23 Burst results for "Tom Power"

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson Discusses the Inspiration for Her Record 'Theory of Ice'

Q

02:56 min | 7 months ago

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson Discusses the Inspiration for Her Record 'Theory of Ice'

"In many parts of North America. It's about time for the melt. Some people call it the spring thaw or the break up. It's the period of time when days get longer and warmer and slowly, lakes covered with ice start to crack up. I had never heard this before as the ice days. Frozen for so long and in Newfoundland, and it wasn't until they moved Ontario and I was sitting by a lake One time that I heard these massive cracks that sounded like rifle shots are like big pings. Scared me half to death, to be honest and those of the sounds that inspired this song. I stepped over a watery it just Hey, fellows, the canoe a car seat. Nice. She paddles to the edge to collect candles, Mr One drink. You should Jax well, it's still easier. The N V. Da Samo Se Simpson would break up. Leanne is one of the most renowned writers and scholars in Canada. She tells stories and poems and makes music. Often focused on her Inish nobby heritage and tradition. Lee and B to C. MOC. Simpson's new record is called Theory of ice, and it begins with that scene. I was just talking about the vice breaking and melting. And we richly end in Peterborough, Ontario. Hi. Welcome to the show that Tom Power How are you? Nice to talk to you. Congratulations. On the record. I really loved it. Thanks so much. You know what I mean about it being sort of scary when the ice cracks? I absolutely know what you mean. The sounds are almost otherworldly. How do you How do you describe him like thunder? Sometimes they kind of sound. I mean, they kind of sound like aliens are landing. I think that shotgun is a good metaphor for them. But if you haven't heard that sounded, so it's a really Really, really powerful, jarring sounds that ice makes. So Where were you When you were making this record that you were hearing those sounds so much. I had the honor of spending time on the shores of Blatchford like in the Northwest territories, both during break up and and freeze up. And those times air just phenomenal times of the year because they're such massive transformations taking place on the land and in the in the water. And so, hearing those sounds and watching this process of melting and freezing and melting and freezing. And eventually the lake moving from this this amazing skating rink, maybe two. Almost like a dram er, a percussive instrument with this frozen layer on top, and then ending up in this this beautiful deep sort of pool of water was something that really fascinated. Me and a whole bunch of different levels.

Da Samo Se Simpson Tom Power Ontario Newfoundland North America Leanne Peterborough Simpson LEE Canada Blatchford Northwest
DOC NYC documentary film festival goes online

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:07 min | 11 months ago

DOC NYC documentary film festival goes online

"It's time for our documentary of the wake from Tom Powers and Raphael in a house in the co founders of the DOC NYC Festival, which is currently taking place online until next Thursday with over 100 feature length films. Here's Tom, with a pick from the festival somewhere are ready. The greatness of America is the right toe protest far right? Day. Martin Luther King Jr is widely regarded as a hero. But the new documentary MLK. FBI returns us to the time when J. Edgar Hoover treated him as an enemy historian Beverly Gauge, explains the FBI Woz Most alarmed about King because of his success. And they were particularly concerned that he was this powerful, charismatic figure who had the ability to mobilize people. King's biographer, David Garrow, wrote a book about the FBI's relentless surveillance campaign. Their agents recorded King's extramarital affairs and tried to smear his reputation. The FBI is frustrated that even though they've successfully caught King In 15 or more hotel rooms, and they've distributed this behind the scenes to church leaders to reporters. Nothing's publicly happened now, as black lives matter. Activists face new government pressure Film makes us wonder how much the FBI has changed. The bureau's former director, James Comey, remains dismayed about Hoover's treatment of King. You know this about humans? What we're best at is convincing ourselves of our own righteousness. I think this entire episode represents the darkest part of the bureau's history. Filmmaker Sam Pollard previously was a director on eyes on the prize and a collaborator with Spike Lee. He's being honored at the document. I see Festival with a lifetime achievement award. MLK. FBI is now streaming on the dock NYC website For more information is a w n y c dot or g'kar flash docks.

FBI Tom Powers Beverly Gauge King David Garrow Raphael J. Edgar Hoover Martin Luther King Jr James Comey TOM America Sam Pollard Hoover Spike Lee
Midnight Sun: Twilight fans feel young again as new book arrives

Q

06:25 min | 1 year ago

Midnight Sun: Twilight fans feel young again as new book arrives

"A fan of the twilight, Siri's You've got something new to sink your teeth into. For the first time in a decade, Stephenie Meyer is back with a new book, Midnight Sun. It's a return to the world of love, Romance and the undead. And this book is a retelling of her debut novel, Twilight. In twilight is sweet and beautiful. Bella told you the story. This time. That same story is told from the perspective of Edward the dark and do me vampire. These books are pretty much as Bigas books can get. They've sold hundreds of millions of copies around the world that created a community of fiercely loyal fans. They've led to a Siri's of hit films. The road to writing. This new book has been a tough one for Stephanie, and there was even a time she said she'd given up on it for good. Stephanie spoke to Tom Power aboutthe one person who convinced her to return to midnight sun and how she eventually found her way back to the world she created. The one that changed her life. Listen to this. Stephanie, How are you? I'm great. Thank you so much for having me. It's a pleasure to have you. This is a weird interview for me. I'm not gonna lie to you because you know at the time were talking security around this book around midnight. Sun is so tight. I couldn't even get a chance to look at the book. It's completely under wraps to prevent any leak. So just tell me about that. What's it like for you to be sitting on top of something that so many people are just dying to get their hands on? Well, it's ah, sometimes a little bit stressful. However, on this one, it's a little bit hard to spoil. Basically, everyone knows the plot already, so it's not like anyone could say. Oh, my gosh. This happens because everyone already knows that So Ah, it's not quite a stressful that usually is. Obviously nobody wants it, Tio. Leak early, but don't really spoilers. Yeah, And I want to talk about that lack of spoilers in a second, But like, are you Are you excited? Or are you nervous? It still is a new work coming out in some ways. Yeah. I mean, I'm a deeply anxious person. So I'm always nervous, Excited is is not an emotion. I experience a lot nervous is definitely kind of a common one. I'm you know what kind of say something with anxiety. It is comforting to know that even when someone gonna reaches your heights, he's dealer get anxious. That makes me feel sort of better. I actually think it makes it worse. The anxiety like it's not like you get to a place where I have been successful. So now I no longer feel anxiety. I think you get the I have been successful. So clearly, I'm an imposter and everyone's going to figure that out. That's where that I thought that would go away by. You know, like the third book, maybe you No, no, it just gets worse. Oh, well, that's that's somehow good to know and disheartened at the same time, But I mean, speaking up, but this is sort of this. This. This This is a stage for you with this book that could be described as either kind of like a serene calm before the storm or sort of like a purgatory. Like, you know, these are the last moments in this that this book just belongs to you. I mean, is that is that bittersweet that you're about to Put it out there, or do you feel like celebrating? Um it's at the bittersweet is definitely the feeling. I mean, honestly, the way I get through life is by not thinking about these things, so I just sort of live in this world where nothing's happening. I haven't read many books. There's nothing to worry about. And then Every now and then I have to step out of that little dream world and Deal with the reality of it, but Yeah, it's it's always hard to put your Your work out into the world because you know, while there'll be people who who like it, there will be people who don't and no matter how many people like that you always feel bad about those that don't So that's that's always a harder thing. So let's talk about this. This untucked about herbal book that is somehow unspoiled Obel insupportable at the same time, Let's talk about it for a second. What I understand this is a retelling of the first novel of twilight from the point of view of a different character. For those of listeners who aren't familiar. You know, this time we see the story through the eyes of Edward the Vampire while the original was narrated by the female lead, Bella, Am I on the right track? Yep. So I understand that it's Darker, even though it is the same story. It's told from a different perspective. And you said that made it a bit darker. Could you tell me about that? Guess so. Bella, comparatively, is very happy. Go lucky character like she is 100% in for falling in love and having a happy ending. Edward. On the other hand. Because of what he is and how he views himself doesn't really see himself as worthy of love. And he doesn't believe that there is a happy ending impossible for him and Bella, so he's pretty Pessimistic the entire time. This is all going to end in horror and tragedy. That's his mindset. And it's all his own fault because he shouldn't have done any of things that he did. He's field spiraling and guilt having massive amounts of indecision and self doubt. So it's It's just Ah, harder place to be, I think also, it is. Ah, lot more realistic to my own mental statement, Then Bellas is I was about to say, I mean, we just talked briefly about like how you know even when you have massive success it, But that doesn't mean You're not anxious. And yeah, you're right. It does sound like you're writing about your own experience in some ways through Edward. Well, I've always felt like I am. Closer to Edward in opinions and how I see the world and when I was writing toilet, I don't think his I think people saw him is a very confident Person. He was very sure of himself. He seemed in control of any given situation. But meanwhile, I was always aware of where his head was even 15 years ago. So to me, the things that were coming from him made perfect sense. But I don't know if they came across In a way that was clearest what was really going on. I suppose all narrow it depending on how surprised people are by midnight sun or if they saw it coming, is it? Do you learn something new about the story? Reading it from me the story that you wrote. Originally, Do you learn something about writing through the perspective of a different character? Little things like I said, I was I was aware of Where Edwards has heads was when I was writing twilight, so it's not a huge revelation. But there are moments where you're like, Oh, So this to him is not a book with a happy ending. Okay? I wasn't expecting that. You know things like that.

Bella Edward Midnight Sun Siri Stephanie Edwards Stephenie Meyer Bigas Obel Insupportable Tom Power Bellas
Sheep Are Smarter

Let's Talk Game with Tiffani Lewis

03:30 min | 1 year ago

Sheep Are Smarter

"Recently I saw this sheet brain eating challenge. Yes, Sheet Brain! It originated in Asia Big Area where Asmar is also popular. If you watch videos. Listen to videos where people are. Spring back. Sites or smacking. Yeah the whole night. You have to check it out Asmar. And some of this has led to people just eating extravagant foods in certain parts of Asia. The brain of an animal is considered a delicacy because of the intellect of that particular animal now I learnt as Durham I travel to Asia China in particular, and during that time monkey was a hot item on the menu. And now it's shifted to sheep brain, so I want a little further. I wondered are sheep also smart because we know that monkeys all right? Now the historic reputation of sheep says they are actually stupid. They're good for two things. Only being eaten and producing wool, and I'll add a third to that being big. Tom Powers like I read that they will actually follow one another into slaughter or off a cliff. Repeat with me. Don't be a follower now on the contrary. Let me paint a different picture about sheep. They are actually loyal and somewhat intelligent. Their intelligence stems where they can do facial recognition, right and I'll add a third to balance the scale. They're smart because they stick close to the shepherd and they're able to recognize their. Their shepherd right, not only the sound of the shepherd, but how that Shepherd looks now you may envision the shepherdess. A man who carries this tall wouldn't staff and has a no shave November type beard. Yeah, that Guy, but the staff is not just for show is actually to protect and covered the flock on a daily basis from real live mingling wolves right out on the prow now in the church relationship this is reflected between pastor and congregation in a mosque between the Imam in worshippers in synagogue between the rabbi in the members. And is closely modeled as these various dynamics are. The sheep proved themselves to be smarter than us. It's because they stick close to the shepherd. Now. This is not me in any way. Discrediting the roles of pastor Imam or rabbi, those that are called equipped to lead in these positions have a huge responsibility as messengers but check this out. They are never to replace or override. Direct intimate in close relationship with God. John Tim. Fourteen says I am the Good Shepherd and I know my sheep and am known by my own. They will no way by no means follow a stranger, so that shepherd that guy with the staff. That's what the sheep do. They follow that Shepard. They know that shepherd one on one relationship intimate, and they stay close now churches, synagogues and mosques. We all see globally. They are shut down. There closed. With a little bit of online. Services going on right, but besides that the doors of them are closed. What a time! To explore the open fields of love. What a time to reconnect with the very God that created the earth and everything in it. What time to stick close to the shepherd to keep from falling off that cliff.

Shepherd Asmar Asia GUY Asia China Tom Powers John Tim Shepard
"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:44 min | 1 year ago

"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Tom power take a listen to this if you've been around a radio in the past fifty years you've probably heard that song that's American woman by the guess who and exactly fifty years ago tomorrow it hit number one on the Billboard hot one hundred chart but here's something you might not know about this song there is some controversy around it some people interpreted as being anti war other people thought it was a message of American patriotism even though the people who wrote it were extremely Canadian the creation of the song and the reception of that song we're never super clear cut so one of the guys who wrote it is here to get the real story on the record Burton Cummings is a Canadian music icon one of the front folks of the guess who Burton Cummings welcome to the show hello thank you very much thanks for having me I'm so excited to talk to have never got to talk to you before but I'm I'm excited to have you here because it's a nice chance to talk about you know something something else you know American woman goes to number one on the Billboard hot one hundred exactly fifty years ago on may ninth and I I love the story of the song because to me it's the story of a lot of really great songs but people don't often see this process I think they imagine people you know office sitting down by candlelight with a quill but I love the American woman's kind of came from that a jam right it was basically jammed on stage we were doing two shows at the curling rink called the broom and stone and it was in Mississauga I guess not too far outside of Toronto and between shows we had the band had finished the first show already in between shows I was outside the ring and I was trying to cut a deal hammer out a deal with this guy bartering for something I don't even remember what and I heard the other three guys start up and I I said to this guy all my gosh you know I'm a try to be on stage I got a run are going to be up there with the band so they the guys couldn't find me at that point and it was time to start the second show so background started this this guitar riffs this June just repetitive refused to more or less to signal me to get the hell even get on stage and it was that at at at at at at that and go on and on and on got out of bed at and I heard this and Iranian and jumped up on stage this started making stuff up out of my head one of those Bob Dylan stream of consciousness moments where you just go with what's coming out of your imagination and I was more or less looking for things that rhyme you know colored lights can get the ties sparkle someone else's eyes a lot of people thought it was political you know it was never political and I've heard Jim Cahill explained the lyrics I mean he didn't even have anything to do with the lyrics neither did background really but for some reason these guys started to say well it was you know the the American woman was the statue of liberty that's just not true right through the like is it like a Rorschach test like where afterwards we can sort of peer into your subconscious even the improvised onstage pick out what you might even singing about after his saying it like it is unclear to what you might have been singing about I remember quite specifically we had been touring the states on the strength of these eyes and laughing and I'm done and I noticed when we were in the states the girls seem to grow up faster it was just they started wearing more makeup at a younger age and dressing more sensuous Lee at a younger age and then when I got back to Canada it seems that the girls were trying so hard to grow up so fast I wasn't thinking about the Vietnam War basically I was just seeing Canadian woman I prefer you and what came out with this what could've been construed as a matter and anti American you know American woman stay away from me one way or the other it's hot the attention of the public and it became much bigger than we didn't see it come and believe me we didn't see that coming yeah I heard that when you guys got us to play the White House you were asked not to play American woman dispatcher see there's another minute really our manager at the time came up with the idea that if we told the press but the White House had asked us not to play it it might be a good job publish the standard well it backfired it backfired on us and we were crucified in Rolling Stone anyway even for playing at the White House for the Nixon administration and it but it's it's not true we were never asked not to play American woman that was a stupid publicity stunt on the part of our manager at the time I think you know Tricia Nixon was one of the reasons we were even asked to play the White House I think she was a big fan of the band and she probably love the record and that's probably one of the reasons we were asked because it was so big on the radio you know but that's it that's nonsense it's it's funny it feels like the song kind of got away from like the meaning of the song I can't imagine what that's like to create a song onstage and for people to a you know in for all this meeting from it that you really have no control over it really is not close to what you actually meant no and and and here's the thing it was a different era in in history you know as I say the Vietnam War was raging there were protests all over on campuses and bat bat terrible shooting in Ohio had occurred you know where the the the troops shot some students down and everything was really friendly and things were off the rails you know it was a very tumultuous time and I guess the you know timing being what it was that song suited a lot of people's emotions and we were we were the benefactor of that but it was never ever meant to be political it never was you were the first Canadian band hit number one on the Billboard hot one hundred with American women you are at a Holiday Inn unless this is another myth but I heard you were in Milwaukee when you found out you went to number one is that right that's very true this isn't this is true the fact back in those days Wednesday was the day you got the magic phone call to find out what chart position your song had the next week I'm ready got the magic news that we have gone number one he called the three of us two to one of their hotel rooms the four of us got on a bed put our arms around each other's shoulders in a circle jumped up and down until the bed broke we were just like little kids and you know people have asked me if you could go back and re live you know a few minutes just five or ten minutes of your life what would you choose you know that what that might be pretty high on my list so it was a you know once in a lifetime experience for us and was of a magic moment for us this is the Jackson five news ABC you knocked out well there you go and I and I I remember too that the Beatles let it be I think was was also in the top ten at the same time so we certainly were up there with some pretty big artists you certainly were so a whole new generation was introduced to American woman through a cover in nineteen ninety nine which led to the song back on the Billboard hot one hundred let's take a listen to that that is when he Kravitz in American.

Tom power
"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:11 min | 1 year ago

"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And for P. R. acts my name is Tom power but one thing that's on your mind lately in this new weird era of self isolation all the stresses and anxieties that come with it is figuring out some coping strategies to get through these days maybe you're trying to do some yoga from home maybe a baking bread or are taking baths maybe you're gone for walks early in the morning when no one else is up maybe you're watching hours of alpaca videos on YouTube or maybe you've dabbled in some mindfulness meditation and if you have you might have encountered an app called calm it gives you these guided daily meditations and it's to Meryl Levitz job to deliver them to you with her voice there are more than a million subscribers who tune into her voice regularly and among them are stars like lebron James Harry styles America is the head of mindfulness over a common she joined us from her home in Toronto terra how are you holding up I'm doing well thank you it's really great to be here I'm I'm glad you're here I have so many questions for you the first you know I know you sort of look look after the mindfulness a whole section in the mind from this program of calm in addition to guiding the meditations yourself have more people than using your app in the mine from this part of your app during this time yeah we've definitely seen it seen an increase on people are looking for tools to help them navigate this chaotic stressful time and people have been coming to our and we've also been offering three resource page for people so we're offering meditations and sleep stories and master classes in music and all kinds of calming things to help people coach and I think within the first week and a half we've had like one point six million people be the pages and pretty amazing and very meaningful to be able to support people in this way Michael this is something that I think a lot of people associate with a very busy life like if you're traveling if you're working a lot of you're always coming and going you take a moment you you sit with yourself you get in touch with yourself for a couple of minutes you know how does mindfulness fit into this time varying with so many people are inside yeah so this is really applicable anywhere at any time for anyone it's a practice that allows us to develop more awareness and insight into what we're experiencing in any moments and it helps us respond to what we're experiencing a more scalp away sh so for this instant I mean we're all going through this collective trauma and our lives are enough people for many of us every aspect of our lives have been changed so we're dealing with a lot of uncertainty in a lot of stress and anxiety and turning towards meditation and mindfulness allows us to find some space in it all I mean meditation is neat they can help us sooner Mr Stein and calm ourselves in times of anxiety and help us develop equanimity which is really the ability to learn to be okay with this uncertainty which is really really difficult and there's so many different mindfulness tools that can help ground us in these times so you know we see so many people are turning to mindfulness it's all over now you know I should turn on my Facebook and everyone's posting about mindfulness and people are looking for tools so this is the perfect time to actually start a practice thank you happy we haven't started well and you know it's it's a duality happening because on one side of things are being encouraged to write a great novel you know we're constantly being reminded that like Shakespeare wrote these pieces during times of dress we're also getting encouragement of like just living yourself and be be happy with our our how you're dealing with it but I am curious you know walking being creative give us during a time like this so you know the connection between mindfulness and creativity is is pretty clear both things bring us into the present moment and so when we're in the present moment it holds us away or anxious and worried thoughts which are what is causing so much stress for us right now so you know when we were out we were writing music or dancing or when we're creating art which were fully invested in and engaged in that activity and there's this really beautiful stillness I mean any musician will be able to relate to that feeling well you know that universal feeling where it's like creation is coming through you you're not making it happen it's coming through you right sh and so mindfulness it is similar and it's that we can still our minds and create space it it's it's a really rare activity that we can only really do in the present moment if we're doing it properly and so at creativity a lot of the time people are under the impression that it's invalid intellectual thing and we need to force creativity but really I really a curse of stillness tomorrow before we go can you show me like just a little thing that we can do a little practice we can do to be mindful of practice they can be done at any time and I actually use that's when I went to the grocery store about a week and a half ago and I got very anxious seeing the bare shelves and you know seeing that that just seeing society that you experience in a grocery store right now so once I left I felt my heart was racing I felt I'm assuming IT in my ballet in so I knew that I needed to calm myself down and so what I did was this practice where I I focused on my bracket close my eyes and focused on my breath I in Hillsborough County for exercise for ten to four and I exhaled recounted eight so along gaining that the brass actually it triggers the parasympathetic nervous system and it comes down to the way I would want to write yeah do you want me to guide you in trying so we inhale two three four holes two three four X. two three four five six seven eight enhanced to three four holes two three four X. two three four five six seven eight enhanced two three four all two three four six two three four five six seven eight so you can it really kind of worked yeah I can at least tell you that I felt different when I opened my eyes then when I close okay good good I'm glad thank you so much for your time today thanks for everything you're doing to keep Canadians sort of sane during this time you're so welcome it was really lovely to talk to you tomorrow live it is the head of mindfulness but the app calm she leads daily ten minute meditations and right now you can access them for free check out com dot com for all the details hi this is spoken to Jones of and you're listening to queue up Tom and dreamy new song now from Marlena more she's a singer songwriter at Edmonton Alberta she just released a new album called pay attention be amazed but she's one of the many musicians who had to postpone the tour she had planned throughout the spring and if you're wondering where that album title comes from she was out on a walk one day eight AM and ten and it was written at a church Billboard pay attention be amazed so to keep you in that nice calm headspace my last gasp is talking about this is Marlena more and I miss you choose that's Marlena.

P. R. Tom power
The Photograph's Stella Meghie on Writing for Romance

Q

10:12 min | 1 year ago

The Photograph's Stella Meghie on Writing for Romance

"I'm going to tell you a story about following your heart and the hero of our story is Canadian filmmakers Stella McGee and she has a new movie out today called the photograph up until a few years ago Stella was a publicist in New York but then she did something many of us dream about she quit your day job and she walked away from that job to go study screenwriting and from that point on Stella McGee became this unstoppable force her first movie gene of the Joneses was a big hit and when Stella directed her second film in twenty seventeen she was the only black woman that year with the wide release movie and sell Mickey is with me in studio right now hello hi I'm very pleased to be talking to you about this film it is the photograph is a romantic dramma would you say that you are romantic and now for only nine and probably much less sentimental than the characters and stories that I write yeah also you didn't you didn't have a phase in your life where you went to a romantic I mean of course everybody dies by it I'm probably I'm I'm probably less sentimental than you'd imagine how do you get roped into this romantic drama okay no but I'm a fan I you know I don't know it's maybe it's you know that's not me in real life but in movies you know I love romantic dramas I love Amanda comedies I I love it I love it when it's fictional well that the film the photograph it spans generations and it's about a woman name may who loses her mother and she begins looking into her mother's early life and she discovers that her mother had this secret longing a lost love listen to this my daughter I put my lan into for which is to expand my heart instead of people are supposed to be a date I love you I love you too I understand why she can tell me about online plus he was alive maybe she thought it would look at or another way that's a clip from the new movie the photograph and I'm here with writer and director Stella McGee you said that this story is partly inspired by your grandmother have so I mean at the time I was writing it I I found out that my my grandmother had a daughter when she was really young and she was going to be reunited with her she was living in London and you know I I didn't know much about it and you know seeing my grandmother kind of go through the motions of of the guilt and fear and the excitement you know it just really it just really touched me and you know made me start thinking about kind of the the the the family layer of the story and the things that you don't know about your you know your mother or your grandmother that's a big story and then you what made you want to take that story and then turn it into a room romantic story on top yeah I mean at the time I wanted I was I was thinking about doing manic drama because and normally right kind of comedy drama romance and I really wanted to do something a little more dramatic and so I was playing with these characters of may and Michael and then that story kind of just you know like I said I wanted to kind of link hi your history how your family history FX your present and how you relate to people and and everybody thinks about that right now yeah you know jet it's you know it's a generational kind of story and I'm always kind of it you know exploring generational stories you know that was G. in the Jones as you know that was the weekend and you know I'm close to my mom and my mom was really close to her mom and I grew up knowing my great grandmother so like that that link is very strong for me is your grandmother still around no she passed away a few years ago yeah because when you love to know her reaction yeah I know it's probably hate it yeah there's the grandmother I guess there's no other way to say this about the film it is a romance and I have to say the sex in it is great to it is not like a Thomas yes but there's one major scene and I remember watching it without my producer Vanessa and after that was over we both turn to each other and we said well that was shot by a woman because it was tender and intimate and believable as a director how do what do you think and how do you approach sex in this movie I wanna get across intimacy you know I want to get across a woman's the filament you know I wanna protect my actors to feel not objectified but we're manta sized and what they're doing is a scary thing for you because lord knows a lot of sex has been done so badly yeah it's hard to do yeah I hated my worst day on set for sure really yeah because I'm just wanting to make sure that it that that's the day that like it really has to go right emotionally like I just wanna make sure I'm good to my actors that were in and out quickly that I get what I need without asking more for more than I need you know this checked on the sat you know there's just a lot of pieces that go in to make sure that everyone's comfortable and you know I mean I just feel like a lot of responsibility to my actors and actresses on set to make sure that it goes well um is it more a question of knowing what you don't need to shoot instead of what you need to shoot this work going on it's about knowing exactly what you want to put in on camera knowing you know an editing out editing it out in your head before you go in so you're not exploring right yeah I'm not using them to now yeah try thing yeah there is structured one of your leads in the photograph is east array and a lot of people may know her from the show does Saudi Robert thank but no one cares because I'm I have been a part of Amazon I reach for my she says that that's the survey on the HBO comedy in secure oesa has this very strong background in comedy and what convinced you that she was the right lead for this romantic drama I mean we'd work together and secure and you know we kind of did a like my first episode with her was like a bottle episode that wasn't really the typical in secure episode in she was just on a date for the most part for the whole thing with one guy and it was just interesting to see kind of the softer side of her that is and always explored on the show and and getting to know her you know she's like a Stanford graduate very smart very stoic at times you know there's just another side to her and another to her to you know to her range that I thought she could tap into mmhm yeah you've worked with a lot of comics people who are known for their comedy work us this year as a mater and Sherri shepherd what is it that you like about working in I love comedians I mean I am I would rather not be see if he is if I don't have to be I just relate to them I find that my writing has a you know there's always kind of dry under current of comedy to it no matter what so I find when I work with comedic actors they can always find the joke even if the line feels drier or flat yeah that's nice I also wonder too whether act for actors working in comedy feels a little bit like there in an isolation chamber in the they worry about being able to do other stuff as well and they're dying to get a different thing yeah I find comics are kind of fearless you know they they have to be I think it's this one of the most scary professions and I you know I I often think they can stretch the most and tap into the most in a you're listening to Q. on Lori brown in for Tom power and I'm here with still McGee the Canadian director behind the new film the photograph now to your story about that moment when you quit your day job to follow your dreams tell me about that day I'm I think they quit when I got into school I think when I got the acceptance letter into grad school for screenwriting I gave notice a thing of as working at Brooks brothers at the time and in I it's just something that I've been thinking about for a long time and when it finally came I was ready to go well yeah big change though yeah big changes showed up in London I've never even been there and I started school well how long were you at school are the program is around here and and I stayed in London for almost three yeah do you like the wind I love London I mean the best part about living there you can kinda go to Berlin on the weekend or you know to do a lot of traveling kind of stuck up a lot of experiences this movie took you to lie yeah how did it feel about being being back there as a director of you know I love peppering in my own life into things and so it was fine I guess Michael there's a there's a lot of me and Michael and that's me okay yeah yeah and it was fun you know kind of putting putting putting him in that situation that I've been in who let's hear a clip from your debut film let's go back to twenty sixteen this is a bit of gene the Joneses right now though mommy but if I don't ask wind should I make it

New York Stella Mcgee
"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For Tom power when Stella McGee was writing her latest movie of romantic drama called the photograph she stumbled across a secret right now our own family in a moment Stella will tell you how she wove that story into the plot of her movie plus when you were little what did you and your friends want to be when you grow up you probably remember astronauts presidents maybe ballerinas a lot of kids right now our US firing to become professional YouTube stars and today in honor of YouTube's fifteenth birthday you'll hear from someone who started down that path but decided to change course all that and so much more coming up on Q. live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jax beer even as the number of global corona virus cases continues to rise there are some reasons for optimism the epidemic may be easing world health officials say there appears to be a drop in the number of healthcare professionals contracting the virus the doctor Michael Ryan executive director of the World Health Organization says the reason isn't entirely clear there's been a rapid fall off in the number of cases and record and and health workers in the last two weeks this may reflect the increased levels of training increased levels of protection and also increased levels of awareness currently more than sixty six thousand cases of the disease have been reported with more than fifteen hundred deaths almost all in China the U. S. of there've been fifteen cases the centers for disease control and prevention says it will start testing for the virus at five locations including New York Los Angeles and Chicago Manhattan assistant district attorney Joan Illuzzi delivering her closing arguments in the trial of former Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein today NPR's rose Friedman was in the courtroom Joan Illuzzi painted once seen as a predator isolating tricking and in some cases forcing vulnerable women into unwanted sexual situations when steam is charged with five counts of rape and assault related to women in New York City he's maintained all his encounters were consensual and his defense is that the women are lying Lucy told the jury that the women had little to gain by coming forward that they sacrifice their dignity and their privacy in the name of justice if one scene is found guilty he faces up to life in prison the jury will begin deliberating next week rose Friedman NPR news New York house speaker Nancy Pelosi in a somewhat rare bit of bi partisanship is siding with the trump administration when it comes to Chinese telecom company Huawei speaking to an audience in Germany during an appearance at the Munich security conference well she said Chinese domination over five G. technology would be to choose a talker see over democracy and she said you S. as valid concerns over while way in social other countries nine states as recognize while way as a national security threat by putting it on our entity list restricting engagement with US companies closely saying nations cannot cede our telecommunications infrastructure to China for financial expediency the trump administration has expressed concerns while we could use its technology to spy on or seek to steal trade secrets from US companies retailers have a bit more to smile about in January with a modest uptick in sales over December as unseasonably warm weather in some parts of the country boosted sales of hardware and furniture stores commerce department reporting today retail sales rose three tenths of a percent last month over overall the increase was relatively restrained analysts will be watching to see what the number does in the months ahead stocks backed off some of their earlier lowest and the trading week on a mixed note down Jones industrial average fell twenty five points to twenty nine thousand three ninety eight the nasdaq was up nineteen points this is NPR this is W. NYC in New York I'm lance lucky as you've been hearing Manhattan prosecutors finish their closing argument today Harvey Weinstein's rape trial they argue that the media mogul thought he could get away with treating aspiring actresses like complete disposables but Wednesday defense attorney down a road to know said outside the courthouse that they didn't prove their case the evidence was all.

Tom power Stella McGee
"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Name is Tom power think back to like a first date that you've ever been on you know empty small talk a connection that feels sort of forced to get that person in your mind now imagine you were connected that person for the rest of your life in the new film queen and slam this young black couple are on a pretty clumsy tinder date I think it's fair to say pretty clumsy today around he's dropping her off at home a white police officer stops them for a minor driving infraction that cop orders the man out of his car and that's when things take a turn for the worse Lena wave run produce queen and slam you might know Linda from the Netflix master of none she won an Emmy for that and she's joining me in studio today hi hi good to see you again nice to see you too and by the way I think you've you've got married since I left side I have congratulations you somehow to go pretty well we invite anyone so was really you know out of them for which is great we want is that the trick to a good when he's about to invite me but I think so it is all we love I mean everybody in our lives but it just made it easier I want to talk about this from the course of I heard that the catalyst for the film Queensland was a conversation you had with the American writer James fried a party that what he said he just came up and said you do some self I was like I'm aware of where you are but he said he had side here for movie that he can write and so I inquired about with that idea was and he said he like as a black man black woman on the way home from the first day to get pulled over by police officer at the officer things escalate pretty quickly and the killing of self defense and they said to get the car and go and that was on the seat I needed he had outlined here he had a title yet couple things for and I was like don't want the title don't eat the online assessment that seed all right that movie and and I was cool amounts like look I'll share like a story by credit with these issues planted the seed but then task myself gone away and growing the tree by myself but ultimately queen is some of what was born out of that just it just I don't know it just it just opened up so many doors for me to explore so many things I have a ruminating on in terms of legacy immortality the fact that black death is more appreciated the black life and and also what it means to matter do you have to be in the world or is it okay just exist and and I think both are valid and these these are questions I want to ask you just a little bit further on the first I want to talk a little bit more about the two characters on the tender date black both from Cleveland Ohio well actually she's not only the Ohio he is she's they're working on the case so what's what's their dynamically our world that things are polar opposites he's religious he isn't it again she believes in being excellent he wonders why black people have to do that all the time we can just be ourselves and each he's very close to his family she's not she's very troubled family of a sort of a checkered past and and also and in the you know the north star for those characters you your mom Malcolm X. amount of the king you know she was Malcolm he was Martin and also about the film all of them to swap places so it really is a sort of Odyssey and it's also a meditation on blackness as well I want to take a listen to a clip for Queensland this is just moments after the shooting where are you calling to find somebody to call my family I don't know what we what.

Tom power
"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Has sent in for Tom power and I'm here with actor comedian and screen writer Julian bell hi Jillian thanks for having me our pleasure this is the part where I'm gonna in one introduce you to our audience for the obvious points are that you are a star on the TV show workaholics you've written for Saturday Night Live and please do not hold this against me I there's something else I noticed in your resume okay eight years ago you appeared in the hit comedy hit bridesmaids. in the film you played an unnamed character called girl at bridal shower that's true and funny story my dad who always used to go to the movies every Sunday when he was alive he went to see it this is the first time he was really seen me in a movie and he blinked and he missed me so he will. to go see the movie a second time and I told them what point to keep his eyes very wide open and then he saw me that's great and I also I bring it up because it's it's to show what you've been able to achieve in that period you've been perfecting your craft for quite some time just if you look back eight years and you look at now you were the lead in a new movie called Britney runs a marathon and you play Britney not all night do do not have a name of the title character it's wonderful the Britney runs marathon is based on the true story of a girl named Britney she feels stuck in life she feels like everyone else around her is moving forward and she isn't and she decides to shake things up by running the New York City marathon siliceous hero a clip of that let's get you healthy I want you to try losing fifty five pounds that's the weight of a Siberian husky you want me to pull a medium sized working dog off of my body..

Tom power Saturday Night Live Britney writer Julian bell Jillian New York City eight years fifty five pounds
"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In for Tom power there was a moment where Jennifer Padiham ski was living on her sister's couch she was frustrated fed up and close to quitting acting altogether she was constantly getting auditions for one type of role indigenous woman and a lot of these parts were just two dimensional correct it sure is that ended up going to non indigenous actors underneath all that despair and exhaustion and longing for the industry to change however there was the seed of another idea another option changing the industry herself today Jennifer's production company has told tons of indigenous stories that are complex and real she's worked on TV shows like moccasin flats empire of dirt and dance me outside last year actor on that's the union that represents Canadian actors gave Jennifer it's award for excellence Tom power talk to Jennifer but the first moment that she felt done with being type cast you know to be honest there are many moments here there are many many moments and it I guess it it began when I realized that I wasn't just you know a singer dancer actor with these dreams of you know being on Broadway and being in film and television I started to addition my first actual bonafide audition was here this in the CBC building for a movie called conspiracy of silence when I walked in the room there were all these you know beautiful native women actors and I was in this room with them and I kind of had this moment I was thinking wow this is my group Mike this is my group yeah and then it just kind of continued for years and years after that it was like I was I was only going out for those additions and often times those roles were being given to non indigenous actors which is was also a mounting frustration in this is still happening still happened still happening today so there was a moment where you went you know what I got to if this is going to change it's not gonna change by going to these audition rooms is gonna change if I yeah I think the moment was I was living in New York City on my sister's couch when she was doing rant on Broadway and I kind of thought you know what I I can't I can't do this anymore either I'm gonna quit forever and just like I don't know I don't know what I was thinking I would I would do but or I'm going to just try and change it and you know maybe try producing and then the world sort of exploded open for me as I manifested this idea of of producing and literally I believe the universe started putting things in my in my past that presented me with more opportunities to harness my in our producer in but it inspiring story you know like if you find yourself in a situation that you're not happy with you you take what it what what else he was a very big risk absolutely start from production of that let's play click this is but because of your own content one of your earlier works this is marks on plaque yeah your motion.

Tom power Jennifer Padiham
"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ted away. Oh in for Tom power. If you're feeling trapped somewhere between the bleakness of winter weeks, some vibes. Here's a song. That combines pretty dark lyrics with a fun uplifting. Sound here's vampire weekend with this? Is. Galley? Sheet known cheated known you. Me, but I've haven't seed through. Cadence weapon with his kroner mcdavid cadence weapon is known as the poet Rowley Pemberton he'll be sitting in for Tom power tomorrow as the guest host of this very show Angeline Ted away. Oh in for Tom power. One.

Tom power Angeline Ted Rowley Pemberton
"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Q. This is cute. You're listening to Q Tom power to you is one of the stars have pretty much the most charming show on Canadian television. No one is telling me to say that I promise Kim's convenience follows the life cream Canadian family that owns a corner store in downtown Toronto. And while it's definitely a funny show. It's also real about the dynamics of being family and walk into change in a generation, seeming know, something about that in his own family. He's by to talk about it and season three of Kim's convenience. Also Joseph shabby John had a tough conversation with his mother that you would dread having any not only had it. He's set it to music you'll hear more about that conversation house family feels about it all that. And so much more coming up on Q. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer in a wide ranging address using the Oval Office as a backdrop President Donald Trump tonight, laid out his case for the country for five point seven billion in funding for his border wall. President also blaming Democrats for government shutdown now close to being the longest in the nation's history is affecting hundreds of thousands of federal workers. Trump painting a picture of a southern border through which gangs, drugs and death. Reporting into the country, largely unfettered over the years, thousands of Americans have been brutally killed by those who illegally entered our country and thousands more lives will be lost. If we don't act right now. This is a humanitarian crisis a crisis of the heart and a crisis of the soul issuing the democratic response to the president's remarks. Both house speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer called on Trump reopen government immediately Shurmur accusing the president of sewing fear to take advantage of a crisis. He himself has in part created most presidents have used Oval Office addresses for noble purposes, this president just use the backdrop of the Oval Office to manufacture a crisis, stoke, fear and divert attention from the turmoil in his administration. The White House says Trump and vice President Mike Pence will meet with Republican senators at the capitol tomorrow president plans a trip to the US southern border on Thursday. At least half a dozen federal scientists were supposed to attend international climate science meeting this week NPR's. Rebecca hersher reports they're unable to travel due to the government shutdown leading climate scientists from all over the world are meeting in Vancouver there. The lead authors on the next international climate science report published by the United Nations in order to finish the report by the due date in twenty twenty one the authors need to write draft by this April. But at least seven US climate scientists who were supposed to help write it are not there. Scientists from Noah NASA and other federal agencies can't travel or work because of the government shutdown. Federal researchers were among the most experienced American scientists invited to the meeting Rebecca hersher, NPR news. It's been eight years since congresswoman Gabby giffords was shot and event in Tucson in today. Democrats and some Republicans your dues to measure to expand gun sale background checks to include the sale of firearms purchased online or at gun shows, California Democrat, Mike Thompson who wrote the memo. Set in the eight years since giffords attack thousands of Americans have lost their lives to gun violence over eight hundred thousand Americans have been the victim of gun violence all the time while congress stood by and did nothing Gifford said now is the time for Democrats and Republicans to join together to do something about gun violence. Stocks closed higher for a third straight session. The Dow was up two hundred and fifty six points. This is NPR and this is WNYC in New York. I'm Sean Carlson. New Bill set to go before the New York City council would make it easier for mayor de Blasio to raise money for his legal debts. Currently city officials are only allowed to accept donations of up to fifty dollars for legal defense funds councilman Stephen Levin, who's sponsoring the Bill says his plan would establish clear guidelines for all officials facing legal challenges we need a local law. So that public officials who may find themselves under investigation now or in the future are able to. To raise funds for their legal defense. Just like a private citizen would under eleven's Bill that donations would be capped at five thousand dollars. And the donors names would be published online. The will currently has about three hundred thousand dollars Neagle bills stemming from investigations into his political fund raising. The New York attorney general's office has announced a Brooklyn resident has been sentenced to sixty days in jail and five years of probation for deep theft. It is the first deaf ruling resulting from an investigation by the geez office. Authorities say Maryland Sanchez filed forged documents with the New York City registers office in order to gain ownership of to Brooklyn properties. Sanchez pleaded guilty last October to two counts of grand larceny in the second degree. In a statement attorney general Letitia James said, she was pleased. The properties will be transferred back to their original owners and encourage New Yorkers to protect themselves against quote potential foreclosure scams..

President Donald Trump NPR New York Kim Rebecca hersher US Tom power Gabby giffords Oval Office Maryland Sanchez Toronto vice President Brooklyn Jack Speer New York City council
Book excerpt: Michael Caine's "Blowing the Bloody Doors Off: And Other Lessons in Life"

Q

12:30 min | 2 years ago

Book excerpt: Michael Caine's "Blowing the Bloody Doors Off: And Other Lessons in Life"

"And in life, and you might have guessed it. The new book is called blowing the bloody doors off, Michael. Join Tom power from studio in London today. Right into it. Sir. Michael caine? Welcome to Q. Thank you very much. I'm so blowing the doors off is a book full of advice. And some of it is from you directly. Some of it is advice you've received over the years. Can you tell me about the advice? You got from John Wayne when you ran into him at the Beverly Hills hotel. Yeah. Yeah. He I just by Alfie, and I was in in in in Hollywood with nothing to do. I was going to a movie we Shirley, MacLaine it. She was late coming there. And I didn't know anybody so used to sit in the lobby looking for movie saws spotted John Wayne, and he was registered in a hotel Luca be said to be what's your name? K I said Michael Caine he said in that movie Alfie, and he said you got to be a star kid. So should thank you. Thanks very much. They said let me give you some advice. I should. Okay. Yeah. Fine months. He said, we talk talk low talk slow and does say too much. And he looked down at my shoes knows worry suede shoes. And he said a never wear suede shoes. He said never wear suede shoes. I said why not? He said because I just told you you're going to be famous you're going to be a stock it. He said you're going to be taken a p in the jets toilet demand. Next year is going to recognize your turn it. So Michael Cain is gonna pay all over your shoes. So don't wait. What a thing. It must be to have John Wayne tell you you're going to be a star. Hey was stunned in Hollywood. When I went there because I'd been a film fan on my life. But to actually go there and made them, you know, it was amazing. John Wayne is very kind to you. He gives you advice, even near death. Right. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I mean, my wife had pen to scientists and she was in hospital visitor. John Wayne was dying in the next room. And we used to walk up and down the corridor. You were pajamas and addressing gown in a cowboy hat in a hospital. He was dying. You know, and he said never worry about dying cages get on with your life. Just do what you wanna do because we're all gonna die. You know that I said, yes. Yes. John. And we say good bye. And I never saw him again. That's beautiful. That's an amazing story. There's a piece of acting advice that I really loved that you come to a few times in the book. So you're playing a drunk on stage the very beginning of your career. Oh, yeah. I would imagine playing a drunken stage like you would hiccuping and stumbling around, but you get a piece of advice and a piece of direction that you really think shaped your work forever. Right. Oh, I did it. I was in first little theatre version is a stage actor I was playing a drunk. We were rehearsing and came on and started in and said, wait a minute. My what are you doing? I said we'll drunkenness and he said, no, he said, you know, proper drunk a drunk is a man who is trying to speak, clearly and walk straight. You are an actor who's trying to mumble a book crooked and the other one he said to me a little later I seen in a play where I had to cry. And so I was crying. And then again, he stopped me said, what are you doing? I said we're not crying in. He said you're supposed to be a man crying. When a man cries. He will do anything not to cry. You are an actor who's doing anything to try cry. You said you got to run you go to run. And so he told me movie acting in two sentences. It feels like it's it's a much harder. What is required then what you originally doing? And it's almost like you have to act mostly inside of you. Oh, yeah. You you do I mean one of the things you gotta remember when you're rehearsing some some when I was in the theater is to look in the mirror Beethoven rehearsed. You know, an experienced tech said to me said never look at the mirror said never let anyone read the lines your lines back at you to rehearse. He said because you've got to remember when you hear the lines is conversation in a movie, that's the first time you ever heard that man say that. But you just got to know the answer to what he say. That's that's so fascinating. You talk about how you use real incidents from your life as an actor. For example, you use it dark memory from your childhood during World War Two when you want to conjure up h I should be clear. You you grew up in London. During World War Two. Tell me a little bit more about that. Oh, yeah. I was I'm a Londoner six when the war started and twelve when it ended, but I was evacuated a lot of the time. So. I was very lucky because the blitz wasn't continuous. There was always gaps because he they used to change the weapons, you know, to be it'd be incendiary for a while. A. Hi, explosives doodle bugs. And then the last one which will be the most worst one with the rockets. Well, it's an interesting point because you talk about using your experience as a soldier in Korea. When you want to feel fear as an actor. But is that a strange feeling being aware that you need to keep in touch with some of the most traumatic moments in your life in order to do your craft. Oh, yeah. I have an incident. I've never told anybody, including my wife, you've been married forty seven years what I do to make me cry. I think of something in my life, and I burst into tears it. It was so. And it wasn't even horrible or terrible. It was just very very sensitive. That's all I thought you were about to tell me just then now never told us. So. If I wanna be able to do it. But you know, what I mean, it's it's it's a funny thing in order to access this part of your craft. You actually do have to relive most most people would like to bury those away forever. Wait, I'm Stanislavsky method actor you you have to live on what happened in your life. What do you think growing up during the war did for you as an actor? It taught me every experience did you can feel right through a great joy and terrible agony an extreme fear. You know, it was it was terrible agony when the war. Started extreme fear all the way through an incredible joy when it finished. And so everything was in the extreme. I remember someone has a reporter said what what was it about? Oh, you guys in the sixties. But it was is people like me. I was the oldest of the sixties was born in the depression in the thirties. Six to twelve hours in a war. When I was eighteen I sent me defy in Korea. You know, when I got home the fifties in London rationing was still on the place was like a morgue vizo roads. And we were burning coal for heating. So smug every day every single day. There was smoke and disgusting place to be and then when we got to the sixties Khrushchev said, we have an atom bomb. You've got four minutes to live. So I suppose we also got formulas to live. We might as well have a good times. I always say that's how the sixties happened. We all had a fabulous time. Let's funny Roger Daltry from the who. And he said the same thing. He said he grew up with rations. He grew up. He said it made him grow up very short. So when time came that he could live life. He wanted to do as much as he could. But we've all exactly the same and the sixties wasn't mastered by anybody nobody thought of it while it was going on. Nobody wrote about. About it was only written about it was just thousands and thousands of working class. People said I've had enough we went we went out. And did what we wanted to do. The thing about the sixties. Everybody I met who is completely unknown became famous. I remember I was sharing. A fact we my friend Terence stamp, and he had a brother, and I was sitting with him. And I said, what do you want to do with your life? He said I'm going to be a music manager. I said, oh, really, you know, tell hoopla is going to be, you know, twenty year old company boy, ill educated and everything. Would never wait. You went to grammar school. Yeah. Yeah. So I said, oh, yeah. Well, good luck. Forgot about it. He said. My mate, we're going to be we've found an act last night. I said, oh, really what was it cold? He said to who. And I found in a pub I finished because he died recently, Chris Christine. But he died very successful and wealthy, man. Do you feel like the whole class thing, isn't as isn't as heavy as it was. When you first started. Oh my God. No, no, no, no. It's still there. But it has no power. I mean, nobody takes any notice of any judge because there are so or something even you know, take. Anyway, I didn't know whether to call you, sir. Now, everybody goes re Michael doug- used the title. So the book is called blowing the doors off Michael Caines Serb, sir. Michael Caine with. No alright. This book is about the lessons you learned throughout your career. So we've talked a little bit about the sixties, and and you coming up and breaking through and becoming this huge success. What I also find interesting is the later stages so in the nineties, you were looking at retiring from films altogether and your credit Jack Nicholson for bringing back from retirement, right? Yeah. Yeah. That's right. I when when is about sixty sixty one or something like that, I got a script producer send it back. So I don't want to do it. The part was too small, and he send it back saying I did want you to read the lover of what did you read the father? And so I suddenly realized up of a lover anymore. If you're going to be a movie star, you gotta get the girl. You know? Now, I'm going to be the father to go to hell with it. So every tired, and I went to Miami department and spend the Miami in the winter in Miami are stayed in London as well. But I had had a restaurant in London restaurant in in in Miami. And that was a success. And I wrote my autobiography at the end of my career, which was called the elephant to Hollywood because I come from a place in London, cool the elephant and castle. So I thought that was a good elephant to Hollywood. And so they're right in my book, and Jack meatless Lewisham is living the way man paint, we became friends and. Suddenly one day kind of got a script. He says it good good partner for you. You say. I live with blood and wine, and it was a very it wasn't a starring pie. Obviously Jack was the star. So I thought well, I'll do this is very good. I'm what I'd done is. I'd I'd made a mistake every tiring too soon. You know, because I went on to begin the second Academy Award for decide to house rules.

John Wayne London Hollywood Michael Caine Korea Miami Alfie Jack Nicholson Beverly Hills Hotel Michael Tom Power Michael Cain Academy Award Luca Shirley Roger Daltry Terence Stamp Michael Caines Serb Maclaine
"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Talia selangor in for tom power today on q if you happen to be in san diego california this week do not be alarmed if you see something a little out of the ordinary likes spiderman having coffee with joker or parley quinn holding the door for the hulk video game characters superheroes big blockbuster movie stars comecon opens tomorrow in san diego it's one of the biggest pop culture conferences in the world and if you've heard of or been to or dressed up at a con close to home before you might know that one of the trademarks of these conferences is the elaborate costumes that fans wear when they go it's called 'cause play and lauren or seaney is going to tell you how it all got started in this queue origin story lauren's journalists and 'cause player herself she even wrote a book about it called 'cause play the fantasy world of role play and as you're about to hear all these people wondering around in costumes it's not quite as out of the ordinary as you might think the first thing you realize when you walk into a comic convention is how not alone you are all around you there are thousands tens of thousands of people all who have something in common with you there's this energy in the air because you realize that sent you have something in common with everybody there everyone's a potential friend and then if you look a little closer you'll notice that you actually recognize a lot of the people there because they're all dressed like people you've seen before they're dressed like batman and superman vs faster than a speeding bullet and he's the super hero of gotham city are there dressed like even more obscure characters from japanese video game that you thought only you in twenty other people played too system these are called cost players whether it's for historical reenactment or religious ceremonies or costume parties or just halloween humans have been dressing up in costumes for centuries in fact so it's hard to pinpoint exactly where the idea of costs play the geeky version of dressing up really originated.

Talia selangor tom power california lauren san diego parley quinn seaney gotham
"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Sixty nine and for pri public radio international until i linger in for tom power naval with the place we'll let you do the king that is the king that's elvis presley with a bit of suede shoes the first song you here on his first studio albums came out in nineteen fiftysix a time of great change in the united states the population was exploding there was this real sense of growth and there was a feeling like the country was on the brink of something big and then along came elvis who to this day really personifies america for a lot of people he came from very little he worked really really hard and in nineteen fifty six he was about to become one of the most famous people in the world but as you might know dur his meteoric rise came his tragic fall you see all of that unfold in a new documentary called the king which traces elvis presley's life and death and uses it as a metaphor for the american dream eugene directly wrote directed and for deuce this film and as you're about to hear the metaphor he uses let's actually more relevant in complicated than ever red bull don't simple elvis presley means a lot of different things to a lot of different people when you're growing up what did elvis mean to you i was in love with elvis growing up i mean they're even high school yearbook pictures of me somewhere that i'll never show anybody of me trying to dress like elvis and do my hair like him and sort of embarrassing things like that but it came out of a deep love of not just elvis but of a certain style gic feeling that i had for what seemed maybe more inspired time than the seventies in an reagan eighties that i was coming of age in there's some flaws in that but i didn't know about the flaws at the time so my first love of elvis is he's the embodiment of that which one feels so strongly about the american dream the opportunity the chances for an everyday person to rise when did you become aware of some of the flaws i guess that you're mentioning with with elvis being a representative of the american dream it came in parallel with my own developing sense of the shortcomings in the american dream itself i come from holocaust refugees and refugees from russia onto the sars so we had all come to this country i'm i'm born here but my my parents and grandparents are are refugees and they came here because of the american dream and so that's beautiful but then they also came here and as sensitive people could see very quickly that it wasn't an american dream for everybody you know it was really for white men ray only only a certain range of white men not even yourselves as immigrants and so there was a certain need to understand right away and it was taught to my brothers and myself that our lives would only make sense if we were champions for the voiceless if we understood that this still was a work in progress here so my whole grownup life has been devoted.

tom power
"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Talia langer in for tom power today on q now you've probably heard about artists throwing themselves into their work before well you're about to hear from someone who literally physically inserts herself into her artwork rebecca belmore is an awardwinning amish matvey artist who's represented canada at some of the biggest art shows in the world she uses her art spark conversation about important issues she went spent ten hours hammering one thousand one hundred eighty one nails into a wooden log each nail representing missing or murdered indigenous woman you can count all those nails yourself when you see her new exhibit at the art gallery of on tario it's called rebecca belmore facing the monumental here's the thing though rebecca doesn't just throw her own body into her work her art demands that you do the same when you see her work on display you have to walk around it and and into it and you crane your neck to look all the way up to the top of it and not only does it get you looking but it gets you talking and feeling as it did for me yesterday seeing this tremendous work so i'm so thrilled to have rebecca belmore here live to tell you more about it rebecca welcome to q thank you thank you for having me yeah we're thrilled at your here so there are several videos of your performance pieces in this exhibit going back to nineteen ninety one and watching them i could see just how physical your work is you'll be submerged in water or kneeling the clothing on your body to a telephone pole or wrapping roles of kraft paper around a tree and another person tell me a little bit about why the use of your body is so important in your work well started making performance about late eighties and i did start withdrawing but i quickly switched to using my physical self in my work and my reason for doing that is that i wanted to assert my identity as indigenous woman to use myself was absolutely the best way to do that yet superior to see these these stories manifest in your body and you put yourself through a lot to do them on some of the performance pieces take place over ten or twelve hours so tell me what what you get out of it yourself by putting your body into your work in such a physically taxing way well as the maker of art as the maker of art i really interested in enjoying the process myself so i see myself as a worker as a i see this process of making art as my job so it's basically i really do to take very serious in the sense that this is what i do with my life the use of the word maker is so interesting to use that word before maker rather than create are on can you tell me about the the difference there difference for you well when i say maker or you know if i say i am the artist it means that i have a place i have a role to play responsibility a place within society our society whether that's indigenous or a global context so that's the thing that's interesting about your work to to me is that some of the some of the issues that you're art asks us to think about earn digits issues and they're not all indigenous issues and the way that you present them also makes indigenous issues at everyone's does that does that make sense to you but the way that i saw that's the way that i experienced what i saw yesterday i think what i'm trying to say is as indigenous people we are part of global community and so we to have a point of view that something to offer to other people yeah i wanna talk a bit about this twenty fourteen performance piece that you stayed where you hammered one thousand one hundred and eightyone nails into a log each nail representative murdered or missing indigenous woman based on an rcmp report from that time that performance to place over ten hours and by the end you had several hundred people on.

Talia langer tom power ten hours one thousand one hundred eight eightyone nails twelve hours
"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"The cbc radio show thanks a lot for streaming or downloading however who are consuming this name is tom power today on the show aaron sorkin i feel like i should be walking i say this and i feel i should be a little bit more eloquent because he's the king of that he's the king of this sometimes unbelievable but always so in rap during sort of powerful dialogue you might know him from like a few good men you can't handle the truth you know and all that stuff the social network that movie zuckerberg and the west wing but aaron sorkin he doesn't do this stuff by accident and he's a musician and he sort of puts time signatures like rights almost times interest meaning like the things that you used right used to denote whether you're songs in four four or three or four the meter of your of your music so the dialogue the the the actors are saying is actually scored like music i don't know this is the best i could possibly give you all at aaron sorkin tell you more about it in just a second also peer quander got on the line this morning your winters incredible musician from montreal but he was part of the protests of the montreal jazz festival i don't know if you know about the big scandal happened this week but there was a play being put on by much jazz festival by roy bear lapaz famed canadian playwright called slave which is sort of the story of the slave songs but the cast and crew was an all white cast and crew which got a lot of protests the montreal jazz has ended up canceling the performances of slave of rebel pasha's play pier cleaners is not only one of the people who protested but he's also performing at the montreal jazz festival so i'm grateful that he got on the line this morning nice and early for montreal to talk to us about that benjamin booker plays some songs debra granik she has a new film about getting off the grid which is ironic because this is a podcast but the show starts now.

tom power zuckerberg aaron sorkin montreal pasha benjamin booker roy bear
"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Desk were confessional names tom power when people think of in a going to use this word that i'm sure people have either used quietly or loudly or have done what i'm doing is talk rather million title when people talk about the ema music of the early odds you ban is often talked about and that's definitely how i first heard about your ban what a i'm curious headed how you look back at that did you feel in the moment that you were leading some kind of musical movement at the time did it feel like you're in the eye of a hurricane i felt like ours part of movement there for certain for sure what about your relationship with a word of his kind of route dancing around will ultimately was he what's relationship with a birdie mona i advocate i've always said a pretty good and i haven't always means yeah um at my relationship with eat most starts with being a fan of the bans came before that group of ants i just mentioned including my own sense field texas it's is the reason sunny day real estate uh mineral with a bans like that where we promise ring that we thought were we thought of as email and then when when that term was them up and it was a neutral term it was as neutral as saying um indy or something like that when the term was put on a apply to us we thought it was an misappropriation a little bit uh perhaps an error hesse will kids 'cause eating we healthy saw these ads in such high esteem then to be included in their ranks they must be wrong but they must be rather must be asked him but it was a we were it was there wasn't there that we didn't push back against it we were it was just too we're more confounded like are we are we lucky enough to be included in that group and we didn't i don't think any of us felt like we were exposed to be placed to latin think any of us felt like we were in league with our heroes and then a little while later uh you know the term i think at first was a neutral to affectionate one or the other you know.

misappropriation hesse tom power
"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"For deaths were confessional names tom power when people think of in a going to use this word that i'm sure people have either used quietly or loudly or have done what i'm doing is talk rather million title when people talk about the ema music of the early odds you ban is often talked about mess definitely how i first heard about your ban i'm curious headed how you look back at that did you feel in the moment that you were leading some kind of musical movement at the time did it feel like you're in the eye of a hurricane i felt like ours part of movement there for certain for sure what about your relationship with that word of his kind of route dancing around will out arkady was he what's relationship with a birdie mona i advocate i've always said a pretty good and i haven't always means yeah um at my relationship with eat most starts with being a fan of the bans came before that group of ants i just mentioned including my own sense field texas it's is the reason sunny day real estate uh mineral bans like that where we promise ring that we thought were we thought of as email and then when when that term was then up and it was a neutral term it was as neutral as saying them indy or something like that when the term was put on a apply to us we thought it was an misappropriation a little bit uh perhaps an error hesse will cause 'cause eating we healthy saw these ads in such high esteem than to be included in their ranks they must be wrong in they must be rather must be him but it was a we were it was there wasn't it that we didn't push back against it we were it was just two we're more confounded like are we are we lucky enough to be included in that group and we didn't i don't think any of us felt like we were exposed to be placed too lengthy of us felt like we were in league with our heroes and then a little while later uh you know the term i think at first was a neutral to affectionate one or the other you know.

arkady misappropriation hesse tom power
"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Rama at the dell with hometown glory you're listening to queue i'm tom power i'm speaking with eric radford he's an olympic pairs skater who will be performing to that song at the games m eric why did you decide to go with the dell um first of all we just love that song both megan an eye megan ashley is saw adel perform in like a small library here in montreal back in two thousand and seven way before she kind of you know hit a big and became super famous and that was one of the songs that really resonated with her and part of megan a ice story is just you know being small town kids that have kind of you know made it as far as we could in this sort of competitive world is skating and that message also resonates with us so it was just it's it's a i guess a one of those it goes without saying type of choices the other thing you can use easy cover beauty sarin yes why that one actually it was are accorded augur for that found that particular piece of music um i had heard a different version of uh with or without you is an or cash will version that didn't have any lyrics actually end our crowder for julian were caught found this version and again you know we sat there um um we listen to it altogether is a group for the first time and we you know he all actually cried or so emotionally touched by this version and it again resonated so strongly with what we were going through specifically in that moment.

Rama dell tom power eric radford megan ashley crowder montreal julian
"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"You know that ten thousand now is theory about genetic eml comply will attend the project as an hours into something you become an ex yeah and and i am not tightly believe in on a think look at the live aspects of it has become what it is because the amount of hours after israel just like playing too yeah no not even playing good gigs like i was playing a herman reply go scout one nine one turned up few a whole number of you play that you played a girl scout gig yet apply to goes scout was the latest geico played a plates at all played in a bingo whole inec collection on see we'd like to old women in the audience that were trying to play bingo ally all of those times like that so good experience in i had so like it it it will leads to where i am now and she says look at where he is now no more girl scout gigs for the best of cue that was tom power in conversation with singersongwriter ed sheeran ed scooped up to grammy nominations for his latest album divide and for you sheeran super fans out there you may recall that he had a small role on game of thrones as a bard pleased many people and that also upset many people come sums up 2017 in a nutshell right there that is it for today's podcast of hugh thanks again for tuning in tomorrow we'll have an interview with one of the top singersongwriter's in country music jason is bell you can find us online at cdc dot c a slash q on twitter cbc radio q facebook execute on cbc radio and on instagram at cb sikh you we really should standardize all these things you can follow me at at stand up alley and ali hassan see again tomorrow.

geico tom power twitter ali hassan israel herman grammy hugh
"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"tom power" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Hey this is golf and you're listening to queue with tom power yesterday in our studio an artist came in that you're probably gonna love especially if you love pop music and only if you don't already love her charlie xe x is a british singer who's been writing and recording some of the best pop music over the past few years it might have heard her song boom clapping on that one or you might have heard her on the big iggy azalea ahead i'm so fancy or an icon a pop track i love it from a few years back right now the charred is getting a lot of attention for her song boys especially its video and if you haven't seen it so the video for boys stars dozens of men people like mark robinson joe jonas resile made katryn nodded like really wellknown artist all doing these sort of sexy seductive poses their pouring milk on themselves they're licking guitars you get the idea here's charlie xe the xe talking about the video yeah i just wanted to use this chain see no i need to make a great pup video that to kinda like flip them out gay science had a little and play with days and kind of gender stereotypes are often seen in pop music videos unite know the gall said ike the sexy key props sometimes and hey i like topsy in the background or like ebola orinoco pm so was true you i'm i'm not like again strike sexiness in music videos a toll at some of my favorite music videos are like all about like sexy gals lie in ondo at dancing around like for example like the tainted love.

tom power pop music katryn ondo mark robinson joe jonas resile milk