low considering that the week White Bab really over the past twenty, five years has barely moved at all. It's just you know a few points in this direction a few points in that direction, but it was to ninety, six, nine, hundred, ninety, four, it was to ninety, six in two, thousand, nine hundred, and it hasn't moved to all that far in either direction in any of the intervening years, and that's always been kind of confounding because. So many things have changed during that time, you'd think that players have. Gotten. Better that they're hitting the ball harder that they're better at fielding maybe those things cancel out but also you have the shift you have all the optimized supposedly defensive positioning happening you have the changes in the ball you have a million other things and so you'd expect that this would change it. It was lower in earlier eras of baseball history, but it stubbornly refuses to move. But so far this year it has moved and again, of course, that could be small sample but there are some other kind of interesting possibilities so. One thing is it I think very by month a little bit but I think usually it varies along with the weather with the temperature I. Don't know if there's a strong correlation there. But for instance, last year I think it was about to ninety in March April and then went up to the high to nineties or even three hundred midsummer and then dipped a bit in September October don't know if it's always like that. But I I think that's the general pattern. Probably I think it is I think that in fact, every year we. During this segment, we talked about Bab being low and then wonder about it, but it's usually yeah, like to ninety right and of course, the weather explanation doesn't apply because it's August right now. So this is when temperatures are at their warmest. So it could be of course that it's not so much about the weather it's about hitters being behind pitchers or something, and that would still apply perhaps could apply even more this year. So that's one possibility. One thing that makes it kind of tough to tell is that it's hard to compare stat cast data from last season two Hawkeye data from this season. The new provider of stat cast information. So if you look at say exit philosophy, it looks like it's down about a mile per hour but it's hard to know whether that is reflecting hitters actually hitting the ball less harder whether it's just the change in the technology and similarly league-wide weighted on base average right now is three a one in the league wide expected waited unbased average is twenty four. So there's a big gap there, which makes it seem as if matters are not getting the results that you would expect given how hard they're hitting the ball and where they are hitting the ball, but it's Tough. To say because ex-wba is kind of calibrated for the way the ball behaved prior to the season and there may be track man Hawkeye issues there too. so that's not conclusive. So that's something to consider but not necessarily an explanation, it seems like the ball has been a little less lively might senses and I think grab Arthur's working on something about this that will probably be published this week but just looking at some of the less advance stats it, it does seem like maybe the ball is a little less likely this year. So that could have something to do with it and Tom Tango is. tweeting about this, and he compared just like any period of this length and he noted that the bit was way down or the defensive efficiency is way up and he said since the start of the twenty twenty season fielders have converted into out seventy one point one percent of the seventy six, hundred thirty, Paul's hit the play in two thousand nineteen there was no stretch where fielders converted as many plays into outs. The average was sixty nine point one, percent twenty twenty is three point eight standard deviations from twenty nineteen. So it does seem strange and the could slightly related to the ball but again like. The peasant fluctuated that much with the massive fluctuations in the ball over the last several years. So I. Don't that could account for it completely, and I do have one other kind of interesting theory. This is something I've been corresponding with a listener named Jeff about and there's an article. I don't know if you saw it in the wall, Street Journal. Couple days ago by Ben Cohen and Joshua Robinson and they made the case that in other sports players have just gotten better at certain things arguably because they're no fans in the stadiums and so there are fewer distractions. So they pointed out that in the NBA to that point, the percentage of free throws was higher and the percentage of corner three pointers was higher like higher rates than had ever been seen in the week. Before and also in soccer, the rate of success on direct free kicks seems to be up pretty significantly and they kind of had a couple theories or hypotheses in this article, and I couldn't tell which they were putting more weight on. But aside from the well small sample fluke explanation, they suggested that maybe players just practiced lot over the few months that they weren't playing. So you know. Basketball and soccer maybe it's easier to practice a skill like free throw shooting or shooting the ball than it would be to practice a lot of baseball skills. It's not like fielders have been practicing. You know feeling flight balls hit off fun goes or something because there wasn't anyone to hit them to them. So I don't know if that could be an explanation, but it seemed like they. Were mostly suggesting that it would have to do with the lack of fans and that could be the case in baseball. If you buy this in NBA and in soccer, it would be hard to see in certain skills because it's you know better versus Pitcher, and if they both have an advantage if they're both better things than you might not even be able to discern that difference but. fielders being better that is something that if there are fewer fans or no fans, there's less noise if you use the crack of the bat to gauge the ball, then maybe you get a better read on the ball, maybe they're fewer distractions from say the white shirts that are blocking out how the ball comes off the bat.

baseball soccer NBA Finney Tom Tango Basketball Street Journal Arthur Jeff Ben Cohen Paul Joshua Robinson
"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Thank you now if i can just say one other thing about it which is less generous as that when you watch hot takes on the internet what you know <hes> professionals but also amateurs any hot take a lot of times you get the sense that the person is saying it because it feels good to say it that they they don't haven't really thought is through that much. They just wanna say they if they want to say it. They're they're trying to kind of <hes>. I don't know it had to put this but they're trying to reflect a your attitude or a particular value or uh of vague sense of something that they want to signify without ever without having actually thought you had tango tom tango would always make the case that when sports pundits would say like well. Actually i'd rather have david accident on my team than than <hes> who was a good angel vladimir guerrero that it's like it's easy to say that because you don't have any money on the line but if like they actually had to somehow bat on like which one is better they would all bet on vladimir guerrero but because because they're low stakes they just say the thing they wanna say and then you sort of start thinking well what exactly you're trying to communicate here about yourself because the hot take itself is worthless. It's all i mean hot takes. They're all like pretty worthless. Takes takes are pretty worthless. Most opinions are worthless. They don't do anything there is in the air and then their proof. They're gone so really. It's about self presentation in so micky. Calloway's whatever literal thing he's saying is probably beside the point. The subtext is what is mickey callaway trying to communicate us us and what he's trying to communicate to us is still eighty toward a certain to somebody. It's hostility towards somebody now. The question is is the hostility to his actual teams. Analytics analytics is his hostility to a actual large segment of the baseball world or is it just the specific reporter asked him the specific question <hes> and he's kinda put off by that question or the questions he's always getting or or maybe a one writer who knows but there's a certain hostility embedded in the answer answer to that. I don't think that it is meant to be taken literally and that sounds like i'm being more generous at just whatever but actually it's more troubling because if what what he is trying to communicate as a hostility toward you know his boss like that's a problem and if he's trying to express <unk> toward you ben a person and i respect a great deal and his books i read i would say that's troublesome to yeah also troublesome if the mets analytics are so bad that they're actually wrong. Oh percents the time but russell carlton works there now. I'm sure that's not the case. <hes> what if it's about russell yeah he's up tweeting russell the we can't stand for that all right. Let us answer some questions. Andrew says last week when the yankees are playing the blue jays the yankees twitter account accidentally tweeted out their lineup where didi gregorius was batting second and playing center field and also batting fourth and playing shortstop. This got me thinking what if you could actually do this in real life you would have six players in the field but the advantage of having a star level player batting twice in the order what candidate would be the best to try this with obvious candidates mike trout playing field and centerfield and batting second and third wind or playing shortstop and third base other. Would you spread the hitters out or have bat combat back to back. I haven't done the math my guest..

Calloway vladimir guerrero mickey callaway russell carlton tom tango yankees didi gregorius mike trout mets david Andrew reporter writer
"tom tango" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

06:01 min | 2 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Bell. Major league baseball on ESPN radio and on the ESPN. Back here in the Bronx. And the new pitcher will be oldest Chapman. Join the gear benign one to scheduling gold, Arcia enders. Chapman on the heels of sack Britain. You have to say the story. Macy's of looked sharp. It's first started definitely the highlight has been guys have got onto the list. See savannah thea. Guy who came off the injured list. They start his first started the season. It looked really sharp. Just. Just ride it right in the grew positive side for the for the keys talked about the keys taken vantage, y'all. Get a quality start. Well, not officially but quality star from CC Sobat ups. Lebron's to get a w they're on their way to do that. I offering infra strike to atom angle. Angled Garcia an Anderson at an angle old for tune. White Sox have won hit. They've had two baserunners today. Hit an error the pitch swing ground by roll this chat. Throw the first at angle is out. Chapin one of those guys. A really good athlete. Field disposition pretty well. Redoing playoffs. The went to the World Series of two thousand sixteen and fucking Miller. And he said if you gave this chat, but a tennis racket left of alone for two years, I'm convinced he compete for the Wimbledon title. He's just that good athletic. Here's our SIA down in for a strike. Garcia. Flied out twice and grounded out. You'll want is infra strike. So here's what's funny. I went on a stat cast dot com. They have Chapman filter. Shafted filter. So it hasn't picture all shop, and it says tired of Chapman dominating Cassie leaderboard with amazing forcing fastball question, Mark. This is your chance to see everyone else. Even click turn it on turn it off the oh two. Visit and account wanted to that's. That that's what somebody here's what I wanna find out whether from Mike petrol, Tom Tango whose idea that was or dare Willman we got to give them credit. I need to know who's idea the chatman filter. I mean, they might have to come up with Hicks filter. George hicks. The want to swing and events. And that's a strikeout. There's tool. The White Sox out of their final out. Here comes Tim Anderson. Four nothing Yankees were in the top half of the night. Shabby Chris singleton? And the pig. What MRs a little bit little intercity. One struck down. Fly derided struck out again. Abc's it off to a good start. Four fifty five right handed hitter at the plate. Basis empty top the one that's in there for a strike that at one hundred miles an hour. Fastest pitch thrown. So far this season. George hicks. One hundred point. The one one swing broken that roller to the right side picking it up. You throw the first and that's the ball. Said is out Chapman closes it out at eight dominating pitching performance by the your piece today, they hold the White Sox. One hit and two baserunners and the combo of Sobat the Vermond Britain and Chapman combined. Four shutt- exciting for the to have see Sobat one of their leaders had their their longest tenure players back on the bump today at a solid outing five scoreless innings and only aided sixty pitches to get through that so Zabel to get a little bit of distance into this game. And didn't have any of those militants any where they had to keep an eye on and be concerned about it. He should be based on what he did.

Chapman White Sox George hicks ESPN Miller Britain Garcia Tim Anderson Macy Arcia enders Zabel Chris singleton Lebron Sobat Yankees Chapin chatman Abc Mike petrol
"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"But Andy case last year was was we are ten and outlier, but still. Yeah. That's true. Yeah. The the two biggest Trajan last winter were I think you Darvish and JD Martinez. Or at least they were at the top of the list the rankings heading into the off-season, and they didn't sign till what mid February. So. Yeah. It could drag on for a bit. Yeah. Something like that. But you know, the pool of suitors is small for players of such magnitude that it does feel like Machado should happen relatively quickly. What? Happens after that. I don't really know because on the trade market. The Marlins are holding so much up by not yet having traded JT rail modo, it does feel like real much auto and Harper are kind of like the big fish that are left in and the other pieces are going to the chips will fall where they may. But. Try to come in. And I kind of forget you come back from from sort of slowing down over the holiday and you come back and you're like, oh, right. There's still like a lot of action. It's left to happen. It's not just the doldrums that had in the way that we used to think of January in February. There's still like I don't I'm not maybe even most of the offseason left to go. I haven't looked at the board of names move around. But like there is an awful lot. Even despite that pre-christmas flurry of activity on that that Friday afternoon, right? So we have gotten a guest today. And I am excited about this one. Because really just the foundation of everything we do on the show, and in our writing would not be possible without our guest who is Dave Smith who is the founder and main operator steward of retro sheet, which has just contribute in calculable amount of knowledge to the store of all baseball knowledge. And we got a question from a listener named Charles months ago that I don't think we ever. Answered on the show, but he wanted to know who would be on sabermetrics mount Rushmore, if you just had, you know, four faces to put on a mountain somewhere at that. He went has a spare mountain to devote to sabermetrics mount Rushmore. But obviously, you've you know, you put Bill James on there. I think maybe you put Sean foreman on there. You definitely put Dave Smith on there. Because just every question. I mean every step last we do every play index. Everything would not be possible without retrocede the effort to collect accounts of every game in baseball history, which is ongoing, and which has made unbelievable progress in as Dave will say is I will ninety five percent of the way there. So I think those three definitely on it. I don't know who the fourth is. Maybe you you smash up dick Kramer and Pete Palmer and combine their faces on their since they collaborated a ladder. Maybe someone more recent like, Tom Tango. I don't know. There are a lot of saber metric in research. Nears? But retro sheet is just the foundation of every advance in baseball research that has happened essentially over the last few decades. So I am thrilled that we get to talk today about the origins of that effort, and how they have made so much progress in how they are continuing to add to the store record. We'll I can't follow that introduction with anything. All right. We will be right back with Dave Smith. That's. Seven hit the big school. Fig. There were gonna do. If it doesn't pay. All right. So as promised now, we are joined by baseball research royalty Dave Smith, the founder and Stewart of retro sheet. Hello, dave. Hello. I very excited to have you on belatedly because richer sheet has given us everyone in this community so much over the years, you are responsible for that or one of the people primarily responsible. So I hope that a lot of our listeners are aware of what retrospect is a dozen how it came to be. But for those who are not can you give us what I'm sure must be by this point eight well, practiced reddish of the origin story, and how it actually started. Sure, I can do that. I don't mind telling the story though, I'm always happy about it. I could I could possibly say this is a little corny, but retrocede began on July eighteenth nineteen fifty eight when I was ten years old..

Dave Smith Marlins mount Rushmore founder JD Martinez Andy baseball Darvish Bill James Machado Tom Tango Sean foreman retrocede Harper dick Kramer Pete Palmer Charles Stewart ninety five percent ten years
"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"At least if you're here, you're swing shouldn't be messed with too much because you have been selected for having swing that got you to the majors. It's very difficult level to reach. I think that theory is a little too broad. There are players in the major league level who could benefit from swing cages. But I do not think that the best players that the major league level would benefit from sweet. You don't want to mess up Giancarlo Stanton. Yeah. I agree. Right. If you're someone lake obviously there guys who have gotten to the majors, and then have made a swing change gotten way better the whole D Martinez and Donaldson Justin Turner, and Danny Murphy, all those guys. But none of them was star. When they made those changes, they got there. So they had some raw ability, but they were not excelling. Now. I mean, it's interesting if you look at there's sort of a launch angle sweet spot as Tom Tango of be has called it where you wanna get balls between about eight degrees and thirty two degrees or something like that like anything higher than that is just going to be a pop-up or a Alesi fly ball, and obviously anything below zeros just gonna be on the ground. So you want as many of your at least hard hit balls as possible in that range. Now if you look at just the percentage of balls in play between eight degrees. Thirty two degrees. Stettin in two thousand eighteen was almost at the very bottom. There were three hundred twenty three guys this year. That's the number of people in the simple and Stanton. In terms of the percentage of his alz- in play. This year was two hundred eighty two hundred eighty of three twenty three in terms of the percentage of them that were in that that at ball sweet spot. So in that sense. He would think that maybe there's room for improvement there. Like, the number one guy in terms of putting his bed at balls in. That launch angle range, Joey Votto, Joey Votto, had forty five point nine percent of his at balls hit in that range this year. That is very good Stanton. Was at thirty percent. That is not very good. So I mean, it's possible that he could increase that. I don't know if you looked only at his hardest hit batted balls may be the picture would look a little bit better there. But it's also that he is so strong that he hits these balls that would not. Be home runs for anyone else. Like, I think we have both devoted entire articles to Stanton home runs that were hit at like ankles that no one else has ever hit home runs at because he can just hit these low drives that just keep going and going and get over the fence. So for Stettin to hit a ball at whatever eleven degrees or something as hard as he hits it that's a little bit different from some other guy. Who's just weekly hitting it at that angle. So, you know, I'm sure he could make some tweaks like he didn't have his best season is here, obviously. But general he's been such a good player that it's unlikely that if you change something dramatically he would be better than he's been not impossible. But I think there's just also a misconception that everyone who has a low launch angle would be better with a higher lunch eagle this past year. So you were using eight and between eight thirty degrees. Yes. So Stanton for the four years, we have from the of seconds. Always been between twenty nine and thirty two percent of his bad balls in that range, so very consistent and and this season Nelson. Cruz was at thirty one percent, very Stanton. Ni now crews in the past has been around thirty five percents. Oh, yeah. You could say Stanton. I guess could stand to hit a few more balls in the air. But like you said, you know, if he can hit a ball out at fourteen degrees above the horizontal, then there's not really a reason to change change that very much..

Giancarlo Stanton Stanton Tom Tango Joey Votto Stettin D Martinez Cruz Justin Turner Danny Murphy eight degrees eight thirty degrees Thirty two degrees thirty one percent thirty two degrees thirty two percent fourteen degrees eleven degrees thirty percent nine percent four years
"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"And that was still taking a toll on him. But his sprint speed on the bases was essentially the same his sprint speed in the outfield, which is a stat. I got from Tom Tango was essentially the same. So his top speed was. It's the same yet. He was truly terrible. So it's kind of a perplexing case. By the way, some of you may be wondering whether Harper's playing center field had something to do with his poor performance in the defensive metrics. We did get some Lister emails doubt that not really maybe a little bit. This was the first time he had played center in a few years. He had not played center at all the previous couple seasons in this year. He played more than four hundred innings there. And obviously in center he's being compared to a higher caliber of fielder, which would make him look worse in a relative sense. But he was also really really bad when he was in right field being compared to right fielders, which was the bulk of his time and the bulk of his negative defensive stats, so probably didn't help. But wasn't the whole reason. Yeah, I noticed in the door the one star plays that stat cast. Yes, track one through five star and in one star plays. He was like one of the worst outfielders. I mean, look he was one of the worst baseball period. According to the numbers, but he I think he made something like seventy percent of catch. On like, the ninety one to ninety five percents, which is just bizarre. It's the kind of thing that makes you want to write it off to luck. But it's just it's a terrible. Look when you go into a contract season. Yeah. He even had zero star play which he didn't make it. I didn't even know. There was real star play. I guess it's just the place that everyone makes they don't even display it on the website. But he had one of those. It was I think it became a Matt carpenter double where he was just standing there. And I don't know if he lost it and the lights are the clouds or something, but he just stood there. And it dropped so lots of weird ones like that. But my theory, which I have developed is that he was just kind of taking it easy out there a little bit more than he has in the past which in one sense is not a bad thing because he used to be a guy who would crash into outfield fences in hurt himself. And he did that in two thousand thirteen he crashed into a wall. He hurt his knee. He went on the DL he had to have surgery after the season. And he tweeted something. The time. I will keep playing this game hard for the rest of my life. Even if it kills me. I'll never stop hashtag respect the game. He was twenty years old at the time and people change between twenty and twenty five and they change even more when they're about to enter free agency. And perhaps when their team is not playing very well, and is probably not going to be a playoff team, which was the case for the nationals for much of the season. So I think and the most compelling evidence to me it's hard to say what someone's effort level is or whether he is easing off the guests little bit. But there's a stat for everything these days, and there is a stat that sports info solutions tracks which keeps track of the number of times that a fielder dives or slides just literally watch all the place.

Harper Tom Tango Matt carpenter baseball seventy percent twenty years
"tom tango" Discussed on Painting Corners Podcast

Painting Corners Podcast

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Painting Corners Podcast

"Sweitzer bonus episode fan graphs, right Dan's and bore skis on with us today. He's going to break down the zips projection system for us. We're gonna talk sabermetrics. We're gonna talk Baltimore Orioles, Texas Rangers, amazing to listen to, and I hope you all enjoyed as much as we did Danzon Gorski greater zip systems, kind of tell us how you came up with that, how how it came about pretty much anything about it that you can. Well, it started kind of in the mid nineties. I was in the early internet sabermetrics community at the time I was I was I was actually young in those days and impressionable, and a friend of nine named Chris dial. He's on the board of saber. Now we talked about, hey, we could do a basic projection system that gets us most of the way towards the kind of mysterious projection systems that existed at the time. They were generally like the product of like fantasy baseball magazine, stuff like that. Baseball. I did have one behind their pay wall the time. So we talked about that. We never really got back around to that. Tom, Tango eventually did kind of that concept with Marcel. So when I visited around two thousand three, two thousand to two thousand three it, it took it a little different for than we invasion. There was a lot more complicated. Computers had slowly been getting better because I, I wouldn't even be able to run zips right now on my computer for fifteen years ago. So so technology has provided some assistance there, but the basic concept that mean is pretty simple. Zips looks at a player's history of both basic and advanced data as whatever I can get my hands on that I can demonstrate has predictive value estimates where player is and tries to estimate where a player's going. The way zips does. This is a compares every player at every point of their career to every other player in major league history and minor league history. Going back to the late sixties. Now. And to try to get kind of a cohort of roughly comparable players to kind of just get an idea of the career paths we're talking about because really all we know about baseball history is from things that happened before in baseball history. So there's a lot of hobbyist number crunching in there, and and zips gives me a mean projection a whole range of projections because you should think of projections not as one simple number, but as a whole array of possibilities. If you ever watch hurricane forecast, you'll see the little hurricane and this giant Cohen that goes out representing all the likely pass. It's kind of the same concept except the the weather. People do something where crucial, and they're also smarter than me, but it's the same general concept. Yeah. I don't know if the weather people actually make up the system, so I'm gonna vote. You're smarter than them not not the guy on the green screen behind the scene. The super meteorologists. I don't know what they call them because the guys on the TV also our meteorologists. I'm gonna go with the super warm, super meteorologists pretty thinning. Yeah, love that. So you had this zip system so say, I'm GM Sam..

Zips Texas Rangers Baseball Chris dial Dan Cohen Danzon Gorski Baltimore Orioles GM Marcel Tom fifteen years
"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"It's only twenty eighteen has me again in twenty forty three. So that is not present. The bird will point to as right and his wins losses would. I mean, the euro I don't think is even close to arbitrating anyway. Yeah, it is a a worthwhile argument and just one of several ways in which raise are trying to sort of break the models that we use. I just looked up teams with relief appearances of at least three innings. So the team with a few est such really Cleveland Indians, they had three the Astros for the rockets at five. The median. The median is I guess it would be twelve and a half and a second place. The royals have twenty. That's twenty relief appearances. If at least three innings and I place the Tampa Bay rays have sixty three sixty three relief appearances of at least three innings. That's a lot that's more three times as many as that he can play. So on the one hand, this is not urgent because there's only one team really doing this and even though I know like the as of used a few openers and some other teams of us an opener from time to time. This is really the raise only doing this, so it's not super born because for now it is isolated to one team, but that also means that this is unlikely to go away. The rays of had a really successful pitching staff this year. The razor fourteen kms over five hundred. They just swept the Orioles that are on the verge of bypassing the mayors and being the team in second place in the impossible ale, wildcard hunt. Yeah. So this is going to go around. So the raise our innocence giving us a chance or us. I'm not the one who's figuring this math. I will never figure out. This math, but the rays are an ongoing experiment to allow people smarter than me. And you like Tom Tango to figure this out before it gets worse? Yeah, I think every team, if it's not a ready, experimenting with the opener is having that conversation because someone with the front office or ownership or whatever is going to be like, well, this team is doing it, and they seem to be doing pretty well. So why aren't we doing it? Or should we doing? And I was talking to someone from the Phillies just the other day who said they're having meetings about whether they should use the opener. It's probably a meeting that's happening everywhere if it hasn't happened already. But before we leave the race, I just wanted to recognize the fact that you tweeted that now and Giancarlo Stanton have the same Debussy plus one twenty four cannot imagine two more different hitters really. And yet they have been equally productive article about one peer versus Adam Dunn, right? Yes. Piece. Yeah, just all kinds of, except that Giancarlo Stanton has also been good. He's like a surprisingly good defensive outfielder given his out, no balk his tower mass. And yeah, it's just fun. Now, Smith is bad like three seventy five or something, and he's of Giancarlo Stanton. So you have any nails. So I wanted to mention couple things that happened this weekend one..

Giancarlo Stanton arbitrating Phillies Astros Tampa Bay Tom Tango Adam Dunn Smith Orioles fourteen kms one hand
"tom tango" Discussed on The MLB Show

The MLB Show

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on The MLB Show

"He inspires such confidence that the fielders are just on their game behind him. Whatever it is you're never going to really eliminate every possible comp. Locating factors. So you have to do the best you can. And I think we're kind of in this in between space right now where we know that we can do better than this because we have stat cast. We have the angle and the bedded ball of the angle and the speed of every bad at ball. And in theory, we should be able to build that into if not a perfect defensive system, at least one that is a much closer approximation of perfect than the zone based ones that we've been using from, you know, a decade ago up until now. And right now we haven't gotten to the point yet where those systems are fully implemented yet. And so we know there's something better, but we are still making do with something worse because it's what we've had. That's exactly where I wanted to go. And that the last big media maybe their odds and ends. We can pick up after this, but this is the last big point I wanted to make. I think we're, we're at a point where the framework of zone based offensive, defensive metrics is obsolete. It just doesn't first of all up and. Until stack Castrilli. There is a robust public sabermetrics movement where a lot of the cutting edge research was done at places like baseball perspectives or by freelancers or people with no affiliation whatsoever. Because all of the data was publicly available either in box scores were on tape, like what baseball info solutions did. And I don't know if this is still what they do, but I have friends who work there and this is how it works. Then they split the field up into a certain number of zones. And for every batted ball, they've tracked where the the zone where the veal or made the play and what kind of play was something like eighty one different types of good or bad play, and they fed all that into it. That was the data that they collected and it's essentially just the eye tests codified and you can't do that anymore. Because when all you needed was tape or all you needed was box score data, I then anybody could do it given enough time and commitment and resources. Now you need the. Actual stat, casts, you need actual tracking data, and we don't all have access to that. And it's just been this along with a lot of the a lot of the, the minds your Tom Tango's, a one of the biggest example examples of this. A lot of the biggest minds in public sabermetrics have gone to work for teams of the league. So not only a little bit of brain drain, but we don't have access to the state of the art data. The teams are using and the way that major league baseball and MLB a. m. our packaging, this the stuff you see from stack cast like it's fun, but they're making they're making trivia not making science, you know, like the catch, probably they're all sorts of of ways that the state is getting used and packaged, and you know to to illustrate how a cool looking play, you know, how difficult was his play actually to make it, it's it's made in anecdotes. And yeah, plural of anecdote is not data, and so they've taken the approach of rolling. It out in bits and pieces. I think which from an entertainment and spectator and marketing perspective make sense. But at times can be frustrating because you kind of want them to just dump the finished product on you and say, we've accounted for everything, and here's what everyone's were. I'd honestly settle for not even the finished product. I'd settle for the data. I mean that's or that. And that's, that's the difference between. So if you look at it as the difference between saber, you know, baseball is commerce. Baseball is a television program. Essentially, it's an entertainment product. It's a for profit major league baseball, a four profit entertainment company, and.

Baseball MLB Tom Tango
"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"So that's what maybe think of it. He is giant and it looks like you would be probably pretty good at baseball. I, I do what having baseball players actually Photoshop or in this case MS paint, but. By the way I can. I can go back if you're, here's at all, Mike, try if you look at baseball reference the last two years. He's at eighty three counts and he hasn't swung, but I just realized baseball reference is including automatic intentional walks, which which is a complication. If you go to baseball. Savant, he's had forty seven, three counselors year and a half. Now he also swung, but just something to keep in mind with the intentional walks, special references not filter that even though they're technically are no pitches. All right. Question from Matthew who is a patriots supporter. And the same question actually was asked by a listener Scott. This is in reference to a Mike petrello tweet that I think has since been deleted because people misinterpreted poor. Mike, I think he tweeted something about how the dodgers in addition to trading for. I don't know dosier maybe it was Machado at that point had also acquired extra roster spots. And so. They were gonna play with twenty eight roster spots for the rest of the season and the twins. We're gonna play with twenty two or something. It was a joke obviously. But I think people took it seriously because Mike works were major pace vol, and they figured he might know. So anyway, the question from Matthew is if roster spots were actually tradable commodities, what kind of value would teams place on them? What type of team would trade or trade for such spots? And Scott asked something similar. He said, how many wins is an extra rest or spot where to a contending team over two months of the season. Although I will note that it's not even really too much this season, right? It's like one month the season at this point because in September, you don't have to worry about restaurants butts. Right. Okay. So the type of team, first of all, the rays would absolutely trade for another roster spot because they would just allow them to use more pitchers more relievers. So I think without question the raise with seek more of of these out and they would just keep everyone up at the major league. Costing some money, I guess, but deal with it, leaving him stuff in terms of value. Just off the top of my head, I would think it's we're looking at a small amount right? Because this is not going to be an elite player. It's something that would give you an advantage around the margin. So maybe a little more rest for relievers or a little more of opportunity to pinch hit with a better player, but already teams kind of have their best twenty five players for the most part in the major. So you're not getting a great player, get a little more rest and I'll say maybe it's worth like between one and three wins. But if you think I'm wrong then tell me why. Well, I've been asked before by listeners and readers what Shohei Otani is worth because he is both a hitter in a pitcher if he were a full two way player all the time, what would saving that roster spot be worth? And I don't really know how to calculate that. But I know that Tom Tango may be among others has made an attempt to and has concluded. That it's not worth very much at all, like maybe less than a win? Probably just because I guess for most teams, you're just not gonna. Have that useful a player in that spot. Like now, teams have the ten date yell and they're shuffling relievers to AAA in Beck and forth again. And usually you're twenty six men is just not going to be that good and is not gonna be used all that much. Like, you know, they're probably teams that would benefit from say, having a pinch hitter on the bench. Now that benches have gotten so small because bullpens have gotten so big. But then how good is that pinch hitter? Actually gonna be. And how often are you actually going to prefer having him pinch hit possibly with a pinch, hit penalty instead of your starter. So I don't know that there is that much of an advantage for most teams, but if you are a team like the dodgers who do have a lot of depth and have a lot of multi position guys and mix and match, I guess in those cases it might be more..

Mike petrello baseball dodgers Scott Matthew Shohei Otani MS Machado Tom Tango Beck patriots two months one month two years
"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Using i've seen some chatter about that seems like it might be baseball related because it's not guys hitting the ball less harder at less optimal angles or anything i think i saw some research from melania thinner tom tango were someone else or all of the above saying that based on a model from previous seasons and the way that the ball has been hit this year you would expect there to be more homers than there have been which might mean that the ball just isn't carrying as much for some reason no one really knows why it carries her doesn't carry seemingly and in related news maybe mlb is now become a part owner of rawlings the official manufacturer of the major league baseball there was a sale of rowlings according to report that mlb and a private equity firm called seidler equity partners which i think was started by one of the partners of the padres they have teamed up to purchase rowlings for three hundred ninety five million dollars chris mayer neck the league's executive vice president for strategy said something to the effect of we are particularly interested in providing even more input and direction on the production of the official ball of major league baseball one of the most important on field products to the play of our great game i don't know whether this purchase had anything to do with the strange fluctuations in the ball in recent years and all the attention that's been paid to that but probably part of it right i know mobis just kind of saying well we should probably just take this over and figure it out ourselves so anyway if the ball does anything wacky in future years we will have no one to blame but major league baseball and their own negligence so let's see i've got three more things before we get to the interview have anything else well pitchers have not contributed to the the homerun spike in recent years i will say pitchers this year have hit seven home runs in one thousand nine hundred seventeen plate appearances they have struck out forty two point seven for.

baseball mlb rawlings padres executive vice president official seidler equity three hundred ninety five mill
"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"It's i've been arguing baseball for twenty five years since the wreck sports baseball pre pre perspective days in college and you know being involved perspectives from the early going and having watched these conversations develop over twenty odd years it's just really something to see how data driven baseball's become into go from place where it was you know what are you talking about you don't know you didn't play the game you none of this this is all garbage nobody would ever use this i mean i grew up in an environment where the voices of the game summarily rejected this whether inside or outside and now i'm living in a world where thirty teams are if if not completely dated driven certainly partially data driven you know where you have joey gallo facing with the seven oh defense and you have finally getting back to an argument you mentioned hater gay let's use our relievers from multiple innings instead of stacking them in these one inning roles let's get away from worrying about a scoring rule the save driving usage let's optin let's eliminate the two ninety ob p sixty five steel leadoff hitter this is all and that this isn't stuff we debate anymore and it's just funny to kind of look at the way the game is played and managed and run in now say all the fights have been one and mind you it's not everywhere earlier saturday i watched mike athenee hold back i save and watch greg holland blow a game i mean it's not it's not perfect everywhere but when you kind of look back and see where we were in nineteen ninety five when we were working on the first perspectives book to wear the game is now it's fascinating and it that's a continuum that's not you know five perspectives changing the world that's allan roth and bill james and craig right and michael woolverton was incredible early guy at perspective said of nobody really talks about anymore and on three guys like don malcolm was doing the big bad baseball book and he go forward to mitchell and tom tango and ben and jeff and dave cameron fan graphs this is twenty five thirty forty fifty years of people looking at baseball and saying this would be the better way to do.

joey gallo mike athenee don malcolm baseball greg holland allan roth bill james craig michael woolverton mitchell tom tango ben jeff dave cameron twenty five thirty forty fifty twenty five years
"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Been kind of continuing education have you had to pick up a lot of new skills while you're there because thinking back to your work when you were writing publicly i would have put you kind of in the the john rao the jeff nyerere in sort of you know writing with a statistical bent but not necessarily in the tom tango class of doing a ton of coding and quarrying and inventing new stats and all that so have you sort of shifted more toward that side of things since you started working for the phillies or have you been able to carve out a role just sort of with the skills that you already had yeah i think in our department we have a very strong knicks of skills and abilities so areas that are strengths for me in my coworkers are able to kind of balance that out but i think the biggest thing around my first year was absolutely a baseball education in our d and picking up coding skills for me sequel in our some of our analysts use python but from free focusing on that in it's something that helps me do my job better in try to work on that but also baseball in general so as general baseball ups intern last year i was really fortunate to have the opportunities to to work with other areas of baseball rations ends pick the brains of our scouts i went to scout school i followed your example ben and you know headed one education out there talking with our player development guys with our majorly coaching staff just there's so many more sources of information here than there necessarily is writing in the public sphere so the learning wherever i can in really growing as a just a baseball person i think is a focus of mine since gabe kaplan came maranda of you had a continuing education in avocados.

phillies baseball ben gabe kaplan john rao jeff nyerere intern
"tom tango" Discussed on Bang the Book

Bang the Book

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on Bang the Book

"In this series so using those fringy starter types of sixth and seventh starter type guys in multi inning facets out of the bullpen very very smart for mickey callaway kudos for that and it's an important thing for me to follow with these new managers you know i wanna see how they're leveraging relievers how they're maximizing the talented they have back there so far so good for mickey callaway so one thing i did want to talk about here today i wanna talk about exit velocity and some of the outliers that are out there thus far because i kinda got the thinking about this when it came to the cleveland indians who have made a fair amount of hard contact so far this season but really haven't had a whole lot to show for it and i'll explain a little bit more here in a minute but you can look you can use the stat cast search function over at baseball savant to look this up if anybody wants to to'real on how to do that please reach out to twitter at skating tripods or adam abang the book dot com i'll be happy to do that for you show you what i use baseball savant for is phenomenal tool the stack cast in for mission is out there is just it's magic it it is absolutely phenomenal is invaluable terrific resources darren woman has over there mike patrol also doesn't great job at stack cast as well as tom tango just great work being done there i disagree with a lot of what major league baseball has done the blackouts from mlb dot tv you should make your product as a widely available as you possibly can i think rob manfred is doing a poor job as commissioner man one of the things that it'll be has done right is putting out that stat cast data so many great resources so many usable things that we can take and you and put put to our advantage here when it comes to betting so league wide this season batted balls of ninety five miles per hour or higher batters hitting five oh five on those eight hundred twenty four for one thousand six hundred thirty to the atlanta braves are banning six eighty six on these balls of ninety five or higher that is sixty eight point.

mickey callaway baseball tom tango atlanta braves cleveland indians adam abang darren mike patrol rob manfred commissioner
"tom tango" Discussed on The MLB Show

The MLB Show

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"tom tango" Discussed on The MLB Show

"So it becomes frustrating for us because we want the access to the cool data but for them it's kind of in entertainment industry question were they want to entertain you like that their primary goal so it's it's a lot of conflicting motivations and have you heard from them at all do they have any issue with you manipulating the data in the ways that you have no with temperature adjustments in ballpark adjustments and things that in theory should make it more accurate but are not baked into the stats as they're provided i i'm assuming you mean major league baseball when we estimate because i've talked to major league baseball and i've talked to track man so um but with baseball i don't think i have a problem i mean i've i've talked to a bunch of people in baseball when they've never said anything better gutted so i don't i don't think that's a problem but i mean this is really kind of sensitive sensitive topic because there are a lot of things going on under the hood that i think people should know about but aren't necessarily public information and it's kind of hard too figure out where to draw the line and the like what you're even allowed to talk about like the me as is really hard i guess can you expand on that without giving away the game so i i know in in 2015 with there are a lot of data problems and i think at one point they have to run an algorithm after every game to finalise the data and i know tom tango has he rip he wrote about this recently.

baseball tom tango