20 Burst results for "Tom Mccarthy"

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

03:01 min | 9 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And be like i trust the sky until they start questioning who trusting and why and that was sort of instrumental. So there's only a couple of actors in the world that have that sort of weight and authority in a sense. So matt was the guy we went to i and he read it and got right back to me. It was literally like over a weekend. We were kind of making the movie. Wow a member. Because steve goal who passed away. I talked to steve. On friday and matt said yes. And steve said great. Let's get going monday. We're making the movie. And i said great and steve passed away on sunday. It was just horrible. It was the worst the worst such a good guy. I'm this amazing guy. And like you know what i loved about. Steve golan was he was the kind of. I met stephen a hotel new york and he said what are you got i go. I haven't written. But i liked this story about this roughneck ghost. Oklahoma had an old draft. I don't want you to see me. Start from scratch. And he said okay. Let's make it. And that was it. And i knew he was one of those guys that we were gonna make it and he said what do you need. I said you don't have to pay me. Just pay these french writers and we're good to go and he said okay and you know he had great taste but he also knew how to get movies made and and didn't necessarily wasn't thinking ahead of had market just wanted to tell original stories. i will. I couldn't see anybody else in the part which is always a testament to someone's performance certainly your direction and i generally have Ever since my first film accountable stupidly written with certain actors in mind and sometimes you get lucky. Sometimes you don't but it seemed like Matt saying yes really was the impetus for you to really push the film forward. And i just couldn't imagine about ills in the park. Yeah i mean look at that happens but looks right movies for other people and they say no. I've done it and then you're like oh but you realize you've written something so specific it starts to apply right and starts to play with matt. What made it so great was knowledge. You'd say yeah but like two weeks later. We're in oklahoma together like it's amazing for a guy that's done that many movies how passionate he is about every bit of the work like the details like he really wanted to dig in and like that's inspiring and you feel that all the way down like it's very generous and collaborative and creative spirit that sort of starts to inspire everyone you know question and you look at the actors that he's shared the screen with that he they. Everybody has such a different approach. Me and my world jeff. Bridges has a very different approach than robert divall. Yup and you have to understand how to direct just worked with bail on ford verse ferrari and i don't think i'm blowing matt out here. But he was just kept talking. About how great bail is now deep. Bail goes now. It's like you know you can do that right like you do it to your pretty good and like if you need to go that deep and just do it stop thinking about it and let yourself go there and and we literally you could just see his sort of you know..

steve matt Steve golan stephen Oklahoma new york Matt robert divall oklahoma jeff ford
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

07:51 min | 9 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"In the show and in the film right up to the Day players who just kind of come in and we used a lot of local casting in this because marseille who are excellent. What's yeah they were just great faces and great people and so game and so where he and every one of them because you know in marseille the dialects different so it wouldn't matter as much this audience but if you're from paris french people in here you know we needed that sound. I needed them to sound like they're from that region so the detective at the end. Yeah everybody there's just so many great roles that were just really enjoyable to cast. But i think with each actor it was like you know. We're talking about dissipated dinner but like with matt. It was just really felt like you know look. We went to oklahoma together matinee. We drove a row. I sat with roughnecks. We just kept talking talking talking really ultimately giving him permission to just not be matt damon. I think that was the biggest thing just like just everyday letting him know. You can totally get lost in this. No one here knows you. You're going to look different. You're gonna walk different. You're gonna move different. Your your rhythm is going to be different and your integrity will be different. What what you are is going to be different so it was really neat. Just giving him the sort of. I think not that he needs it but that little extra boost to kind of dive in come to that in a moment but in terms of having made all of your films here and then you go and you make a film in france. How difficult was it to communicate with the crew. Did you have a translator speaking french apart from. You're not that hard man. Those guys are just they're ballers there. They know how to make movies. They've been doing it for a long time. They make a lot of film community. They really embrace their own movies. They're movie is incredibly vibrant and they found a way and i spoke just enough to get by and it was really exciting. What happened really was interesting. This movie and steve goal and moan was my wonderful producer. Who passed away before we made. It sorta did back napkin and what it would cost and he just underestimated it because the cost of going to marseille was huge and so we had to shrink in a way. Our cost was going up and my crews were shrinking. And i remember film messina. My wonderful production designer called me. He's like so it was just like an independent movie now and i was like no. It's not an independent movie. Because we're spending way too much money and i would never get you and masa and wall all these other wonderful people in carin if it was an independent movie. I just couldn't afford you so we're european movie now so now. There's a lot of talented people working with less and being more hands on. So that means phil you're going to be on set with me. You're not going to be three days ahead of me. And it made a difference and you know masa always operates anyway so just like suddenly. My team was sort of more together all the time in terms of my keys and you could feel it in how we were and like deeply supported by our majority. French grew what i loved about the film as you have very direct and kind of unselfconsciously aesthetic Which is i mentioned to you. Last time i was on the stage before the pandemic i interviewed a clint eastwood for the film that he had. That was just coming out On richard jewel and it reminds me of his aesthetic. I mean if you look closely you think oh. This is a film that could have dreamt that it's it isn't showy but it's so powerful in so clear and what it wants to say Did you in. Mazda did whether films that you looked at. This is the third film and tom mentioned he. And i share cinematographer. Was this the third the third time you've worked with him. Not specifically. We do talk a lot on movies. There's none that like we kind of you know earmarked is like that's our aesthetic. I think we were just building on what we've done. Quite frankly and i think we both feel like you know we believe in stepping back and really letting the world and the actors play right in sort of giving them that space to do it and in this case we're very static in in oklahoma. We're using a slightly different and more thickly changed. And we're anamour. If it can oklahoma kind of wide frame with short depth of field just so we could just be really isolate matt really feel his isolation and his grounded nece and then then. When we got to marseilles we we went spherical went very hand-held went just moved the camera more. We wanted to feel the energy and it was a little dirtier. The frame was just thirty. Or which is marseille In a great way. So i think that's those are the kind of choices when trying to grab this. But they're still a classical storytelling approach to what i do. Even though this structure is very unclassical right the structure of the movie and is very unclassical. And its approach. So it's combining those those elements. And i think that is a bit of a nod european so making too right like what they do. So you know i think for all of us. It was really just trying to find a tone. I think tone is everything we knew we were going to be moving through genre and different story points and different moments that we're going to sort of be unexpected for an audience but the tone had to remain really i think that's always the directors greatest task right. Hold the tone. If you hold the tone and the performances of solid the audience will have a path the locations that you and your production designer really spectacular really grounded film in in a in a non terrific marseille which i really appreciate it. What were you. What were you looking for when you were scouting. Just that right. Not the postcard. We didn't want the postcard of the city or france. And we we knew. We were in american team primarily setting up there and we needed to feel authentic. This wasn't a backdrop right. It wasn't the born movies where drop in all these great european cities to great effect. I love those movies. This we need to feel inside we needed to live with it and it's incredibly subtle but it's incredibly specific right so we needed to kind of like we didn't shoot on a stage and in all of marseille every location was live and it was just like we were lucky as you said. We were fortunate to be able to do this to go find that and live in it and it certainly provides the actors which is so crucial to just this reality that they can live in and then finally you know matt's character. By the time it gets the marseille he was so formed. it was just fun watching him move through. The city was like sandwich bag. Even what's hat subway saying. Yeah but that was the thing we're like all right. Where was the subway okay. There's one three blocks down there. He would go there every single night because he has no no intent on sort of investing in the culture in any way until he's sort of finds himself there with version. I think it's one of the most immersive performances. I've seen from that in some time. Which is testament to your direction and script and both of you really doing the research to for him to be believable as someone who's roughnecks i. I bought every every moment of it in matt isn't a torey. Ously selective actor. What was the process of getting him. Attached had you send him scripts in the past. Have he has said we never worked out. Isn't it just know some of was timing. Is it always and everything. But this was really quick and he was sort of top on my list. I think we felt like we needed an actor of that stature. Not just to get the movie made. But i needed someone to audiences both in america and globally to be like. Oh he's a hero. He has integrity. He's going to do the right thing. Because we knew we're at a moment in time where we had to start subverting expectations not just cinematic but in terms of humanity you know we had to like weird where two different everything was sort of upside down so i want an audience to come in.

marseille steve goal oklahoma richard jewel matt matt damon nece carin messina france moan paris clint eastwood phil Mazda tom america
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

05:56 min | 9 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Allison who is imprisoned for murder. She claims she did not commit eager to regain her trust. Bill embarks on a mission to exonerate alison despite language barriers cultural differences and a complicated legal system in addition to stillwater. Mr mccarthy's other direct royal credits include the feature films the station. Agent the cobbler and timmy. Failure mistakes were made and episodes of thirteen reasons why he was nominated for the award for outstanding directory achievement theatrical feature film for his two thousand fifteen spotlight following a recent screening of the film at the theater in los angeles. Mr mccarthy's folkenflik. Director scott cooper about filming stillwater. Listen odd for their spoiler conversation. Good evening thank you very much. Thanks for coming out tonight. I said to tom i said i. I'll be surprised if anyone's here. In what a great turnout. Thank you guys for coming out to such a beautiful and powerful and in very human film. Tom and i had dinner just before. This and i said tom you've packed so much. Into into this film it starts off as this investigative thriller which of course. Tom does quite well with the beautiful foam spotlight. And then said yes. And then it segues into this kind of tender and an unexpected romance and then to this kind of on memory and kind of questions and america's moral authority. So what was the genesis of this film. Great question does the trailers led me to believe that. This was going to be something. And i'll get to it like a taken decidedly. Not that it's definitely not that And i love those movies. But yeah i don't cut the trailers Unfortunately who cuts trailers. But yeah this movie. It's been a long haul with this. When i started this ten years ago. Thinking about it worked. Was there another writer on it. Sort of rotor thriller based on the same story. At least the setup of the story about this man going to visit his daughter in prison. And then i just wasn't satisfied with it. I felt i didn't have a point of view on it. I i felt like it wasn't dimensional enough. I couldn't feel the humanity in the movie. And so i put down. And i've never really done that with script before. I normally just write them figuring out and then make them and this one. I just couldn't figure out. So put down for about six years. And i picked it up again in two thousand sixteen and the whole world started to change and i you know i reached out to to new writers. These are guys who collaborate. Jacques oh dr. Who's the director. I greatly admire from france. And i just sent them the draft. I said i'm not. I don't like the script but i like this setup. I like the idea. I like at the heart of it. This father daughter dysfunctional relationship. And these extreme circumstances and tomorrow bit again in no way. Deborah and i started working together and You know we. Suddenly i felt like i had something point of view on it which was like. Who is this guy from the middle of the country. What don't i understand about him. And what can i start to understand about him in this discussion and also as you point out at the time like america was suddenly everyone in the world was suddenly questioning are what we perceive to be our moral authority and i thought that played pretty well into the sort of mythic hero idea of american abroad guy emission. Getting it done moral imperative. This is the right thing to do at all costs and it just felt like the right time to have that conversation with an audience through this character. The screenwriters that you mentioned wrote rust and bone prophets and Depend movies that. I also really really great movies. So how'd for someone who writes his films as you generally by yourself. How did that come about you. Did you just call them up. And you call their agent. I literally just call the film to the email. I sent them a script and a really lame email and just said would you guys read this and can we talk and we did a very awkward zoom or. They were very french with me and they were squeezed into the frame together and they just sort of like you know they didn't like the script and tell you that yeah pretty much They're like we like the idea but we don't like it but they were. They were direct and more than that. There were incredibly specifically articulate about what wasn't working what they thought it could be and the way they diagnosed. It just really spoke to me. I was like okay. That's the movie i wanna make. I don't know what it is yet. So i flew to paris a couple of weeks later and we just sort of hold up in their place where they worked for about two weeks and just kind of like talked about the movie and everything And what it could be in. That was then spent another year kind of laying out the draft will having no idea what you wrote and what. They didn't knowing your films as well as i do. Which are always really character based in deeply humanistic and with really great minimal dialogue and then also knowing the films that they've that they've written and you can really see how these films benefit from both of your points of view. How did you divide the labor great question. It's really interesting because we had similar aesthetics systematically really appreciated their movies. I think they appreciate a mine. At least they said so. And you know i'm i. I'm as influenced by european films. As i am american cinema without question and also a big fan of french cinema so it was great because you know as writers i would. They would make these choices which i would be like. What are they doing. You can't do that and then be like an example. That's really interesting..

Mr mccarthy stillwater Director scott cooper tom Tom timmy Allison alison america los angeles Bill Jacques Deborah france paris
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:38 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"In front strangers entirely even. Don't forget this. Podcast is sponsored by better health. If you're feeling down emotionally out of sorts on line therapy can help better. Help is not a crisis line. It's not self help it's professional therapy done securely online you can start communicating and under forty eight hours wherever you are in the world schedule. Weekly video or phone sessions and change therapists for free if needed w t f listeners. Get ten percent off their first month of online therapy at better help. Dot com slash w. visit better h. e. l. p. dot com slash w. t.f. Now i will place him murky music on my little next guitar Boomer this monkey in the find a cat age everywhere man.

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:45 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"What <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> they want <Speech_Male> to cause out in <Speech_Male> the world if <Speech_Male> they're not especially if they're not <Speech_Male> creative and they just wanna <Speech_Male> start shit because they're <Speech_Male> sad and angry <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> you know that i <Speech_Male> think accounts for a lot <Speech_Male> like <Speech_Male> a lack of personal <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Not responsibility <Speech_Male> but ability <Speech_Male> to to <Speech_Male> deal with <Speech_Male> their own. What's going <Speech_Male> on in <Speech_Male> themselves. And <Speech_Male> i <SpeakerChange> think that's <Speech_Male> a lot of what the movie's <Speech_Male> about i think. So <Speech_Male> i think if you <Speech_Male> don't that's where <Speech_Male> sort of generational trauma <Speech_Male> and generational <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> decay <Speech_Male> starts. <Speech_Male> You know and i think that's <Speech_Male> what that's what <Speech_Male> happens in families <Speech_Male> and communities <Speech_Male> and even in countries <Speech_Male> and i think the right <Speech_Male> now we're at a point in this <Speech_Male> country where <SpeakerChange> we're having <Speech_Male> a reckoning. <Speech_Male> Yeah in <Speech_Male> some days hopeful <Speech_Male> some. 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It's all part of a <Speech_Male> similar conversation <Speech_Male> from all different angles <Speech_Male> and you know <Speech_Male> there's great representation <Speech_Male> just what you <Speech_Male> just cited right there <Speech_Male> and exciting representation <Speech_Male> in the best way. <Speech_Male> That's that's not <Speech_Male> sort of. <Speech_Male> it's it's organic. <Speech_Male> it's just <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it's just like artists. <Speech_Male> Having their moment. You <Speech_Male> know like sterling. Having <Speech_Male> his moment have any chance <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> go one to go. Look <Speech_Male> you got to go. <Speech_Male> You wanna go see you <Speech_Male> know it's like you when you were <Speech_Male> in the middle east and <Speech_Male> you were like oh <Speech_Male> my god an <Speech_Male> arab country wherever <Speech_Male> it is the. <Speech_Male> I don't do it enough <Speech_Male> yet. 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It's everything <Speech_Male> yeah great talking <Speech_Male> really <SpeakerChange> great <Speech_Music_Male> talking thank you. Thanks buddy. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Mccarthy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> does a great talk. <Speech_Music_Male> I enjoy <Speech_Music_Male> that guy and i got very <Speech_Music_Male> moved and <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> between Mccarthy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> does a great talk. <Speech_Music_Male> I enjoy <Speech_Music_Male> that guy and i got very <Speech_Music_Male> moved and <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> between us. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> We were talking <Speech_Male> about win after the <Speech_Male> interview on the porch <Speech_Music_Male> fucking <Speech_Male> started crying. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I guess that doesn't <Speech_Male> stop the crying in <Speech_Music_Male> front of people don't <Speech_Male> know that well <Speech_Male> crying in front <Speech_Male> strangers entirely <Speech_Male> even. <Speech_Male> Don't forget this. Podcast <Speech_Music_Male> is sponsored by better <Speech_Music_Male> health. If you're feeling <Speech_Music_Male> down emotionally <Speech_Music_Male> out of sorts on line <Speech_Music_Male> therapy can help <Speech_Male> better. Help is not <Speech_Music_Male> a crisis line.

middle east
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

06:56 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"The whole cast and I don't it's you know. I i find these times. I love the work. I love doing it all this part of it Seems a bit beyond me at times. Sure so what now. What are you actively. Engaged with a creatively as that radio thing. No now. I'm working on a tv project right now. Actually that i sort of started for some reason during cove it. And i'm kind of excited about but i don't think i can go deep on it. You know what it is. So you're sort of like you're in the groove of it. Yeah yeah yeah. Yeah and you did that that big that thirteen reasons. Why right yeah. You know a guy i know i. It was right after spotlight and brian. Yorkey is a really talented writer. Out of and came out of the theater musical theater. He reached out to me. And just said hey. I got this thing. I had to get there and can you help me. Get it there and We just kind of jumped in together. I direct the first couple episodes and I didn't know it was gonna have the impact it did and start the conversation. It did But it kind of blew up at one. Yeah and what was because there was a little like. Yeah Yeah yeah i mean. This show focuses on on the on a young woman. Book the book and a young woman who commit suicide and it's a really obviously powerful and Topic that the a lot of people feel strongly about and i think it played out in when that thing was released. Oh so right. So i remember so people thought you were gore flying a romanticized. I think so. I think some felt strongly about that in some people didn't some people thought especially i think the young people watching the show felt like no. This is the conversation talking about. I'm always. I'm always a fan of having the conversation I think that's more important. And i think that's our job is artist to kind of promote the conversation. No i i absolutely and i think that know. There is a an issue about that the dialogue around criticism in around you. You know that as as a like. I just had a conversation with ao scott. It was a different conversation. But but the the the idea that criticism is supposed to sort of also have its own language around evolution of art. Right yeah it. It's not designed to stifle creativity or to moralize necessarily so like you know. There's a risk that if these conversations around what can and can't be said culturally. Yup continue to push back. Yep creativity yeah that you know. We deny the exploration of the strike absolutely. It shuts down the conversation right now. We're seeing this our society and look. There's a lot of good happening. But there's a lot of like narrow lens. Focus on certain issues that i think are becoming so explosive for people that artists are feeling more and more tenuous about extending themselves in like. That's what we need to do. You know a white middle aged guy. I need to go explore other cultures and ideas to expand and hopefully to bring my self to that conversation and it's tricky to do. I think right now because there's just so many landmines and i feel like that that is making it You know it's something. A lot of us are talking about all the time where we have the right. Do what we can talk about. What the push back is soup. It's an incredibly tenuous. Artists is stuck in the middle of strange kind of Kind of viral explosion of particular public opinion. You might even be a minority situation on a platform that does not have a global impact or impact even A national right but but it it is antagonizing enough for the corporate overseers who facilitate the making of work to be nervous. Yeah so then you know. The artists stuck in the middle of like well. Fuck if the studio is going to get pissed off because yeah this thing is blowing up. I i believe my vision can transcend this and we'll add to the conversation. Yeah but now. We're stuck in this other. I'm in the middle of a conversation. That has nothing to do with what i'm doing. Which which is which is trying to have the conversation right which is trying to engage with the ideas. And like i you know. I talked to so many writers and filmmakers. Were feeling that pressure right now and it just and it's coming from all sides and and i think like as artists were always trying to liberate ourselves. We're trying to be. There's a there's a courage to like driving into ideas knowing we're not going to get everything right. never do you know. That's not our job to get it right. It's our job to kind of have the conversation to explore things to be curious and to push people to sort of look at themselves and look at others and think differently but with that you need to make mistakes. And i think we're getting to a place in this culture. It feels sometimes to me that like making mistakes can be critical and people are ready to jump on people who make mistakes That's i think can become problematic toll. Yeah i think that's why a lot of people just like to do their work and not talk that much. It's why sometimes even these situations just us throwing is around. It's a different time. it was ten years ago. I mean do you feel it on your show. Do you feel a reticence. Hesitancy a pressure either from yourself. Probably not at this point but from guests coming on. I'm curious can you feel people. Yes sometimes you know. And i and i certainly sensitive to some of you know but but the weird thing is like. I think generally irresponsible artists with some sensitivity. You know knows what's correct and what isn't and and his sensitive to real issues versus reactive issues but but alongside of that. It's so easily to be misinterpreted rightly so like it becomes tricky to even have a conversation about certain things i think so and i'll go step further than that like things are changing languages. Changing right language does and so. And you're right and we're gonna speak and we're going to say things we we have to evolve yes and we have to well but the problem is if the punishment is so swift and severe that making those mistakes. Sort of override the evolution. Then i think we're in a really bad situation. Then we're not growing in a healthy way. We're not expanding and exploring where sort of in a defensive posture. So people if they want people to change they've got to learn got. It's like okay. Examples can be made but then we have to continue learning. Yeah yeah and growing and most people will given the chance sure especially if they're not public people. Yeah if you give the exactly if you give them a second chance. But i think we're just feels like it's such a harsh climate right now. You can feel it. You know i feel like some of it is because of the isolation and the lack of human connection sitting across but also some of it is you. You know dealing with personal trauma. Like i talked about grief unresolved grief earlier that like what any individual is carrying with them and how that manifests in their behavior..

Yorkey ao scott gore brian
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

08:14 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"I wanted to sort of explore and ideas i wanted to explore in of screenplays suddenly started to come alive. It was interesting to me right but the more you acted because i mean he did a lot of acting before station it yep here and there but then like i mean the i would assume that the wire was a big deal like because i i remember that part and i i remember watching you in it and thinking like you know who's this guy. Yeah but But that was you were thinking. Who's this guy. I hate this guy i think. One of the more disliked characters on that show. Well you just saw the evolution of spineless right. Yeah i pity meet spinelessness. In fact i remember but not out of the gate right. It's sort of now. Slow earns love and in fact. I was editing my second film to visit visitor when david simon called and offered me that role at edition for a couple of the roles in the show and didn't get them and then he called me in that. I think i have the role for you. Have something you really connect with now looking back. Yeah it was always like. What did simon see me. I would capture that spinelessness but he did the same thing. Yell did. Cook at this spineless. Irish we need guys like this guys to puncture right there in the world. Yeah you're right. It is a tragic. They see my tragic flaw and they and they eating sad it is. It's painful the visitor. That was a great movie. Where did that you know where did you where did that. Where did the inspiration for that. Come from i was in the middle east screening the station agent. I was sent by the state department to screen the station. Agent with errol morris and the fog of war picture that double at the movie mcnamara. Yeah and so really weird. Double bill and i was spending time in lebanon and i was spending time and he's incredible communities of artists arab artists. And just thinking like wow. We're talking a lot about this part of the world. And i don't think we know these people like i want to start. I want to write a movie with some of these artists. And i started there and then i started thinking about the part that richard jenkins played in this professor. I just same way. I was talking about stillwater right. There's all these little pieces. I kinda magpie from in my life. And i started spending more and more time and then i was like what's going on with detention in this country and this was back in two thousand five two dozen for before really talking about it and i signed up for church in brooklyn to visit. I'm in new york to visit one of these detention facilities and it was horrifying. And i started. That started again sort of a little bit journalistic in. My research meaner viewing detainees interviewing people. Who were deported and started focusing on that and boy did that get worse. Whoever's why i mean well that's interesting too. That the like what i was talking about. The outside of this thing was that the exposure to other cultures art and artists. Yeah it you know as an american who you whether you admit it or not this sort of weird entitlement and you know even if you don't see yourself in that way there is a kind of perspective of there's a there's something myopic about just being american no matter what you are absolutely so you artists are left ear right or whatever but you know all of a sudden when you're like oh my god there. There's this entire like you know Called old culture of creativity and expression and and history that you know i know nothing about it it's enchanting and beautiful and yeah in crazy relevant. Yep yep it's really to be open to that is is profound. And i think that's what i'm sort of experiencing now because i'm always open but you get very kind of stuck in your your life in. What are you letting in how you gotta make choices. I'm gonna go do this year. I think it's the biggest problem maybe in this country today right at toyota aren't breaking out of their lane and look i'm guilty of it. Still when i dropped in oklahoma i was like oh man i i in some way felt i understood that place without actually going there and like you know likewise for them. The a bunch of these roughnecks in their in their family came into new york premiere and we had. I'm adam over. The house in brooklyn matt came over. We had dinner in the backyard had pizza and beer and just hung out. And like you know. I realized like most of them hadn't been to new york most of them. Hadn't you know had that experience and it was. It led to this really lovely late night thoughtful conversation about our differences and about our sort of isolation and are sort of silo in this country and as you said more with you know phones and and and and you know the interweb and all those things that divide us and legacy. It's gotten pretty critically bad right now. Well what's interesting is that you know i've talked about this with my producer brennan. Mcdonald's is that you know really the singularity is happened. Yeah it just you know. I don't know we were expecting something. More sifi yeah but we are now sort of thoroughly appendages of of of of a technological algorithm universe. Where you know. We're just all being pimped out by algorithms to the point. Where is very hard to decipher if we're honoring any of our own desires and or or pursuing any personal truth or being critical of anything coming in or what that information it's being tailored to us by machines. Yeah it's kind of fucking horrendous debt. You have to kind of conscious we go all right. I got a mind my mind and who has time to do that. All right in. Who has the sort of rigor to do that. Like most people don't even think that must realize it's happening right now right. I mean creativity and now enables you to do that. The life of an artist or a creator or i. It's your responsibility to react to that and we do almost innately. There's a pushback try to step out. Also right we're trying to step out and create a world. I mean there's not you have habits but ultimately if you're going to spend six months or a year making a movie yeah you know you're you're not just sitting at home festering about facebook. No no you're not and you can't really learn anything you get you know it's interesting with what the pandemic a couple ideas are starting to work on and i kept hitting walls. Yeah and i was like what the fuck is. Why am i hitting these walls like these are kind of ideas leaving the house. And i'm not interviewing anybody. I'm not going and sitting literally. That was it. yeah. I was doing this whole thing on. Low power. Radio is related to the low power radio stations and listening to these stations around the country which are super cool. And they're like just great radio stations. And i was like i cut stuck in my writing and i was like what's the matter and i'm like oh i'm not actually. I've never been to a low power radio station. What you mean not i mean regional or local or low power is something that started probably back in. I don't know two thousand ten ish went. Pirate radio was really trying to stir trying to halt. Pirate radio you know. And they started creating low power radio zones. Which is there like. They have a you know they have like. Fifty watt stations reached like a mile or a mile and a half. But they're they're all over the country right now really and they're amazing and so some of these radio stations like i was listening to in west virginia charleston west virginia which is just like an amazing radio station and just a wake up and put it on live. Radio library playing not cod cast. It's just like you guys inning in their backyard. They have a station little station or from their home but they kind of what's the following imagine. It's pretty local. But now i was listening. I started in van. And i started communicating with them and they would communicate back with me and started that you know but but i couldn't go down there. I couldn't sit in a room with them. I couldn't get my still haven't so what happens now. Has the movie. Doing i think the movies doing well. It's tucked really tough to tell and these times just because the box office gov it and who's going and who's not But i think we had a pretty good opening weekend as far as the studios gets there and they're really excited about it. They've all been calling me and you know the movies playing really well and i'm super proud of it. I'm super proud of matt's work in it..

david simon errol morris richard jenkins brooklyn new york stillwater state department lebanon simon middle east Cook toyota brennan oklahoma adam Mcdonald matt west virginia facebook
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

07:26 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"What we do like smart people who thought a lot more about theater acting writing and directing in a way whereas like oh. I love the way this. I remember james bundy. Who now runs the drama school year. My class and i would just listen to him. Talk and thank god that guy smart and i love the way. He articulates his ideas on performance. And what was the kernel of of this. This awakening. I in terms of like The art of it. What do you mean why. I mean like you're saying that like y- these were intelligent people talking about acting acting writing. So what was it that made you realize that you wanted to do or could do i think also because there was an intellectual side of the pursuit which i didn't realize the same with movies four years later that it was like suddenly i realized. Oh there's not just this emotional side to this work. But there's something deeply intellectual which i find fascinating i'm a very. I was always curious person. I'm like oh. This is where i can. I think i was curious. Person who wasn't always an intellectual person even in college. I didn't pursue as as even as philosophy major. I just didn't have the i didn't have the training i didn't have. I was like yeah rigorous enough as a person to dig in as deep as i should. I was immature immature. Drives me nuts man. Like you know. Because all i wanted was to be an intellectual but i didn't have the discipline it's not. I don't think tim maturity it's like in order to really be able to source what's necessary to be a traditional intellectual. You've got to do a lot of fucking reading dude. A lot of work. By the way i think you just cracked it. That's it for sure the that's where the charm comes in. Yeah fake it. Charm takes over when the intellect hits the walls mirisch right so it was like. Oh the charm i do. I adamantly here. I'm going to tell a story i'm going to be funny for about two minutes and that'll that'll make everyone forget. I was supposed to be smart. Yeah i feel like. I do that and qna's for when releasing movies all the film nerd question format. And i were just talking about this. Santa barbara yesterday. And i remember the first moment to santa barbara. Jim sheridan the great irish and jim. I remember i was on this panel with ham and anthony make gala and danny arcand directors. All so you know so far beyond. Jim does this thing. It's it's the actual. It's the perfect. Irish answered everything where they would any question they would ask. He would answer any way he wanted to. It had nothing to do with the question and he would just be charming and funny and finish and people will be like. Oh so warm. Irish so inviting and i was like i would be staring down the line being like he didn't answer the question. That was not a proper answer. And i thought oh. Jim hasn't mastered. Yes yes the great art of bullshitting totally totally. And he knew the a new gig guy knows how to make a movie. Obviously and the You know we just didn't didn't wanna play the game and it's great so but but when you write any place i wasn't your thing i wrote two one. Act play with a buddy at yale and it was the second one that we wrote together a out the ford brothers and p.t. Barnum in new york where i met peter dink lidge who then do then started my first film stace nature. You met him where he cast him. Tom thumb was a role in this play. That you wrote the one. And and i needed to tom thumb in new york city. And everyone's like you got see dink. He's great he's a theater actor jon. His nickname dink. Wow courage yeah well. I mean they're like in order to cast tom thumb properly. Ding sounded right. I said i gotta find him. I had to go find him. I had to go down and see this play. And he was in it and he was really good. And i'm like guys kind of a stud and and i met him afterwards. Cast in this play. We work together. We became friends and And then when i was writing station agent i started thinking of him for the role. So you actually you wrote you. Kind of yeah. He created a for him kind of dead. Yeah yeah yeah. Because i just hadn't seen it and i thought what i saw him when i directed him which i think now the world knows. Because of game of thrones was that like he was a leading man. Who's writing in you know in an unconventional way. And and he was just so a deeply soulful actor and i thought my god if i could capture this in a film and capture and so i started writing for him to transcend dwarfism some level or embrace it right everything right you know and just be. He'll humanized right. Yeah and you did it. Yeah we did it would. That would play. Involves tom thumb. What was the pitch on that it was. It was a play called the killing act about the ford brothers. Who killed jesse james coming to new york based on a true story in selling their act. They're killing barnum to barnum. And then what barnum did was spun it and each sold them not as heroes but as cowards which is now most people don't them as the coward the cowardly ford brothers right and we thought well a cool comment on fame and all that stuff and it was crazy. Interesting weird and you call yourself on and not intellectual. That's pretty thank you should. It was but you know we have that story but that was your own sort of like you comes from your curiosity that you know that you know you. You find things in the culture that that will that will enable you to execute these explorations of morality and humanity and and and and having a relationship that's kind of juiced up with something struggle all. That sounds great. Still wouldn't call me an intellectual right like you. And i know we know when we're around real intellectuals you're like wow that guy is a liquor and i can name many that you're just like oh that's a different kind of mind. That's a mind that. I will never have no no absolutely. I guess you're you're not intellectual but but it's but it's that's the artistic brain it's not the intellectual bright but the conversations that will come out of that inspiration you know in the intellectual circles be. You've done your part move the ball. I think so. I think so for me. It's a little more enjoyable absolutely. But like i i. I'm just thinking about what what does inspire. Because i'm i'm thinking about things that i get hung up on because when i put together an hour of stand up i've got you know i have to think in terms of themes and i have to feel that there's some engine driving it You know and i've become obsessed with you. Know the difference between what we do in our real lives and what we are reacting to That we put in our heads up that the the disparity is profound. Yeah and a and it speaks more to like what we were saying when you sit down with roughnecks as opposed to so there's something really kind of compelling about that lens i think so. Yeah well that's just what i'm just going back to the intellect i think no. I think you're absolutely right. But i think it's like for me and it sounds like you're the same like an anything i do. There just needs to be a little bit under the floorboards somebody operating that intellectually chase so first draft of stillwater was the straight up. I couldn't find that thing as reproached at six years later. I had a both point of view and i had questions..

james bundy tom thumb qna danny arcand peter dink lidge barnum Jim sheridan ford Jim Tom thumb Santa barbara santa barbara Barnum gala ham tim anthony Ding new york jim
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

06:52 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"This where mike. I'm doing something that i'm proud of. And so something filled up in me so for you is also linked to being recognized. Definitely you know. Because i worked hard and i always thought my comedy was worthy and i never knew like i knew. I wasn't an entertainer. But i thought i was culturally relevant. But that's relative to the cultural walking by you weren't an entertainer. I never thought of myself as an entertainer. I thought i thought of comedy is some kind of weird truth. Pulpit where the context was specifically you just you. You had to be funny but what was really going on. There was like i was. I needed to find myself and find myself in relation to the world. I live in and then share this journey with people and sometimes they got very dicey i mean i think back on it all the time. There was a. I was in boston at sort of at the beginning of my career working at a club. Doing whatever the fuck i did. I don't even know why. I was driven by anger. And and sort of like you know true. Yeah right that. And i get a set once and some guy who was you know local media position. I don't know who he was. Just he walked up to me and he looked at me he goes. Why comedy resonate with you. Because i still think about it. I'm like i don't know. I still don't know You know. I've gotten better at it. But i don't really feel like i do like many people and i don't think i'd do it for the reasons that many people do never was in it for the money. I just wanted to be a great comic and for me. Great comics did something more than just entertain. That's it yeah so when someone no there there. I don't know. I still don't quite know. I know that i'm doing good work. But you know relevant. I don't say that's safe to say you are sometimes some people but like the but then it's like whoa. I think you're right but it. My brain goes i. It's a small bunches. This small crew people that think think think that i'm relevant so then it comes to like you know how many of the world but then i know like i'm not for everybody. I'm barely for me. So like how you know what i mean i do. I do trust me as a filmmaker. You deal with that all the time especially i never think of myself as a filmmaker who puts myself out there into the world. I don't i just some filmmakers lead with their personality and integrate way and they lead with their brand for lack of a better word. I've never been that way. I love like you just said it. I've never thought about making money right. I just loved the work like i. You know i boston. College led me to that. I started acting. I'm like oh acting school. And then i had this dream like. Oh maybe i could be an actor in my. And i'm that would be amazing if i was an actor like that would be incredible. How does that happen. I mean so you're like you know you're a at the improv group is breaking apart. Yeah and then what do you do. I was i started always loved plays and i'm like why couldn't i do a play. Minneapolis then i moved to chicago. I'm going to move somewhere else. Movie chicago. I just started trying auditioning but i didn't know anything. Do stand up. No that would scare the shit. I did a lot of comedy and the impress stand up. Stand up just always scared the shit out of me. yeah now. And i just started acting and i thought okay. This is cool. I really dig this. Like i was pretty good at it. I started getting roles. And then when i and then i realize chicago. You started saying yeah. Why did you say it like that. That's a good theater town. No i know. I'm just doing it. No not at all like chicago. Turns out to be the sort of source of most of modern comedy and and so we ask all the shift from sort of like stand-up based product and sketch based product. Yeah it's different. Yeah like you had these this generation of standups who are these weird rogue characters that you primarily got into the racket because they couldn't get along with people and that sort of the focus of television In comedy shifted from there to these relatively emotionally healthy groups of people that knew how to work with each other and there were many tears if there was writing directing acting all in one package and the kind of left the the gypsy stand alone to figure out a new way. But that's how i and it's a great theater town. No i become a great friend of mine. Terrific artists that guy. He's he's he's solid guy and on so many levels it's crazy. Ah because he's like you know you talk to you know you hang out with me so like this good chicago. Is oklahoma guy right. Correct august osage. Yeah but but a great guy but yeah just a monumental talent. But i think he's emblematic of chicago like a blue collar theater artists town like they not fussy. They're not fancy they just work. They loved the work. I think that's probably where we're now. I think about it how i started and so i'm like i'm like oh just do the work and don't worry about the other shit right right. So where'd you. Where'd you start working. Did you do steppenwolf now. I never they never hired me. You weren't angry. That was not angry or cooling up more started doing plays. I was not a terrible inc. I guess you gotta you gotta be fueled by sweaty booze and yelling. Yeah you think about like I have that in my dna. But maybe not enough for steppenwolf at the time. And i just started doing plays at theaters. There and i loved it but i realized i didn't really know what i was doing. Like people kept using terminology and being like. What's the beat here. And i'm like what the fuck is a beat so you didn't so you had no acting training none not a day just being funny with a group of people and suddenly i was like with real hardcore theater people who understood it and we're very good at but he had a knack for it. I was. Yeah i did. Yeah i did. If it was getting roles yeah probably. I probably shouldn't have been so. I'm like okay. I'm pretty good at this. And then i thought. I need to get training and i went to yale drama school. I went to the place available. Which was and they. Let me in. Because literally walked into. That i probably would. Yeah i do think on some level though. Isn't everything a little luck on some level. Come on look good people out there right. I know but that program. There's like you know like twelve people in you've got to go through this panel of people that are pretty snooty so they gotta you got to that alone for me is that it's gotta be some luck involved because there's just no sense some nato of course but we can build this coupled with lot yes of course we can make a fix for one million dollars. Yeah i think that was and then that changed the course of everything once that happened then i was sort of run so that probably informed. Just being in that environment must have informed. You're writing as well everything because we're doing the of graduate training all that stuff. But i was also writing in the cabaret which is sort of a separate thing that you can do. But i think more than that. I was around people who are articulating..

chicago boston mike Minneapolis yale drama school oklahoma nato
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

06:46 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"It's not that they didn't acknowledge it mad. They didn't weren't horrified by but they never has to sort of as two partners sat down and said let's talk about this to catholics and how we feel any started had this long conversation and i just sat back and drake my copy and watching. I'll never forget that conversation. So i thought oh this is why you make the movie you kind of. Keep the conversation going. Obviously not enough has changed in that regard case and this is like two very thoughtful. You know loving caring people and good catholics. And they really hadn't had the deep discourse on it that i felt it deserved word. They ended up with it. Like you know like what what was the ark of that conversation where where did it. Land a bit unresolved. My father passed away before. I finish the movie. My yeah i know is always made me sad My mother came to the premier. It's actually nice story came at the premiere and was so overwhelmed by the movie. I think my father sometimes as a way of my mother processing. They work together. They work through things like good partners and she lost her voice at the premier like literally doug hysterical blindness historical voice loss literally in the course of the screening and i think by the end and it was a big premiere and there's partying and she. She struggled for that week of trying to understand where this put her in her community of catholics and friends and then in a kind of amazing moment father joe from her hair she drove into new york that next week and when it opened when saw the movie jelica drove right to. My mother's house knocked under door and said it's a good movie. You you should feel good about this. He basically absolve her and while she was back and she was my most. He's been my most ardent. supporters says. She needed father joe to to talk about a guy. I'm forever indebted to literally went to church with her the next week and thanked him these you. What did i remember my brother-in-law over my shoulder saying are you sure you're welcome here. And i ask a question. I don't know but i did it when thanked him and said amen. That was that was solid. I appreciate that that's interesting and say. Hey man i think i said hey father did you grow up with that guy. I mean we're not long. After i left i was an altar boy. Yeah and there's nothing. I was an altar by. That's it but that's that is and just the way you looked at me. Over your glasses that is the repercussion of of what went down for centuries and you know. I don't wait it's interesting that the compartmentalizing thing that you talk about because like i'm jewish and i'm like relatively unsophisticated in terms of knowing anything about you know the catholic church or even my own religion to a certain degree but i do know that the the older people know and i think they knew and and and that there was and they didn't know what to do with boys who were moving towards something that they saw the senate i'm not saying that pedophile homosexuals. But there was something about repressive sexuality that you know the way some men or boys were driven into the priesthood was dubious absolutely i mean. Look it's it's it was a total broken system. And i don't just mean just in terms of the church in terms of society right safe to be gay at the for for for hundreds of years right and it's fairly gotta have certain cities of course of course and many of these families. I think you're right they. They literally put their children in that situation. And then it just it just was corrosive like the catholic church didn't deal with it. Parishioners didn't deal with that. There was no transparency and honestly quite honestly not enough has changed in. That regard had not enough. A lot of young people are at risk and all these situations and we as a society are still choosing in many cases to look the other way. But one thing that's happened is a lot of people have have recalibrated their opinion and their approach in their commitment to the church. I would think i think so. I think this country churches recalibrate it. I think the church is like we're not going to change as much as people want so people can stay or they can leave. I think the churches rebranding. They're sort of like we're not about we. Might we might be downsizing. Yeah yeah yeah. it's a new non. Pedophilia catholic chart. If that's part of the new pitch so so you tell your folks like gonna do improv. Like why did you do in college in some silly group. Yeah it's not a silly group. I'm sure i guess it was a silly group now. I mean it was. It was a silly name. My mother's i'm just realizing you're right. It was a silly group. My mother's fleabag okay. And what would that was there. Forever is an improv. It's always anything like that. Met this group of people who still are dear friends today. Who still all work still are smart people who do comedy and acting and other things and that was the beginning for me that was like oh okay. This is i. I like this is different. You liked it and it was like a big group. Have many seven seven people men and women. Yeah and you're doing sketch. Sketch comedy improv improv. Yeah and he'd performing. It's kind of a big thing on campus. Like a lot of people you know. Polar was in that group. When she was there she started the year i left. I think are really nancy walls now. Nancy corral was gina. Senate it miley flanagan williamson's and actor you know you're in la so there was a lot of really talented people who came through that and more for me. It was just like you know. I was a kid from jersey. Who never thought of this stuff so suddenly i was like. Oh this is a different way of thinking looking at the world. Were you an english major. Something philosophy really yeah. I started in the business school. Because that's my you know. I'm the kind of irish catholic kid that went to bc with like three pairs of slacks yellow green. And red. right. I think in navy blue i think four i literally had slacks slacks. You mean like. I don't have a parachute completed chino and i mean i remember. My parents gave it to massacre. I don't think i'm gonna wear these very much. I don't think ever wore them but they everybody wore chinos fucking. Bc's like that. yeah you're right. It was the chino. Culture boat. Shoes and chino down collar right. Don't overdo it. Jeez it wasn't a guy that sounds like that. A navy green line. Bigger coming coming right ways i had. I still have one. I definitely had a navy blazer was like come on. That's the that's the uniform but yeah so you go there with that. I started in the business school. I had a great oxfordshire vassar. Many oxford shirts the best teacher. I had a busy one of them. Here was a business school professor accounting finance guy. Who'd basically pulled me in his office and like just said don't do this..

doug hysterical jelica joe nancy walls Nancy corral new york miley flanagan williamson catholic church senate gina navy Senate la jersey oxford
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

05:49 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Yeah you know. And deep gone tie. And i didn't have that and i always felt like you know i i. I'm the guy she died with. I don't have this long life where you know it was rough man is. This is something you'll ever examined in any way To work the right. And i've been trying to you know i mean i'm sadly i'm a comic. So what do you do with that. How do you process that on on stage. And i've been sort of doing it you know. I've been emphasizing through hours and hours. Because like i do think that grief is underrepresented In the in the sense that it's something that we are all going to experience one way or the other you know and the one thing that got me through this thing was realizing like this is not unusual. It's sad and tragic but losing people in grief. It's not it's human right. But i mean you are comic but you're also a very good actor sure right and there's other ways of expressing. I just curious. Because i know you've been talking a lot about that way and i'm just wondering if there's other long-form way because i mean i don't know if it's going to be in writing. I did small movie Which i brought a lot of it to that. I think it's it's opened something up in me. That's not that's good and probably isn't gonna close you don't let it become bitterness. Yep yeah so but like in speaking of how you got to be like. You know somebody who tell stories that that wasn't the original intention. Was it for you know. I mean like how did you come up. Where'd you grow up. I grew up in new jersey. A jersey jersey. what part of jersey new providence. Where does that. What county union county. A really. yeah he would jersey guy. I'm born in jersey. Morris county is haunting lakes from my mother's from that my dad's from jersey city. Yeah yeah come genetically jersey jersey in me. Yeah you're d you spent any. How long were you there. Your whole child today until i went to college. So it's it jerseys all right. I like jersey. People come out of jersey. You came out of jersey a lush i. it is such a unique place and it's such a unique personality. And yeah i. But i know that no one i knew. Did this or anything like this. I had no you know. I didn't think about this on my brothers and sisters. I got three brothers and a sister. Big irish catholic family but none of them went into show business now. What what did your parents do. My dad was in textiles. My mom was a housewife textiles. Me like towels and sheets and things. Like manufacturing on the corporate side. He didn't actually work that out so they sold the goods to people that put their like an office in new york. And you have. These companies drove into the city. Every day commuter guy took the train erie lackawanna back in the day. Yeah it was cool. You know it was like. I don't know when i told them i was doing this. They sort of just looked at me. Just blankly just almost. Not even in wigan. Would you tell them you're going to. Do you know what i started to do. I started to do improv comedy. And i got out of college and i say i'm gonna go work with this improv comedy group. Where'd you where'd you go to college. Boston college undergrad catholic genius. Yes straying joy. You know that it's like i was down the street. You don't hear that now says acquaintance ats. I was down the street. Be biju for us. Jewish kids couldn't quite make the grade be used like this great sort of middle class jewish repository of kids who disappointed their parents. Yeah it's great. Play was an interesting place to go to school. I i enjoy. Enjoy the education looking back. It was wonderful school. Maybe a bit modulus in terms of the type of people hasty little space the in a way the jesuits are very interesting people. There are an interesting folks. how so learned. yeah. I did yeah heavy duty. Heavy duty So when you got to college like you you you. I started to separate a bit but you naturally had respect for the jesuits he'll do. I still do for the catholic church. But i'm just. I'm not really practicing catholics even after spotlight. Even after you immersed yourself in your spouse or winning movie seal the deal now. I mean by that point. You know actually part of the reason i wanted to make it. I remember. my father passed away. When i decided i was going to do that movie. Because they were very good catholics. And i realize how important the catholic church to a lot of people and i went out and i sat with him at a diner and said i'm going to direct this movie and As soon as they announced. It's going to get a lot of press. And i want you to know about it and some catholics probably won't be happy about it and i'm gonna do my best. It was a brand of intense conversation. And then he said you better go talk to father. Immediately he no. He grabbed by the scruff of my neck. Took me over to the church. No he said that he said look. I'm down. I said i understand. Why do you want to do it. And like just represent all sides you know and i said look. It's not a movie. If i just pillar right like i've got there's got to be a bigger conversation there. And he understood that what was his wh- how did your fam fam. Your parents generation respond to the reality of what was the sexual abuse. Yeah you know what's fascinating about. My father sat with me for this old school. We went to the diner. Two guys are recovering jersey. Yep evidence old glory and we talked about this and then my mother joined at some point. I don't know if this was planned but suddenly she she'll go and you know at this point. I don't know. I'm forty something years old and this is just bizarre. I'm talking to my. I'm like pitching my movie to my parents but we started talking about an and it led to a conversation about the sexual abuse scandals in the catholic church and i realized they had never had a deep conversation about. I think they just put it in a box..

jersey jersey jersey erie lackawanna new providence biju Morris county union county jersey city new jersey wigan Boston college new york catholic church
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

05:21 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"I think so. I think they're more human movies. They're just there and there's empathy like bill baker who matt damon is a very flawed character. But he's dimensional character but he's also like fails. Yeah i mean. I mean that that is the whole thing is like once you realize where you are in that. Move your like. He's not this is not how you go about doing. It creates realtor and in those moments. Were matt so i can off sorry. I like where he does things that he again knows. Noser wrong and they're going to he he tries be doesn't think things through yeah. I think you're right. I look. I think there's a fallibility to us all and i think now is the guy with two young daughters. You'd think oh man. I just screw up all the time i do the wrong things. I say the wrong things i act out in the wrong way. And you're you know when you got little people staring at you you're really. I'm really conscious. So those scenes with him and his daughter to me. I think it's the thing matt probably connected with. I in the script. Or just heartbreaking. To me they're heartbreaking. You know look again. It was interesting. You know when when we started working on the original draft of this. We were all listening to podcasts. And by that. I mean like long-form story podcasts. S town cereal though singer kind of just talking about it and the craze of it and we're like This is cool. How these things start off is thing and become something else and they keep evolving and suddenly like. I don't care what they're talking about. I'm deeply involved. It starts as a mystery. And i love story and whatever and we were just really into these things more like. Why can't that be our template here. Why can't that be are sort of cinematic tempo interesting and let this sort of let this movie changing lanes and become more human when it needs to. Because we knew we weren't just interested in the straight up thriller. We weren't into that has been done and done well. This isn't just an american on a mission. This what you you almost inverted the through a definitely right. Well yeah because well. That's interesting so that was the template is you realize. Why can we know. We have a certain amount of freedom narrative you. We're not beholden to anything that you know. This is set up to be a rescue mission. But but what it's really about is is this guy's journey to possible journey to his own personal freedom and the littoral attempt to free his daughter. No question look and what normally happens on those missions. The mission is the story. This is what happens because we all have other life around our missions. We hold his other life around it. Let's continue to keep that alive. Let's continue to explore that because ultimately that's where the pain comes from at the end. And i think that's what separates this movie from just a particular genre so human drama that than it is and i. I didn't see you know a genre and i didn't see also i i. It's also like talking with that. We did in the kitchen about peak. This is also a grief movie definitely. And i'm just finding in life that most people are carrying around unresolved grief and if you start to look at that like how who knows how to handle that shit yet because you know you got to suck it up and live But like you know. I recently had a revelation about my mother's boyfriend. I'm like. Oh my god. If i look at his life you know grief is going to twist you in ways. You can't imagine you don't process. Yep yeah i think you're right. And look i think sometimes it's beyond us to take the proper steps to cope. You know unless we really have set up in our life right that really forces us and then so sometimes as in movies i think as in the story events happened to us. If we're lucky that push us to confront these things it's painful but it like forces our hand a little bit us out of our lane a little bit and makes us and it doesn't mean we're going to be necessarily better for it but we are going to start to understand and be more in touch with which is at least a silver lining that's hopeful maybe beaten into humility. Maybe maybe but you might not know it right. And that's the worst part is i. Give life this beating you into humility. But you're the last to know comedy of errors. Everyone sort of like when is he poor. He's walking dead walking dead. Yeah so you mentioned that You got to know. Lynn shelton a bit. I did i did i. You know it's been a fan of your show for a while. And i you know again tragedies a funny thing. I didn't shout when when lin pasini was everyone. Just you know broken hearted about it but it was interesting we met. I met her randomly one night at eight. I was invited by edgar right. Paul rudd and want to see. Paul simon play and i remember. I was a big fan of her movies. We met in l. a. One night randomly and had a nice chat and she showed up. She was the fourth and we had the best time. We went to the soft. Paul simon his last concerts for dinner talked all night. The four of us. Yes geeked out and started this great funny new relationship and then i'm on. I think what's called the old people's social media marco polo. Yes she loved that thing. I'm not on it but she was. I don't do it with anyone. I have two groups of friends with. That's it and one day. I get smarter polar. She's like tell me. This can't be you because i don't have any social media presence and she's like you're not on this and it started this very funny back and forth with her at random times and just go and it was like i. Finally my wife's like who's on your mark ball. Mike this group this group and lend shell. I don't know why she's become this thing she's like..

Noser bill baker matt matt damon Lynn shelton lin pasini Paul simon Paul rudd edgar marco polo Mike
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

07:39 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Officially council. What happened and then can come in what happened. That's our plan. Everything in my literally. Sounds like everything in my life. Was there reason. Was there panic. There was no panic about this. I mean no no fan and get nervous about doing things when i lecture like But there was more. I didn't know i was going to stay till monday. Okay he's been driving this release. The and i was like maybe i just want to get back to new york. Can then right now. let's stay into it. That was the decision. So it's all personal. My longtime editor. Tom mcardle yeah. He somehow caught wind. I was gonna do it. I think he had matt's interview and you mentioned it. Yeah and so. He shot media mail. It's like you gotta do that right right. He he i think he was. Maybe the first person who mentioned your podcast me. Oh yeah because i had made this assumption on my gosh it. This like what is happening. Is there panic at the studio. Because it's all me all. I thought we had something to do with the amanda knox tweets. It's you know we don't need to dwell on that but that was my assumption. Sort of like. Here's what i do like the studio said this. We have got gotta do some damage control but but it's an interesting topic about inspiration you know. And and the difference between you know inspiration life story and also the difference between sort of like Art and life. Yeah what what was your reaction to that. Just that like sort of analyzing that a little bit like look. I you know first of all i. I really empathize with her feelings. And the circumstances around all that yes. It's tragic horrible traumatic but still waters will work. Fiction writes it. And i think with everything in my life. I'm pulling sort of magpie buying as you are. We all are from different things. So one of the biggest. Inspirations for this was a conversation. I had with a relative of mine whose father like really struggled with addiction and there and i always knew it and i i finally said hey could we just do like three one our phone calls and you just lay out that relationship with me and it was. It was the most it was the deep she ever went on. It was like really beautiful. Her father yeah about her relationship with her father and how dysfunctional it was and what that meant and it provides so much. And i'm like okay. That's the relationship. I wanna explore in this movie and so that was a big piece of this and then i would say you know. Of course that story was sort of in the headlines. You know her story in the headlines. A lot riding the trial was going on so that was a piece of like like that relationship. I like these two people father and daughter being sell together that was critical to you with great dysfunction ingredient pain and then like an another example would be like i read this amazing book that dealt with like a psychologist from berkeley who went to rural louisiana and like embedded with tea party. You know members understand them with empathy and it was like this incredible distillation of like their situation. And i'm like okay. This is two thousand. Sixteen when i re engage with the script. I two french writers. And i'm like okay. This is at the heart of it. Like we've got this woman in a cell we've got this father daughter huge dysfunction and we've got this philosophy of middle american that that is so well articulated. Let's try to unpack. Well interesting thing about the film was that you know it is not political film. It's not a political character. And you make assumptions about it. Because i remember people are like Calling it a trumpy movie and thanks for that at all. Because that's the way you know. A black and white tribal culture thinks that like they're willing to write off any character that wears a hat or those glasses as being a indicating something whereas why the in the scene where it's addressed which. I thought was kind of great where the french people like. We have to ask this right and his answer again was sort of like you. Don't really know how he feels because of what he's enabled to say in that moment and i don't wanna ruin it for anybody but but there's a lot of that going on the film like you like. I talked to mad about it. Where where the viewer this. You don't even know what the fuck is happening for. Fifteen minutes and i think that's a that's a great thing and a testament to your writing must have been something that you had to craft fairly carefully yet very much like you're like i you know i. It's sort of like where we going. What's going on. who is this guy. Who's that lady. Where's the money coming from. Why why does he know marseille out of this guy. Why does this guy travel to france and look. I'll say this about that. When i re approach the script i i started at ten years ago. Put it down starting from scratch in two thousand sixteen and i. I've been to marseille at that point. Five or six times. I knew mar research just just hanging out in the city this process with all movie. It's very it's very journalists like this is like a. This is at work of fiction. I mean spotlight was different. Spotlight was different spotlight. Okay so going back to what you asked about. What this is based on spotlight was a true story based on real people right do that. I engage them. I know i'm writing about real people. I am going to tell their story. I gotta be factually. Accurate spotlight was that this was fiction. And the way i build. That is like so. Yeah ten years ago hanging out. Marseille learning the city. But when i picked up the script in two thousand sixteen i realized i hadn't been oklahoma like i'm like i said to my wife. I literally got damn like. Oh my god. I know marseille. Maybe better than oklahoma and i got off the plane there and you realize you realize how big this country s right the and i'm like i don't know this place at all and and i started setting up these interviews with roughnecks in my sister and track down ex but i mean it's so you set up interviews at roughneck that's not. I'll tell you one thing. That's not something that happens in a roughnecks wife every day and i imagine it's not something they have sort of a general. Let's just get to know each other chat. I wanna know what makes you guys take. It was kind of that. Yeah it was literally. Do you set those interviews up. When they go she got to an oilfield. No i set it up at a barbecue joint in the small town of barbecue joint and they were they go. We would just set up these locations. And i'd met one or two oil rig workers roughnecks and then what they would do which just call their friends and say. Hey man go to this barbecue place at one o'clock and talk to this guy tom. He's okay he's okay and they would sit with me and i would just have these interviews. And he's he's not out to fuck no they you know. I'm sure you mentioned you know when i first started going there. And showing up they weren't a little reticent learned director from brooklyn it took him a little bit to open up but by the time you know four five six visits and then i brought matt you know they started to matter like all right. They were pretty good about it. I mean what what was the interview. I mean what what did what everyone was different. Because each one of these guys that are drastically different personality and come back and so these guys were still you know. Some of these guys were pretty broken damage. Some these guys really got their shit together. Yeah roughnecks just a background on these guys like they're an iconic like persona in oklahoma and like most of a lot of them at least going back away from kenny baker and ryan and these guys who was meeting with. We're breaking out. They didn't graduate high school. They got right to work. Know they didn't know interesting very specific type of of of weird challenging dirty work huge hugely hugely. Gotta have a trump game and you gotta be strong to be tough and by the way. I think the one thing these guys probably mostly stuff is their work ethic. Yeah so these guys get out of high school..

Officially council Tom mcardle amanda knox matt marseille tea party berkeley new york louisiana oklahoma Marseille france tom brooklyn kenny baker ryan
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:31 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"It senior. Jerry wexler jerry. Wexler i play jerry. Wexler from new york He was the Producer and One of the partners at Atlantic records. I listen folks. Tom mccarthy is my guest today and right off the bat here at the beginning of the interview. We talk about the the amanda knox thing now for those of you who don't know a couple of weeks ago. Tom did an interview with vanity fair and they asked him they asked him. You know if the movie was inspired by amanda knox's false conviction and imprisonment in italy and tom talked about how some aspects of that true story inspired him in thinking about the script for still water which is not that story i. It's not her story. When the article came out It it you know. In a click beatty way really played up that aspect of the interview making it the headline of the peace and talking about it being inspired by the amanda knox saga quote unquote and then You know understandably. Amanda knox herself had a very negative reaction to that piece and she wrote a series of tweets explaining why she felt the promotion of the movie in. This interview was exploiting her right down to the magazine calling her real life ordeal a saga a quote unquote saga. It's definitely worth reading her tweets about it and i would. I would suggest you do that. Well when all that went down suddenly our interview with. Tom got cancelled which we just figured was because they didn't want him doing anymore publicity about the film because of this swirling buzz but within a couple of hours we got notified that it was back on and that tom specifically pushed to have the interview on cancelled to un. Cancel the interview. So that's really where we enter this conversation. It's the first thing we talk about Here at the beginning this talk and we got right into the idea of what inspired the movie and whether or not the film is exploiting a real life situation so you can decide for yourself because you can see still water in theaters now. And this is me talking to tom. Mccarthy you did this you cancelled and then you're back. Did officially cancel. It was.

amanda knox Wexler Jerry wexler jerry Tom mccarthy Atlantic records Tom jerry tom beatty new york italy un Mccarthy
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:53 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"All right led do this. How are you. What the fuckers. What the fuck buddies. What the fuck knicks. what's happening. I'm mark mayor and this is my podcast. Wpf welcome to it. How's it going guys. Okay would you do this weekend did you. Are you are you out there. Dodging the delta. Wait for the omega. Wait for the omega. it's gonna burn your face off. I was out. I was out in the world. I'm sorry i don't mean to make light but sometimes what to do today on the show. I talked to tom mccarthy. Rit you know his work. He just i just saw stillwater and i really enjoyed the the writing which he did as well And directing. that was great I also his movie spotlight. He's a jersey guy he was he. He began working Doing sketch comedy in college. He's an actor. And all around interesting guy. Also a friend of lynn shelton's which i didn't fully realize until he mentioned it. He also directed the station agent Oh yeah and the visitor and win win. And i believe he co up due to talented dude I will get into what went down around this booking a little bit more before the interview because he was booked and there were some online controversy about the movie still water and then suddenly he wasn't booked and then he was booked. But i'll talk about that in a second. Let's talk about denver denver colorado. So i've had some thoughts right as many of you know about a week. After the comedy store opened. I started back up. I started going at it. Getting you know getting strong again. Getting my My muscle memory back in my chops together. Getting my calluses back for doing the stand up comedy at the nightclubs and then i did four shows. over the course of four thursdays in july dynasty typewriter. So once i got my calluses back. I just started doing the big riffs. Big riffing our twenty our twenty five working through the new material new thoughts the pain the glory the the confusion all of it dumped it into the big our riffs and then like as per how i was trained as to how as per how i came up. You know when you got the shit going. How do you tested out. Well you got to go to a comedy club. Look man comedy clubs honestly are still the best place to see. Stand up comedy you know once we polish it and it gets to a theater. It's a different thing. There's no frenzy. It's a it's a set piece for the most part a little room for a little riffing but for the most part you when you're out of theater you want to present the good thing the whole thing. The polish thing the thing as it comes together in the clubs. Sometimes you don't know what the fuck is going to happen. You try to seek. What's it ordering adnew. But i gotta be honest with you man. I hadn't been at a comedy club in a while over a year now. There's always been the way. I've done it man you'll work it out in the clubs and since i've been able to do theaters take it to the theater. And sometimes you work out more theater. But mostly it's in the trenches. And i had feelings had some feelings man i spiralled a bit after my thursday show and speaking of spiraling w t.f with mark mariners sponsored by better help online therapy people are trying to put their best foot forward during these tough times. But you still might not feel like everything is ok. In fact a lot of people are still feeling down and emotionally out of sorts for sure it might not be depression or total breakdown but even feeling a little bit off can we to a negative quality of life..

mark mayor lynn shelton tom mccarthy knicks denver stillwater jersey colorado confusion mark mariners depression
In 'Stillwater,' an American Oil-Rig Worker Seeks to Exonerate His Daughter

Weekend Edition Sunday

02:08 min | 10 months ago

In 'Stillwater,' an American Oil-Rig Worker Seeks to Exonerate His Daughter

"It's a familiar story. The stereotypical American goes abroad crass and brutally honest, but with a heart of gold, who breaks all kinds of rules to save the day. But while the new movie still Water may wink at this formula, it has its own story to tell about America's place in the world. You're innocent, so we gotta keep fighting. It doesn't matter that I'm innocent Dad. It's not about justice about finding peace. That's Matt Damon as Bill Baker, a former oil rig worker who travels to Marseilles, France, to see his estranged Daughter, Alison, played by Abigail Breslin. She's in prison accused of the murder of a local French Arab girl, but claims to be innocent, and Baker struggles with the unfamiliar language, culture and legal system as he attempts to free her The movie is out now in theaters and its director is Tom McCarthy, who won the Academy Award for best original screenplay for Spotlight in 2016. I began by asking him if the real life case of the murder of MEREDITH Kercher, which sent American Amanda Knox to an Italian prison in 2000, and seven before she was eventually acquitted. Inspired this film. I would say the seed was there. I started the script 10 years ago, Really? And I was sort of fascinated with that case, particularly the idea of An American student being imprisoned and then ultimately focusing on the relationship between as you point out her and her estranged father. So it started there and worked on this first draft of the script with another writer, and I just got into a place where it just was straight up thriller. I just felt it lacked dimension and Maybe authenticity, and I sort of put it down. I made the decision is director not to pursue it. Put it in a drawer for about 67 years and I picked it up again and I re approached it sort of from Page one with two new French writers. And we really talked right off the bat with Tamar. But again, in the way Debray about exploring the sort of you know all the dimensions of this story, the human dimension of it. The thriller Dimension suspends

Academy Award For Best Origina Bill Baker Meredith Kercher Abigail Breslin Matt Damon Marseilles Tom Mccarthy Alison Amanda Knox Baker France America Debray Tamar
Matt Damon Runs Deep in “Stillwater”

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:07 min | 10 months ago

Matt Damon Runs Deep in “Stillwater”

"That take people into unexpected and difficult places. And that's the case in the new film. Still Water starring Matt Damon, I'm trying to get my little girl out of jail. That's all I give a damn about. You sound very American right now. Good. I am. Yeah. And you're also a stranger here. What did you do? You just have to trust me. Well, let's talk about it with Washington Post film critic Ann Hornaday, who joins us on Skype. It's great to have you back in. Thank you so much. Hello. Hello. So the premise of this film seems to have been inspired by real world cases of Americans who have been imprisoned overseas. Tell us about it and how this this film takes it on. And how does it do? Well, it is, um Sean is based on the Amanda Knox case, which I'm sure a lot of people will remember that Amanda Knox was imprisoned in Italy for murdering her fellow exchange. A fellow exchange student and filmmaker Tom McCarthy, of course, who won the Oscar a few years ago for the wonderful movie spotlight took that as a jumping off point, but really only that this does not. This is not a retelling of the Amanda Knox story. He focuses on a father character here, played by Matt Damon, who, as you heard in the clip comes to Marseille, where she's in prison. And and, um, first just on a routine visit, but then following up on a lead to maybe get her released and I think you know McCarthy is a wonderful film maker that's been as well established in his previous work, but He does slip here a little bit only because he wants this to be a lot of different movies in one way. It's an international thriller. Almost in that tradition of taken with a guy you know, trying to do the right thing by his daughter, Um, and then it also turns into a love story. The the wonderful French actors Camille Catan from a terrific Netflix series called Call My Agent. Plays a woman single Mom was whom heap of friends and they have a wonderful chemistry going on that I was very intrigued with, but then it gets. There's also kind of under underlying political

Amanda Knox Ann Hornaday Matt Damon Tom Mccarthy Washington Post Skype Sean Oscar Marseille Italy Mccarthy Camille Catan Netflix
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:55 min | 10 months ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Came here for college. And that's where she met this girl. Lena one fouling dead and call the police. All they cared about house asleep among air everybody. We have exhausted every possibility. Next is a liar. Not helping it. Myself i could. What's your name. Insist very protective. With god before no one would to you trust me and not from here. Let's not say she's my little girl among. It's not often that we get to talk to oscar winner on this show about a movie. That is absolutely a masterclass in both craft and theme and impact. But today we have tom mccarthy writer and director of stillwater which stars matt damon and abigail breslin along with co writers and. Forgive me if i pronounce the names wrong. Thomas bee gain and no debray. This movie is something special. It manages to be a compelling plot that drives interest for throughout the entire story if each is an incredible performance at the center as well as a number of very good supporting performances. but it's also one of the deeper films. I've seen recently in relationship to times. We live in the relationship. We have to our culture..

Lena Thomas bee tom mccarthy abigail breslin oscar stillwater matt damon
"tom mccarthy" Discussed on Elevate: The Official Podcast of Elite Agent Magazine

Elevate: The Official Podcast of Elite Agent Magazine

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"tom mccarthy" Discussed on Elevate: The Official Podcast of Elite Agent Magazine

"On the show. Today i'm joined by a couple of innovators in the area of real estate automation. That's rex lab. Ceo anton babkov and rick crm. Hit of product. Tom mccarthy so welcome. Back to the show and tom and the show for the first time. Tom glad to be here. Yeah really really excited. Thanks for having a say well. It's it's great to have you back because we've had some great chats in the past. And thomas mentioned your first timer on elevates they can you describe exactly what it is j. x labs. Yeah so. I'm the head of product for rex. And my role is basically purely focused on the on the crm in coordinating without design and development team. Basically chart the cost for the product. So i spend a lot of time talking to customers getting product feedback and then taking that feedback to product team and working on building new features and solving new problems and moving the product ford and a bunch of ways. Amazing and radio. I think you'll buys have changed on the website. Because i was reading them before we walked in here. And they great. By the way and anton you describe yourself as doing all sorts of ceo things including hailing. Take news and jumping up and down with excitement. What's the in may jump up and down with excitement in the race in recent months. Oh god what i. It's an exciting time. It's such an exciting time to be alive. The roaring twenties of back. This is my big name. I think Covid has done some really interesting things in terms of people saving money and also suppressing some of those instincts that we have to travel abroad. And do all those things as we don't destroy we're gonna be stuck here for a little while so it's really interesting. Seeing how people are translating that into into creativity and Into some you proceeds and is really fascinating with the money. Money supply people are starting to spend some of those that was squirreling away. What's happening with the property market. What's happening around climate change. What's happening in technology and being at the cross section of that business. That that's definitely got me jumping up and down with excitement at the moment. It's extraordinary such an amazing time for the industry. Such extraordinary time for the industry to make hype all the signs but also kind of knowing that this really strong fundamentals that are driving some of the gross and some of the activity that we saying. It's a really big macro changes. It's just an exciting time. Who wouldn't be jumping up and down.

Tom Today samantha tom thomas Covid today first time Ceo anton babkov first rex rex lab x labs j.
Innovation and the new Roaring 20s: Anton Babkov & Tom McCarthy

Elevate: The Official Podcast of Elite Agent Magazine

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Innovation and the new Roaring 20s: Anton Babkov & Tom McCarthy

"On the show. Today i'm joined by a couple of innovators in the area of real estate automation. That's rex lab. Ceo anton babkov and rick crm. Hit of product. Tom mccarthy so welcome. Back to the show and tom and the show for the first time. Tom glad to be here. Yeah really really excited. Thanks for having a say well. It's it's great to have you back because we've had some great chats in the past. And thomas mentioned your first timer on elevates they can you describe exactly what it is j. x labs. Yeah so. I'm the head of product for rex. And my role is basically purely focused on the on the crm in coordinating without design and development team. Basically chart the cost for the product. So i spend a lot of time talking to customers getting product feedback and then taking that feedback to product team and working on building new features and solving new problems and moving the product ford and a bunch of ways. Amazing and radio. I think you'll buys have changed on the website. Because i was reading them before we walked in here. And they great. By the way and anton you describe yourself as doing all sorts of ceo things including hailing. Take news and jumping up and down with excitement. What's the in may jump up and down with excitement in the race in recent months. Oh god what i. It's an exciting time. It's such an exciting time to be alive. The roaring twenties of back. This is my big name. I think Covid has done some really interesting things in terms of people saving money and also suppressing some of those instincts that we have to travel abroad. And do all those things as we don't destroy we're gonna be stuck here for a little while so it's really interesting. Seeing how people are translating that into into creativity and Into some you proceeds and is really fascinating with the money. Money supply people are starting to spend some of those that was squirreling away. What's happening with the property market. What's happening around climate change. What's happening in technology and being at the cross section of that business. That that's definitely got me jumping up and down with excitement at the moment. It's extraordinary such an amazing time for the industry. Such extraordinary time for the industry to make hype all the signs but also kind of knowing that this really strong fundamentals that are driving some of the gross and some of the activity that we saying. It's a really big macro changes. It's just an exciting time. Who wouldn't be jumping up and down.

Anton Babkov Rick Crm Tom Mccarthy Covid REX TOM Thomas Ford