24 Burst results for "Tom Powers"

"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 2 weeks ago

"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tom Power. Actor Michael J. Fox is really open about what it's like to live with Parkinson's disease. His research foundation provides hope for the millions of people affected by it. But what is it like to be responsible for all that optimism when sometimes his own road is bumpy? Michael J. Fox opens up about that in just a minute. Plus, imagine a photo of a couple of teams looking down at their phones. Blown up so big. It covers the wall of a building I need. Jordan will tell you about her new exhibit that features photos just like that, and what they say about who holds power in the Toronto suburb where she grew up and far beyond it. All that and more. Coming up on cue. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. President Trump has fired the Department of Homeland Security official in charge of overseeing federal election security efforts. NPR's miles, parks explains Chris Crabs was in charge of the cyber Security and Infrastructure security agency. Over the past three years, Chris Crabs helped overhaul how the nation shares threat information and communicates about elections more broadly. After 2016. It took the government months to get information about Russian hacking out to the right state election officials, but that's completely changed here's crabs earlier this fall. Been a lot of talk about efforts to hack our elections over the last four years, and some of you might be wondering whether the 2020 elections will be secure. Well, I'm here today to tell you that my confidence in the security of your vote has never been higher. That view got him fired. Trump said in a tweet that he terminated crabs because he didn't share his views about voter fraud, even though there is no evidence fraud affected the 2020 election. Miles. Parks. NPR NEWS Washington kneels of reports yesterday. The nation's acting Defense Secretary, Christopher Miller, is making it official today. Miller saying US will reduce troop levels in both Iraq and Afghanistan. Announcement fulfills President Donald Trump's pledged bring US forces home when conditions are met to keep the U. S and its allies safe. Troop drawdown comes despite warnings from allies and even fellow Republicans, like Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell were calling the move rash. I think a precipitous drawdown and either Afghanistan or Iraq would be a mistake. The troop withdrawals would come just days before President elect Joe Biden takes office. Trump, meanwhile, is yet to formally concede the race. Bars and restaurants in Michigan will halt indoor dining services for three weeks. Starting tomorrow is Alex McLennan of member station W. D. T reports.

Chris Crabs Donald Trump NPR Michael J. Fox President Tom Power US Iraq Afghanistan Department of Homeland Securit official Joe Biden Parkinson Jack Spear Christopher Miller Jordan Mitch McConnell Alex McLennan Michigan
Fresh update on "tom powers" discussed on Q

Q

00:04 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "tom powers" discussed on Q

"For P R X. My name is Tom Power. Welcome to the show. It is Thursday. Thank you So much for tuning in. As I mentioned, you're gonna hear a conversation about hip hop in mental health coming up in a little while and also Gonna hear from Katy Perry, who we talk a little bit about the struggles that she's gone through kind of getting herself back. As she puts out New music's to stick around for that David Chang has become one of the most important voices in this conversation about restaurants and what they mean. In 2004. He started out with a humble noodle shop in New York's East Village called Momofuku. It was bold and unpretentious, experimental fun. Became a sensation and Momofuku grew into a global brand, but David running restaurants around the world, including in Canada. He's been busy with a ton of other stuff, too. Like a cookbook, podcast TV shows like Ugly, Delicious, and for a while he even had a magazine. Now he's got a pretty revealing new memoir called Eat a Peach, where he opens up about success failure. And living with depression. But before all that we talked about what it's like running a restaurant during Cove. It heads up that this conversation includes topics of depression and suicide, which may be triggering to some David, How are you? Thanks for having me, Tom excited to be here. I have to say I have a terror in my heart asking somebody in the restaurant industry this But like, however, the last few months been for you. It's been a It's like a grieving for the loss of a close, loved one. That's what it feels like and going to the steps of grieving. And Learning what the new normal will be in getting ahead of whatever is around the corner. It's been quite difficult, but as difficult as it has been for me and the restaurant group there plenty of other restaurants And people that work in restaurants. The labor force itself that I've had it much harder than myself so I can't complain and I were doing everything I can to A sort of like mitigate everything. It's it's we could be here for two days talking about all the things that have gone wrong. Yeah, I think we need to take a very pragmatic philosophy and start to Focus our efforts on what we can control. Not what we can't what one of the things you question is And you you mentioned this in the book that people will happily pay $25 for a plate of past in a nice Italian restaurant. But they think of plate of noodles in an agent restaurant should cost at least half that. What does that tell you? What does that tell you? I don't mean people are being intentionally bad people. I just think that Times change and cultural truths and perceptions are often times antiquated to Rome, but they're hard to let go. And Tells us that there's racism that is pervasive and everything, and it may not be the most blatant, obvious kind, but it is insidious nonetheless. It is so Momofuku in the East Village and being awarded two Michelin stars, which is one of the biggest honors in the culinary world. But at the time you say you'd rather have two Michelin stars in the highest rating of three stars I wanted you could explain to us why Tom, because I'm a neurotic nest of a person. All right, Thanks for coming. You want the honest truth? Yeah. Yeah. David. Yeah? Yeah. Fuckers out. Now talk about a basket case. That would be mean. I think I get it Go on to say it, and then we can talk. But, you know, like, I'm always afraid of being something something that would be taken away from me and That's an incredibly selfish way of looking at the world. I see that and I'm learning to be less selfish, but It was the idea that man If I ever get three stars, not that I ever think that I could. But I feel that if we worked at it, we could get there. And that's probably in and of itself is the Michelin guide as people question reviews and guides and altogether which is a healthy criticism, but Back then it was If I get three stars Oh, my God. That's terrible. Like first of all, there's imposter syndrome. Secondly, there's nowhere else to go. I have to maintain this. Now there's nowhere else to go like this sucks. It's terrible. All. The only thing that can happen is something to be taken away from you. Which is why a lot of you know Asian families. When the immigrant to Canada or to America, you know, they put a priority on the math and science is because there's no interpretation on That there's no potato er interpretation on a work of fiction as a great or something like something and always be taken away from you, and that is like traumatically. Like in blazing in my mind that everything would be taken away from you, especially in honor, and that's what I like. I don't want that. Of course I want it and I don't want the responsibility that comes with I'm just a guest. Sound strange. I'm happy to hear you say, Tom. I'm a bit of a basket case. That's the reason because you are pretty open in this book about about mental health about being diagnosed bipolar about having suicidal thoughts. What was it like to open up about that.

David Chang Tom Power Michelin Katy Perry Canada Depression New York Rome America
DOC NYC documentary film festival goes online

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:07 min | 2 weeks ago

DOC NYC documentary film festival goes online

"It's time for our documentary of the wake from Tom Powers and Raphael in a house in the co founders of the DOC NYC Festival, which is currently taking place online until next Thursday with over 100 feature length films. Here's Tom, with a pick from the festival somewhere are ready. The greatness of America is the right toe protest far right? Day. Martin Luther King Jr is widely regarded as a hero. But the new documentary MLK. FBI returns us to the time when J. Edgar Hoover treated him as an enemy historian Beverly Gauge, explains the FBI Woz Most alarmed about King because of his success. And they were particularly concerned that he was this powerful, charismatic figure who had the ability to mobilize people. King's biographer, David Garrow, wrote a book about the FBI's relentless surveillance campaign. Their agents recorded King's extramarital affairs and tried to smear his reputation. The FBI is frustrated that even though they've successfully caught King In 15 or more hotel rooms, and they've distributed this behind the scenes to church leaders to reporters. Nothing's publicly happened now, as black lives matter. Activists face new government pressure Film makes us wonder how much the FBI has changed. The bureau's former director, James Comey, remains dismayed about Hoover's treatment of King. You know this about humans? What we're best at is convincing ourselves of our own righteousness. I think this entire episode represents the darkest part of the bureau's history. Filmmaker Sam Pollard previously was a director on eyes on the prize and a collaborator with Spike Lee. He's being honored at the document. I see Festival with a lifetime achievement award. MLK. FBI is now streaming on the dock NYC website For more information is a w n y c dot or g'kar flash docks.

FBI Tom Powers Beverly Gauge King David Garrow Raphael J. Edgar Hoover Martin Luther King Jr James Comey TOM America Sam Pollard Hoover Spike Lee
Midnight Sun: Twilight fans feel young again as new book arrives

Q

06:25 min | 4 months ago

Midnight Sun: Twilight fans feel young again as new book arrives

"A fan of the twilight, Siri's You've got something new to sink your teeth into. For the first time in a decade, Stephenie Meyer is back with a new book, Midnight Sun. It's a return to the world of love, Romance and the undead. And this book is a retelling of her debut novel, Twilight. In twilight is sweet and beautiful. Bella told you the story. This time. That same story is told from the perspective of Edward the dark and do me vampire. These books are pretty much as Bigas books can get. They've sold hundreds of millions of copies around the world that created a community of fiercely loyal fans. They've led to a Siri's of hit films. The road to writing. This new book has been a tough one for Stephanie, and there was even a time she said she'd given up on it for good. Stephanie spoke to Tom Power aboutthe one person who convinced her to return to midnight sun and how she eventually found her way back to the world she created. The one that changed her life. Listen to this. Stephanie, How are you? I'm great. Thank you so much for having me. It's a pleasure to have you. This is a weird interview for me. I'm not gonna lie to you because you know at the time were talking security around this book around midnight. Sun is so tight. I couldn't even get a chance to look at the book. It's completely under wraps to prevent any leak. So just tell me about that. What's it like for you to be sitting on top of something that so many people are just dying to get their hands on? Well, it's ah, sometimes a little bit stressful. However, on this one, it's a little bit hard to spoil. Basically, everyone knows the plot already, so it's not like anyone could say. Oh, my gosh. This happens because everyone already knows that So Ah, it's not quite a stressful that usually is. Obviously nobody wants it, Tio. Leak early, but don't really spoilers. Yeah, And I want to talk about that lack of spoilers in a second, But like, are you Are you excited? Or are you nervous? It still is a new work coming out in some ways. Yeah. I mean, I'm a deeply anxious person. So I'm always nervous, Excited is is not an emotion. I experience a lot nervous is definitely kind of a common one. I'm you know what kind of say something with anxiety. It is comforting to know that even when someone gonna reaches your heights, he's dealer get anxious. That makes me feel sort of better. I actually think it makes it worse. The anxiety like it's not like you get to a place where I have been successful. So now I no longer feel anxiety. I think you get the I have been successful. So clearly, I'm an imposter and everyone's going to figure that out. That's where that I thought that would go away by. You know, like the third book, maybe you No, no, it just gets worse. Oh, well, that's that's somehow good to know and disheartened at the same time, But I mean, speaking up, but this is sort of this. This. This This is a stage for you with this book that could be described as either kind of like a serene calm before the storm or sort of like a purgatory. Like, you know, these are the last moments in this that this book just belongs to you. I mean, is that is that bittersweet that you're about to Put it out there, or do you feel like celebrating? Um it's at the bittersweet is definitely the feeling. I mean, honestly, the way I get through life is by not thinking about these things, so I just sort of live in this world where nothing's happening. I haven't read many books. There's nothing to worry about. And then Every now and then I have to step out of that little dream world and Deal with the reality of it, but Yeah, it's it's always hard to put your Your work out into the world because you know, while there'll be people who who like it, there will be people who don't and no matter how many people like that you always feel bad about those that don't So that's that's always a harder thing. So let's talk about this. This untucked about herbal book that is somehow unspoiled Obel insupportable at the same time, Let's talk about it for a second. What I understand this is a retelling of the first novel of twilight from the point of view of a different character. For those of listeners who aren't familiar. You know, this time we see the story through the eyes of Edward the Vampire while the original was narrated by the female lead, Bella, Am I on the right track? Yep. So I understand that it's Darker, even though it is the same story. It's told from a different perspective. And you said that made it a bit darker. Could you tell me about that? Guess so. Bella, comparatively, is very happy. Go lucky character like she is 100% in for falling in love and having a happy ending. Edward. On the other hand. Because of what he is and how he views himself doesn't really see himself as worthy of love. And he doesn't believe that there is a happy ending impossible for him and Bella, so he's pretty Pessimistic the entire time. This is all going to end in horror and tragedy. That's his mindset. And it's all his own fault because he shouldn't have done any of things that he did. He's field spiraling and guilt having massive amounts of indecision and self doubt. So it's It's just Ah, harder place to be, I think also, it is. Ah, lot more realistic to my own mental statement, Then Bellas is I was about to say, I mean, we just talked briefly about like how you know even when you have massive success it, But that doesn't mean You're not anxious. And yeah, you're right. It does sound like you're writing about your own experience in some ways through Edward. Well, I've always felt like I am. Closer to Edward in opinions and how I see the world and when I was writing toilet, I don't think his I think people saw him is a very confident Person. He was very sure of himself. He seemed in control of any given situation. But meanwhile, I was always aware of where his head was even 15 years ago. So to me, the things that were coming from him made perfect sense. But I don't know if they came across In a way that was clearest what was really going on. I suppose all narrow it depending on how surprised people are by midnight sun or if they saw it coming, is it? Do you learn something new about the story? Reading it from me the story that you wrote. Originally, Do you learn something about writing through the perspective of a different character? Little things like I said, I was I was aware of Where Edwards has heads was when I was writing twilight, so it's not a huge revelation. But there are moments where you're like, Oh, So this to him is not a book with a happy ending. Okay? I wasn't expecting that. You know things like that.

Bella Edward Midnight Sun Siri Stephanie Edwards Stephenie Meyer Bigas Obel Insupportable Tom Power Bellas
Sheep Are Smarter

Let's Talk Game with Tiffani Lewis

03:30 min | 5 months ago

Sheep Are Smarter

"Recently I saw this sheet brain eating challenge. Yes, Sheet Brain! It originated in Asia Big Area where Asmar is also popular. If you watch videos. Listen to videos where people are. Spring back. Sites or smacking. Yeah the whole night. You have to check it out Asmar. And some of this has led to people just eating extravagant foods in certain parts of Asia. The brain of an animal is considered a delicacy because of the intellect of that particular animal now I learnt as Durham I travel to Asia China in particular, and during that time monkey was a hot item on the menu. And now it's shifted to sheep brain, so I want a little further. I wondered are sheep also smart because we know that monkeys all right? Now the historic reputation of sheep says they are actually stupid. They're good for two things. Only being eaten and producing wool, and I'll add a third to that being big. Tom Powers like I read that they will actually follow one another into slaughter or off a cliff. Repeat with me. Don't be a follower now on the contrary. Let me paint a different picture about sheep. They are actually loyal and somewhat intelligent. Their intelligence stems where they can do facial recognition, right and I'll add a third to balance the scale. They're smart because they stick close to the shepherd and they're able to recognize their. Their shepherd right, not only the sound of the shepherd, but how that Shepherd looks now you may envision the shepherdess. A man who carries this tall wouldn't staff and has a no shave November type beard. Yeah, that Guy, but the staff is not just for show is actually to protect and covered the flock on a daily basis from real live mingling wolves right out on the prow now in the church relationship this is reflected between pastor and congregation in a mosque between the Imam in worshippers in synagogue between the rabbi in the members. And is closely modeled as these various dynamics are. The sheep proved themselves to be smarter than us. It's because they stick close to the shepherd. Now. This is not me in any way. Discrediting the roles of pastor Imam or rabbi, those that are called equipped to lead in these positions have a huge responsibility as messengers but check this out. They are never to replace or override. Direct intimate in close relationship with God. John Tim. Fourteen says I am the Good Shepherd and I know my sheep and am known by my own. They will no way by no means follow a stranger, so that shepherd that guy with the staff. That's what the sheep do. They follow that Shepard. They know that shepherd one on one relationship intimate, and they stay close now churches, synagogues and mosques. We all see globally. They are shut down. There closed. With a little bit of online. Services going on right, but besides that the doors of them are closed. What a time! To explore the open fields of love. What a time to reconnect with the very God that created the earth and everything in it. What time to stick close to the shepherd to keep from falling off that cliff.

Shepherd Asmar Asia GUY Asia China Tom Powers John Tim Shepard
The Photograph's Stella Meghie on Writing for Romance

Q

10:12 min | 10 months ago

The Photograph's Stella Meghie on Writing for Romance

"I'm going to tell you a story about following your heart and the hero of our story is Canadian filmmakers Stella McGee and she has a new movie out today called the photograph up until a few years ago Stella was a publicist in New York but then she did something many of us dream about she quit your day job and she walked away from that job to go study screenwriting and from that point on Stella McGee became this unstoppable force her first movie gene of the Joneses was a big hit and when Stella directed her second film in twenty seventeen she was the only black woman that year with the wide release movie and sell Mickey is with me in studio right now hello hi I'm very pleased to be talking to you about this film it is the photograph is a romantic dramma would you say that you are romantic and now for only nine and probably much less sentimental than the characters and stories that I write yeah also you didn't you didn't have a phase in your life where you went to a romantic I mean of course everybody dies by it I'm probably I'm I'm probably less sentimental than you'd imagine how do you get roped into this romantic drama okay no but I'm a fan I you know I don't know it's maybe it's you know that's not me in real life but in movies you know I love romantic dramas I love Amanda comedies I I love it I love it when it's fictional well that the film the photograph it spans generations and it's about a woman name may who loses her mother and she begins looking into her mother's early life and she discovers that her mother had this secret longing a lost love listen to this my daughter I put my lan into for which is to expand my heart instead of people are supposed to be a date I love you I love you too I understand why she can tell me about online plus he was alive maybe she thought it would look at or another way that's a clip from the new movie the photograph and I'm here with writer and director Stella McGee you said that this story is partly inspired by your grandmother have so I mean at the time I was writing it I I found out that my my grandmother had a daughter when she was really young and she was going to be reunited with her she was living in London and you know I I didn't know much about it and you know seeing my grandmother kind of go through the motions of of the guilt and fear and the excitement you know it just really it just really touched me and you know made me start thinking about kind of the the the the family layer of the story and the things that you don't know about your you know your mother or your grandmother that's a big story and then you what made you want to take that story and then turn it into a room romantic story on top yeah I mean at the time I wanted I was I was thinking about doing manic drama because and normally right kind of comedy drama romance and I really wanted to do something a little more dramatic and so I was playing with these characters of may and Michael and then that story kind of just you know like I said I wanted to kind of link hi your history how your family history FX your present and how you relate to people and and everybody thinks about that right now yeah you know jet it's you know it's a generational kind of story and I'm always kind of it you know exploring generational stories you know that was G. in the Jones as you know that was the weekend and you know I'm close to my mom and my mom was really close to her mom and I grew up knowing my great grandmother so like that that link is very strong for me is your grandmother still around no she passed away a few years ago yeah because when you love to know her reaction yeah I know it's probably hate it yeah there's the grandmother I guess there's no other way to say this about the film it is a romance and I have to say the sex in it is great to it is not like a Thomas yes but there's one major scene and I remember watching it without my producer Vanessa and after that was over we both turn to each other and we said well that was shot by a woman because it was tender and intimate and believable as a director how do what do you think and how do you approach sex in this movie I wanna get across intimacy you know I want to get across a woman's the filament you know I wanna protect my actors to feel not objectified but we're manta sized and what they're doing is a scary thing for you because lord knows a lot of sex has been done so badly yeah it's hard to do yeah I hated my worst day on set for sure really yeah because I'm just wanting to make sure that it that that's the day that like it really has to go right emotionally like I just wanna make sure I'm good to my actors that were in and out quickly that I get what I need without asking more for more than I need you know this checked on the sat you know there's just a lot of pieces that go in to make sure that everyone's comfortable and you know I mean I just feel like a lot of responsibility to my actors and actresses on set to make sure that it goes well um is it more a question of knowing what you don't need to shoot instead of what you need to shoot this work going on it's about knowing exactly what you want to put in on camera knowing you know an editing out editing it out in your head before you go in so you're not exploring right yeah I'm not using them to now yeah try thing yeah there is structured one of your leads in the photograph is east array and a lot of people may know her from the show does Saudi Robert thank but no one cares because I'm I have been a part of Amazon I reach for my she says that that's the survey on the HBO comedy in secure oesa has this very strong background in comedy and what convinced you that she was the right lead for this romantic drama I mean we'd work together and secure and you know we kind of did a like my first episode with her was like a bottle episode that wasn't really the typical in secure episode in she was just on a date for the most part for the whole thing with one guy and it was just interesting to see kind of the softer side of her that is and always explored on the show and and getting to know her you know she's like a Stanford graduate very smart very stoic at times you know there's just another side to her and another to her to you know to her range that I thought she could tap into mmhm yeah you've worked with a lot of comics people who are known for their comedy work us this year as a mater and Sherri shepherd what is it that you like about working in I love comedians I mean I am I would rather not be see if he is if I don't have to be I just relate to them I find that my writing has a you know there's always kind of dry under current of comedy to it no matter what so I find when I work with comedic actors they can always find the joke even if the line feels drier or flat yeah that's nice I also wonder too whether act for actors working in comedy feels a little bit like there in an isolation chamber in the they worry about being able to do other stuff as well and they're dying to get a different thing yeah I find comics are kind of fearless you know they they have to be I think it's this one of the most scary professions and I you know I I often think they can stretch the most and tap into the most in a you're listening to Q. on Lori brown in for Tom power and I'm here with still McGee the Canadian director behind the new film the photograph now to your story about that moment when you quit your day job to follow your dreams tell me about that day I'm I think they quit when I got into school I think when I got the acceptance letter into grad school for screenwriting I gave notice a thing of as working at Brooks brothers at the time and in I it's just something that I've been thinking about for a long time and when it finally came I was ready to go well yeah big change though yeah big changes showed up in London I've never even been there and I started school well how long were you at school are the program is around here and and I stayed in London for almost three yeah do you like the wind I love London I mean the best part about living there you can kinda go to Berlin on the weekend or you know to do a lot of traveling kind of stuck up a lot of experiences this movie took you to lie yeah how did it feel about being being back there as a director of you know I love peppering in my own life into things and so it was fine I guess Michael there's a there's a lot of me and Michael and that's me okay yeah yeah and it was fun you know kind of putting putting putting him in that situation that I've been in who let's hear a clip from your debut film let's go back to twenty sixteen this is a bit of gene the Joneses right now though mommy but if I don't ask wind should I make it

New York Stella Mcgee
"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Has sent in for Tom power and I'm here with actor comedian and screen writer Julian bell hi Jillian thanks for having me our pleasure this is the part where I'm gonna in one introduce you to our audience for the obvious points are that you are a star on the TV show workaholics you've written for Saturday Night Live and please do not hold this against me I there's something else I noticed in your resume okay eight years ago you appeared in the hit comedy hit bridesmaids. in the film you played an unnamed character called girl at bridal shower that's true and funny story my dad who always used to go to the movies every Sunday when he was alive he went to see it this is the first time he was really seen me in a movie and he blinked and he missed me so he will. to go see the movie a second time and I told them what point to keep his eyes very wide open and then he saw me that's great and I also I bring it up because it's it's to show what you've been able to achieve in that period you've been perfecting your craft for quite some time just if you look back eight years and you look at now you were the lead in a new movie called Britney runs a marathon and you play Britney not all night do do not have a name of the title character it's wonderful the Britney runs marathon is based on the true story of a girl named Britney she feels stuck in life she feels like everyone else around her is moving forward and she isn't and she decides to shake things up by running the New York City marathon siliceous hero a clip of that let's get you healthy I want you to try losing fifty five pounds that's the weight of a Siberian husky you want me to pull a medium sized working dog off of my body..

Tom power Saturday Night Live Britney writer Julian bell Jillian New York City eight years fifty five pounds
"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ted away. Oh in for Tom power. If you're feeling trapped somewhere between the bleakness of winter weeks, some vibes. Here's a song. That combines pretty dark lyrics with a fun uplifting. Sound here's vampire weekend with this? Is. Galley? Sheet known cheated known you. Me, but I've haven't seed through. Cadence weapon with his kroner mcdavid cadence weapon is known as the poet Rowley Pemberton he'll be sitting in for Tom power tomorrow as the guest host of this very show Angeline Ted away. Oh in for Tom power. One.

Tom power Angeline Ted Rowley Pemberton
"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For our documentary of the week from Tom powers and Raphael and the house and the co founders of the dock NYC festival and the pure nonfiction film series and podcast here is Raphael. With this week's pick in this year's Oscar category for documentary feature film, only one nominee comes from outside the United States. Syrian filmmaker Salal Durkee has been exiled in Berlin since two thousand fourteen but he returned home to document the rise of Islamic Jihadism dot. He's trying to hide my immense. Fear. I said goodbye to my wife and son and set out toward the land of men who long for war to northern Syria province controlled by al-qaeda, aka on this refund. Durkee gained access to one of the founders of serious, Al Qaeda. A man named Abu Osama, the resulting film is called fathers and sons it chronicles more than two years in the life of Osama and his young sons as he indoctrinates them jihadi philosophy. With God's help. We will keep fighting until we liberate all of Syria and establish a fair Islam caliphate where everyone is treated fairly in a landscape torn by civil war children play among burnt-out tanks and landmines Durkee follows two of the boys as they enter a Jihadist training camp. The instructors keep a steady rhetoric of global struggle. Is done. God's promise came true in Afghanistan. The American troops were humiliated and retreated because of the JD this film is one of the most intimate portraits. We have of the process of becoming a terrorist of fathers and sons is now.

Salal Durkee Abu Osama Syria Raphael Tom powers Oscar NYC Afghanistan United States al-qaeda JD Berlin two years
"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"International. I'm Tom power. Man. I can't get over. How good that song is. I don't know if I need to tell you what song that is. Maybe maybe just never turn the radio on back in nineteen ninety nine. Maybe you just emerged from a cave Britney Spears in nineteen ninety nine but just taking over the airwaves with her first big hit baby. One more time the song. You're hearing right now today marks twenty years since she released her debut album of the same name an album that went on to become one of the best selling albums ever selling twenty five million copies worldwide that record and that song shop Britney Spears into superstardom. Thanks in a big way to Swedish songwriter and producer name max, Martin Max Martin is the guy behind so many big pop songs. He's worked with basically every big pop star. You can think of Taylor swift, Katy Perry. The backstreet boys the weekend, we're gonna get into more of that. And the kind of lasting legacy of this massive Britney Spears record on its twentieth. Anniversary on today's Q this music Powell Lisa Christiansen is a producer and art supporter CBS's Vancouver as well as the. Oh, host of the pop culture podcast pop. This joins us from Vancouver highly, sir. Good morning. She did it again. Especially plate with fire. Me right now is our good. Friend freelance music writer at Tabassum Siddiqui had to have, hey, how are you? I'm very well. So on this exact day twenty years ago Britney Spears drops her debut album, baby. One more time Tabassum on the way. And you said to me nothing like the passage of pop time to make you feel old. What do you remember from with this record came out? I mean, you know, what I think is really interesting is just kind of how big it was right out of the gate. You know, here she was making her music debut, people kind of knew her as a kid star Mickey Mouse club, and so on but soon as this single drop the album was pretty huge, which in that really crowded pop landscape for her to make her Mark like dot early as a teen star was pretty remarkable. You know, I mean, I think there was a thing where that always happens with food kind of fluffy pop where critics were mixed, you know, and so on but at the same time, something knowledge, just how catchy legitimately wise. And then you can't really argue with the numbers, you know, huge sales right out of the gate for this album, also radio chart, play just climbing like crazy. And when it was if you think back to that era when pop music was doing really, well, and there was a really wide plethora of artists just breaking records left right and center for her to come onto the scene at sixty and seventeen and do that pretty big deal. Lisa. How about you? Yeah. I remember, obviously that is just one of those jams that sticks in your head. And you just want to you know, sing it all the time and tabs, right? It really. He did come out of the gate. However, my kind of association with the music is also that uncomfortable feeling of first thing the video and seeing the sixteen year old girl and the girls school uniform dancing through the hallways. Telling me that loneliness was killing her and I'm like, well, then go play a game your kid. This is a was I mean, this was a very visual time as well as it usually is for pop singer. So I'm always like conflicted between the two sort of feelings and images. Yeah. Tabassum? It was it was a very sexualize video. She was sixteen years old during school ghost girl. Schoolgirl clothing. What's your take on that? I mean, you know, it's interesting because it's funny to think back to that time and sure there was some backlash, but at the same time, I don't know that it was in the same way that we might have seen today. You know, it's interesting to think about how video like that would be received today with such a young woman being portrayed in that way. You know, she and her handlers were clearly trying to move away for that. Mickey Mouse, t really young star kind of situation, and so very deliberate move on their part to kind of position her this way. But that's also in itself kind of very uncomfortable. So, you know, on one hand, you know, it feels like a really good thing that maybe we wouldn't be seeing that same sort of imagery today on a on the other hand, the fact that you know, she was so young and not was. I kind of way that we saw her is really interesting to think about so the guy who helped make this record is a guy named max Martin Swedish songwriter producer, arguably one of the most and not even arguably one of the most important figures in popular music up there with Lennon McCartney he wrote baby one more time. Several other songs off the record. The thing is if you don't know max Martin by name, and you're screaming at your radio saying, how dare you compare them to let an McCartney hair some of max Martin's biggest pop.

Martin Max Martin Britney Spears Tabassum Siddiqui producer Lisa Vancouver Tom power Lisa Christiansen Lennon McCartney Taylor swift CBS writer Katy Perry twenty years sixteen years sixteen year one hand
Book excerpt: Michael Caine's "Blowing the Bloody Doors Off: And Other Lessons in Life"

Q

12:30 min | 2 years ago

Book excerpt: Michael Caine's "Blowing the Bloody Doors Off: And Other Lessons in Life"

"And in life, and you might have guessed it. The new book is called blowing the bloody doors off, Michael. Join Tom power from studio in London today. Right into it. Sir. Michael caine? Welcome to Q. Thank you very much. I'm so blowing the doors off is a book full of advice. And some of it is from you directly. Some of it is advice you've received over the years. Can you tell me about the advice? You got from John Wayne when you ran into him at the Beverly Hills hotel. Yeah. Yeah. He I just by Alfie, and I was in in in in Hollywood with nothing to do. I was going to a movie we Shirley, MacLaine it. She was late coming there. And I didn't know anybody so used to sit in the lobby looking for movie saws spotted John Wayne, and he was registered in a hotel Luca be said to be what's your name? K I said Michael Caine he said in that movie Alfie, and he said you got to be a star kid. So should thank you. Thanks very much. They said let me give you some advice. I should. Okay. Yeah. Fine months. He said, we talk talk low talk slow and does say too much. And he looked down at my shoes knows worry suede shoes. And he said a never wear suede shoes. He said never wear suede shoes. I said why not? He said because I just told you you're going to be famous you're going to be a stock it. He said you're going to be taken a p in the jets toilet demand. Next year is going to recognize your turn it. So Michael Cain is gonna pay all over your shoes. So don't wait. What a thing. It must be to have John Wayne tell you you're going to be a star. Hey was stunned in Hollywood. When I went there because I'd been a film fan on my life. But to actually go there and made them, you know, it was amazing. John Wayne is very kind to you. He gives you advice, even near death. Right. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I mean, my wife had pen to scientists and she was in hospital visitor. John Wayne was dying in the next room. And we used to walk up and down the corridor. You were pajamas and addressing gown in a cowboy hat in a hospital. He was dying. You know, and he said never worry about dying cages get on with your life. Just do what you wanna do because we're all gonna die. You know that I said, yes. Yes. John. And we say good bye. And I never saw him again. That's beautiful. That's an amazing story. There's a piece of acting advice that I really loved that you come to a few times in the book. So you're playing a drunk on stage the very beginning of your career. Oh, yeah. I would imagine playing a drunken stage like you would hiccuping and stumbling around, but you get a piece of advice and a piece of direction that you really think shaped your work forever. Right. Oh, I did it. I was in first little theatre version is a stage actor I was playing a drunk. We were rehearsing and came on and started in and said, wait a minute. My what are you doing? I said we'll drunkenness and he said, no, he said, you know, proper drunk a drunk is a man who is trying to speak, clearly and walk straight. You are an actor who's trying to mumble a book crooked and the other one he said to me a little later I seen in a play where I had to cry. And so I was crying. And then again, he stopped me said, what are you doing? I said we're not crying in. He said you're supposed to be a man crying. When a man cries. He will do anything not to cry. You are an actor who's doing anything to try cry. You said you got to run you go to run. And so he told me movie acting in two sentences. It feels like it's it's a much harder. What is required then what you originally doing? And it's almost like you have to act mostly inside of you. Oh, yeah. You you do I mean one of the things you gotta remember when you're rehearsing some some when I was in the theater is to look in the mirror Beethoven rehearsed. You know, an experienced tech said to me said never look at the mirror said never let anyone read the lines your lines back at you to rehearse. He said because you've got to remember when you hear the lines is conversation in a movie, that's the first time you ever heard that man say that. But you just got to know the answer to what he say. That's that's so fascinating. You talk about how you use real incidents from your life as an actor. For example, you use it dark memory from your childhood during World War Two when you want to conjure up h I should be clear. You you grew up in London. During World War Two. Tell me a little bit more about that. Oh, yeah. I was I'm a Londoner six when the war started and twelve when it ended, but I was evacuated a lot of the time. So. I was very lucky because the blitz wasn't continuous. There was always gaps because he they used to change the weapons, you know, to be it'd be incendiary for a while. A. Hi, explosives doodle bugs. And then the last one which will be the most worst one with the rockets. Well, it's an interesting point because you talk about using your experience as a soldier in Korea. When you want to feel fear as an actor. But is that a strange feeling being aware that you need to keep in touch with some of the most traumatic moments in your life in order to do your craft. Oh, yeah. I have an incident. I've never told anybody, including my wife, you've been married forty seven years what I do to make me cry. I think of something in my life, and I burst into tears it. It was so. And it wasn't even horrible or terrible. It was just very very sensitive. That's all I thought you were about to tell me just then now never told us. So. If I wanna be able to do it. But you know, what I mean, it's it's it's a funny thing in order to access this part of your craft. You actually do have to relive most most people would like to bury those away forever. Wait, I'm Stanislavsky method actor you you have to live on what happened in your life. What do you think growing up during the war did for you as an actor? It taught me every experience did you can feel right through a great joy and terrible agony an extreme fear. You know, it was it was terrible agony when the war. Started extreme fear all the way through an incredible joy when it finished. And so everything was in the extreme. I remember someone has a reporter said what what was it about? Oh, you guys in the sixties. But it was is people like me. I was the oldest of the sixties was born in the depression in the thirties. Six to twelve hours in a war. When I was eighteen I sent me defy in Korea. You know, when I got home the fifties in London rationing was still on the place was like a morgue vizo roads. And we were burning coal for heating. So smug every day every single day. There was smoke and disgusting place to be and then when we got to the sixties Khrushchev said, we have an atom bomb. You've got four minutes to live. So I suppose we also got formulas to live. We might as well have a good times. I always say that's how the sixties happened. We all had a fabulous time. Let's funny Roger Daltry from the who. And he said the same thing. He said he grew up with rations. He grew up. He said it made him grow up very short. So when time came that he could live life. He wanted to do as much as he could. But we've all exactly the same and the sixties wasn't mastered by anybody nobody thought of it while it was going on. Nobody wrote about. About it was only written about it was just thousands and thousands of working class. People said I've had enough we went we went out. And did what we wanted to do. The thing about the sixties. Everybody I met who is completely unknown became famous. I remember I was sharing. A fact we my friend Terence stamp, and he had a brother, and I was sitting with him. And I said, what do you want to do with your life? He said I'm going to be a music manager. I said, oh, really, you know, tell hoopla is going to be, you know, twenty year old company boy, ill educated and everything. Would never wait. You went to grammar school. Yeah. Yeah. So I said, oh, yeah. Well, good luck. Forgot about it. He said. My mate, we're going to be we've found an act last night. I said, oh, really what was it cold? He said to who. And I found in a pub I finished because he died recently, Chris Christine. But he died very successful and wealthy, man. Do you feel like the whole class thing, isn't as isn't as heavy as it was. When you first started. Oh my God. No, no, no, no. It's still there. But it has no power. I mean, nobody takes any notice of any judge because there are so or something even you know, take. Anyway, I didn't know whether to call you, sir. Now, everybody goes re Michael doug- used the title. So the book is called blowing the doors off Michael Caines Serb, sir. Michael Caine with. No alright. This book is about the lessons you learned throughout your career. So we've talked a little bit about the sixties, and and you coming up and breaking through and becoming this huge success. What I also find interesting is the later stages so in the nineties, you were looking at retiring from films altogether and your credit Jack Nicholson for bringing back from retirement, right? Yeah. Yeah. That's right. I when when is about sixty sixty one or something like that, I got a script producer send it back. So I don't want to do it. The part was too small, and he send it back saying I did want you to read the lover of what did you read the father? And so I suddenly realized up of a lover anymore. If you're going to be a movie star, you gotta get the girl. You know? Now, I'm going to be the father to go to hell with it. So every tired, and I went to Miami department and spend the Miami in the winter in Miami are stayed in London as well. But I had had a restaurant in London restaurant in in in Miami. And that was a success. And I wrote my autobiography at the end of my career, which was called the elephant to Hollywood because I come from a place in London, cool the elephant and castle. So I thought that was a good elephant to Hollywood. And so they're right in my book, and Jack meatless Lewisham is living the way man paint, we became friends and. Suddenly one day kind of got a script. He says it good good partner for you. You say. I live with blood and wine, and it was a very it wasn't a starring pie. Obviously Jack was the star. So I thought well, I'll do this is very good. I'm what I'd done is. I'd I'd made a mistake every tiring too soon. You know, because I went on to begin the second Academy Award for decide to house rules.

John Wayne London Hollywood Michael Caine Korea Miami Alfie Jack Nicholson Beverly Hills Hotel Michael Tom Power Michael Cain Academy Award Luca Shirley Roger Daltry Terence Stamp Michael Caines Serb Maclaine
"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"My name is Tom power. And that is Whitney Houston, the greatest love of all. And at one point when you're walking through the art gallery of Ontario. Toronto you'll hear that song while walking through the exhibition Whitney Houston, and then people like Wanda Sykes Simone and incredible other black women who were all at the center of his collection from McLean Thomas. It's called Nicolini Thomas fem warr it showcases wide variety of work from the visual artist. Based in Brooklyn when it opens tomorrow, you'll have the chance to see striking photographs intimate portrait video installations massive paintings adorned with glitter, and rhinestone some of them incredibly powerful images that ultimately make you rethink how society looks at the black female body in here to tell you more about it right now is the artist yourself, Elaine Thomas joins me live in the Q studio. Hi, nice to see you get to see you. Good morning. House has candidate. So far candidates. Great. I love it. You're gonna stay. Maybe a I'm sure I'll have to at some point. Trying to figure out how to get citizenship. I feel like a lot of guests. We have also the apartments are really, Maxine. Schools are good. Yeah. No, it's been great. I had such a huge welcoming here and always had a great time my partner, and I we brought our kids here. And you know, we we love it. We love it. So the support spin immense and this beautiful. So couldn't like it. I know I want to ask a question about something that comes up an often often during the pieces take a listen to this..

Whitney Houston Elaine Thomas Nicolini Thomas Tom power Wanda Sykes Simone McLean Thomas Maxine Ontario Toronto Brooklyn partner House
"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"My name is Tom power as I'm sure you've heard the US midterm elections are tomorrow. I didn't have someone over the weekend. Say to me, and I really love when people say stuff like this. They said, hey, I don't actually know what the midterm elections are. And I've just been nodding along with everybody. So I was I found a pretty good CNN descriptive like what are the midterm elections? If you need to know that I haven't done it yet. But I put it up on my Twitter. I Matt Tom power CBC. I dunno as someone who regularly doesn't know very much. I love it. When people are are able to ask questions like that. So anyway, what you probably have heard if nothing else is that the US midterm elections this year a really politically charged. They seem life has never been higher stakes. You heard over the weekend. Former US President Barack Obama saying these midterm elections might be more important than his first election the election the first black president. But no matter which way, you lean no matter which way, you feel about these elections. This is something that sounds at. I'm guessing we can all agree on out of the ordinary. There's a group of southern country. Singers, two brothers TJ and John Osborne who perform as the brothers Osborne, and they've come out to support a democratic candidate for governor in the traditionally red state of Tennessee. So I want to put this in perspective for you. According to Rolling Stone, no other mainstream country musicians. No other major label mainstream country musicians have publicly supported a democratic candidate in this election campaign. Pain. The reason Taylor swift doesn't count guesses because she's not as country anymore. But as you're about to hear the brothers Osborne have never fit the mold of what people expect of them or country singers, they may sound like a traditional country band. But when you listen to their latest record, they'll hear him singing about whisky Willie Nelson. Oh and legalization..

US John Osborne Tom power president Matt Tom Twitter Barack Obama CNN Willie Nelson Rolling Stone Taylor Tennessee
Marijuana, NYPD and Terrance Monahan discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

Marijuana, NYPD and Terrance Monahan discussed on All Things Considered

"Tomorrow the NYPD. Will no longer arrest most people caught smoking marijuana in public instead they'll simply, issue summonses it's the centerpiece of a new marijuana enforcement strategy announced by mayor. De Blasio and NYPD leadership back in June but the new policy is, not without its critics

Marijuana Nypd Terrance Monahan New York Wells Fargo Bank Officer Jamie Time Jimmy Floyd De Blasio Oak Park America Illinois Dr Jackie Moore Rafael Tom Powers Brooklyn OBA JOE Monaghan Eighty Six Percent
"tom powers" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Talia selangor in for tom power today on q if you happen to be in san diego california this week do not be alarmed if you see something a little out of the ordinary likes spiderman having coffee with joker or parley quinn holding the door for the hulk video game characters superheroes big blockbuster movie stars comecon opens tomorrow in san diego it's one of the biggest pop culture conferences in the world and if you've heard of or been to or dressed up at a con close to home before you might know that one of the trademarks of these conferences is the elaborate costumes that fans wear when they go it's called 'cause play and lauren or seaney is going to tell you how it all got started in this queue origin story lauren's journalists and 'cause player herself she even wrote a book about it called 'cause play the fantasy world of role play and as you're about to hear all these people wondering around in costumes it's not quite as out of the ordinary as you might think the first thing you realize when you walk into a comic convention is how not alone you are all around you there are thousands tens of thousands of people all who have something in common with you there's this energy in the air because you realize that sent you have something in common with everybody there everyone's a potential friend and then if you look a little closer you'll notice that you actually recognize a lot of the people there because they're all dressed like people you've seen before they're dressed like batman and superman vs faster than a speeding bullet and he's the super hero of gotham city are there dressed like even more obscure characters from japanese video game that you thought only you in twenty other people played too system these are called cost players whether it's for historical reenactment or religious ceremonies or costume parties or just halloween humans have been dressing up in costumes for centuries in fact so it's hard to pinpoint exactly where the idea of costs play the geeky version of dressing up really originated.

Talia selangor tom power california lauren san diego parley quinn seaney gotham
"tom powers" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Talia langer in for tom power today on q now you've probably heard about artists throwing themselves into their work before well you're about to hear from someone who literally physically inserts herself into her artwork rebecca belmore is an awardwinning amish matvey artist who's represented canada at some of the biggest art shows in the world she uses her art spark conversation about important issues she went spent ten hours hammering one thousand one hundred eighty one nails into a wooden log each nail representing missing or murdered indigenous woman you can count all those nails yourself when you see her new exhibit at the art gallery of on tario it's called rebecca belmore facing the monumental here's the thing though rebecca doesn't just throw her own body into her work her art demands that you do the same when you see her work on display you have to walk around it and and into it and you crane your neck to look all the way up to the top of it and not only does it get you looking but it gets you talking and feeling as it did for me yesterday seeing this tremendous work so i'm so thrilled to have rebecca belmore here live to tell you more about it rebecca welcome to q thank you thank you for having me yeah we're thrilled at your here so there are several videos of your performance pieces in this exhibit going back to nineteen ninety one and watching them i could see just how physical your work is you'll be submerged in water or kneeling the clothing on your body to a telephone pole or wrapping roles of kraft paper around a tree and another person tell me a little bit about why the use of your body is so important in your work well started making performance about late eighties and i did start withdrawing but i quickly switched to using my physical self in my work and my reason for doing that is that i wanted to assert my identity as indigenous woman to use myself was absolutely the best way to do that yet superior to see these these stories manifest in your body and you put yourself through a lot to do them on some of the performance pieces take place over ten or twelve hours so tell me what what you get out of it yourself by putting your body into your work in such a physically taxing way well as the maker of art as the maker of art i really interested in enjoying the process myself so i see myself as a worker as a i see this process of making art as my job so it's basically i really do to take very serious in the sense that this is what i do with my life the use of the word maker is so interesting to use that word before maker rather than create are on can you tell me about the the difference there difference for you well when i say maker or you know if i say i am the artist it means that i have a place i have a role to play responsibility a place within society our society whether that's indigenous or a global context so that's the thing that's interesting about your work to to me is that some of the some of the issues that you're art asks us to think about earn digits issues and they're not all indigenous issues and the way that you present them also makes indigenous issues at everyone's does that does that make sense to you but the way that i saw that's the way that i experienced what i saw yesterday i think what i'm trying to say is as indigenous people we are part of global community and so we to have a point of view that something to offer to other people yeah i wanna talk a bit about this twenty fourteen performance piece that you stayed where you hammered one thousand one hundred and eightyone nails into a log each nail representative murdered or missing indigenous woman based on an rcmp report from that time that performance to place over ten hours and by the end you had several hundred people on.

Talia langer tom power ten hours one thousand one hundred eight eightyone nails twelve hours
"tom powers" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"You're listening to q with tom power it is the friday before the candidate long weekend i bet there some of you listening to this on the radio driving down the old pch as we speak for a lot of people headed out on the highway for canada day long weekend is a right of passage one usually soundtrack by yes some classic canadian summer jams and what better way to explore some of the great canadian summer james with good friends of the show hosts of one of the greatest canadian podcast around winner of the canadian comedy ward for best audio podcasts audio segment show or series to go from taggart untorn jeremy taggart at charleston we love you tom today weekend 'til someone's bills the water i love you guys to what does candidate long we can latrine john for me the the memory that springs to mind the most is working as a driver on cbc's canada day special from parliament hill one year you wear driver i was a driver i wanted to work with the john o vision crew guys on another gig and a different capacity so i got so lost driving buffy sainte marie to a free report it was one of those like the windows getting smaller i had an hour to get over the recording back to the hill i blew it there were beads of sweat on the back of my neck and then she was so gracious and kind of angry issue didn't see the great big sea was on it spirit of the west was on at burton cummings with on it was like the most canadian ity light up and there's something about canada day in the national capital region where one hundred fifty people were so proud which is something that we're not often easily that's one that sticks out for me for sure i similar thing playing those you know molson park candidates shows like back in the day with those yeah i mean just when you see everybody psyched and just forty thousand people and flags everywhere i mean that you can't top that can you know you can't before we get into that so let's get into the to the music air what qualities does a canadian summer jam need have i think you have to have an involuntary physical reaction to it on your like member right in the members it has to have a groove it has to be up really that mellow i'm so curious but one of the picks with given how you say it will get to that in a second that was the genesis jam jam by the way the game we play which is that like it's not about whether you like the song or now it's about when you hear it do you just turn it up because you kind of got a you got it's also not about what baggage your perception of the performer is brought with you right you can't think about whether you like katy perry or you don't either the jam hits you in the fields or a dozen what a night by april one yeah i'm only anytime you say seventies rock and he's like many maritimes weddings where that's when the heels come off and you give to the dance floor with vodka soda of you're having tonight comes on that's what it takes me back to all right so let's get into the canadian james we picked we have taggered towards here jamie we're gonna start with you okay i gotta say i'm a bit perplexed here's your choice for classic canadian summer jim it's amazing you should hear me harmonize on this by the way summertime i guess no i yeah through dr windows down maybe driving.

one year
"tom powers" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"I seriously meaning if you can pick up josh whitehead's book and read it it's a it's it's it's quite powerful and it's easy to read it's a wii novel but it's powerful at the same time i'm tom power you're listening to q when you do a job like this for a couple of years i think we're just coming up to the end of our second season on the show east to hear a couple of patterns when it comes to talking to people who've made it in hollywood story that you hear often goes like this you know all i wanted to be an actor because i saw movie when i was young and i pointed to the screen and i said i wanna do that and i did went to school and a couple of years later i'm an actor or you might hear like well both my parents were actors so felt like the family business so i decided to follow in their path and become an actor if you ask jared abraham sin why he got into acting which i did in this interview you're about to hear he gave an answer that i've never heard before something along the lines of i had to get out jared grew up in flint on manitoba which the mining town eventually started work as a miner himself when he wasn't working underground he was training as an m a fighter even fought professionally under the name wolf blood but then he reached this point when he was about twenty when he was ready to pack his bags head west and try something completely new again not the usual path for an actor in hollywood but it's worked out for jared you'll soon be able to catch in the film american animals jared abraham sohn join me from studio in his new home vancouver in a conversation that i wasn't expecting to talk about his road less traveled.

josh whitehead flint manitoba hollywood vancouver jared abraham
"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Twister every perfect son donna i was born a fire on his show spitballs just tom power q is back right after this headlines on your phone fairly break the surface dive into the news those tough sanctions depend on chinese participation and the chinese might lose their enthusiasm for sanctions of north korea is behaving better so kim jong un might have his own art of the deal playbook here and that includes loosening sanctions but keeping his nuclear weapons listen to morning edition everyday on wnyc.

north korea kim jong un donna i
"tom powers" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Hello this david sedaris did someone say q with tom power i did you're listening to it i'm laurie brown in for tom power whether it's live standup or on late night talk shows or even at the white house correspondents dinner this past weekend a ton of comedy this year feeds off politics but what you don't see all that often is a comedian who takes on something like fascism and mixes it with family life but that's what charlie demere set out to do on his latest comedy album listen to this so behind them it's called fatherland and is going to be half about parenthood and having children and then half about nazis and where they do not see stuff we're gonna do baby stuff and in the middle is going to be a joke about nazi babies and the that's a clip from charlie's latest comedy album called fatherland i think it's fair to say it's a little different from what he usually tackles when he's writing books or plays or when you hear him on the debaters on cbc radio charlie damaris stopped by the q studio to talk about his long career in the vancouver comedy scene and to tell you what it's like to find the funny in fascism and fatherhood you know when a lot of artists start writing a new project they often don't know what it's about until it's actually done is that the same with writing comedy album did you know that this was going to be about fascism in fatherhood when you start it.

david sedaris charlie demere charlie laurie brown white house charlie damaris vancouver
"tom powers" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Kinds of shows but you're looking for something that's got an international flavor i think that's what what can appeal to you maybe we'll see it in canada reads i hope so great thanks for coming in for having me jail richardson is an author and the arctic director of the festival of literary diversity her book pick today was the bleeds by dmitry in israel a bleeds by dmitry nez out less rela jail back with another book for you in just a few weeks hello this is reporter you're listening to q with tom power unreal route the river's let down wanna feed some people down await as thirsty liquid spirit free your hands now now now now if you think of reality television in twenty eighteen you might picture the world you see on shows like keeping up with the kardashians shows that are pretty polished kind of make you wonder how real the reality on tv really biz about ten years ago the show getting a lot of attention stood out in a different way because even though the stuff going on might have been a little bit scripted at least it was raw l baby because everything's put together and you feel great you look great awesome oh yeah why during right before we go out take off the tank and then we put on our fresh shirt teaser yeah those are real people you met on jersey shore which ran for three years on mtv if all of the lives of eight people as they partied and fist pump their way through the day all living under one roof in seaside heights new jersey even if you didn't watch the show it was pretty hard to miss there were parodies of it everywhere characters snooky j wile the situation all became household names there were definitely a few hairstyles inspired by the show definitely if you spray tans inspired by the show and now there's a chance that all that poofy hair included could come roaring back when a new show premieres tomorrow night on mtv it's called jersey shore family vacation just before launches two of the original cast members jay wile and ronnie stop by the q studio to take you back to where it started back to their big hot spot the carmen nightclub back to those late nights partying with snooky.

richardson director dmitry nez reporter kardashians mtv seaside heights ronnie israel jay wile three years ten years
"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Uhhuh i'm laurie brown in for tom power if you've ever watched the simpsons or murphy brown or late night with david letterman when he was still on the air you're definitely gonna wanna tune into q tomorrow nell scovell has written for all of these shows and tomorrow she's going to take you into that tv world and open up about what it's really like working in the writer's room for so many of these hits shows and with all the extra challenges she faced when she was often the only woman around nell scovell is going to get funny and honest about that onto moral show then on wednesday you're going to hear from james ivory he made his name writing and directing films like room with view howards end and remains of the day and finally after six decades of working in the industry with merchant ivory films he was recognized with his first oscar for screen in writing just last month picking up the trophy for best adapted screenplay for call me by your name james ivory on what inspires him to bring love stories to life on the silver screen coming up on wednesday on q dan caesar mccue tom power guitar.

tom power simpsons david letterman nell scovell writer james ivory oscar laurie brown murphy brown six decades
"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And from pri public radio international i'm laurie brown in for tom power think about all the preparation that an actor has to do years of training time spent getting comfortable on stages and sets knowing how to break down a script and take direction there's a lot you need to learn how to do acting is not usually a job you just fall into but that's exactly what happened to joshua leonard about twenty years ago joshua was looking for a new creative outlet something fun to do as he was working through a difficult time in his life he auditioned for this small experimental film and ended up scoring a rule almost no budget for this movie no big name actors and it was shot entirely on small hand held cameras by the actors themselves but once blair witch project premiered it got big and it's inspired plenty of films since then that have all been shot on small handicaps joshua leonard's latest movie is called unseen and it's directed by steven soderbergh and stars clear for it's another intense experimental horror film and this time it's shot entirely on an iphone joshua join me from our studio in new york to talk about what it's like to fall into this kind of job and to get used to performing in front of an unlikely movie camera i wanna know what it's like acting for an iphone.

tom power joshua leonard steven soderbergh new york laurie brown twenty years
"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"tom powers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm ali hassan in for tom power so get this quiz shepherd was just fifteen years old when she came up with the script for her first film and unlike a lotta screenplays didn't stay in the drawer by the time quinn was twenty that script was a movie blame reimagined arthur miller's famous play the crucible but instead of being set at the salem witch trials it is set in a high school now remember what i told you acquit shepherd she wrote the script at fifteen and she says that was actually a huge help to her as the director end the lead actor in blame she didn't have to remember what high school was like she was living it blame is all about a student who starts a relationship with her drama teacher jeremy but when i spoke to quinn shepherd we started the conversation with the inspiration about the film when welcomed to queue thai so tell me about blame it's a modern day retelling of the crucible what was your introduction to this story so when i was fifteen i was actually cast in a regional production of the crucible and i was so enamoured with the play and also with playing abigail i was really method when i was a teenager and i felt like i really latched on to that character not you know obviously she does a lot of really horrible things hitting apply but there was something really powerful about playing such an adult role that i hadn't i really had never played an adult role a fifteen before for those unfamiliar can you tell us a bit about the crucible in who abigail williams's in the play abu williams is a 17yearold girl who goes to work for a married man as a servant you know it's the sixteen hundreds salem and she hasn't affair with him and win his wife get suspicious heathrow's route and won't speak to her again and so she grows very angry and resentful and jealous and wants to destroy his relationship with his wife in order to get revenge and sort of have this continuation of power of the she fell when she was having this affair with him so i think what's very interesting is it's a it's a role that often cast with an adult and i think the choice to have a real teenager play the role just really changes the the story because there's there's things that you understand about the impulse seventy.

ali hassan tom power quinn arthur miller jeremy abu williams salem director abigail williams fifteen years