21 Burst results for "Tom Shoes"

"tom shoes" Discussed on How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

07:24 min | Last month

"tom shoes" Discussed on How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

"Will vary and i mean. My thing is cancelled really close on saturday. I mean i is saint that they are going to be sitting here listening and i can hit two sides of this. I can hear. I can hear the stylists but because it you know as prices ago in up an i'm there's more silence going to seven days now open in sunday's so now what we're asking all what we're talking about here is actually reducing this for attracting more staff and making it a more attractive live stall for ourselves but san hose would be saying. Hey my rents aren't going down. I cannot afford to close a day. I think what we did research. Obviously we spent spent quite a few months researching this before. We introduced it first to our community where we could start testing it out. I can put numbers in play with the salons that we coach but this this is already happening and so when we started going chat groups Nosing around if you will and like you said it's been you've you've talked to salon owners have done this that some salons reopened this way eighteen months ago right like so through the pandemic. They decided to reduce hours. Change the hours of operation already and so we have some salons in our year end to being closed saturdays. And they're they're they're not just still getting by their thriving there absolutely driving still and that's where if you're looking at changing the hours of operation do it with concrete knowledge about your business. We by no means are suggesting. Go give this a try. And if it doesn't work you can always go back like. I don't think that's a good plan of attack for the strategy. I think you know as exciting as it may sound really dig in their dive in and figure out if it if it if it could be viable if it is right for the business stat that you see in your salon yet on the other thing is as well as up. We're looking to look into spread those islands from saturday into the week. So we're not looking at reducing. So for instance as a group were within the uk who we said what we're gonna do. We're gonna nine till nine. Is the big solid nine to nine. Monday tuesday wednesday thursday and then finish at five o'clock on a friday to have the weekends like five o'clock like everybody else uncle. The doctors lawyers loyalism utilities. Everybody else five o'clock with dubs. Happy hour if you on your weekend off and so again it goes back to when not trying to just say okay now. We can do five days a week. We're not we can do a reduced week. Sorry we can spread those islands out within the week. Give them the option of coming back in the evening. I'm not it's been. She usually popular a popular with with The salads that over the clients that we spoke to five the amount of people like god. If i could just go home do dinner. Time five thirty and then get a to a seven o'clock you know i'll go and get a hacker or going out and getting a nails done or whatever that is and it's been it's been extremely populous of. So what are we talking about he is. We're rumors talking about restructuring now the way our industry works. Because what you would suggest in here it it can sound outlandish. And that's why. I love it. Because i live out these things and i think he's challenging the norm and that's why i really salute. This isn't for everybody. But i guess to get to this position. This is where. I guess you guys come in. You've got to look at your. You can't just close a saturday and not make adjustments of areas of your business. So that's what you've got to look at here. you know. I think the thing to remember here with this because we keep. We always keep going back to this. It's not just a scheduled. Change that is a coal redoing them. I think if you compare it to a lot of companies that have caused a strong kohl's in belief behind them. You'll see exactly what it means. So for instance. At tom's tom's shoes right tom shoes. They got loyal to the how many years ago but as soon as they launched. That's all be completely honest. Not exactly the most attractive in the world's but super comfortable. We all knew that when you buy a pair of shoes they donate a pack right so somebody in the third world is going to receive a path. They have a kohl's behind that business. I'm that allowed them to tap into a community perhaps would not have been interested in not shoot. It was just on the shelf. They had a great pop us right and this is our way for us to say that we have a greater purpose right. There's a lot of salon owners listen to this right now with things in themselves. Hang on a second. David in the call i do take care of my staff. I do treat them really really well all into stand that when they worked for us you know. They have a great lifestyle. So i don't need to do this. The thing is that even though. I know that you take right caterpillar staff. It's not obvious to everybody outside of your four walls. If you're on your team yes the get it but this means that when you get in the local publicity about what you stand for and why you are doing this people walking down the street who are not a guest say. Hey that's brush salaam Loan i was. I was reading about and they don't open saturdays because they take such incredible care of the team. Members is a greater cause to this. But i would say that david and i'm glad that you mentioned that cause joe to public's walking down the high street on a saturday yet they closed because i they. They're looking after they start. That's great but i'm getting a feeling also. There could be. People will downstream giving. What the heck it. I close in on a saturday on saturday. Highstreet should be alive not close in. You know all we meant to be their suits in people's lifestyles. You know the how people want to live their lives. Because we're all my saying well. Actually we're looking after our staff not appliances is a fine balance. Isn't it that you're gonna get that balance right because people will say we want you open on a saturday. That's true you know. I think there always has to be the differentiator if you ask anybody in the handwriting industry any salimo. What makes you different than the sullen down the street. They're gonna come back with things like all. We have a better standard of hairdressing. We offer constant education to our team members. We do this service. No one else offers this service. You know it's the same stuff in order to really stand out. I believe in today's world. It has to be something that isn't related to the hairdressing that you do the has to be something that's so even though maybe somebody's gonna think i'll let closed on. Saturday really wants to go down the saturday. The rules the know that. Yes but you are open late nights. I can get my hands on the monday evening with them at eight o'clock as well so this is why it's so important that if you want thinking of taking this on i'm role in this being the only person in your area is really heading this up that it's done in a way that your whole community realizing that you marketed correctly so again. This isn't a case of sitting down with your team members on.

tom shoes kohl tom uk caterpillar David joe david
The New Season of Shark Tank

The View

02:14 min | 1 year ago

The New Season of Shark Tank

"Well, mark with the economic downturn. It seems like shark, tank is more relevant than ever. Do you feel that way? Also I love the show. I appreciate that yeah, absolutely. I mean look there are so many small businesses going through hardship. There's so many people who've been laid off from their jobs and trying to determine should they start their own small business and the answer is yes and Shark tank a good job of educating people and getting people to understand what entrepreneurship is all about, and you know one of my favorite sayings is one thing that separates the American the United States. Of America, from every other country in the world is our sense of entrepreneurship entrepreneurial spirit and that's a quote from that Joe Biden gave me at one of his events and I. It's so true and it's even more important today. That's who we are as a country. We are a country of entrepreneurs and Shar taken spires people young old in the middle to go out and starts company start companies and I'm so proud to be part of it. I love the show to mark any of you would be a better president than trump but tell us is there are there any special guests on this upcoming season? Oh Yeah we've got Daniela Bet ski who started kind bar. We have Blake Majkowski who started Tom Shoes. We have Kendra Scott of her namesake country company Kendra Scott. We have Alex Alex a Rod I mean we got a great crew of special guests and I got to tell you the deals are incredible. I did more deals this season than any other year before. And the entrepreneurs were intense. You saw one clip Alan tents that was, but they also had to quarantine. So by the time they got on, there were ready to go and you know. It was just so much at stake. We knew that we were studying the example for America to really get people excited about starting companies because honest guy honestly guys I think what we look back in twenty years at this pandemic twenty twenty won't find out that some kids from who knows where started amazing companies that have become world class companies, and if we can inspire those kids to go out and do that I, mean who wouldn't want to be part of that and seizing twelve is all about that.

Kendra Scott America Joe Biden Alex Alex United States Shar Blake Majkowski President Trump Donald Trump Alan Tom Shoes
"tom shoes" Discussed on Changes Big and Small

Changes Big and Small

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on Changes Big and Small

"Community has said they would like assistance and when you think about sustainable development, it should be the community saying this is what we need not. US coming in as Americans saying, this is what we think you need, and in that regard further, we should be working ourselves out of a job. Like one of our focuses was to teach small-scale farmers who were interested in fish farming about fish-farming, encouraging them in empowering them to do it and TCB teaching them to to teach other the the farmers that we worked with I'm fully confident like we still talk to them every month and they are continuing right now they're ponds are doing well, and they've learned a lot. Of improved through yields have improved their business practices are better methods of keeping records and so on and they're teaching each other. So that's still going on. That's great because it sounds like there's ownership on the local level, right and there needs to be another for. The. What were you doing in? India. I was teaching Eliza teacher at the Canadian school there. But then I did a bunch of volunteering with some local organizations I was teaching computers, and so some schools had computer donations. For example, that were in a locked room. The kids were never allowed to us because they might break it. So I would volunteer add some schools on a Saturday and help with the kids get access to those computer does sometimes for small organization you would try to arrange volunteering but there was nobody in charge of volunteering and then it would just never happen on less one person took it upon themselves but in a large organization that was all of this stuff that you had to do to get access but it was very streamlined, it comes down to what we prioritize and sometimes in a lot. Of organizations volunteering and volunteers is something that gets left behind or it's like if somebody wants to pick it up because as a society, we value money in. So that drives a lot of the decision. So when you talk about volunteering me others the good intentions on social impact of or the interested social impact. But very often we're capitalists world and money drives a lot of those factors that allocate where we prioritize our resources in. That's how communities that have good intentions get left behind. Well. One of the most recent volunteer activities I did in India was actually through my previous school here in Czech Republic. We worked with teach for India and one of the conversations that we had was about we want to make sure that it's not we're not in a position of imbalance in the power dynamic. It's not we're bringing all of this knowledge to you because we have everything to offer and finding ways so that there could be some reciprocity. In this process and I imagine that this is a big component of volunteer work at. How. Do you make sure that it's not just a given? Take a role or the white savior role or even more. Conscious Dynamics to consider there's been some criticisms even of some social companies. because. For example, maybe by providing resources to a local community, some of the local businesses might be put out of business might their repair services need any more? So how do you think about this this activism and the dynamics that can play in volunteer in how have you seen them play out and I was involved with Tom Shoes for Awhile Thomas is a company. that it gets a lot of positive press for you know, giving a pair of shoes with every fair that sold and that's great. If you look at the effects of Potocani Oasis, disease.

India fish-farming Tom Shoes Eliza Canadian school Czech Republic Thomas
Designing human-like voice bots for IVR with Einav Itamar

VUX World

06:10 min | 1 year ago

Designing human-like voice bots for IVR with Einav Itamar

"For those who? have. Never. Come across Volk. It is is A. Platform describe as a platform technology enables you to. Automate in coming calls into the in the Houston. conversationally, I. You describe. It. Wa. You're automating. Both incoming and outbound calls using the I. We also providing solutions for Omni Channel. On top of feats, you know many auto companies. The are Chad with companies are trying to into the space of voice. But then the extent that you get these, you know naturally suitable because voice is much more complex than I'm your shed, but we went the other way around I created. A solution that is good for contact center. Now, we're also studying to provide the solution channels and to provide also on me across channels solutions. Across. Messaging Chats websites in-app in many other channels, swell. Rhonda's this because eventually customers today expect to get the best service across the channels to get it also to be consistent and fluent. so you're talking. On about trade-offs, contacts and trade offs, and how you kind of you develop the plow foam to try and counteract some of the. Can you elaborate a little bit on what kind of trade offs? You UTAH. Yeah, sure. So S I mentioned. I. Think Sense. There is such thing as customer service. There is always a trade off between. You know. The company's you know our clients at one to provide. Good. Customer experience, but Dan their cost. For providing customer experience and especially. When there is a your scaly. So as no telecommunication companies and banks as A. Growth in a number of customers, a number of agents, it becomes more and more challenging to keep the level of customer experiences still keep the cost same. Venture. Customers what we experienced when we are calling. Is. Experienced long waiting times. We experienced sometimes inexperienced agents or you know all short agents, we know maybe limited access to internal systems or. Out Maybe. So So. Then on the other hand when companies try to solve skill ability issues and use technologies like. Then again, they get. They throw their customers into amaze rights with the that is not great. Awesome experience, and then sometimes they try to. Come these using. Trying to divert customers the other channels that they're more scalable like email and chat, and so on. That eventually, still customers are still calling and again receipts during co-lead more and more again because if you want something and you now. You still need to call. So it's not one or the other, he needed to provide great customer experience across channels and I think that if chat was where like a trim two or three years ago. Now, it's clear that the voice is as important as jet and you need to provide again a solution across channels and. Make sure that you don't need voice s like. Sumptuous is. Completed to. Jets. It's interesting that you mentioned or what you mentioned earlier makes me think about how a lot of times customer service can actually be a differentiator. Sorts can be a competitive advantage for starting companies. In. The US you've got a handful of companies that are just like really known for good customer service like jet blue, a trader Joe's. Maybe, there is something that you as well. Cain any companies that Spring to mind. You're like, okay. I. Don't mind calling them. I think John Lewis Typically tend to have a pretty good customer service, but another one from the US is Tom's shoes. Of you've had this dog is where some very agents have spent like twenty thirty minutes on the call was among and something. I think any complaints they ended up just giving you a new pair of shoes in insulin, and then there's another one about flower. Flower. Company where? They, they missed delivery to someone's There was an important delivery wasn't birthday with something else and the Mr Delivery, the person foreign open ended up giving them free flowers not announced just free flowers everyone. Constantly after that. For Making one mistake. So it just shows how important is to have customer service because people like me who have nothing to do with it tells stories about. That's going to be really expensive if you're going to be willing to stay on the phone for hours with the human. So I guess Vocal Da da driven customer service help companies close that gap a little bit when it comes to that customer service advantage. I don't think they relate to that. you. You mentioned several companies that could. A similar experience. No. Before costs and for civil ones. Not just automated, but I will make sure that. The customer experience comes first. So this is our ideal customer. So for instance, American Express is also where known. In. you know in in their? Ability and willingness to invest quite a lot. In order to provide great experience. So when we met with them initially, they were very excited about us both from the ventures you need. innovation and business the different business units. So that got us into a place where they invested in as they are one of our. Trusted the Bucknell's and we are Again one example for. For Great Company that believes in US and knows the importance. So great customer experience and not just

United States Jets Omni Channel Houston. WA Great Company Chad Rhonda Mr Delivery Utah John Lewis DAN American Express Cain JOE TOM
"tom shoes" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"He is the co founder and CEO of what would you say is the kind of the emotional roller coaster that you ride as you're trying to get. The business off the ground and dealing with partners and all of that. I mean, I was super super blast you know, with with the three other co founders I have we are we all have kind of our unique skill sets. We all have the lane that we kind of march and runnin. But yet we overlap in a way that makes it so that we all kind of contextually understand what the other person was working on? But I always respected their level of expertise in that one area, so we didn't really step on each other's toes a whole lot at the end of the day, I think, as it relates to whether you're finding founders or early employees and even employees as you scale setting, setting your kind of core values and the things that you as a person care about, and what are the things you want to hold integrity, you know and ethically how do you make decisions related to business and The four of us just happen to be really aligned. I'm wanting to always do the right thing by the customer and by our other team members and putting ourselves last in that equation on. I think that's what really helped us gonna gel and really worked incredibly well together was the over the five almost six years now. Am I remembering right? That your dad was an entrepreneur? That's right. What did you learn from him? I learned kind of the hustle on the drive. You know, when my dad was starting this company, I think I was probably five. It was really early on, and I think through kind of just general osmosis of being, you know, around in that situation of being curious, and my dad got us involved in things like photoshoots and you have had us help him pack of samples for trade shows and Watching kind of the early stage, kind of like, hustle and grind that he would do you know, it's funny because you know we went out and raise some capital and my dad was like I just save $5000 worked in the basement of our house. So it's a different I think age in which people are starting businesses. We expect things to happen much faster and use capital the kind of short in the time horizon, but He built his business over 35 years. And I think the respect that I have for somebody who just likes slowly kind of chips away and kind of that level of determination. I think I got a lot of that kind of never really giving up. No matter what challenges face you on that note, What would you say are maybe Three top characteristics that a successful entrepreneur leaves. Yeah, the first I always say is focused, You know, which is kind of counter to what an entrepreneur is rather common entrepreneur. Anything. What do you think? Well, I think in entrepreneur walks around the the world, you know, with eyes wide open, constantly questioning how things could be done better, right? You know, this is annoying. How can I fix that? Right here? You're always trying to fix things, right? Especially you see a problem. You want to solve it? Whether It's about creating a business or creating a product. You know our service or whatever to make your life easier, but that once you kind of hone in on an idea, focusing on just that one thing and really taking, you know, and kind of putting the blinders on and really kind of quieting the outside noise. Just remaining super focused. I've seen it happen with myself, You know, we started with socks and then a month later, I was like, Let's do underwear. Let's do sweatshirt. Let's do she shirts and I've had so many mentors along the way that have reminded me that the best businesses that we look Teo, you know the Nikes thie under armour is the Lululemon's Tom Shoes. They all started with one product on, you know, spent years just getting the message out about that one product and why it was so great. And then once they were picking us, they earned the right to then start to expand into other product categories that once I kind of absorb that really realized, wow, like we have a really long runway. We've got to tell one story consistently to the customer and that there's plenty of customers and people out there that don't know who we are even as a business today. We're we're six years into our business over 100 million of revenue, and you still got to realize that there are plenty of people in this country. We still have no idea who we are, and so by staying focused and being just telling that same story over and over and over again and becoming experts at one thing, rather than being mediocre and a bunch of things, so that focus is one What would be another two again? I go back to setting core values Early on, it's Ah, you know, it seems business schooling to sit down and write out the things that you know our most important to you. But The act is guiding principles for how you make decisions, but it also, as you start to bring in other team members. It helps to identify people who are who you believe believe in similar things as you do, but also gives them a set of guard rails by which to make decisions so that as you scale you as the founder of the CEO, our executive can start to remove yourself away. You know, give provide more autonomy to your team, which ultimately is the key to success in terms of scaling of businesses is not getting pulled into every little thing and constantly finding ways toe delegate information out. Um 1/3 1 is Thanks, but particularly in terms of consumer you've gotta have you've got to be super product and super customer focused. You know, if you don't have a good product, Andi, don't treat the customer. Well, it's going to be a massive uphill battle. I think people think, you know. Oh, I'm just gonna I'm gonna create a toothbrush company That's going to donate a toothbrush, Teo, you know, from a social costs, they think that's the one thing. But if you have a bad tooth brush the customer might try at once because you've got this mission, but they'll never come back. So really has Start with having a really good on unidentifiable product. And then again, there's there's no room in this digital age, with the amount of reviews and stuff that are available to not always treat the customer, you know, at the highest peg within your organization. Last question for you is just in general. Knowing what you know from A failed business.

Teo founder CEO co founder Tom Shoes executive
"tom shoes" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

"Yeah. Definitely! mean. The reputation of that charity you know, how well does. Kind of outreach it as sort of thing. Yep for sure. So as Scotland. SIP water. Problem I usually correct. People hydrate during a shell anyway so. Kuncoro. Down, like a forty ounce. Cup of water during the show. Good man. Some good for the day. Should. But, yeah, there's a lot of really great charities out there and you know. My first personal favorite is Doctors Without Borders. Yeah for sure for sure. I think on just on on this subject for sure like doctorswithoutborders, fantastic organization like. Talk about a team whose been doing like selfless work for as long as I can remember this just amazing. I think that definitely. There's definitely an advantage to having the KPI that is quantifiable. Right so if you can count, it just makes it Kinda easier to. Come up with language. I first of all to share your story, and then secondly, and this is important to coming up with language that people can understand and spread for you so like with Tom's back to them. For example you know. They came up with this language, which is buy one give one. I mean. That's four words I. Mean You couldn't get their story more concise than boiling it down to the. Concentrated essence it's it's a beautiful thing when you think about it, it's like A. It's said the Mona Lisa phrases in away like it's just so so well crafted. so yeah, like when folks are exploring like you know, what should, what should we do? What's our KPI GONNA BE I. Don't want to talk them out of supporting some something like doctorswithoutborders buyout by all means I mean you know just having like a the dollar value? Be Kpi of like you know we've given. Today. We've supported Doctors Without Borders. Ten thousand dollars. Fifty thousand dollars, or whatever pretty great but I think. When the KPI isn't a dollar figure and it's an actual. Like a tangible thing I think is probably the most. To in my mind is the most powerful thing, and has the most resonant so number of shoes. Sorry pairs of shoes given away by Tom's pairs of socks given away by Bomba's number of trees planted by style loop. Number of dog saved by. Kid with an imaginary friend. WHO's a puppy comic? Those kinds of like. Tangible KPI's verses like the more fuzzy fiscal KPI dollar value I think for me has more resonance when it's a tangible thing. Worth by the way houses giving almost one hundred million shoes away. Easy! Man Our last I checked a longtime ago. Up to one hundred million. Or close to. Jameson to get to work got some catching up to do. So. Issues I. Definitely agree the more specific can get. The better is always better. I mean issues basically shows a year cumulative better track of stuff. There's a little bit more accountability and you being a lot more specific. Sit. Anybody can put dollar figures down issues. We get the point where seeing dollar figure. Your in of itself isn't really all that meaningful. On the other. Lady said you know number Hughes given way number of socks giving away how many? Rescued, that's the thing is definitely going to be something a little bit more tangible indefinitely. Something more specific. Yeah and and don't you think it makes for a more interesting story like I? Mean Tom Shoes might say we've given away. Two hundred million dollars with a shoes like to me, that's. Just if the shoes are two bucks a piece for the pair of shoes that they give away. I think to me, it's it even though it's a smaller number, it makes for a more interesting story to say. We've given away one hundred million peasants shoes. Then we've given away two hundred million dollars with issues or two hundred million dollars with footwear whatever. That that hard number of pairs of shoes, hundred million play. I don't know what do you think what would it? What's more has more impact on you. Definitely number of shoes. I Yeah Yeah. Baen this by the way is not doing as well. They're only up to about ten million pairs of socks. Tam. Still really impressive I mean here. It's Dolly Parton we're. We're on a mission to plant million trees right, so say like we still got a lot of work today. Where we we've got a long way to go with a really fantastic star like we got the wind on our back right now we've got A. Platform in the world that has dovetailed review acquisition with tree, planting and online reviews right now, just white hot as far as marketing strategy like pretty much. Every single brandon business on the planet is. Like a five star arms race right now, trying to get more reviews than their competitors. Just because it's so valuable to them, it makes them so much more money. At the one of the most interesting things around that phenomena actually is tripadvisor in our member. Checking tripadvisor about. A year ago or something and has has like. Holy doodle like hotels on here. That had like ten thousand reviews. Ten thousand guests reviews and it got me thinking just because I'm in this space right I. Give this stuff a lot. More than the average. Of course because. It's my bread and butter, but I got thinking like. Holy Doodle, there is no such thing as enough reviews. If there was like wh-. These hotels would just stop. That'd be like well. We got two thousand five star reviews like. Do you want to stay here or not? But of course they don't stop because what they're trying to do is actually create that status Delta. That trying to. Get a huge lead on the next closest hotel. That's down the road that a potential guests might consider so that when the guest is looking at those two hotels and like these guys have got. Four four hour rating or whatever it is I'm tripadvisor, is it? It's not stars. DOTS I don't even know what kind of rating system that date still basically a one to five so. When it comes down to you. But. The again. Emphasize reviews obviously. You know obviously aren't our. Better as well, you by understand what whether they're messing up? They can also correct that in you know. Basically you become a much better business. Yeah, definitely, that's a really good inside too, and I think for. Data driven businesses and even small businesses..

Tom Shoes tripadvisor Doctors Without Borders Scotland Dolly Parton Mona Lisa Jameson Bomba Lady Hughes
"tom shoes" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

"And see how much they can get for the services rendered. You know whether it's selling comic books or given a head, cut or going to a gym and you know that's not a bad model. It's been the model and the template for a long time, but I felt like there was something a bit more interesting something deeper out there, and as I started to dig in what I found was that there were businesses that were using giving. Or being generous as a way to actually give them a competitive advantage and so. Yeah this whole concept of For me is regeneration is because I'm somebody who is. Providing a giving angle specifically around ecology around environment around our biosphere, but really I mean any kind of business could be using this model. Of. Essentially generosity to give themselves a competitive advantage. It doesn't have to be environmental doesn't have to be tree planting, and then you could be helping any any different kind of. Charity. Aw, any any kind of. Social Cause to to basically use the same kind of template and be more competitive in this case, be a more competitive rider or comic book, artist or brand. Okay. We shall looking at a lot of businesses for starting she ally. Businesses are starting to actually do things like offering scholarships. Paying Ford in huge ways yeah, that's a great way of putting it actually paying it forward is lake. It's just it's a really powerful way to get a an an advantage in the marketplace. That's far more genuine than just like where he trying to make a profit. This time in marketing, call KPI and It's like the most important thing that any businesses measuring. That we're going to measure well for most businesses it's like. The performance indicator that keeping the closest I on is how much money they're making. I just feel like there's some really interesting brands and businesses, and just even like a smaller entrepreneurs that are doing really interesting things around KPI's at. Don't actually have anything to do with money. one really great example, and and for me this was. kind of an Aha moment was when I discovered a company called. Toms shoes free. Listen as if they're not familiar with Tom's They're a shoe company. That has this slogan. Buy One give one, so you buy a pair of shoes from Tom's shoe company and they'll give away a pair of shoes. To me like. I I heard about that probably about eight years ago I was standing in a playground, and somebody told me like I had my daughter was probably two three years old at the time, native pair of shoes for her, and and one of the parents was like. Toms shoes they make a great shoe and they have this thing. You buy a pair and they'll give away I was like Nah. That's. That's that sounds really cool. And so, that rewired my brain this I was like hold on a second like if I buy a pair of Tom's shoes from my kid, a parachute is gonNA. Get given away to a kid who needs a pair of shoes. I'm like Oh! I really liked that. I love that idea and and the fact that. I heard about Tom Shoes. From apparent in a playground really says a lot about how powerful that. That model and that message is. Because think about it for a second. Like when Tom Shoes, showed up maybe ten years ago. I don't know when they started, but there. Let's call them up a fairly recent shoe company. When they decided to launch their brand, there would have been tens of thousands of shoe companies already on the planet like planet. Earth did not need another shoe company when Tom Shoes launched a company. There was definitely enough shoes enough shoe companies in the world, so these guys come along. They're like hey. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA compete here. We're going to try to sell shoes. Like what are we gonNA do well. They come up with this really interesting concept. Buy One give one, and it's through the giving. It's through the generosity that they've managed to create a really successful shoe company and effectively steal market share away from other shoe companies that just have a traditional business model of we make great shoes. If you need some coming by some of our shoes, whatever shoe company? Company on the planet is basically telling the marketplace whether it's Nike who does it really well, and in a very glamorous glitzy way to some of the smaller companies in the world who don't have the marketing budget that is essentially the message shoe. Put out into the world. We make great shoes. If you like him, you should come by some Tom's comes along and says we make great shoes. If you buy, a pair will give a pair away like that's remarkable. That's worth paying attention to, and that is like one of the key reasons to this success I think. That's success leaves clues. And when we look at a competitive landscape, and we try to find a way to give ourselves an advantage. That it's a really good idea to see who's doing what and to try to take a feather from the CAP I. Don't WanNa. BE A billionaire. I don't WanNa. Start a shoe company, but I. DO think that part of their game plan is really advantageous to me as a small business person and I think part of that game plan would actually be really valuable. To people in the comic book spaces well. Yeah I mean you're already seeing publishers by publishing I. Don't mean like these are looking at the individuals that Ernie. Who Making your point to make sure that their butcher will free especially you know giving him to libraries.

Tom Shoes WanNa Nike Ford Ernie
"tom shoes" Discussed on The Catalyst

The Catalyst

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on The Catalyst

"Its and a sharpie. And i started writing down because i knew exactly what i wanted griffin markian pure to be and i started writing down all catnip. I wrote my catnip way twenty years twenty five years before twenty. Three years with catnip. I ever came up with this. I put it on a wall everything that i wanted to do everything. I was really good at all my strengths than i put on the other side of all all the things. I didn't want to do other things that didn't resonate with me. To this day i'm griffin is still the only pr firm in new york. I don't know maybe anywhere else that only specialized in television we didn't do any print we didn't do any events we didn't do so many things at pr firms do. We were only tv and still and that was an amazing part of this journey. Was the work that we've done in television doing cbs sunday morning. Segments for armez and for Tom shoes and traveling to theo. Pinson doing a shoe. Drop and doing story of betsy johnson did. Oh my gosh. So many things with carolina herrera that were fascinating bunk. And i were retained by samri rio. Hello kitty for eighteen years. And that's another honor being on retainer with a client for that many years and working with an incredible in house team handling everything from all the celebrity relationships to all the broadcast to working with them on co brands because bunk. And i come with so much experience in going back to the trend. Forecasting marketing communications..

griffin markian Tom shoes griffin samri rio betsy johnson Pinson theo cbs new york herrera carolina
"tom shoes" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Welcome into the wind tres to business lunch this is that G. soup he okay for me to go ahead yes me okay okay all right great welcome to the winters business lunch thanks so much for joining me I'm happy Monday this Monday of twenty nineteen hopefully you're not experiencing any Monday blues you know what you shouldn't because we have a great show for you this hour we've got we have a little bit of talk about the business of pot of which is going to be legal come January first also we've got some tech talk as well as what to do to make sure that your money is right four two one T. twenty with Elise clink our favorite CEO of best money moves so that's all coming up in this hour so let's get started right away I believe Thomas with that hi Tom how's it going eight thank you how are you fantastic so Tom shoe but he's a journalist with the sun times he's been covering of the legalization of marijuana since it started since it was just a rumor right yeah yeah it shouldn't see yet that's the the bill was introduced that that didn't go through so now they they try again in lo and behold January first sales are to kick us and how's it looking are we gonna be ready where are we right now you know like most places that legalize cannabis there is a pretty much always supply issues Illinois this is largely because like licenses are still being told out to cultivation centers grow facilities so yes a lot of the dispensaries are a pretty worried about how much product that we have on the shelves obviously there's like so much enthusiasm about people having their first chance to go into a store and buy we actually our buy products by Adam Boulton stop so we'll see how it shakes out there are a couple stores that are are opting not open just because they want to ensure that they have enough product what that medical patients so there's only a couple dozen across the state to be up in January first only nine as of now in Chicago so the options are pretty limited right now and on the sun times website you just released an article with a map of where folks can go to find legalize marijuana on January first right and so a lot of these places in Chicago that's what they're trying to be really accommodating given that January first there's probably gonna be lines so whether it's setting up warming tend to switch what dispensary cut the look here center is doing so that you don't want that western or you know other places are encouraging their patrons to go hang out of other business days and kind of using a paging system collective now once there turn a blind so yeah people are trying to get creative here and is there is a huge expectation that there's gonna be like our long wait longer at different places well thank you so much reporter Tom Schubert work we find you I know you're always tweeting about this what's your Twitter handle I can use my name again at times yeah yes you bet spelled as C. H. U. B. A. with the Chicago sun times we'll have you back on let's talk about how everything rolls out in the new year thanks so much for being with us perfect thank you thank yell all right right now it's over to Jordan burn field.

"tom shoes" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on WGN Radio

"WGN the person on the planet Dave John Michael is a veteran creators Michael's desserts it is a light dessert raise your hand if you don't like desert hands in the air for the past love dessert time and says the reason I became a Baker is because I have an epic sweet tooth I've been passionate about inequality since I was a little kid and season four of the baking championships is on Michael runs a one for one company every dessert sold by the desert for someone else to meet in that cool very cool a treat for people that don't get traits my friend to mention one thing yeah what's that Michael's thirteen what Michael plant the most valuable person on the planet good morning Michael I this is an amazing story how do you do this to thirteen years old some home schooled thoroughly worry about all that much to do it I'm not the school I'm not those bond they gave out sometimes I have a lot of orders going and fine hi I'm Anna how do you know which you know what I mean where where do you take the desserts to make sure that folks that don't get treats get them in order to magic bound soldiers they also go like homeless shelters like last week with a homeless shelter if we don't you go around the scene and we do have people that are homeless people are this is Tom shoes every pair toms shoes you buy they contribute a pair as well I mean second thing for dessert so what type of desserts we talking about time.

WGN Dave John Michael Baker Tom thirteen years
"tom shoes" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Rose on the planet Dave John Michael Jones Michael black is a bakery creator of Michael's desserts who doesn't like desert raise your hand if you don't like desert I don't see any hands in the air to the bass love dessert and says the reason I became a Baker is because I have an epic sweet tooth I've been passionate about inequality since I was a little kid and season four of the baking championships is on Michael runs a one for one company every dessert sold by the desert for someone else and needed not cool very cool a treat for people they don't get treats all I forget to mention one thing yeah what's that Michael's thirteen what Michael plant the most valuable person on the planet good morning Michael I this is an amazing story how do you do this to thirteen years old some home schooled thoroughly had to worry about all that much we do it I'm not the time or not the response they gave out summertime's out a lot of orders going and I'm in a whole bunch hi I'm Anna how do you know which you know I mean where where do you take the desserts to make sure that folks that don't get treats get them in order to match the count soldiers they also go like homeless shelters like last week that they will still homeless shelter me gave out if we don't go to the magic box of stuff around the scene on the parts in stock and we gave the people that are homeless people are this is Tom shoes every pair toms shoes your by they contribute a pair as well me a second I think for dessert so what type of desserts we talking about so I I sometimes may come to all my menu contact I get bored making the same thing over and over again stop new flavor Tom giveaway give me an example like when you make you make cookies to make cupcakes we make one.

Rose Dave John Michael Jones Baker Tom Michael black thirteen years
"tom shoes" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:07 min | 2 years ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Rockstars. I'm Pat O'Brien. Welcome to the show. Check Cam Mark lack to how do you pick the right people? Joining me as Peter dog as the co founder of at Leto. So a how do you pick the right people and be how important is or vice versa? Yeah. I would say the the is extremely important. If you have the right people you're going to fail, and that's that's helps. So so what we do. I can Leto is that we want people that live the brand themselves. We want people that do Ford from engineers to Markson people to sales people want people that understand the brain brand and understands fort part of and they feel like they're in. Yeah. So we can just have people that know read it live. That's and then, of course, chemistry chemistry is extremely important go with your God. And feel can I do I want to be in a plane with this? Guy or this. And then obviously if a family when you're doing visit it is it is totally a family. So the chemistry is extremely important. And then respect always respect important values in culture. I know that when you're finding the right people when I'm building my business, or when I consult for another person company culture is one of the biggest things that always comes up, and it comes down to retention building your business better faster with more employees coming through because they want to be part of the company culture, Tom shoes. Google Zappa amazing companies tomorrow, the cultural how important is company culture. What are some things that you guys deal? Well, we have different things we do. We have something we call. Lebron? Well, that is that if someone is down, and you are when you do start up some days, a heart. The others have to take the first up. It's something to do. So if we see someone that is having a bad day, we use all the engine we have or it could be me personnel of again getting back on track again. So that's really seem because it's like everything in this world is run on emotions. So if one person is toxic it's going to bring the energy down. It's it spreads like this. So it's it's it's extremely important to to get the good vibes up all the time. If you have bad vibes work on it, focus on it and make it make it appear. What about values? I think values is one of the most under looked and undervalued things in an organization when you go into most small businesses, he asked him one of their company values. They look at you with this puzzled face like, my company values. So how important is getting everybody to be absolutely in alignment with the values in the organization. It comes from when you start picking the people you have to look at them and feel this is the person that. Has the right values of what Reid value that for us at I'd let that is. We are doing sports with forty sports for everyone. So we need persons that are holistic who don't down anyone. It's about having value adventure sports. Like, you said you respecting people and respecting everything around Sarai, if it's a cultural difference if it's religion or what it is. We need to have people with very wide shoulders who can you can take the world as different as you mentioned cultural differences another year from Denmark here. So is there a difference between you know, Denmark, or really any other country versus the United States that you've noticed in regards to how they go about finding the right people in building a team. The biggest difference about damore is the size. So but also. We have something called in law of John say that that's that's a stupid thing. It's it's about shouldn't feel that you're any better than anybody else. Ego. Yeah. It really puts you it makes you, and it has so many bad things about because it destroys creativity and a lot of ways. But the good thing about it as we can say here is that you very humble with that attitude from them. Are you come here? And you're so humble about that. You are in a country where you can make everything possible, and you want to contribute to to this country with with what you bring into it. And the another culture difference is that. Because of that people. They all Americans. Who is very enthusiastic and not. But the people we meet our get gets excited and this show the site men, and they're very well behaved. So so we when we get out of meetings today. This was the best meeting we ever had. And then we made sometimes never hear from them again vs Denmark when when people react like that. That means okay. They're ready to invest in it. So we really had to balance that if really not being too or will buy all this excitement, and you know, really, okay, taking that. Okay. We have great meetings. But just a few of them comes out. Yeah. Well, let's talk about James Small teams versus big teams. I'm Mark lack on Business Rockstars. And joining me today is Peter Dallas Steve Jobs says one of my favorite quotes, ever knits, a small eighteen will run circles around a large sea team. And so what are your thoughts? Is it more important to have a tight knit group of a couple of guys, but they're all at the top of their game. They're all the best. They're all professionals and experts always better to have a giant just group of people with more diversity. I was the first because that's how business is spills. You killed in meetings and in meetings for having meetings. I mean, everything dies. There's no innovation in that. So if I was to now, we're a small company going big right now. But we I would really recommend that even bigger companies should take out these groups and take them away from the roof and do the innovation here days wants to feel like they're a part of something they wanna feel like they're part of a tribe, but community club. I mean, that's why I let it was going to be so great as you guys figured out how to incorporate that feeling of a community that so what else is there anything else specifically that you would come to mind when you go building a good team? What is what is the foundation if that comes to mind? Celebrating victories. That's very important because you want to be a part of a winning team. So you can you can always find something to celebrate. I mean, even this and that gives like a feud feeling of I'm part of something. That's great is moving the right direction. I mean, we celebrate together. We celebrate together. We always do that in Atlanta. We celebrate the first match we had. We celebrate the first campaign the first Facebook common celebrate these things and they're difference between how Denmark celebrates the winds versus how American culture does everything is just big here. And you know, and that's one of the thing. I love by living here is that. It's it's okay. To say, hey, we did this. We nail this good. And I was talking about law Johnson Denmark. If you say that then you might. Feel that you're better than other wet by saying that, and that's that it's killing kind of the winning culture by here, you have a winning culture by. It's it's okay. To just say, hey, we did this. So I'm really taking I'm taking the the humble attitude from Denmark here, and then trying to at that into this winning culture, which actually fits very good Jammie hiring tip. Well, I can say our say we need to do sport. With these people we hire with them. We do. That she played with them. I I've going I if they don't win survi- finds for that, I can do them or or if it's not me, it's the the other partners team was so divided in in different sports. So our CEO he plays tennis saga and our CFO. He say he plays. So I so you can always you could always just go for Ron jock or save it bike out. I love that. That's I think that's really part of your company culture. They're fun. And it's revolved around sports as becoming rap. Gimme your ten twenty thirty seconds speech. I call it a stadium pitch to the world sparring entrepreneurs and entrepreneurs tuning in. What's your best advice for them? Do something that you feel is liking out there make something that you would use something that you see as a product or a solution. That would make a difference for yourself. Don't imagine everything about what how could he or she what would different difference from from from in your own life. That's that's really the best advice because in that.

Denmark Peter Dallas Leto Pat O'Brien Google Ford Markson co founder Johnson Denmark Lebron Tom shoes Sarai Ron jock Reid Facebook United States CEO John James
"tom shoes" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

Show Me the Meaning!

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

"So I don't really have this experience of going into an office, especially since the kind of closure war fever pitch has hit the high that it has recently. But I've only heard anecdotes. Okay. Yeah. I mean, I'm going to be honest. I rarely feel like muzzled or anything. It's you can you can say whatever you want still it's more to here. It's more. I mean, just right. But like, a it's more just you're saying the reaction to it your it's more variables. So you're it's kind of like, you wouldn't you just don't feel comfortable expressing yourself. Right. This kind of what you're saying in the example that in Yaki set. So for example, if if you're talking about a corporate culture in which like everyone in the office is bought into casual Friday or some. Like that. And then if you're the one person that descends against casual Friday Friday is about example, because it would probably be something a little bit more. Okay. Someone super against casual. And then you. Or okay. Let's say you work for Tom's shoes. Okay. And you know, Tom TOMS shoes is the whole idea is that for every pair of shoes that you buy. They give pair of shoes to kids in Africa. Now, I'm imagining if you work at Tom's shoes, you are living in breathing that ethos of charity now imagine I worked at Tom shoes. I said, hey, guys, you know, this is kind of fucked up in this kind of bullshit because there are shoemakers in Africa that are being put out of business by Tom's shoes. And this is actually kind of harming the community's ability to create a whatever a community that can provide for itself. That might be an unpopular opinion that it would be best especially if you're not a manager. If you're just an underling probably best if you kept that opinion to yourself, and I think that that's kind of what more of what in yucky. Saw hasn't that always been true though? Like, I feel I feel no different than thirty some odd years ago. Yeah. Probably. Yeah. I mean, I said the same thing happened to my dad in in the financial industry under saying it, kinda sucks. Yeah. I think I've said this podcast before like, you know, if you need something if you need a job. Yeah. If you like probably kit play it safe. But you know, the people, unfortunately that can get away with saying, whatever the fuck they want in this country, you know, Allah, Donald Trump or something is if you have a bazillion dollars. You literally I I'm not gonna lose his job. I'm not gonna lose even if I lose PR, whatever who gives a fuck, you know, like I have all the money in the world. So that's why there's going to be this weird trend. I feel like we're only the, you know, the well to do amongst us are going to be able to really have these mouthpieces or feel the most comfortable to say whatever they want and people who actually have to provide for their families and stuff. It's like, well, I wanna fuck and say whatever, but I don't want to lose my job. What a lot of law. You know? So it's this weird effect chirp. I mean, we do see repercussions for people in power now that are saying whatever they want with the exception of Trump. We do see that. Now. Just off the top of my head. You know, the James Gunn Twitter says you Asian like people that's a whole. You know, there's different than politics. You know, people who get elected, I guess, right? There's also the question of who the fuck cares about Twitter. But that's a whole thing. Anyway, we're gonna go on rapid hundreds hundred warzone. Work. We find you guys down the internet. Ryan I released comedy videos on Ryan shorts every week just released the immemorial for the vendors on there, and you can find me on there or the funhouse channel. I guess now we'll be playing grand theft auto next next next week. Yeah. I I think think it's. it's sporadic schedule over there. Are you know, I fucking suck..

Tom shoes Tom Donald Trump Twitter Africa Ryan theft
"tom shoes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Yuki Noguchi explains why the CEO's are getting involved. Blake Majkowski founder of Tom shoes supports causes like access to clean water, and I care in poor countries, but embracing something as controversial as gun control is different. He says his board of directors debated whether he should engage in a political issue unrelated to their business. Everyone is very concerned about you. You know, doing something like this? But ultimately, we recognize that this opportunity for us to really be a leader business and to show our customers that we're engaged in the issues that matter most to them he along with the CEOs of Levi, Strauss, Dick's sporting goods, an RX are realty sign. The letter calling on the house to pass stricter background checks. Majkowski says about twelve percent of its customers say they won't buy his company's shoes anymore as a result. But he says today's CEO's need to accept that some customers will leave, but those who remain will be more loyal. Yeah. We we lost some customers by doing this. But I think we also strengthened our relationship, and then Wade it was far greater than different with boss. Scott wreck is CEO of Rx are realty a developer in the New York area. He has also become a vocal advocate for gun safety. Even though the issue has nothing to do with his business. I find it important for she owes to take a greater level. Of social responsibility. But the decisions I sound off comes with substantial risk. Paul Argenti is a business professor at Dartmouth. He argues CEO's should be very careful. You're basically, speaking out on something out of passion, not out of logic and businesses have shareholders, and it's really not worth taking a risk unless it's absolutely important to you. That may be why the number of executives who signed. Today's letter is still small and largely made up of executives who've already spoken out on gun violence. John find Blat is president of every town for gun safety a gun control advocacy, group, he points to banks and other retailers that have adopted their own gun control policies over the last year dishes, a key moment very much like the moment when corporation supported marriage equality, which was often seen as a turning point for that movement. Find light says he hopes to see growing business support for gun control. But he also acknowledges that even if the Bill passes the house. If stiffer opposition in the Republican controlled Senate, you can Gucci NPR news Washington. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Targeting someone because of their dreadlocks corn rows or other hairstyle can now lead to steep fines in New York City among other things employers. There can no longer force workers to straighten their hair to promote a certain corporate image, the new guidelines apply to everyone, but they're specifically meant to protect black people who often face discrimination because of their hair Oluwa, a ladder sui visited a couple of New York City hair salons to learn what people there think of the new protections hair has often been a battleground I used to have to get my hot cold when I gotta Huggins was ganger. She went through great wants to get her naturally. Kinky hair to be straight. That was like torture a hot comb, literally put that on the stove a heated up, and then they call through your hair, you could hear like sizzling the worst the worst today. She's got dreadlocks that go pasture shoulders growing up straighter hair. Seemed like the most acceptable hair instead about natural kinky curly hair, which is also she sitting in a salon chair at the beans. Hallway waiting to get her neograph interlocked, it's Saturday morning and the salon. If they're women platinum quails in orange tip. Twist. Someone's getting a harebrained dry for that it floats up around her face like a cloud..

CEO Yuki Noguchi Blake Majkowski Scott wreck Blat Rx Tom shoes ta Huggins New York City Paul Argenti NPR founder Wade Senate Gucci NPR Levi New York Washington Dartmouth
"tom shoes" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

09:37 min | 2 years ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This is just Rockstars. I'm Alex Worley. Welcome to the show. Joining me right now, the CEO and founder of why chair Hawaiian volcanic water Ryan and men's thanks for being here. So if you could start off by giving us an overview of your entrepreneurial journey, I know that you started this business pretty much right out of college. So really what was the catalyst for starting at just? So we, you know. No, we launched. I graduated early with my co-founder to launch a full time when we were about twenty one. And so we it actually was originally. An entrepreneurial entrepreneurial projects we were in the undergrad program at USC. Specifically, there's an entrepreneur program and. It's called the center for entrepreneurial studies. So I had actually started working on this concept when I was a freshman so went through feasability classes is band classes. And eventually thought that we had kind of a resonating lifestyle brand that could actually create some really positive disruptive industry change in terms of our environmentally packaging. Environmental packaging. Our social message give back component. So our goal was really to create a carbon neutral Fiji needs Tom shoes. So a little bit more about the brand and how disruptive how so I mean, our our platform is based on live healthy lives sustainably live ethically. So it starts with the water at sauce, which is kind of important. So it's is actually filtered through about fourteen thousand feet up through The Modelo volcano on the big island, and that unique filtration process enriches it with these trace minerals Smits it naturally alkaline electrolyte rich daily recommended intake of silica fear. Hey, you're getting your nails. And as a really smooth now seal so starts with water. But then the sustainability part. Is we were the first major premium water brand beverages actually in the country to use one hundred percent our pet. So what that is is our bottles are actually post consumer recycled bottles, so we basically have a ninety five percents smaller carbon footprint than every the bottle that you see out there. And then we offset the entirety of our logistics. To our regional reforestation programs are facility runs off thirty three percent. And then the last component which is super significant is for every leader that you buy we donate a week supply of clean water people in need in Malawi Africa. We also donate an extra two percent of revenues towards local nonprofits in Hawaii, fostering, education and conservation. So that's a lot. Now. Fall in the could picture start with. So since you're an entrepreneur. How would you define entrepreneur? And really specifically what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur. Yes. So I think I mean, obviously this gets used I feel quite a bit. But it definitely takes a certain amount of from correct. And ability to stay positive the most successful entrepreneurs that I've met and been pushing us to. Call upon for advice. It's always the ones that find solutions. When it seems like there's really no way out. And so there's that which is kind of a little negative. But then the other side of it is those that kind of can see a bigger possibility than most people around them and are willing to kind of have small sacrifices to achieve that. When other people might not believe that is even possible or exists. And so I think it's at times it's a little bit. Unnerving and definitely stresses you out. But. It's all worth it at the end. Yeah. Do you ever still feel those nerves in fear of failure? I haven't right now. Like, I I have a huge conviction in my company, and the brand that we built, but. You know, we we have a lot more to do. And when worked when you're going so fast, you know that comes with it. A new set of complexities in terms of you know. Needing the right amount of cash making sure you have the right systems operating programs. And so now these are all things that keep me up at night right now so deal with all of because there are a lot of highs and lows is an entrepreneur. So I think it comes down to have you really get personal life as if you really if you have a really stressful work life. You have a lot of things going on home. You know that just cannot mentally you're just going to be exhausted. So for me, it's making sure that I am spending enough time with my girlfriend, my family, my dog my friends. Cutting off. So like Saturdays are always mine. Sunday's usually work like half days. But. That's really the rest of symbolic maintaining the balance. Exactly. So a lot of entrepreneurs they transition from working at a nine to five to being an entrepreneur, and that's a really strange transition year in a unique position 'cause you really started in college. So what was that? Like is that something you'd recommend? If you do what would you caution? New entrepreneurs to think about. Yeah. I think that there are a lot of benefits to going in a very competitive industry. Very name use. You know, I if if I had any industry experience in beverage, I'm actually not sure I would have. I'm not sure if I would have started why care because it would have seemed like there were so many barriers to entry. And I would have talked to so many people that would have told me, you're crazy. And you know, I think having an idea that I knew as disruptive that I was doing enough focus studies and analyses ability. Where I felt like we could change the industry and kind of holding onto that. And then seeing things out as they come obviously, we made tons of mistakes. But it got to a point where we realize we did have something that we could do it. And I don't think we would have ever been able to get Beth are if I had had some some work experience prior because I was coming in with just you know, so much energy ignorance is bliss ignorance is a lot of naive attack. So so take me back to those first months. What advice would you offer your early entrepreneurial south? My advice would be to put together an amazing advisory board. People that have done it before not just people that have experienced big beverage, the very successful companies that are doing tens of millions of dollars hundreds of dollars. But people that have. Donna from from the gecko. So we can talk about the honest guys even talk about. All of the coconut water guys that started from scratch off from nothing. And then grew the Branston come multi one hundred million billion dollar brands because they've actually been through every single stage. Not just the later stage. And so we eventually put an advisory together. But it wasn't. It's all about two to three years, and where it was one that was super super relevant. Is there a mentor? That's coming to mind that has been specially impactful in your life. Yeah. So my my dad is obviously been amazing. He's an entrepreneur. So I definitely inherited. I'd like to think. You know, a lot from him. And then also the had a strategy for. Kind of like a CEO of kinks wine, which is a big brand. John lennon. He's also an investor in care. He's been amazing. His his advice has always been. I talk to them every day. And he's always helped me stay really positive. But another thing, you know, one of his best quotes is just a little bit dark but higher slow fire fast. That's about it. All the time. I'm here. Yeah. So that's like, you know, I mean. I wish I had really. Dovan early on and started researching investing into techniques like top grading things like that. He really helped me figure that on. Yeah. That's one of the common questions. I ask is do you believe in that common philosophies? So sounds like you do can you why it's worked for you. Well, so it's you have to have like a system I feel like so we use kind of a hybrid of with the top grading methodology. And so basically it minimizes the possibility of you hiring a b or c player maximizes the probability of hiring an eight player. And you know, the problem is a lot of entrepreneurs they need someone needs one fast. And they don't realize the hiring the wrong person is actually gonna cost them now five to ten times that person's salary if they're not the right person. And so we have to get back to let's have like a Goto business structure protocol for hiring. And that's going to enable us to have a bad ass team. That's going to push a sport a lot quicker. But it's the best and worst part about working for yourself. Best part is a flexible schedule and being able to kind of pick the projects that I can help and work on and really spearhead kind of having my own level of autonomy..

CEO Alex Worley USC co-founder Hawaii The Modelo volcano Goto John lennon Branston founder Smits Tom shoes Malawi Fiji advisory board Beth Donna Africa
"tom shoes" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"So with that many shoes. I mean, that's so many shoes. Did you have to go to other village in how the Argentine in village that you were adder how do you find places for all? We give seventy three countries we actually give a million choosy year in the United States. So I don't realize that there's unfortunately, a tremendous amount of poverty on native American reservations in our country in different parts of of West Virginia, different parts of Tennessee. I mean, it is it is unfortunate. They level of poverty that we still have our suite of a million shoes year in the United States mainly shoes for kids to play. So that's always that thing is like giving them like cross trainer or something that is supports our feet. So that they can develop in play. Because also be city is such a big problem our countries. So the more that they're playing the more that they have. But we're to help with that. But yeah, we get in every world seventy eight entries. You know, we do a lot of school shoes in India or school for kids. Go to school. We do cold weather boots Mongolia. I mean, you know, it's pretty. There's not a place that doesn't get by Tom shoes. You're getting as as as a as a recipients. So it's still today I myself, and I just can't believe that like this is all happened in the last and the last four years the model itself as really simple, and I think that's the most beautiful part about it. You know, you didn't overcomplicate things like as you see, you know, up in coming entre, preneurs and them possibly complicating the process, what has been like your operation, and like kind of a message or solution for those who are up and coming. So I know there's a lot about preneurs out there who are, you know, starting their own brand or business, whatever it is. And I think there's an overthinking element to it that that stops them from making an impact like you're making sure drifts that question in two things. It's really relevant also to where we are a brands day. So. It truth matter is is that yes, if you can build a simple model like that. It's really effective in getting your message out a people connect to it in allow people to share the story. And so I always say like, there's, you know, your things you really got on his nonce preneurs, especially at you're engaging social topic in that is one you gotta be really really passionate about what you're doing. Because being entrepreneurs lonely..

Tom shoes United States West Virginia Tennessee India four years
"tom shoes" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

05:10 min | 3 years ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Could cough. You. Good topics actually talk about today. Let's tell everybody of the topic right now that's happening in the studio. I can't see what is happening not only crawled under the Ottoman under your feet, which he loves to the half of his body is under your desk shelf on the on your right hand side. Now, he's had his inside the shell. He's halfway under your autumn. So I can see nothing he can get into there. Oh my goodness. Little comedian. I don't know. Can you excuse okay? Is doing something or he's messing around. But he doesn't have anything something else. Sorry. I mean, literally snake although he has something from underneath your desk. I think we should should take care of that. I'm going to have to leave the desk. Last night last night. He could tell when he's got something by way runs. Yeah. So he's got a box of something. I don't even know where he got it from even what is that. Trying to eat my oh, does he have any more of them? I this lovely English English in Christmas ornaments that were sent to me once over British postbox almost took my finger on. I don't care about your forget about my own. Wait a minute. I need to check. He is something else. Anyway, last night running around the box or something. The heck is he got now the they took that go onto your coat hangers? Yeah. So you can hook another coat hanger onto it. I I don't even know what had them stored. I couldn't see where he got the box from running up and down. Then a pair of some British flags all over he got them from. I don't even know where I had them stored. He's something else. Anything's larry. And he runs around. I mean, I think I must say ten times a day give me that shoe. No is now he's knocking over. I've got my shoes in plastic. Bins blessed plastic boxes. Yeah. Shoe boxes? And now it can Eclair knocking them over taken the leads off to in the corners. And taking the shoes out. There were five shoes out the other day, and he has a preference for the right shoe? You only take the right shoe a five out there. He is. Honestly, it's my I mean, of course, if I've got my closet door open, would you expect? But you think they're protected in plastic shoe boxes. Now, I can knock a stuck at Tom shoes over that one. Really is. You know, he did this morning. I'm sure you've as a million times gathering, water Niko. Thanks for the water. So FaceTime infringe yesterday the water on the back of the sofa and begets drinks away hydrates himself. So this morning. I have a glass of water to bring in the studio. And he's looking at me like, okay, you don't my water for me. He's something here. I just give them their own glass. Now seriously. Get one for me and get one for them. It's so much easier because did start doing it twelve years. Geez. The great though dogs. They have great personalities this the just the so individual, and we embrace every little crazy thing about them. Don't we you. And we just love is love him today. Well, let me tell you something that happened in Vegas. Here's a little local news you go. Oh, you know. What Jim I wish that we could get legal gentlemen, the new new series because it's not on breadbox yet. But that's a little quote from there. You local I would love to see the notes my cities like they never went away. She's so funny anyway of going off the subject they're going on a bit of a tangent. Because local news, here's some local news. Las vegas. Ambulance company is now got a therapy dog. Are they as great? Well, this happened before makes so much sense to me well train a Meghan LeClair LeClair. Like that. And mercy is a therapy dog in training and physics with a vehicle service technician Jonah Venetia at the American Medical response and medic west headquarters in Las Vegas. And so basically mercy is the new therapist into Intel and she's a little furry therapist as well. She's just form and sold. She's a golden doodle and she over a medic west and became the newest American Medical response and medic employees in July she'll serve as the company's therapy dog when she's fully trained the inspiration, adding mostly to the team came after the aftermath of October one. And I'm sure you're very well aware of that shooting that happened on the strip biggest mass shooting in the country, very traumatic for the city, very traumatic. And we come in on the anniversary of that. So the be a lot going on in town. We personally, no. Bryce and his wife. Stephanie kurkin who? Have the charity and training.

Las vegas Tom shoes American Medical response Meghan LeClair LeClair Intel Stephanie kurkin FaceTime technician Jonah Venetia Bryce Jim twelve years
"tom shoes" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"This lovely English these love English thing. Christmas ornaments that were sent to me one is a British postbox. Yeah. You're almost took my finger. I don't care about your forget about my own. Wait a minute. Check. He is something else. Anyway, last night running around the box or something. The heck is he got? Now, they took that go onto your coat hangers. Yeah. So you can hook another coat hanger onto it. I I don't even know what had them stored. I couldn't see where he got the box from he's running up and down. Then he had a pair of sunglasses. I'm Richard flags all over. I don't know where he got them from. I don't even know where I had them stored. All he something else. He and he runs around. I mean, I think I must say ten times a day. Give me that shoe. No is now he's knocking over. I've got my shoes in plastic. Bins blessed plastic boxes. Yeah. Shoe boxes? And now he can climb up knocking them over taking the lights off joined the corners. And taking the shoes out this five shoes out the other day, and he has a preference for the right shoe? You only takes the right shoe a five out there. He is honestly. It's my I mean, of course, if I've got my closet door open, would you expect? But you think that protected in plastic shoe boxes now he can knock a stuck at Tom shoes over that one. Really is. You know, he did this morning. I'm sure you've as a million times get drink of water because thanks for the water. So I'm FaceTime infringe yesterday. The water on the back of the sofa and hop begets drinks away hydrates himself. So this morning I've at last afforded to bring in the studio, and he's looking at me like, okay, you're gonna water for me. He something sweet care. I just give them their own glass. Now, seriously, get one get one for them. It's so much easier because did start doing it twelve years. Great, though, dogs just great personalities this the just the so individual, and we embrace every little crazy thing about them. Don't with you. And we just love him love him to death. Well, let me tell you something that happened in Vegas. Here's a little local news, and you go, oh, you know, what Jim I wish that we could get legal gentlemen, the new new series because it's not on breadbox yet. But that's a little quote from you local. I would love to see the notes my said it's like they never went away. She's so funny anyway off going off the subject they're going on a bit of a tangent. Because local news, here's some local news. Las vegas. Ambulance company is now got a therapy dog. Are they as great? Well, this happened before makes so much sense to me well train a Meghan LeClair. Declare messy is a therapy dog in training and visits with a vehicle service technician Jonah Venetia at the American Medical response and medic west headquarters in Las Vegas. And so basically mercy is the new therapist in town, and she's a little furry therapist as well. And she's just form and sold. She's a golden doodle and she became over a medic west and became the newest American Medical response of many employees in July she'll serve as the ambulance companies therapy dog when she's fully trained the inspiration for adding mostly to the team came after the aftermath about Tober one. And I'm sure you're very well aware of that shooting that happened on the strip. Because my shooting in the country, very traumatic for the city, very traumatic. And we're coming up on the end of her Serie of that. So the be a lot going on in town. We personally, no. Bryce and his wife. Stephanie kurkin who? Have the charity.

Tom shoes Las vegas Vegas Stephanie kurkin Meghan LeClair American Medical response Richard Bryce Jim American Medical technician Jonah Venetia twelve years
"tom shoes" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"tom shoes" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"One of the, you know, things we do other than just kind of intersection of faith in cold share as we look at what's happening in this generation in different trends, and one of the things that's interesting is in this issue. We look at the generation coming up. So the millennials are now twenty three thirty eight and Jin's Z is eight to twenty two so relevant. Kind of core. Readership is kind of like college to thirties. Right. So I think ninety three percent my readers between eighteen and thirty nine our average, routers, twenty-seven interesting seeing generation slot shift happen, we're all college students. Now are Jin Z engines e. Of you know, we're starting to see enough evidence that they are very different than millennials. And one of the the the articles in this issue kind of luminance the shifting trends that are happening that make Jin's e very unique and not only just, you know, unique and different from millennials. And a lot of ways really poised to push the church in a new direction, you know, like they are incredibly moral like they they they don't really drink the most sober generation in. Well, they are eleven I mean, that's the other part of it. Well, but but also they their attitudes about abstinence like, they're, you know, they really take absence. Seriously, there, you know, very, they believe in inclusivity, they believe in transparency authenticity when it comes to institutions and inclusivity thing is one of the things that the article highlighted will will challenge some of the, you know, long-held church, you know, kind of dialogue, you know. Like this generation Jin Z is the church is going to have to like adapter die and Mustang compromise or change. But like the way that the church has talked about inclusion as one of the big issues that's going to have to be rectified move forward because that's a major value in millennial Cindy sort of skeptical and cynical about large institutions like the church, or like, you know, Facebook or whatever, but Jin zi wants to change institutions. You know, we saw that with the parkland kits. They want to go in there make change and not just approach things cynicism, which will have huge implications. For the future of the church was a really fascinating read. Speaking fastening, rapid, wrapping up the segment there. There's there were two pieces in the in the issue that were notable one we talked to author Lorne winner about church and church history. And how the church needs to own up to some of the unseemly aspects of our history. And and and as those. One of those things that we don't really think about that often, but church history is incredibly problematic and a lot of ways and something that we need to actually take head on moon for it. But then also Jesse wrote a piece about conspiracy theories one of your passions. But I wanna point out about it is I couldn't believe this. Because when I think about conspiracy theories you've been pitching this for a long time this piece, and we kept is just wasn't totally sold on it. And till you showed me the data that conspiracy theorists are and the people who believe conspiracy theories are not a weird fringe people listening to late night radio. They are statistically the demographic that is most susceptible to believe in conspiracy theories are young Christians, that's crazy to me. And we show some of those stats. There's also like a really an anecdote that I really like the beginning of the Cicilline from answers in Genesis is the young earth, you know creations. They have they've had to dedicate entire section of their website to come. Batting flat earth conspiracies because so many young Christian college students were coming to them and asking for answers because as they saw it if you take the bible, literally talks about the four corners of the earth explained that it is. It was an interesting rabbit hole to jump down. It's interesting because it's not just it starts off on kind of like an interesting kind of weird. No. But also looks at why it's oftentimes a dangerous theory slope once you kind of start jumping down these rabbit holes. We also talked to Derek minor current has like mccaskey founder of Tom shoes. How about their next era and mission? Michael Jordan, Kristen bell. Dr Eric Mason. And our last word is written by our very own any f- downs. So it's a great issue. You don't wanna.

Jin Jesse Jin Z Jin zi Dr Eric Mason Facebook f- downs Lorne Kristen bell Michael Jordan Derek founder Tom shoes ninety three percent
The Carnival Of Business Growth Strategies - Featuring Guest Tiffani Bova

Amazing Business Radio with Shep Hyken

05:58 min | 3 years ago

The Carnival Of Business Growth Strategies - Featuring Guest Tiffani Bova

"To amazing business radio with bestselling author and customer service and business experts ship Pikine Chappel talk with some of the smartest thinkers and business to help make you more successful in your professional and personal life. This is amazing business radio with chef, hiking. Hello, everybody Shep hike in here. Another episode of amazing business radio. In this time we have an amazing guest. I always say that, but this time I mean it. She's truly amazing Hernandez, Tiffany Bova, and she is not only a great person. She's a an a mate outlet her tell you what she does it Salesforce, but really her book growth IQ which comes out August fourteenth available everywhere you'd think it would be available. It is an outstanding book and it's so much more than just customer service, inexperienced, but let's get Tiffany on here. Let's let's talk about what she does and I could tell you, is that when you look back at her bio, her bio is, I don't know like a three and a half pages want well, not really three and a half paragraphs long, but it's filled with well, I could go on and on, but that would just be reading it. So Tiffany, welcome to amazing business radio. I tell us who you are and then let's talk about your new book growth. IQ gay. Get smarter about the choices that will make or break your business, loved the title. And by the way, Tiffany before you start talking? Not only do I love the title. I love the book because as I looked through the aesthetic appeal of the book and it's a nice regular hard bound book looking at it from the outside, but there's some really cool find sin images and cartoon kind of things that you have in there. It's just a great book. So welcome to amazing business radio. Well, thank you for having me to this amazing show. Well, we're gonna friend, we'll thank you. Thank you. Last time I saw you, we're talking about your new book. It was in New York City right expense ago, and I think you have left to go talk to your agent about things. And here we are six, seven months later, the books getting ready to come out just around the corner here and gosh, am I excited so quickly? Dons some background on who Tiffany is in your Gartner experience and your Salesforce experience and lots of great things. Oh, yeah, here's I always like to just frame it up this way. So first thing I'd say is everything I learned about business aren't. It's carnival which that's a whole conversation. Carnival second. Yup. The carnival the the second thing I say is I call myself a recovering seller because I used to be a quote of burying sales reps or the individual, and then managing teams, and then larger teams and bigger teams, and then eventually managing marketing as well and customer service and call centers. And I did that for about twelve or thirteen years. And then I spent a decade at Gartner as an analyst and research fellow covering the transformation of sales and as well, the impact of customer experience in the way companies to grow and go to market and how and where they use partnerships and third party channels to to take their products to market. So that was a an amazing decade of just getting my hands journey and learning a ton around just the mechanics of big company and small companies try. To grow. And now I've been with Salesforce for a little shy, three years two and a half, and knowing the global growth and innovation evangelist here, and I get the amazing opportunity to travel around the world talking to our customers as well as on customers about what what they see in the market and how they're really trying to use technology to be much more engaging with with ultimate their existing base as well as net new customers. I love the word evangelist because I know one of your counterparts over there. You know the the evangelist follow after who's good friend of ours. So anyway, cool. Title, global growth and innovation evangelists. Are I wanna go back to the carnival. Tell me about the carnival. I knew that we'd get you. I knew that would get you. So I, I would say this I was born and raised in Hawaii, which is also kind of random. But we, we had this sort of roaming carnival that we go around the islands to raise money for schools or it was like a fifty state fair. And you know, it happened maybe a dozen or eighteen times throughout the year, and it had been going on third generation from the early nineteen hundreds. And then I started working with the family. They were kinda like my second family, their daughter was my best friend, and so I started working in high school for them in the outdoor games at carnival. So like you know the darts to hit the balloons to win the black light posters or the rings on the Pepsi bottles, or you know everything around winning teddy bears and all that kind of stuff. Aren't you gotta tell on any further? They rigged. Well, no. Okay. So you were in an honest carnival.

Tom Shoes Tiffany Jeff Bay Starbucks Gartner Salesforce Bangladesh Hugh Amazon Two Hundred Dollars
Alex Wirley explains the secrets of health and entrepreneurship

Business Rockstars

02:02 min | 3 years ago

Alex Wirley explains the secrets of health and entrepreneurship

"Business rockstars i'm alex wirley welcome to the show joining me right now the ceo and founder of a care hawaiian volcanic water ryan and men's thanks for being here so if you could start off by giving us an overview of your entrepreneurial journey i know that you started this business pretty much right out of college so really what was the catalyst restarting it just so we relaunched graduated early with my cofounder to launch a full time when we were about twenty one and so you know we it actually was originally an entrepreneurial entrepreneurial project we are in the undergrad program at usc specifically there's an entrepreneur program and it's called the loyd gripes center entrepreneurial studies so i had actually started working on this concept when i was a freshman so went through feasibility classes is spend classes and eventually thought that we had kind of a resonating lifestyle brand that could actually create some really positive disruptive industry change in terms of our environmentally packaging environmental packaging our social message i give back component so our goal is really to create a carbon neutral fiji needs tom shoes so tell us a little bit more about the brand and how it's disruptive how do so i mean our our platform is based on live healthy lives sustainably live ethically so it starts with the water itself which is kind of important so it is actually filtered through about fourteen thousand feet of poor spokane rock through the modelo volcano on the big island and that unique filtration process enriches it with these trace minerals mates it naturally alkaline electrolyte rich daily recommended intake of silica really good for your hair your skin your nails and has a really smooth mouth feel so starts with water but then the sustainability part is we were the first major premium water brand one of the beverages actually in the country to use one hundred percent our pet so what that is is our bottles are actually post consumer recycled bottles so we basically have a ninety five percent smaller carbon footprint than ever bottle that you see out there and then we all set the entirety of our logistics through originally forestation programs our facility runs off thirty three percent minimum blind energy and then the last component which is super significant is for every leader that you buy we donate a week's five clean water to people in need in malawi africa and we also donate an extra two percent of revenue towards local nonprofits in hawaii fostering education conservation so the lot the paints a good picture to start with so since you're an entrepreneur how would you define entrepreneur and really specifically what it takes to be successful entrepreneur nursing and definitely stresses you out but it it it's all worth it to the i haven't right now i have a huge conviction in my company and the brand that we built but you know we we have a lot more to do and you know when when you're growing so fast you know that comes with it a new set of complexities in terms of you know you know needing the right amount of cash making sure you have the right systems operating programs and so you know these are all things that keep me up at night right now so exciting to deal with all of because there are a lot of highs and lows is an entrepreneur so i think it comes down to have you really good personal life because if you really if you have a really stressful work life you have a lot of things going on at home you know that just gonna mentally you're just going to be exhausted so for me it's making sure that i am spending enough time with my girlfriend my family my dog my friends cutting off so like saturdays are always mind sunday's usually work like half days but you know that's really the recipe symbolic maintaining the balance xactly so a lot of entrepreneurs they transitioned from working a nine to five to being an entrepreneur and that's a really scary transition year in a unique position because you really starting college i think that there are a lot of benefits to going in a very competitive industry very naive you know i like if i had any industry experience in beverage i'm actually not sure i would have i'm not sure if i would have started why because it would have seemed like there were so many barriers to entry and i would have talked to so many people that would have told me you're crazy and you know i think having an idea that i knew as disruptive that i was doing enough focus studies in enough feasability where i felt like we could change the industry and kind of holding onto that and then secretly things out as they come obviously we made tons of mistakes but it got to a point where we realize we did have something and we could do it and i don't think we would have ever been able to get that far if i had had some experience prior because i was coming in with just so much energy ignorance is bliss and ignorance is a lot of naievety my advice would be to put together an amazing advisory board people that have done it before not just people that have experienced with big beverage the very successful companies that are doing tens of millions of dollars hundreds of millions of dollars but people that have donna from the from the getgo you know so we can talk about the honest gee guys you can talk about all of the coconut water guys that started from scratch from nothing and grew the brands to become multi in one hundred million billion dollar brands because they've actually been through every single stage not just the later stage and so you know we eventually put an advisory board together but it wasn't until about two three years in where it was one that was super super relevant doing john lennon and he's also an investor he's been amazing his his advice has always been i talk to him every day and he's always helped me stay really positive but another thing you know one of his best quotes is just the little bit dark but higher slow on fire fast that's about it all the time i'm here so that's like you know i mean i wish i had really dove in and early on and started researching investing into techniques like top grading and things like that he really helped me figure that on and so basically it minimizes the possibility of you hiring a b or a c player and maximizes the probability of you hiring a player and you know the problem is a lot of entrepreneurs thing is someone that it's one and they don't realize the hiring the wrong person is actually gonna cost them five to ten times that person's salary if they're not the right person and so we have to get back to okay let's have like a goto business structure and protocol for hiring and that's going to enable us to have a bad ass team what's going to push a sport a lot quicker but it's the best and worst part about working for yourself best part is a flexible schedule for sure and being able to kind of pick the projects that i can help and work on and really spearhead and kind of having my own level of autonomy the worst is that you feel like you have the weight and the responsibility of all your employees your team investors your friends and family in this case originally brought in a lot of friends and family and your and your partners when you're making tough decisions which you often have to do you research you go with your gut deep talk it out what's kind of your decision making process having context but there's a lot of times when you're in a really fast run company that just really don't have time to sit and wait around like a lot of other people would like depending on the personality types and so nine times at a time when i trust my gut students in the right direction but but we're gonna take a quick break when we come back we're going to talk more about building business we are the biggest entrepreneur platform on the planet this business rockstars

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