5 Episode results for "Tom Golisano"

Built, Not Born w/ Self-Made Billionaire Tom Golisano, Founder Paychex

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

38:09 min | 5 months ago

Built, Not Born w/ Self-Made Billionaire Tom Golisano, Founder Paychex

"Thanks for pressing play. This is Christopher lockhead failure different. And we're an award winning podcast and some people call us an odd cast for people who value real different conversations about how to build a legendary business and a legendary life on this episode billionaire. Tom Golisano he's the founder of thirty billion dollar market CAP paychecks. And you're gonNA love this guy. He's got a new book out a smoke. A new book that I really enjoyed reading built not born. A self made billionaires no-nonsense guide for entrepreneurs and we dig into the book. He shares his insights on a ton of stuff. Including when and why you should build. You should start a company how to build a long term successful business and we get a little bit personal. It turns out that Tom is married to tennis. Legend Monica Celis and she won eight Grand Slams and at the age of sixteen. Monica became the youngest ever to win the French. Open so he tells us a little bit about that. We also talked philanthropy investment strategy and what Tom Learned by owning and turning around. Nhl Hockey team the Buffalo Sabres and when it came time for Tom to sell the team why he sold them for sixty million dollars less than he could have pay special attention to Tom's message for us. Senator Elizabeth Warren As I'm sure you know we are in an election season here in the United States and NAM. Tom has some thoughts for her. This is a legendary episode for more on Tom. His book go to Lockhead L. O. C. H. age EA D. DOT COM and. Check out the show notes for this episode. Now what do companies like ring hint into Kovas have in common? They all use my friends at Oracle Nets we'd to accelerate their growth successful companies founders entrepreneurs and CEOS know that in order to grow fast. You must have the right tools if you WANNA take your company from two million to ten million or ten million to hundreds of millions in revenue net. Sweet from Oracle gives you the tools to turbo. Charge your growth with net sweet. You'll get a full picture of your entire business finance inventory. Hr customers and more. It's everything you need to grow all in one place right from your phone or your computer nets we will give you the visibility and the control that you need to make the right decisions in grow with confidence. As a matter of fact nets week customers grow faster than the average S. and P. Five hundred company and that's why nets read is the world's number one cloud business system trusted by more than nineteen thousand companies in frankly net sweet his last system. You'll ever need to schedule your free product tour right now and receive your free guide. Seven key strategies to grow your profits visit net sweet dot com slash different. Today that's net sweet dot com slash different because at net sweet business grows here now. I also want to tell you. The famed management consulting firm. Mckinsey recently did a survey where they discovered that ninety. Two percent of companies believe that their current business model will not be economically viable. If they're industry keeps digitizing at its current rate. That's why getting digital is now a top priority for CEOS and executive teams all around the world and also helps to explain. Why spunk is one of the fastest. Growing enterprise technology companies in history. You see spunk. Is the leader in data to everything and spunk. Brings data to every question decision and action. Visit S- plunked dot com slash D to e as in data to everything and learn how you can turn data into doing that. Spunk DOT COM SLASH D to e. I also want to tell you we have a stunner coming up a special two part series with the real. Da Narcos Havi opinion and Steve Murphy. They actually flew out to California and spent some time with me. It was great getting to know them. These are two real American heroes and if you loved net flicks Narcos. These are the real guys. They worked with Colombian law enforcement for six years to take down the world's first Darko terrorist. Pablo Escobar narcos. Now is big home. One of the top shows ever in net flicks history in two part series. I we get into the real story stuff you didn't if you didn't see on the show. And then we dig into their life in leadership lessons. Look I'm just telling you. These guys are amazing. And this is good as podcasting with people talking gets so I would encourage you to hit. Subscribe Today on whatever. Your favorite podcast player is for Volume different so that you don't miss this special two part series coming up very soon now heyhoe. Let's go tried to help. People make the decision whether or not to be an entrepreneur the ramifications of the so called risk the so called Our Chip Times that you're going to have and so on and so forth. That's where I started and I have Encourage her of entrepreneurs for example in the book. I talk about sometimes. It's riskier or many times. It's riskier to work for somebody than it is to be your own entrepreneur for example. If you were for large company you know you can do very well as an employee but your baby. Your department doesn't do so well reflects on you or the division of the company doesn't do well or even the company itself and then all of a sudden you'd find your so the company sold its value and far less than everybody thought it was going to be worth it central. If you have your own company you're sort of set aside for those kinds of risks and the great thing about owning your own company is Sometimes you can sell it for value or you can pass it onto and hair a son or daughter or some relative There's so many advantages to being an entrepreneur over working for somebody now a lot of people associated. I degrees of risk. Be An entrepreneur. If Your Business concept is well thought out else and you're very well qualified to run your company or your medium size company. Whatever then I think. That's the best of both worlds will end. I love that you have this sort of smaller. Business Entrepreneurial Mindset you know I lovingly refer to them as a small entrepreneurs as distinct from a living out here in the Silicon Valley area what we refer to as Biggie entrepreneurs the entrepreneurs who go and raise several hundred million dollars venture capital and try to build the next facebook. Or what have you and so? I love that that sort of where you start because those small entrepreneurs are the backbone of our economy. Well exactly right you know. Paycheck says his client six hundred seventy thousand businesses in the United States of America that our clients and the average size company that we process the payroll for had fifteen employees. Who did you say? Six hundred seventy thousand yes. That's how many clients paychecks so processes a pair of four and the average size client has fifteen employees. So you can see. It's very endearing to me the small business environment that we have in our country and the opportunities that it presents to our population. Yeah I mean if you look at the statistics and you know people like brookings and others do. I think really important research in this regard but if I'm remembering right about fifty percent of all of the New Patents created in the country. Come from small to medium sized businesses hybrid that to yet and we all know with all due respect to you know. Ge and IBM and so forth. And I don't have the number off the top of my head. Maybe you Tom that. The vast majority of new job creation and new wealth creation comes from start ups and smaller businesses. Exactly and you know entrepreneurs have doesn't necessarily mean you have to own the business. Because small companies have fewer employees the more entrepreneurial attitude or perspective. They have in their small company. The better so are you an employee of a small company it really does well to Be Entrepreneurial Yeah I've always felt the same way and I think I understand what you're saying on the risk side because I always thought like if you're an employee of a company you have to live in a world where you know depending on the size of the company somewhere between three and maybe sixteen or twenty people get together in a room typically on a Monday and make strategic decisions about your life and if you're not in that room that's a bad scenario for you. It's not the most comfortable feeling. I agree with you. And so if you're trying to help encourage new entrepreneurs you know if you are selling me. Maybe Tom on entrepreneurship. What were the thing? What was the things that you would say as to why I should maybe not go work for somebody else and swing? Swing hard at the puck in my own business. Well let's assume first of all that you have a concept or an idea for another prize that has a chance to be successful and one of the basic ingredients. I think that's so important for an entrepreneur is to have industry knowledge For example if you WANNA say you wanted to be an entrepreneur because you eat dinner once we what's tonight that you're going to open a restaurant that's not a good foundation for opening a business My personal situation paychecks. I sold accounting movie scenes that did payroll applications. I and then I also worked for a company did payroll processing for larger companies and sort of ignored the small end of the market at the lower end of the market. So I had drawn industry knowledge before I started. Which of course was very important to my success so anybody. Who's considering being an entrepreneur of the first thing I would ask is. What's your industry knowledge? You know enough about this industry. You're getting vengeance that you could ABS- absolutely make a difference or are you gonNA end up getting Very serious and costly education. Because you got it into something. You really didn't understand. Yup we see that a lot and I think in Silicon Valley. A lot of people talk about that as founder category founder market fit. I think it's just very very important So than encouraging people to Piatra preneurs and trying to make sure that they have sufficient industry knowledge of the industry. They're getting into and then of course. Things like financing sales management sales management. I think is one of the biggest issues with other preneurs. You've heard I say gee I have a cash flow problem. Well generally speaking that cash flow. Probably because you're not selling enough of your product you're not making enough sales and you're not creating enough revenue so you walk into a bank or a potential investor and you say you have a cash flow problem many times. It's a sales problem. So sales practice and sales management very very important and then the Entrepreneurial Environment and what would you advise me five? Maybe I was more of a technical founder or kind of a product oriented inventor type founder. And that wasn't my natural skill set. What are the things that you think are not a person with without sales background would need to know as a founder? Ceo Well first of all as the founder. I would suggest heartedly that you start making sales calls yourself and learn as much as you can about the process and not going to be able to develop a good sales team unless you have that knowledge yourself so you might as well dig right into it. Start making sales presentations and sales calls. Then if he's still don't think you're the right person to be doing that. At least you'll be in a position to train somebody that you hire to perform that function. Salami test this on you. I've long had this theory that I don't care if you're an engineer and inventor or an artist or whatever sort of you view yourself as in the non sales world as a founder you have to become the best salesperson in the company and you have to figure out how to get those initial sales and understand what motivates the customers in what resonates with them and what features and capabilities are. GonNa really make this thing go etcetera etcetera. That you SORTA have no choice. Frankly I think it's a tremendous amount of fun and a lot to be learned when you're in the very early days engaging with those customers and if you're a non sales-oriented bounder I think you just have to decide. This is going to be a core skill set. I I believe that for a long time Would you take it that far? Or how do you think about it? Chris I wholeheartedly support what you just said First of all if you're uncomfortable at the more you do it the more comfortable. You'll be calm so you shouldn't be afraid of it. You gotTA JUMP. Right in and get ready to that sales process and makes them barely cells. What we'll do for your confidence or not only yourself but for the employees you have in. The company is significant and substantial. But I can't see anybody becoming an entrepreneur and being afraid of the sales process. They have to get into it. I couldn't agree more now. I'm also curious. You have an interesting take on sort of what most people. I think might call your personal life and how it fits into being a business owner. Could you sort of elucidate? Maybe a little bit on your thoughts. There you mentioned things like having a pre-nup and a post nup for your business and always gets people's attention I think a pre nup posting up is very very important because the reason for it is somebody. An entrepreneur can build a very successful business. And if they have a spouse I you know based on history in our country. The number of marriages that have been divorced at some point because people change or needs change their motives change whatever it may be necessary to split apart and nothing could be more harmful to a small business the separation of ownership and they difficult situation. So if you get that ironed out first before you go too far down the road. I think it's a real benefit to nothing is worse than being a situation where you've got to sell the company for Marital Settlement and have the seller that low price. And a time when you don't think it's the most appropriate time so post pre nup. I think are very very important by couldn't agree more people. Forget that if if Tom and Chris go into business together. Well Chris is now in business with Tom's wife and Tom Right. That's a that's an expansion. That happens a lot and it's a very unfortunate situation when it happens the other one and I'm curious if you have any particular insight I've also seen how a state planning in planning for your You know I don't know how to say it. Untimely death is also critical if you're going to have partners or ambassadors at because how you handle that situation needs to be thought out in advance if God forbid happens absolutely key man insurance or key person. Insurance is a very important aspect of when you have partners So that's the partners. The surviving partners can afford to buy out say you know the equity in their entrepreneurial venture from the essay and that has to sell the company or break the company up to satisfy the need. It's so critical and yet it doesn't get done very often It should be done quite often now. If this is too personal feel free to kick be under the table but now we're on the topic of spouses. You are married to an extraordinarily accomplished incredibly famous. Incredibly well respected woman. Could you tell me a little bit about your wife? Everything he said about her is true. First of all she's very accomplished being a number one world championship. Champion in any sport is very very oppressive. But the thing about the Monica is. You wouldn't know it by knowing her people that spend time here company or just can't believe how personable she is how down to earth she is. How else will tears and so on so forth so Have had a little experience. America's my associate with Monica is probably the best thing that ever happened to great and I love hearing a little bit about her. Of course I remember her as a fan and I'm no expert on tennis but if I'm remembering her career right I mean there was a period of time. Where not only was she the most dominant female tennis player in the world? She was really one of the most dominant athletes in in any sport male or female for quite a long period of time. Yes she had eight Grand Slam championships. before she was twenty one years of age she was just a ferocious tennis player. Well respected in their field. And you can't give her enough Kudos for what she accomplished. Look I don't embarrass you but it's obvious you have had a rockstar. Entrepreneurially business career. There's just no way around it and your wife has one of the most storied sort of athletic Lives or careers in history. And so you know you guys are like to rock stars together. What what's it like being married to each other? Well when we walk down the street in the United States or at least in upstate New York and South West Florida. I'm probably the one recognized. Firt but on the rest of the world everybody recognizes Monica before they do me even though she'll wear hats sunglasses and so forth that to show off but It's fun and it's great because people are so nice to both her and me as we walk down any avenue in the United States and and then the rest of the world. She's just so well known and the rest of the world. Nobody knows many outside of the United States and so you know as a man and certainly as a seriously accomplished man. What's it like if you're in some parts of the US or fear in France or you're wherever you are and You know your wife's face and name is pretty house household and and and to your point you're not and yet for most of your life and most of your career your study. I gotTA believe you're used to be in the rock star in the RU. Well the The big advantages at least internationally and I don't mean to sound facetious but we do get a choice of our tables. Quite frankly and we get reservations. Where probably we should restaurant. I love it. It sounds fantastic. Another thing I was curious to ask you. It seems at least based on my kinda reading and and trying to get to know you that philanthropy means a lot to both of you and you've invested tremendously in education and a whole bunch of other areas that. I'd be curious to hear a little bit about your thinking. In that regard philanthropy has become part of our lives For sure and when people ask me why I do it. I have only a simple answer and that is because they can't for example we've invested in three children's schools one in Rochester one in Syracuse New York and one in Naples Fort Myers Florida very gratifying very rewarding I guess I don't go a week without giving the letter a phone call if somebody stopped me on the street telling me what the hospital did for their child. And I'll tell you when you hear those stories you gotta say to yourself boy. Mike Glad I did that. You know I'd probably give more credit than I deserved. Because it's really the doctors in the staff at the hospitals that do the work but it's just very rewarding very gratifies. I'm so fortunate that I was able to do it. And of course I've gotTA thank paychecks. Because if it wasn't their paychecks of this would be happening to me. That's so interesting that you say you know we're at a time where at least I hear. Maybe you're even more sensitive to it. You'll tell me You know here's some negatively about billionaires and The elite didn't Obviously were in election cycle here in the United States. And and there's a lot of talk about sort of this whole topic and remember recently And I you know I've done some homework on your political background on. I don't necessarily want to have political conversation but I. I don't know if you remember. Somebody made the comment about who you rather give a Billion Dollars to Elizabeth Warren or Bill Gates and and so I guess with all that said we're in an environment where there's sort of an interesting dialogue about Billionaires in the role they play in our culture in our society and our economy. Is there anything about that? That's on your mind. Yes Chris there is if I were to get into a verbal conversation with Elizabeth Warren. Here's what she would hear from me. I went for years without paychecks. I started my company with three thousand dollars. I work very hard for a lot of years and evolved into something. That's very very important to the business community our payroll services already church services but it didn't come easy and yes. I'd be covered billionaire but I've also paid over two hundred million dollars in taxes last ten years and I've given away over three hundred billion dollars to philanthropy now when Elizabeth Warren talks like. I'm sorry sort of Laos and I didn't deserve to be successful as they became actually really resent it and I resent her and knowing how hard entrepreneurs work and the fact that some of them are really successful all the coolest in the world should go to those people because they pay the price some way for the success and to demean them is really hurtful to me. Is that yeah? It's very clear and I appreciate your comments. And I support them. A thousand percent and what people fail to acknowledge is that some meaningful percentage. I don't have the number in front of me of our billionaires are entrepreneurs guys who started out like you did or like Sara Blakely or like you know Bill Gates and Paul Allen you know everybody likes to shit on Amazon right now and they forget that that guy started out with nothing and try to change the world right and on and on and on I mean so many more living in Silicon Valley. It's it's so exciting to be here because A huge part of the future gets created within a fifty mile radius. And that's an incredible thing to be around him associated with and yet that part of the discussion doesn't show up now does it. Yeah You know paychecks has fifteen thousand employees and some of the other investments that. I've made probably equal another five thousand. People that have secure well-paying jobs and they have somebody who's lived up the public trough all their life. Criticize US really irritates. Me As you can understand. Yes well you and I are in violent agreement there Now I'm also curious talking more. Maybe about entrepreneurship and some of the newer things. You're involved with you. Know I see Three D. printing fiber optics a- and the Internet. And of course I would love to if we have time to get to A little bit about the Buffalo Sabres. But maybe could you walk me through kind of the things that you're interested from business and investment point of view today. Sure well first of all. We won't talk about the Buffalo Sabres. That was one of the best financial investments. I made as you know they. They were in bankruptcy in Buffalo New York and nobody was standing up from the buffalo community that had the resources to acquire them and being the Rochester in about sixty miles down the New York state through a I thought the sabers. We're very important to the buffalo psyche if you will so. I made the investment in the Buffalo Sabres and it was a very modest investment compared to what people get for athletic professional athletic teams but we made the investment and we turn the situation around. We became a winning team. We went to play offs. wanted me here Espn radio that's the best manage professional sports organization in the country and We were successful and we made money to which is A lot of people didn't think that was possible turned out to be a very rewarding experience. You turned around us. Sports Franchise in a small market team. And of course hockey as much as I love being a Montreal or myself you know. It's not anywhere near as popular as some the other major sports in the United States. So could you maybe share with me a little about how you took over the struggling team and turn it around? Made it profitable and sort of brought it back to life for the community. Sure first of all we must understand that. The buffalo community is very sports oriented. Then they wanted they love winners. And so the best thing we could do is owning sports franchises. Try to become a winning team and we hadn't been for a number of years before that. Well we made some key trades. We talked to the coaches and general manager is if it was a business but what the question was. How do we win more game? Let me give you an example. I'm going to pat myself on the back for this one after I own the team for about four months I went up to the coaching staff. And I said guys how come are. Shooting percentage is the number twenty nine to thirty in the League in other words. How many times do we shoot the puck at the goal and actually score and we were twenty nine hundred thirty in the League so I said well. What are you doing about it? And the coaches says well. Nothing specific they said. Well I'm trying to do something specific. Quiet you say. Take an extra half hour practice every day and do nothing but shoot at the call until it builds the players confidence that they can hit that net and find the open spot and they took me seriously and they did start doing that. And by the end of the year I think we had the third or fourth highest shooting percentage in the league. Oh there's nothing unique about what I said that just with common sense to me that when you're taking shots at the goal scoring you shooters. They're not as good as they should base. So I mean that's one practical application that somebody from the business world took into hockey. The other thing we did that was quite unique was head Barry Bill pricing for our tickets. We knew we were playing Montreal. Toronto there was tremendous demand for hockey tickets at our home arena but if we're playing Atlanta or Florida or something like that something like that. There wasn't that the man so you fix the pricing to go with the demand which was very unique and that's how we ended up basically selling out almost every game over a number of period here because when the leaves so the Canadians or maybe the bruins or some of the traditional teams. Were coming to town. More people were coming to To the rank. Oh here having would we unfortunately at at least that's what I said. The first time I thought is whenever we played Toronto or Montreal. There was many fans from Toronto Montreal. They were favorite fans and these people drove in from Montreal. Toronto to see the Games because they probably didn't have access to tickets and either about three all Toronto. Yeah so take advantage right and I am sure. Montrealers and they drawn. Tony didn't care absolutely there's price still cheaper than CNN. It well I I love. I love that and You mentioned that it was a great investment. So I'm curious you know it's one thing to make an investment start a company but You know the old no one to hold them in when to fold them. So what led you to as much as you loved it. Sound like it was a lot of fun for you. How do you make that decision to sell an interesting question? Yes we were going along we were profitable. We were filling the arena. We had fairly successful team when it came to wins and losses and A gentleman by the name Terry contacted US and carry Was very interested in owning the hockey team and he made us an offer. We said Cherry. Thanks for the offer but We're not ready to sell it as this point. But a few months later or general manager partner and managing partner developed a heart condition. And His name is Larry Quinn. Larry was Very dedicated to the Buffalo Sabres. He worked very hard trying to make them successful in. Put a lot of self inflicted pressure on himself. Well with his heart condition. I decided maybe this is the time to sell the the the sabers and I knew Terry Gula would be owned her because there was nothing. Terry cool was going to do more than keep the team in buffalo and that was A prerequisite rather fact. We received an offer from gentlemen. I will mention his name but He offered a sixty million dollars. More than Terry if we would help them move the team and we decided that would be a good move. Because they don't think Larry and I could walk down. The streets of Buffalo Resolve team to somebody that moved. The buffalo life would be in danger. So when Jerry came along and Made us an offer again. We decided to sell it. And I'll tell you I was in it for eight years. I had a lot of fun. Didn't especially like working with the media and that's no secret and I can remember we. We are having playoff seasons in some of the media in Buffalo that we couldn't run a seven eleven store or one of them called us the three stooges but other than that it was a great experience enjoy mentally. I'm curious particularly as an entrepreneur and we hear a lot about greed money and so forth in our culture. You had an opportunity to make. I mean most people would say sixty million dollars is a very material amount of money so you had a chance to make a meaningful amount money more but for yourselves by moving the team and I I get the joke about you know getting in trouble in downtown buffalo but all kidding aside helped me with sort of how you make decisions. That are not financially oriented. Well I think you know. Perspective got a lot to do with it. For example Larry in another gentleman were co owners of the company but they actually owned a fairly small percentage compared to myself so most of that sixty million dollars crude to me but the perspective. It wasn't that important to me but was more important. Is that the Buffalo Sabres. Get an owner. That's GONNA to be dedicated to the buffalo market and worked very hard to make that seem successful in Buffalo. Now Larry and and Dan the other gentleman I think probably maybe a little bit about us not thinking that offer but I think in the end. They thought it was the best thing. So that's what we did. I love it now. Maybe a little bit about some of the other newer investments and entrepreneurial endeavors your ear into right now. I'd love to hear sort of where you're placing bets in trying to build new technology and new companies. Yeah I could mention of one or two of them if you'd like First of all I'm invested in a company called green light. I'm the majority shareholder in it and green. Light provides Internet service in the Rochester New York Metropolitan area we service. I think almost forty thousand households. The product is well accepted. It's reasonably priced in psych quality. Well we just made a decision recently. He's go into the buffalo market. We held a press conference just a few weeks ago and press conference was on a Tuesday morning by Sunday afternoon. Just from the press conference we had six thousand people from Buffalo. Sign up for the service our not ready to produce it yet. That's a hell of a press conference. Tom Yeah I know I wish they could do more of those but So obviously the market is in demand there for good Internet Service. Where we think we're going to provide it also invested in the company that is providing do you know what? Three D printing is. Yeah of course three. D. Printing is the benefactor products using a particular type of process and isn't that process when the product is made for example. Let's say a case for a cellphone if they used three D. printing to manufacture that case. There's a certain amount of residue that has to be cleaned off the project finished product and we developed a a company. I'm invested in developed a product. That does the cleansing cleaning of that manufactured products. Now we're just getting underway with this but we think of great future. That's a little bit of a technology best for me. I generally like businesses that have recurring revenue such as Internet service or payroll processing things like that. So those are two of the most recent things that'd be gotten involved in. What is it about those businesses that attracts you to them? Well with the Internet service it's recurring revenue you know. Once you build the customer base keep adding to it and maintain a good quality product. It can be very profitable in incremental revenue is also much more profitable than standard other businesses the uniqueness of the three D. printing product. What got my attention there and certainly seems to be a product or service could be very much in demand fascinating. All right. Tom. Will is there anything else? You WanNa touch on before we wrap. I just told that People that are interested in owning and operating. A business takes the time to read the book. I think it could be helpful to almost anybody. I had a lot of people. Come up to me that. Read the book already. And so I wish I read this twenty years ago And that makes me feel good that there's constant and that's important to people. Well I WANNA thank you for taking the time to write it. I think it's very important thing to do. We know when when you've achieved the level of kind of insight and success that you have and so. I think you've written a great book and I really appreciate this time with you Tom. Thanks a lot as well there. Is Tom Gallstone? I sure hope you enjoy them as much as I did. What an amazing guy and I also WanNa remind you coming very soon. Our special two part series with the real. Da Narcos make sure you're subscribed because you are not going to want to miss a second of it all right. We would like to thank Tom. Gullikson on his brand new book built not born self made millionaires No-nonsense guide for entrepreneurs my good friends at nonprofit one fully live dot. Org Dream Plan and live your best life. Check THEM OUT AT ONE. Life fully live Dot Org. Also want to remind you about my Marketing PODCAST lockhead on marketing. And what makes it different is? It's one of the few marketing podcasts. On strategy and mindset most episodes and others might be hard to believe are short fairly to the point and We were lucky enough to make number one in marketing number. One in business on Apple podcasts. So check out. Lockhead on marketing. Also my dear friend Duska Zapata and her best selling book how to be ferociously happy and other essays a podcast. I love with Jaime J. Culture eats strategy. Check it out another podcast. 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Tom United States Buffalo Sabres Buffalo New York founder hockey Senator Elizabeth Warren Rochester Monica Celis tennis Montreal Tom Golisano Chris I buffalo community Mckinsey America Silicon Valley managing partner Christopher lockhead Lockhead L. O. C. H.
Paychex Founder, Tom Golisano | How He Built a $28 Billion Dollar Business and Became the Owner of the NHLs Buffalo Sabres

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

33:42 min | 7 months ago

Paychex Founder, Tom Golisano | How He Built a $28 Billion Dollar Business and Became the Owner of the NHLs Buffalo Sabres

"On today's show we interviewed Tom. Gagliano the founder of the twenty eight billion dollar company paychecks on today's show he shares with us us how we took three thousand dollars in credit card and turned it into a billion dollar net worth Tom also shares with us how he was able to build his net worth by solving a problem that ninety five percent of small business owners have this right here. Folks is a laser show with Tom. Gagliano how did you know that Tom Golisano was once the owner of the NHL's Buffalo Sabres and now he's the author of a new book built not born a self made billionaires no nonsense on since guide for entrepreneurs like you don't need a liberty to introduce this show they show dots to May eight kids co created by two different women thirteen multi million dollar businesses ladies and gentlemen welcome to the thrive time. Shaw Yes yes. And yes thrive on. Today's show we get to interview today's guest about how he doctors e built eight twenty eight but-but-but boop boop boop boop boop boop a billion dollar business Tom. Welcome onto the thrive time show. How are you sir? Have doing well the pleasure. Hey how are things in Florida right now is. Is the weather fine. How are things in beautiful Florida looking out the window? It's about at eighty degrees in pure sunshine. Green it's wonderful here now. That's a long people. That's a long distance from Naples. Florida to where you started your career in Rochester. New York When did you first figure out what you wanted to do professionally? Quite frankly I thought you were going to ask you what I figured out. I wanted to get out of snow and cold weather. Dan Young Guy but I decided I wanted to be in business for myself. Probably my college days I had some experiences watching my father and business who eventually ended it up going bankrupt and I saw some of the things he went through and I vision some of the things I wouldn't do if I was in that position and so when I went to college I just focused entirely on the idea that someday I wanted to be in business. Being an entrepreneur is the only way to go. Where did you every but at at least for me? Where did you go to college? I went to a small two year college in Alfred. New York called altered. State tack was in the Southern Tier of the state they are they going to rename it. Paychecks University Name is already used in our training department. Okay Okay Well I. I'm sure they're they're proud of you. Now how did you first start the company. Were you in the dorm room. Helping your buddies right. Paychecks for their side hustles. Or how did you get started. You start paychecks. Well actually I was working for a company that did payroll processing for larger companies. Their target market was fifty employees up to five hundred employees and I was in sales and then they eventually made salesman June. I was driving down the street one day and I got to thinking you know. Most businesses in America Erica have less than fifty employees. So I went to the library. Compare that and I found out ninety. Eight percent of all American businesses have less two hundred employees in ninety five percent have less than fifty employees and I decided that was a market. Nobody was attacking going after after. So I decided based on my knowledge working for that payroll processing companies to make somebody vacations to their product and how they operated oriented and put it together to see if I could come up with a product line or a payroll processing product. That would put the need and basically I did three things that were different in those days. Back in the sixties and seventies people used to fill up COMP- fairly really complicated computer input cheats Which means they end to be trained in how to do it? And then the information had to be physically transferred to the payroll processor by a delivery or by mail I got the idea for example in average fifteen employees company. They could just call in on the telephone. A trained operator professional on the other end would extract from the client. Exactly what they wanted to do. For their particular employees it was the cheaper and it was much more accurate than the customer filling out an input sheet. The second thing is back in those days nobody in the payroll processing business. This was completing payroll tax returns. If you're an employer in New York state for example you have a minimum of fifty two payroll tax returns and payments must be made every a year. And if you don't do it properly on time. The fines are pretty pretty strong and third. We had a price. It's so small. Companies could afford awarded the average minimum charge back in nineteen seventy was about twenty four dollars a pay period only eating only if you had one or two employees. Well well we brought it down to about a dollar a checker dollar a person Yup and charging at that level now. When I had all his ideas I went to my employer and I jeff? Let's start up this division. I'd be glad to run it for you. Know be a major part of it. They said they didn't want to go after the small company market. They didn't think it was going to be profitable the best thing that happened to me because I resigned a few months later and started paychecks. The paychecks a company that my wife and I used for our businesses and see. I'm always amazed at how they do it so inexpensively I'm serious. I'm not just saying this because he's on our show. I've been using paychecks forever and my wife and I have thought about in years past that you're looking at the budget. You might say you know. Let's see if we can trim costs and Area A or B and we're always saying to ourselves we could not possibly probably provide a service. We couldn't do this ourselves. That are somebody yes. I'm just blown away my my. I'm getting nervous here so blown away. What what questions did you have for the founder of paychecks? Because this guy has been solving my problems for years I like him a democratic. You go by doctors these. I'M GONNA CALL IS MR G is coming told me anyway. I've I've got a question. You're a super yacht correct. Yes they do now did Jakarta super-yacht how does that work or they already named. When the guy constructing dams yours is named still have his name Laurel when I find online? Did you name it. So what does that mean to you not much basically second owner of the previous owners at called this Laurel and what I took it over. We decided we'd leave the name the same because it does do a certain amount of charter business and we didn't want people to lose track of the boat load because we changed the name the wake and I wrote pricing per minute. Oh absolutely you'd like us to raise your prices. You feel better. No no no hello paychecks. Also no no no no no wife and I. We've talked about this and we were saying this is years ago. It's like how in the world do they do it so inexpensively expensively and obviously you guys have gone and got more efficient time. But how'd you go out there and get your first ten customers. Did you just cold call. Did you show up were you doing you know what I did. I ace put together. A mailing lists from the Roster Chamber of Commerce out about three thousand letters early November nineteen seventy and I was hoping to get sixty clients out of best mailing. I ended up getting six. Wow I I had gone true all my money by that ended up with six plants so from that and it was you know Beg Barrow and all the other thing but It took me forty years to get my goal. Three hundred clients. I ended up the first year with about forty so it was a long haul went for years without our payroll check. Good thing my wife took on a job and a charitable organization but we survived it and then it was just a matter of Eddie clients here after here. What was your low point when growing the business because doctors you started your first business? I started my first business. I worked at Applebee's target and direct ATV when I was starting. DJ CONNECTION DOT COM. And I remember vividly eating Rama noodles having no disposable to speak of being in a in a tight spot sharing during the one car. That barely worked Tom. What was your absolute lowest point when building paychecks? But one of the things that happen to me it took a few of the people and we only had a few working out for dinner one night for some sort of minor celebration and we went to a popular steakhouse in town and we had dinner and I still had my American Express cards My other two cars master charge visa and taken away but I still have my American Express cards I paid for dinner with American Express Card in the owner who I knew came back to me with my American Express card cut in half and he said He. It was directed by American Express to do this. That was no longer going to get credit so obviously that was quite embarrassing so fortunately he was a client so I said how would it be leave. I just had my track my charge for gender against your bill and you know you'll be reduced. Its I'm getting out of here with some sort of posture left point I remembered friends coming over to the house. I remember one time. Good friend of mine came over. You opened up the refrigerator door. We were that close and there was nothing in it having gone through. That sounds like he's not through a little bit yourself. The real character building. So how did you fund the scaling of the business. I mean Gee said it took you four years to get to three hundred clients. How did you fund the scaling of paychecks? which today's he has six hundred seventy thousand customers? Tom How'd you do it. Correct well after. I got established in Rochester. New York with about three hundred clients. a friend of mine came into the office and his name was filled. So where I'm Phil said time. This looks like you're GonNa make it. Is there any way I get involved and I said well. How would you like to be a partner with me in the cities of Albany Syracuse and buffalo flow? And he said Yeah. We'll do that and we agreed to it. He got started in a couple of months later and employees of a client came into my office. Said Thomas is really great service I I like to go somewhere in the United States and startling I said we're we would you like to go. He says well Miami Florida so I thought to myself t being a partner with somebody in Miami Ame. That's not bad. There we go. So that's the word partnership he says we all know. I WANNA be your Franchisee now. There's a whole new thought but it meant you know me helping them get started maybe an initial fee percentage of revenue and. I said okay. He went off to Miami Florida. After I got these two individuals started I said is this. This is the way to build a national organization so during the next four years I brought into the company Ten different partners and six different franchisees. He's the all except one lived in Rochester New York and they moved to various parts of the country. And we got started that way We had a cool or at least I had to go that we would someday consolidated that one company and either it'd be a public corporation or else sell allowed to another company and every year. We added salespeople We try to average of seven percent. More people more salespeople arrear today we have over twenty five hundred people in the field sales representative. Wow Okay so now you got twenty five hundred people in the in the field is either out there. Selling six hundred seventy thousand customers one yacht when Super Super Buddy. This is not a little dinky out there. Yeah Yeah so so when did you. When did you get inspired to write your new book? I mean what. Tell me so. Tell us about your new book called. What inspired you to write this new book okay? The book is called built. That born built that born we picked up title because it sort of this very well described. The process wasn't born with any money was didn't inherit any CETERA ET CETERA. Build it from scratch. When I started the company I had three three thousand dollars and three credit cards in my name People have been asking me to write a book and I thought it was the right amount of biography but in talking to various publishers. One of them's suggested why don't you write a business book. I and I said she's that might be a good idea and talking to him on the phone. I started writing down the table of contents about what I would want to say. It flowed real easy so I decided editor right the Business Book Harpercollins publisher and is being released in middle. Chevy way I would like to get your take on this because your book title is because it's a built not born a self made billionaires no nonsense guide for entrepreneurs now's the I'm gonNA ask a passive aggressive mentorship session for you right now so I'm going to. I've I've got a friend of Tom. Hypothetically he goes by last name Zellner not this cylinder but a different want and he only owns about ten percent of a bank and he's struggling and he's got the the one optometrist Tom Clinic. That's doing the most revenue in in his state of not you as someone else very successful auto auction and other companies and he wants to build a he wants to get to the bees zone he wants to go from the end zone zone from the millionaire status to the billionaire status. What tip hip would you have for my friend not not not not our co host here not you but someone what typically have for somebody who's already a multi millionaire who wants to become a billionaire well the way we did it and the way I probably would advise people to do is doing plateaus paychecks at fifty thousand clients we set our say On a hundred thousand clients got under way so to fifty and so forth until we got it up to the point that we're at The other thing we did a very good job combination of luck and good management. We pick the market that huge. You know the numbers businesses and United States is at least twelve or fifteen million million of them in today even today with our success and other companies successes you had all the payroll processes together. We still have about twenty percent of the market who is a huge marketplace. So that's one of the things that serve. It was very very well but the other thing is we didn't try to do it. And Big Gulps we did it in Small Mall Plateaus and when you have a product that you know works and you can make money at it. It's a good way to go. So how do you differentiate yourself so eighty percent of that like you said you had twenty percent of the of the available marketplace. How many of the do you know how many others are using a payroll company? And how do you differentiate from those other payroll payroll companies. Well if there's let's say there's fifty million businesses and that means the payroll processes all together have Three million and. I think that's pretty close to be very accurate How do we differentiate ourselves? Well I you're a client. I hope you feel. You'd get very personal service and we're very responsive We have software that I think is very comprehensive and fifth most situations. People don't need to change services Were as you said earlier. We price fairly low so we're Very competitive in that area The poor thing I would say is our sales organization is very well trained in the product and the product knowledge You're not going to buy a payroll service from a sales person that comes in your door and doesn't seem to know what they're talking about and that very confident so we spend a lot of time and effort for training. Our salespeople honor service how it works and the benefits to the customer. You don't say this as far as paychecks. My three reasons I love these guys. One is the pricing unbelievable to their super accurate and the price the accuracy. Everything is they say. Yes all the time you call and say I have a question and they go. Yes how can I help you and other payroll companies so you probably know with this too with a can't give you a straight answer. No one calls you back. I mean these guys do it right I I really. I really do like like this. And I think you tomor our source source of wisdom and a lot of things but in your book you write about some stuff that I think is controversial and so I would like to bring up some of the things and if you just hang up and that'll be are little codes either. The question compare enough in your book. You talk like we used to talk about riding finding a pre-nuptial or even post-nuptial agreement it's very critical to any business owner. You're saying it's it's very critical for any business owner to have a pre nuptial and post hosts natural agreement Explain what a pre-nuptial post nuptial agreement is and why you think it's important for any business owner well. pre-nuptial agreement is an agreement agreement between two parties. Who are about to get married? As to how they wouldn't distribute assets that they accumulate or come in with before the at the time of the marriage. Posting up is just an agreement ridden after marriage When the two parties decide it's appropriate? Here's why it's so important. I'm sure you've heard of business. The people that have gone into business nope premier premarital prenuptial agreement or post they go into business. They're successful and then one day they decide that they're going to split up. Well that puts the entrepreneur and a real bad situation. Because chances are he's going to have to make. There's some sort of payments to the to the other spouse and that'd be require that the business be sold and there you are now in a situation where the business has to be filled. You're not going to be selling at the time you want to sell it most naturally Or at a time when you can maximize somebody's the sale price so it ends up being a real tussle and sometimes could you know make a divorce proceeding very very sensitive and very very you know what I'm GonNa do. Is We have solicitors out there. Who are saying this right away I can? I can hear the listeners. Saying this right now. They're going but what would be the point of being married to somebody. You Know Tom if you're not committed to it working out somebody there's thinking this and they're going by signing pre-nuptual I am. I'm before it even starts conceding that it's not gonNA work workout. I know that's the argument. People are saying out there. What would you say to that I would say? Pre operative post NUP is a contingency. I M okay. We also have to remember fifty percent of marriages today in the United States of America. End Up in divorce. And that's the reality you gotta you got to Face keep in mind you know sixty seventy or a hundred years ago when the life expectancy was so different than it is today or two hundred years ago But today marriage is being so long and people change you. Desire to change their motivation to change and a postman upper pre-nup. We'll you know. Take care that continuously so that when the time comes unfortunately if it does come It'll be more easily settled. I I definitely get to pre-nup I've I've heard about those about those. That's I understand but posts nut. That's close enough. This is the first time I've heard about that. Mu How do you how you picked up. How do you bring that up over a cocktail? Like hey honey. Guess what I think's a great idea in other words together and things are working out. Well my buddy billionaire Tom. Tom Founder of paychecks. He asked me. He told me the advice. He's given us his eye on this book. I opened up here says we should get together and talk about how we're going to break it up. No I I totally get it but I mean that's Super Boob right there post nap. That's kind of a super move because being part you're a business person you have to be a pretty good negotiator to there you go. That's true. Okay Tom I have another question for you here in your book again. And this is a new book. Built not born self made billionaires no nonsense guide for entrepreneurs in the book you talk about this idea of going against the grain to generate opportunities. Are you talking about petting a cat backwards. Or what are you talking about. Well I thought I gave you an example Tampa earlier the payroll processing industry. Back in the sixties and seventies was focused on a much different market paycheck focused on it went after larger companies. Funny paychecks our desire to go after the low end of the market for two reasons number one. There are so many more of them more more. Small businesses than larger businesses would fall into the paychecks range. Secondly and here's a little bit of the key to paychecks success the way rape payroll processes process. is they charge you per check created in other words one. For every one of your employees the more employees you have have on the payroll the lesser per check. You'RE GONNA pay payroll processor. Got Another words. If you're a hundred person payroll you may only a fifty cents. I'm just pulling these numbers out of the year. You may only fifty cents a check. But if you're five-person payroll your total. Bill might be seven dollars dollars. Which means you're paying a dollar forty at check? The revenue from ten ten person payrolls is two and a half times more than it would be for one hundred percent payroll to get that Yup Avenue. Ten- tense would be two and a half times greater than one hundred person payroll now. I I think it's easier to sell ten times in one hundred because all the other processors are going after those large clients so it's much easier to sell the ten tents and their respective overhead is not consistent with the the fact that it's ten companies instead of one another which we can operate we can do. Ten payrolls take easily as we can do one one hundred. There's gotta be something that you do or Worldview worldviews that you have that. Most people don't have because a lot of people I just don't become millionaires. Let alone billionaires do you have maybe in addition to your book do you have. Maybe some books that you'd recommend or do you have a kind of a pithy quote you'd like like to share with people or or what's your big tip for our listeners out there. Well I'll tell you I'll give you some people. Ask Me if I had a mentor. You're I don't think I've ever had a mentor. What I've had is a bunch of negative mentors in other words as a salesperson for paychecks? The company I told before and the company that burroughs corporation I was exposed to a lot of small business people and I learned a lot more watching watching them. Operate when they were doing well rather than when they were doing great. So I've learned watching people make mistakes. I think that helped help the most Also I think I did a pretty good job at keeping. The company focused both on product line and and achieving sales quotas that was number one importance to our management team that we always fails scores and sales goals Tom. I've got a question for you if you could go back. Say The mid seventies you you've got paychecks started in seventy one. You've kind of hit that critical mass of at that point. Where you you said in your interview earlier said it? Looks like you're going to make it your friends. It looks like you're going to make it if you go back to that time for back going back in the old time machine gene and talk to yourself. What advice? What would you say to yourself at that time? Well a number of things I'll give you one is as soon as we went public. I came out with a product line. That was much different than what we were doing. It was a similar to monster DOT COM. But it was before the Internet now we made an investment in it but the sad part of it. The the bed partner who was Wall Street did not like us going into a diversified business. Much different than what we were doing. No soon after in public so our stock price suffrage average some periods of time because of that now after a year I said that's enough and we closed it down Secondly you know I said we brought in ten partners and six franchisees. I probably could have done it with fewer people. Sure it just pay their territories Larger than they would have had less those people to deal with. Yeah excellent there you go and now. We're on a personal note. I've been I've been looking at your bio and countries to research on you a very interesting wresting life you've led but if you could go back say a few years ago and you could either one owner professional. NFL football team. ooh Be the governor of New York. Which one would you choose? Ah Well I've never wanted to own a NFL team you know. I own the hockey team. The Buffalo Sabres right and that was a great experience over an eight year period. I did want to be governor. I tried to be governor three times as an independent independent in New York state which is a tough throw. The two major parties have so much strength in New York state side for an independent. They get elected I. I would've loved that challenge back then I really would have I have I have. I have a couple of final questions here. I've noticed you've donated throughout your career. Tutored and fifty million billion dollars. Is that correct. You've donated over fifty million dollars to charities thus far is that right actually. It's over three hundred million now. Three hundred million. What kind of charities do you do you give to? Who and what charity? You look for in the charities that you give back to the actually. The two categories of charities sounded onto intellectually Developmentally Disabled and Steven is now in his early fifties and but because of his experience We spent he and his mother. We've given quite a bit to organizations that deal with people with developmental disabilities he's We have a foundation set up in our name It gives out approximately two million dollars through two the foundation. Also oh there's a lot of organizations and any community hospitals and schools That type of thing and We probably hit most of them. At least they know if most of them in the Rochester New York area. We're now expanding down to southwest Florida so into individual individuals with developmental elemental. Disabilities is is a major one. But we also help. As many schools schools colleges universities hospitals. Can we have three children's hospitals named after rose one in Rochester Syracuse and one in Naples. Well I'm not sure. What a series of poor life choices that? Tom May end up on our show. But this is the puck on the show and I know he was confused as the how would happen. We've had John Maxwell on the show so many great people but this was one of my favorite interviews. This was awesome awesome. Tom Thank you so much. Yeah thanks appreciate doing it. Hey well I'll tell you what. If we're ever in Naples Florida area we're gonNA bring out our megaphone we have a megaphone phone does not have a megaphone in the studio you actually do megaphone and if you hear some guys running around the water short areas harbor looking for the Buffalo Sabres here. We're looking for top. If you hear us just wave at US and that way we'll know that you know duck and run you tasteless. Give me a call by lunch. Oh where again. You are a customer right. We are. Oh yes you could write it off. Yeah even a better. We're doing lunch oncoming Tom Company and that right there was a blast e blast. I encourage everybody out there. If view are stuck in a Rut. And you don't know how to grow your business and you can't afford one on one coaching and you can't afford to get to a workshop. Why don't you check out our online school? It's just nineteen dollars a month and you go to thrive time show DOT COM and com. You Click on the business school button so again go. To thrive time show DOT COM and click on the business school button and there for just nineteen dollars a month. You can have access to millionaires and mentors via video. People Super Super Success Stories. Just like today's guests. I mean if you want access to Michael Levine the world's top branding and PR expert. Where Lee Cockerel Hawk role? The former executive vice president of Walt Disney world resort's who once managed forty thousand employees at one time in one million customers per week. You can and have access to all that for just nineteen dollars a month. Check it out today by going. To thrive time show DOT COM and clicking on the business school button. And they're you can subscribe. You can check get out and if you have enough money to do it if you got the money in your pocket. I would encourage you to pick up a copy of Tom's new book. He doesn't need your money but he does need to share share the wisdom that he has learned over the years. I mean this guy's given away over three hundred million dollars of of money to charities and he's written a book not to make a quick profit off off. Yeah but but to teach you the skills and the principles that he's learned in route to building a billion dollar business. Twenty eight billion dollar business known as paychecks. His new book is called built. Not Born self made billionaires no nonsense guide for entrepreneurs check it out today again. It's built not born. A self made billionaires no nonsense since guide for entrepreneurs any further. I do we liked in each and every show with the boom which stands for big overwhelming optimistic momentum. Because we know that's what it takes to build a successful company to what wh- what if you could gain access yes to download each and every book that I've ever written for free. Well that'd be terrible because I don't like you okay. We're making a big assumption But assuming that you do like me and you like the thrive time show you can now go to thrive time show dot com forward slash free dash resources. That's it's thrive time show dot com forward slash free dash resources to download each and every book that I've ever written for free. You can download the e book version of in each and every book that I've ever written for free clans. Want chime in here. Oh quick I don't like you or capitalism. I feel like we should get free stuff. Well I am in the process of explaining where or you can get free stuff and you can now also download all the helpful infographics infographics on firing one. 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Tom New York United States Florida Buffalo Sabres Paychecks University Rochester New York Tom Golisano founder America Rochester Naples Alfred partner DOT COM Dan Young Guy Shaw business owner
#180 Tom Golisano -Self-Made Billionaire Founder of Paychex on Entrepreneurship

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

43:58 min | 6 months ago

#180 Tom Golisano -Self-Made Billionaire Founder of Paychex on Entrepreneurship

"I'm Sean Delaney. And you're listening to what they're what got you. There is a must follow for entrepreneurs creatives high achievers and change makers each week I sit down with some of the world's most influential the people and focus on the journey behind their success we uncover the strategy tactics and routines that help them get their. Now's your journey. So it's time to learn what's going to get you got to dance with Sean Lady. What got you Dan with Sean Delaney got today with the lady? Well I think one of the most important things about identifying risks is what I call industry. Now if I just thought of payroll processing. They've never worked for payroll processor. I never would have come up with the idea. I just didn't have enough knowledge or understanding of the needle the province but because I worked for a company like that and because I was out selling the product and have a good understanding now people felt about things I totally Redo some of the risks. And we got the Tom. GAGLIANO IS A self made billionaire in air who started the payroll processing company paychecks with just three thousand dollars and a credit card to start. Tom Grew paychecks to a twenty eight billion dollar company. Any with more than six hundred thousand employees if you want to know what it takes to be an entrepreneur who makes dreams happen then this is the episode for you making making change transpire. That's the mission behind the most amazing tasting protein bar brand taking the nutrition industry by storm that brand and their NC TICO and they make the most delicious Kito friendly all natural collagen protein bars. If you're obsessed with the quality of food going into your body look I am then head out and pick up these amazing bars jammed with ten grams of collagen protein. They only have two three net carbs. No added sugar and unloaded with High Quality MC tee oil for the healthy fats from coconuts. Whether you're busy running the kids around from activity do activity a professional athlete. Or just someone looking for great tasting convenient stack do yourself a favor had debt. MCAT coat dot com and use code. WG Y T for twenty percents off your order so Tom Welcome guy there. How you doing today doing very well today? How could you not do well? Sunny Florida in November. Yeah we're we're fortunate enough to be here in your home Just admiring the gorgeous landscaping the unbelievable water scenes and I. I'm fascinated by this because I really did. Enjoy the new book and it resonates so much. 'CAUSE will come out of you in this book. Is that entrepreneurial it so I have to know where did that H I come from when you first realize you had that entrepreneurial gene gene. Well I guess going back to. Even when I was a young boy I had a paper route I collected bottles. I collected newspapers. I did all kinds of things because my parents were having a tough time financially. So there wasn't a lot of money to spread around so I went out and started doing those. Things got a level of satisfaction. Tim Enjoyment out of it. But serious thing happened to be one day. I was about seventeen years old. My father was a salesman for macaroni Company in Houston. This deliver macaroni two small supermarkets around the city in a big truck. So I used to helping leaves sixty five sixty six years old but one day we were back at the distribution bution point my father headey very degrading conversation with his boss and I had to sit stale neared and listen to it and it really affected me so I sort of made two commitments. One I wanted to have my own business and number two. I never would talk down to people. I finally got talked down to that day so what college it offered. Stay Tech thought about it. All the time I was in college came out Look for opportunities. Today I got out of school and it just continued from there. It's remarkable a story like that. The impact in the lasting impression impression that can have on you I N interested. They'll prior to that. The did you have any idea what you might do. When you're older specifically glee? No I knew I wanted to be the business world and took business at Alfred Tacke Which is the college I went to a two year college? I worked a year before I went to school because I didn't have any money to pay for room and board books and all that type of thing But I was pretty sure right from the beginning that I want to have my own business and control my own destiny. So I'd love to hear the origin story paychecks. Here you have this incredible circumstance where you view something your father father happening. And then you get that real id so then. How does paychecks come to be well I had worked for a company called electronic counting systems will call? Es for sure and they were a payroll processor they were typical of the payroll processes. Back in the fifties and sixties. They went after large companies. Their thought was larger through the company. The more checks they will produce in the more revenue. While I went to work for that company they started in sales that made me sales manager and then when they have just driving down the street I said you know we have an opportunity so a lot of small business but our product doesn't fit very well and I went to the library and found out ninety. Ninety eight percent of all American businesses are less than one hundred employees and I said why are we knockin heads against lawler competition at the high end of the market. Why don't you come up with the product for the Woah the market especially when the fifty employees? So I dreamed up a product definition very simply The way we get information from declined to press baron hadn't called him on the telephone instead of filling out of combat complicated computer input. She that has to be then picked up process and of course some back. So why don't we just add calling on the telephone. We'll read the employees in the. Let's let's just tell us a verbalize what they want to accomplish. Typical twenty person payroll takes about two or three minutes and the client doesn't have to learn how to do anything. Okay secondly if you're an employer in the United States of America you are really an unpaid tax collector. You collect taxes from your employees you remitted to the federal and state governments ever bits. And if you don't do it correctly or untie so heavy fines you panther. You have to pay well. Why not accomplish that for the clients pay the federal estate taxes forms? They never get behind. Never get caught up or forget to bake debates okay and saving those fines and penalties in the third part of it was doing the payroll tax returns and charging price people could afford to pay which we brought the price for payroll process. Doubt did when charges but the interesting part is the unit revenue per pero prefers. I was much higher. His why hero processors charge by the number of people the higher the number of people the lower the Revenue Bersin her project produce. So the fact is you ted. Ted Person Payrolls as opposed to one hundred the revenues two and a half times more okay but the at overhead is not to nap times more so much more profitable. I think that reflects in our profitability ratio issue high percentage of return so anyway I went to the management of the company. Let's do these three things and go. After the low end of the market. They said No. They thought that US doing payroll tax returns clients. Would that that go to. CPA community certified bubbly uh-huh and I disagreed said they want us to do payroll tax returns because they can't it's very tedious. It's if you do it manually. Especially in they can't Dan Builder Timeout. At a rate that makes them happy so they turned me down so I sat on the idea for about two or three months. And we're back in the the president's office and said I still a good idea what he's saying they said no week. Later resigned started. Ee could only wait so long. I feel like anyone who listens to that. They're automatically going to think of creative problem solving it and here you identified this issue. This problem found the solution. Have you always been like that. Do we see ways to fix things. Not but I think your point's well made I think our trainers are people that want to create the eight six problems okay. What I was trying to do is find a better way to fix the problem Unpaid tax collector for government. No easy job. Okay okay. So let's find a better way to do it. Embedded founded. I am sure you are prior to the start of this. We discussed a little bit around risk. DOC and I'm trying to think how you identified risk. I being a younger employees in the organization and taking this stopper management do idea and then once you bet on yourself herself into in decided to start the company. How'd you identify risk early on? Well I think one of the most important things about identifying risk is what I call industry knowledge if I just thought of payroll processing it never worked for payroll processor. I never would have come up with the idea. I just didn't have enough knowledge or understanding of the needed. Here's the problem. But because I worked for a company like that and because I was out selling the product and have a good understanding how people felt about things I totally reduced some L. of wrist too often though you find people go into businesses they start companies in industry. They do not have good industry knowledge and that really is has been successful. I know you work with a a number of young entrepreneurs right now. Is that the key thing you're looking for. Wh when thinking of helping one of these entrepreneurs is direct industry knowledge. Absolutely I think it's very very important You know sometimes. People refer to investing in small businesses. Either bet on the idea or you bet on the Jackie the person running in okay. I really look hard at the person writing it first. And then the idea the concept based on good industry knowledge that makes a winning combination. What are are you looking for in the jockey you I mean thousands and thousands of employees? Now have been under you. You must be very good at identifying little traits people people that good that perfect but maybe pretty good. You're never perfect. When it comes to recruiting indirect people I think you look for people that like competition whether it be sports more in business That they will persevere that they will work hard That they will continue to learn and grow. I WANNA on behalf good knowledgeable county now. They don't have to be an accountant but they better be able to be their financial statements Both the profit loss under Balaji. Too many people go into business do not have a good understanding financial statements and it's really reduces. Their ads been successful. I know you're a numbers this guy. So when when you're thinking of a business plan idea how into the weeds do you get are mapping out of business plan over multiple pages or a pretty good idea in in your hand Probably get three or four business plans week and some of them are five pages in some of them are five pounds The five pounders. I've rarely look at. I think enough of the story can be told in five pages. As long as Britain. Well understood these this concept of business plans get blown up in our colleges and so forth They don't have to be as complete. Maybe some of it helps educate the entrepreneur by doing it. But somebody walks in and says we're looking at a twenty billion our industry as they would have to do with anything you know how you GonNa get a part of it. That's the important thing but just because you're involved. The big industry has no real impact. And you're going to be success learn. Yeah I think it was in the book you were talking about overall market share and I think you you mentioned the two who other biggest competitors along with paychecks. I think you guys or twenty percent of the total markets. You see these business plans. Now be seventy percent of the total market just entirely unrealistic. You mentioned looking for people who are competitive and I know you played sports growing up. How much of that? The baseball background played played into business. View directly. I can't say that it did but there is no question. It created part of my personality. I I mean one is when I want to do better than the next guy and I was willing to pay the price to do that willing to pay the price. I'm I'm trying to think when you when you first set out with paychecks. What was the vision? How close to where you guys are now did? Did you think you'd get well. When I first started the day I started first of all I have very limited resources at three thousand dollars in a couple of credit cards and the credit cards only lasted a few Monsanto company's back Obviously because I could make payment terms but I envision the a three hundred clients in Rochester New York and as good work very hard and be the only salesperson. 'cause that's all I could afford was myself Embassy started with two people at another person in the office took me four years to sell those three hundred clients now. Paychecks sales two two thousand a week at doesn't reflect on my sales ability just to get the three hundred clients handsome Rochester New York and live happily ever after so talk to me about that. Was it four years. You never collected a paycheck. That's correct as you. I need to speak to that because there are so many people that are unwilling to sacrifice a week of not getting their starbucks drinkers on daily. That here you sacrifice for four years. Here's so I just need to know what what's that mindset the mindset was I knew if I could get up to three hundred clients or thereabouts I was going to be okay. And I'm out solid navy more to a week so it's just a matter of time so I had just had a put up also. I had some good friends is to take us out to lunch and dinner. All the time live a treatise to golf and stuff like that And I made a number of borrowings from banks of course it couldn't tell what was for a business loan headed televised of just consolidating some personal ALZ because they won't loan money to his new startup business. So if you know. Your Time's coming opened up the refrigerator. There wasn't much so but I knew it was there because I had industry knowledge I knew the market was there in my sales results. Just prove to me that we can do this. It's just a matter of time and effort back to the numbers right. You identified what I love so much about. Your story is how how relatable it could be to anyone three thousand dollars in your pocket. Some industry knowledge in here. You build a business worth twenty billion dollars. So do you really believe I believe I. I know the book title Built Knop Born you truly believe that anyone can develop that entrepreneurial mindset i. I wouldn't be as blanketing. Is that that but will. Here's what I will say. I think there's a certain amount of entrepreneurial spirit or knowledge and everybody now some idea at a scale attack tab one attending maybe a one okay but the great thing about the world the business you can take a one and make them into three or four or you can take four make committed seven and maybe you can take six and make him into a nine or ten. So with trump with training and knowledge and understanding people can expand expand their entrepreneurial skills. So that's important. Not only the people in business but people work for business you want them to be entrepreneurial too so you mentioned that in the book that you need to develop those people look for entrepreneurs that are part of your business. How do you develop those people those people that it really truly grow that business for you? Well I had a a saying I guess or expression higher attitude in that skill higher attitude in that skill you can trae skill you cannot train attitude in my opinion now. Sometimes you can help but you can't take somebody has a bad attitude. Generally speaking tournament to Feiger. It just won't have so with that kind of mentality. We brought in a lot of people that were very ambitious. Wanted to work hard. Wanted to be success. How do you get that out of someone I know? In the interview process. It might be thirty minutes an hour with someone. How do you identify those people? That aren't ambitious. That might have tiger personality You identify them. I think the best way is to talk to the previous employers. Now what's happened. Unfortunately in this day and age employers are very nervous about giving references about of previous employees. So so you gotta dig as much as you can And there's a little small thing you want to hear one small thing. I always look at you. Come in and sit at my desk in my office. Listen set jared By Secretary Walks Sean. Would you like a cup of coffee. You say sure she brings a cup of coffee. You take it you you put down on the debt. Don't say thank. You didn't say please okay. Then you walk away you leave the Empty Cup of my desk. Don't come back for another interview. Yeah those are kind of quirky things but it does reflect on the person's personality. Yeah no I have talking with a another. CEO recently only and those little personality traits those little things they do. It tells a lot about a person and you can truly pick up and and I I love how you believe that you can just develop these people and you can give give them proper training or are there particular employees or coworkers that you really enjoyed working with throughout the years. Well I saw at I a subdued or eighteen partners Jaycees They were a lot of fun because zoo. Handsome strong willed people and they had their own ideas particularly after we we went public. Can you can you talk about that. Because I know there's a lot of people get a lot of questions about dealing with those strong willed employees and here you've got these seventeen shareholders orders and the way you navigate it that was just magnificent. Well first of all to get them to agree to form one company. I think I deserve the salesman of the year. Okay the way that happened action. I said our perspectives a month or so etta time than we had a meeting the AH NASA were the new Atlantis Hotel. We spent two days sitting around the table. The other the second day I went around the room mysolar interview out. I don't think a lot of made their decision until I called her name because there is a lot of mixed emotions I told them they gotta be extra preneurs as their own business in Harry m you know similar between six months and four years telling him they should join in become part of a public look bigger company. I want to know more about going public but I'm also curious. It took you four years to get to. The three hundred clients was at that point that you knew that you'd really be very successful with this business Now it didn't start in on me until one day while the person's had hired that company. Es came in at the time. It looks like you're GonNa make it. He says how can I get involved. as-as well we do a partnership in Buffalo Syracuse. And he said Okay and then a few months later employees of a client walked in the door to Terrific terrific service. I WanNa go someplace and started paychecks. I said well I'll partner with you Not where you WANNA go. He says Miami. I said Arner it is no no I want to be a franchise. I said. Well you'll pay initial fees percentage of your revenue. I'll train you come down and help you the first. There's few events so deal so we did that than after doing those to get started. I said wait a minute. Maybe this is a way to build a national company and baton. For the next three years I went out recruit people that I thought would be good entrepreneurs in all but one of moves from Rochester to another city in the country then I realized they we have tire by the Taylor. There must be that that excitement that momentum want anthony. I'm really interested about as you're building. Momentum is upstate New York and your ties to Rochester and just just talk about a nice time conflict conflict. When I was in my early twenties I wanted to move to either Florida or California? I Hate Winter Ski. I didn't like Ice Skate. Take another that But that was my conflict but you ended up staying in Rochester. When you got family and friends rely friends funds were long time? It's hard to leave so we stayed in Rochester. Once once twice during our history we thought about moving out of state Mainly because because of tax reasons so we decided it's just too big of a move to many people stayed Rogers interesting interesting. E there was a quote I remember remember reading about when you bought the Buffalo Sabres and that no one else was stepping up to the plate to support that community. So it seems like it's it's entrenched in you'd at to help that always that like purchasing a professional sports well first of all I only see three. NHL Hockey Games in my life. So I know nothing about the game. I wasn't real excited sighted about it. I never watched Like that but the city of Buffalo is in trouble. I mean this. This hockey team was important. Part of their culture and and people demonstrated that to me and I became interested same time it was also running for governor. It brought brought about quite a bit of conflict because everybody thought I was interested in buying the sabres. Because I was doing it for political reasons which is not the case uh-huh But the result was we ended up by the team and I became much more of a hockey fan. I why did the team to run at least break even didn't necessarily have to make a profit but I didn't want it to lose money and after I tough year are we really turned it around. Would he bought the team. We had fifty five hundred season ticket oldest by the end of the second year. Fifty thousand and that you know obviously turned and financial picture at a competitive nature in your exactly now. One thing. I'm so intrigued. By though is running paychecks you so you mentioned the run for Governor and then the hockey team. How are you possibly able to manage that? I'm good delegator is that is that the key to it all. I think it is the key to it all. I always thought it was my responsibility to be a good delegator Accomplish more because if you put it all on your shoulders unders you're gonNA limit yourself but being a good delegator bringing in the right people to execute than you give a lot more done. How early on did you identify? Dentist this from the early really early. Yeah I'm so intrigued by that because you see so many people who are just so stuck controlling controlling their entire business and they can't grow. That's just an incredibly aware of you to be able to do that early on you know it's funny you ask that question because I'll tell you a story Several years this guy's asked to do Presentation to group of entrepreneurs right here in Naples was about three hundred people in the audience he had at the end of the presentation tation and that at the end of the QA. Women's up and said Mr Gallison she said the. How many people did you have to stop down on while you're the corporate ladder? And my immediate response was Ma'am the key is not the trampled down keys debris with you. And that's what I felt. I did with my eighteen or nineteen partners in franchises and all the rest of the heroes didn't do it just for myself. I brought everybody along and to me. That's the Keel at. It's so funny just reading the book and then you mentioned all of those original partners if they kept all their stock doc if you were I think it was two hundred fifty million dollars. What's that like being able to step back for a minute and see the value created not just for for the employees toys the shareholders but the number of people that you've truly impacted over the years with has like it's two things it's first of all extremely gratifying? It's also creates a lot of pressure yourself to continue. You know 'cause you brought a people belong to a certain point you on new ones that you just brought brought in to be as successful as earl's so it creates responsibility which I think is great. This is what makes the world go round. It seems like a reoccurring theme that keeps keeps coming up. Is that growth mindset. You have Y- you mentioned can continue to devote evolve and develop and I'm really intrigued about the growth mindset when you took the company public until you take a company public. You've never done it before. So then how do you learn quickly. Enough that to navigate all the things that come with public company. Well first of all you need a really good support person chief financial officer because they are responsible for the day to day. Contact the banks in Wall Street so you gotta they have a person that really knows their way around in that arena a second. You gotTA keep an open mind you gotta learn yell. Stock analysts to some people revere them some people dislike them. I haven't a revere them Mainly because I thought it was important that they understand the paychecks story that they understand where we're going in how we're going to get there and that will drive the stock price to a more positive rate. When I hear people talk about being a public the company everybody quarterly results? We didn't fear that because it created disciplined structure for us. We wanted to continue to grow but we wanted to do at disciplined structured way so that Wall Street understood it was supported so it was more of a marketing challenge. If if you will because if you don't find a way to promote your stock in a positive way nobody's GonNa let you mentioned having that that vacation that long-term vision does that get down to the culture that you create within that company she. I hope so The one thing about growth as you brought up is when you have growth in the company. People are excited they try. Harder is very less us. politicking backstabbing. Everybody's upbeat soon. As Your Company's growth starts to level off then the spirit it starts to diminish politics begin to creep so so far so it's a very important reason to have both just to keep people's attitude and spirit in the right direction. So let's talk about that. I know paychecks of for the majority of the time everything was seventy percent year over year increases. Many years how do you develop L. AP- that positive mindset and that belief when things aren't going necessarily great at the time you gotTa have basics. We have a strong marketplace. I mean the numbers. Small businesses in this country compared to how many of them are using a payroll service. It's a wide open market. So if you have that situation that's very very important. Secondly if you run the business well and you can show prophets Without out being over over demanding but you can be a profitable company in prophets can grow and people could benefit from that We have a lot of people in stock options in the company and of course that drives a lot of their efforts to you mentioned delegation a few minutes ago. And I'm wondering what what your role looks like a CEO of Public Company. How much time were you able to dedicate to thinking about the future of the business? You never stop thinking about you. Just never stop thinking about And I was a little unique. I guess you know running for Governor three times lows still. CEO that was a very unusual situation. Zabel to do it. It obviously strong support staff. Everybody knew our objectives business goals so it was fairly easy from the from that point but it tastes good quality people and they have to understand the goals objectives as well. I mean you have to have some unique skills as well. I mean even thinking about just being able to compartmentalize as you might be leading board meeting. And then all of a sudden you're on a political campaign how are you able to get in that mindset in each different circumstance. You'd better do it. Quick you better do it quick because because I tell you it's two different worlds In fact people ask me. What's it like being in politics versus Running a business. The interesting anything is in an industry like payroll processing. You can have multiple companies all be successful. Our national competitor automatic data processing Azeem. Very successful company were very successful company but in politics there's only one winner and consequently they do things that I consider. It'd be absurd in that this early always ethical or legal. That's the difference. I mean people in our industry. I'm friends with yeah. I don't think too many politicians especially today are friends with the other side. You continue to bring that up in the book about building up the people both in your organization not talking down on what could be called a competitor. How early on did you identify that? That was important for the overall success of business actually actually early on What even as working for selling I realized? It's a far better approach while making a sales presentation not had to degrade your competition First of all irritates usually protect customer Secondly yet up saying things that probably are not true. You are totally correct. I just thought it was a much better sales approach. I used to start with automatic They were the leader in industry. They started the twenty five years ago. Complimentary okay but then I say but our product does evolve to this this. How big the sales? And that's how I I tried training our salespeople to sell. I'm just thinking about your abilities and something I feel like you've done. A lot of years are difficult conversations. sations how how do you approach difficult conversation. Yanni way to do it. I'll tell ya you gotta terminate somebody you can think about about it and think about it. Plan your speech and so on and so forth. Don't do that. Just bring him in. Sit him down and say I have to you. Straight to the point trade. To the point it saves time headaches. As far as I'm concerned those are the most difficult conversations a CEO has to have eaten discuss more about that about what what what it's truly like being c. l.. It's the most difficult element firing people. What else are you experiencing a lot of like? I said that the environment is positive in your growing. It's pretty easy but when you have difficulty Either in sales and profitability areas. You have to figure out why you gotTa do something and you gotTa do it fast. So and the other thing is major-party responsibility if the companies here. You've got to think about what's going to take it. There okay. Could be product. Development could be increase in sales and Sales Dell's decrease in the size of the sales organization Could be changing geography. Could be many things the CTO has to create Where the company's openings going then he asked to sell that digits to to the people that work there and then after you get started you gotta measure the results adults to make sure it's getting done so that's kind of three step process to Luckily era great sales guy able to sell that you mentioned two things their speed. And then we're you're taking the business and something I really enjoyed hearing about. Were some of the speedy and quick decisions in terms of acquisitions and I would. I just love. You've been hearing a story about that. You've probably talked about the acquisition of a company called advantage It was about to go public it was a payroll processing awesome company. The product is very much like ours and they were going to go public and they. They created their K.. One that's the document that explains their operation and I rented it. Looks like they're serious ad. They had forty or fifty offices in. We're growing I said said they're gonNA be a third player industry if we let this continue so I was going to be Chicago for an investment conference. I knew they were headquartered in Chicago. CONSI- called up the the head equity guy that on the company and it says the meat you said okay. We walked into his office at four o'clock in the afternoon. The chief financial officer. We walked out at quarter Phi but a handshake deal and I paid a lot of money for it was the best move I ever made. Calculated risks there. What's the narrative like in your head? Where is it? How exciting is that? The the thrill of that. I'm not so sure I'd use the word exciting. I would say it's tense in ads very dense. Because you got. You're making soon quick decisions in. You're talking about a lot of money. I think the set was issues over forty the dollars and have a forty five minute conversation about it even though you had the support of your chief financial officer intense saw. I have to assume you've done a lot of thinking about that deal. Prior in your head are is that how you're able to assess it. I I had thought about it in my head but I had no now. Ideally I was going to concentrate it in one forty. Five minutes doesn't really. No idea going idea is going to happen. Wow well first of all I never met the people so I didn't know no. How stronger Denzel Company what? I'm pretty sure I have to imagine. So I'm thinking about even just the overall Ralph growth. You experience these new things like that. It's almost like you put another notch in your belt after you deal with something like that. How much more advanced you think you became towards the end of your career? As opposed to the beginning I think one ways and be only because of experience and thinking situations Out One of the things that add WanNa sound like a jerk care about one of the things I've been told many many times. Hi It's so unusual for person that starts a company with one employee to still be running it when it's at ten thousand employees and I I guess I stayed with. It is nice. They've never threw a I mean that's unique circumstance of really is so are. Are there other things that being able to look back. Reflect that you think. We're just vitally important for that sustained. Excellence now I think I think I've already mentioned the size of the market. The fact that we had a really good management team that wanted to be successful That's what drove. We were fortunate enough. I was able to talk with you a few minutes. Prior to this and one of the things we're discussing is the book writing process and that you have so many of these ideas in the head and and one thing you wish you had done is journal throughout your career so you could just look back and reflect exactly right. I really wish I had kept some sort of journal or diary. Just a few words every day would have been great and then the able to go back and I'll talk to one of the ex-partners on the phone and look bring back memories you know. Kick out of talking about him and join would amend a lot more Is that what it comes down to a massive success is it about the journey and those little experiences with colleagues and friends throughout the time I believe it is the journey is what's in the being able to look back on series of experiences Are Very very much fun. I I would love to talk to you for a little bit about philanthropy and I know you've given over a quarter of a billion dollars and just the impact that amount of money can have talk to me about philanthropy for a minute. It's almost as hard to give it away is to make it. And here's what I mean and by that in philanthropy particularly when you're dealing with the kind of You know most of our grads are accessible. Finally in Dallas It's a big responsibility. First of all the organization is presented to you. Do they have the wherewithal to create whatever project victor as could money for do they have the ability to pull it off. Will the money be. Spent wisely will management team. Be there for you. Know the Thanksgiving a several million dollars organization autism that that three people leave effect. We have experienced that we've had with about four or five colleges. I'd give the money to build a building or something Susan. Make the announcement to see Yo- announcers you can't do anything about it anyway. It's it's difficult got it takes time and it takes energy Fortunately I have in our head of our foundation. A woman by the name of style she'd been with over fifteen years that she does a phenomenal job of investigating inspecting understanding their needs. And whether or not they can make they can have it. It's almost like you need to provide a copy of the new book built Knop born. Do I anyone. You're donating money to so they can better. Understanding the the S- quality of the ask is more difficult than as much fun as vested neck position. And so fortunately I have guessed so she cut a lot so he's nice that someone by your side in terms of circumstances it seems like that's over occuring theme. Now you're helping develop the next set of entrepreneurs. This book is is large part in doing that. I know you work with a handful of entrepreneurs now businesses and any parting advice any big takeaways. You think they'll get by reading this book or even the entrepreneurs you work with. What's it like working with you? Well now I would say as far as takeaways this book. I think there's a couple of near that are extremely important. And you may snicker the first one but frayed in today's Day and age. If you starting a business you should have a prenuptial agreement. The spouse Nothing being worse comes in nothing can happen. That's worse than run a successful business. For whatever reason you split up from your spouse and business it has to be sold off whoever that could that could be horrible secondly Once you successful don't bet the farm you're GONNA get approached by all kinds of people. They might cue to invest in their business or maybe you want to create a new idea new business. Don't bet the whole thing on whether the GonNa make it sound takeaways. There air it even just ties back into that recurring theme of that Long Term Vision. And that's something you were able to do year after year is is understand potential long-term games Eh is that something you're always thinking about. And if so how far out are you looking. Well don't forget today. I don't run the business. Yeah okay up jared aboard. I have some responsibility ability for direction but not a lot. Fortunately we have a CEO. Martin beauty is very good We have some conflict Affleck's we always will have but is doing a fantastic job. And he's got his eye involving knows where to take it for example When I left page objects and two thousand four CEO Payrolls about eighty five percent of our revenue. Okay during the last ten under twelve years Marty has created a product mix which now human resource services are almost half the company things like 401k administration. Nation's cafeteria plans unemployment representation all these new products as he's evolved. That are really made a difference so now. Paychecks is viewed not only as a payroll passes which is becoming a little bit of a commodity a robust but now this whole rage of human resource service. Arguing continues the growth of the company. I really did enjoy this conversation. Tom From three thousand dollars to a multi billionaire. It's fascinating to hear the journey. Would I appreciate most about your story in the book is how it's an action. It's a playbook for those young entrepreneurs now so I I really do appreciate that. I cannot not thank you enough. The book is out now built not born. Tom Gal Sano thank you for joining us on. What got you? There was a story you guys made it to the end of another there episode of what got you there. I hope you guys enjoyed it. I really do appreciate you taking the time to listen all the way through. If you found value in this the best last way you can support the show is giving us a review rating it sharing it with your friends and also sharing on social. I can't tell you how much I appreciate it looking forward. You guys listening to another episode.

CEO Rochester Tom Gal Sano Hockey chief financial officer salesman Florida United States Sean Delaney Sean Lady Tim macaroni Company Monsanto company NC Public Company starbucks baseball Kito Dan
#575 Billionare Paychex Founder, Tom Golisano, Shares How to Build a Successful Company

The Small Business Radio Show

52:55 min | 5 months ago

#575 Billionare Paychex Founder, Tom Golisano, Shares How to Build a Successful Company

"Get ready for all the craziness of small business. It's exactly that craziness that makes it exciting and totally unbelievable small business radio is now on the air with your host Larry Maltz. Thanks for joining this week's radio show remember. This is the final word in small business for those keeping track. This is now show number. Five hundred seventy five eight is leap day twenty. Twenty another day to get unstuck and really show your brilliance of the business world. This episode is provided by next EVA. The all in one communications platform for your small business. It's also sponsored by linked in the place to generate leads drive traffic and build your brand awareness for a free one hundred dollars credit to launch your campaign go to www dot lincoln dot com slash SB are. We're also sponsored by visa. Sita all you need to run your business in one software try IT FOR FREE AT. Www Dot V. C. dot com. That's V C. I T A DOT COM and use buried ten for an exclusive discount world supported by blue summit supplies. Get Your W. twos intended to nine tax forms and all your business supplies at. Www DOT blew summit supplies dot com slash. Sb are use the code espionage ten at checkout to save ten percents off your order well my next guest personifies the American dream. He built a company from three thousand dollars a credit card to having over three billion dollar valuation. Tom Gal Asano is an entrepreneur. Philanthropist civic leader and former owner of the bus buffalo SABRES NHL team. He's also the founder and chairman of the Board of paychecks with more than fifteen thousand employees and one hundred locations nationwide paychecks of the leading provider of payroll human resources and benefits outsourcing for small and medium sized businesses. Active in both business and philanthropy. Tom Currently mentors the entrepreneurs who run businesses in which he has invested and overseas his family's charitable foundation. Today's donate over three hundred million dollars to a wide range of charnel causes. He's just come out with a great new book. It's called built not born. It's a how to guide to help much. Moore's Tom Welcome to the show to be here with US morning. Well I know you've told the story many times but please go back for our listeners. And tell us how. Did you start a company on three thousand dollars in credit card? Well I was a sales person the sales manager for a payroll processing That specialize in doing payroll processing for larger companies one hundred employees or more. But you drive down any street. In the United States you'll see. Most businesses have less than one hundred employees. In fact at the library I found out ninety percent of all businesses in the US have less than one hundred employees and nobody in the payroll processing. Business was directing their efforts towards that low end market So I started a company You're right three thousand dollars. In a couple of credit cards. Credit cards lasted about three months. Before the vendors took him could keep up with the famous. It started out slow. Took me four years to get the first three hundred clients in today. Paychecks signed up about two thousand companies a week. Give me an idea right. Now we're processing the payroll for six hundred seventy thousand company. That's providing human resource services to those organization. So I've met a lot of experience and a lot of background without your preneurs. First of all I love him. I think they're great for this country. I think they're great for America. They the ones that are the major job creators and as you work with them you realize that sometimes they make mistakes like the make mistakes I made so I wrote the book with the idea that whatever ideas or concepts I could give them to help them be more productive and more efficient. I thought it would be a real good idea so tom code. I wrote the book the book it was real easy for me. As a matter of fact I was talking to a book publisher on the phone and he was talking on the phone to me. I wrote the table accounts the chapters. I wanted to cover. And as you go through the book you'll see You know ones that very very important entrepreneurs so one thing that I want to go back before. We discuss the book. Is You said that it took you four years to get three hundred clients and I think that's important because a lot of times people look at success story like yours and they think that it happened overnight but it really didn't. It didn't and you know that's one of the interesting points about ownership Shia Dealing with entrepreneurs sometimes they get over. Who's iast about their ability to sell customers or clients and they hang up their shingle or they put up their sign. Whatever they think the world is gonNA come to them and they soon realize that doesn't work that way that they're gonNA have to go out to the world and bring the world to that and it takes work. It takes hard upper takes time and so forth. But I think that's the biggest. Most classic mistake entrepreneurs make they over anticipate their ability to sell their product or service. And what do they do that time? Do you think because they're just too optimistic. Or they're too in love with their service and it's or if I build it they will come and people naturally just by it. Yeah I think they get caught up in the enthusiasm and in a way. You can't blame them. Maybe starting a business without enthusiasm would probably be a steak right but they are over at those yet in my opinion. And they're over they over project what they're going to be able to sell to their customer base right because somewhere along the line those customers have probably been getting along almost just fine before you came along. Actually switching to your solution is actually harder than you think it particularly back when I started in the early seventies payroll processing for small companies today are average sized client had fifteen employees or define for a small payroll processing. Wasn't even thought up for that market at that time so we were kind of new to the market. We did some things that bay their product. A little more favorable to small companies. And obviously it. It worked over longer time. I think one of the most difficult things when you start out is to get other companies to trust you. And I'm thinking how'd you get these companies to trust you to do their payroll which is probably the most sensitive things they have. Well I'd like to say it was my smart sales ability and so forth. But it took us a while because people were reticent you know handling the company's payroll is very personal things especially in a small business owner is used very concerned about confidentiality and doesn't want the word to get out in the street that what payrolls all about. So they are we're at radisson today. It's a lot different story. Most companies that start up now think about payroll processing. But I'm GonNa give you an interesting. The tessick we'll all the payroll processes combined. The United States today and there are lots of. We only have combined twenty percent of the potential marketplace wound. So there's room for growth for all the payroll processes is obviously included paychecks. That's crazy me because I win the advice. I always give the small business owners as soon as you get your first employees. You've got to outsource your payroll right. Because maybe because I made that mistake in my where I didn't and the IRS shut me down. Because I didn't remit the payroll taxes. Or what a collective my employees on time. That's funny thing about that time. They get upset about that. They do you know. The burden is a big to an employer for example if you have five employees in the state of New York you have a minimum of fifty two payroll tax returns and payments must be made at a timely and correct basis. And if you don't do it correctly timely the find a pretty severe so reliable payroll service like paychecks is is really a good move for new entrepreneur so nothing then you watch purse face. Tom Is to try to figure out how much money they need to run their business. And I remember in the early two thousands when I was Angel Investor. Guy Pitched me and said well to get started. I only need a million dollars and I'm thinking yeah island need a million dollars to. But how do you figure out actually the amount of capital that you do need to start? Your Business. Well it's not an easy thing and of course you have to go through the process of doing sales projections and the amount of sales revenue again. Who's GonNa be the biggest indicator much capital you're going to need and because entrepreneurs have a tendency to over enthusiastically speculate? What evidence is going to be and it doesn't happen then they end up in what they call a cash flow problem but it's really a sales problem having industry experience before it out. Sprinter opens up their business. is a very important thing. I believe I was fortunate enough. I worked or a payroll processor baby directed at services to a different market that I went after but having that industry knowledge for any entrepreneur. Very very important so Tom. How'd you figure out the right amount? Because I've always said that sometimes entrepreneurs raise too much money and too much money gets them to be lazy and stupid. How do you make sure you don't waste it well? A lot of times depends on the source of the money. If your own money you may have a tendency to be a lot more careful list. We should be more careful with other people's money. That's exactly right right. But I'd sort of a investor myself and the number of businesses and it's always the sixty four dollar question. How much money do they really make? And where's IT GONNA come truck? It's it's probably the biggest area of concern for any entrepreneur. And so how do you help them through that you help them through what the cash flow is going to look like a year or two years from now? Well the way you help them through is to sit down with them and look at their projections and make sure they're realistic For example in the case when I started paychecks. I knew how much revenue is gonNA come in from each customer. I had an idea of how many customers I could so a week a month or year. Then I took that revenue balls applied it by the number of customers and then I took a look at what my overhead was and for example customer brought in fifteen dollars a pay period every week and I had a hundred up. That would be fifteen hundred dollars a week now. What is my overhead? Their service those customers and that's pretty easy to determine. Probably they had two or three employees and the caught the proper processing and so on so it's pretty easy to do. I think any enterpreneur that goes into a business should have a real good idea of what it takes to make a profit starting with the sales volume and compare it to their expensive. I think any entrepreneur. Starting a business can put that one piece of paper one page business plan should be. How many clients do I need? What's going to be by profit margin per client and how much capital do? I need to get to that point. So one of the things as your giving someone capital. You've got into Gauchet what the equity deal is going to be and I know that the philosophy for your company is a good deal for everyone. Tell us about that. Does it mean a good deal for everyone? Is that possible very possible And I think it's also a quality way to operate venture the people around you that people use. Oc eight with if they're not doing if they're not getting a decent deal from you for whatever the service might be or equity in the company They're not gonNA stay with you so I really believe that Making deals that are good for everybody's very court the let me tell you how. Paychecks became a national company despite help. Explain this question. After I got started in Rochester New York and those three hundred clients I started. Got Getting individuals involved In studying payroll because those paychecks offices in different cities around the country the fact that four year period. I brought in seventeen more people. Seventeen different people that all basically lived in Rochester New York and moved to various parts of the country and started a paycheck operations. Did that number of years Four or five years and then we decided we would form one company would band together. These seventeen organizations we would become employees and shareholders. We had a five year plan to Open offices and develop ourselves squirts for the first three years focus on profitability. The next two years then eventually sell the company or take public now. When I can't been surveyed the sales pitch these people who consolidated into one company. I was trying to make a good deal for everyone. Now you mentioned we have a market capitalization of the company of thirty one billion dollars today. The smallest shareholder of the new organization owned one and a half percent. Now you can play one and a half percent types thirty one billion dollars dollar amount so and then not being a great deal for everyone and that's sort of the basic philosophy when I get involved with entrepreneur entrepreneurs. How's this going to be good for everybody? I really liked that because I think that in the world today in politics and current events. It's always seems like you win. I lose right and I think that you can business if everyone can come out ahead. Everyone's happier for and greater chance of success. The only place you win and somebody else loses in politics or sports or sports right absolutely quarterback next year. Exactly let me ask you one last question. One of the things that always puzzled me is. How do you train a entrepreneur to become a good leader and a manager because I was fortunate of Tom when I started my career for the first ten years I worked for? Ibm They promoted me to a manager. They sent me away to charm school for a month. And I got a lot of experience and training and to be Majer but most entrepreneurs don't they don't know how to relieve delegate and lead. What advice do you have them for that? Well there's some basic principles of that and it's going to sound so basic People probably scratch their head and say that right here it is treat people who where you WANNA be treated. That's the number one goal a good leadership honesty and integrity and treat people the way you would like to be treated and then they will follow now. I believe. You're an entrepreneur with a certain skill level. Let's say you're at three work with experience you could become a six or seven or maybe a six can become a nine So everybody has the opportunity especially in including employees of small companies to become more entrepreneurial than they are. I like that a lot. It's trying to improve what you have. The town of the book is called built not born people and get it at Amazon but Tom if they want to learn more about your journey where can they reach you the website Tom? Tom Dot Com. It's T. O. M. G. O. L. I. S. A. N. O. DOT COM Tom. Thanks so much for being on the show and thanks for everything you do to help out entrepreneurs pleasure thank you much this is Ami twenty w cpt in Chicago. We'll be right back time and place. Is Everything especially when it comes to marketing but in today's age of a million messages per minute and not enough hours in the day? How do you really catch people's attention? Fortunately there's a simple way linked in can help you speak to the right professionals at the right time with over sixty two million decision makers on Lincoln. You're able to connect with the right business. Leaders are relevant to your company and Lincoln ads. You can make sure your message or getting through to these relevant people. 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Finally his business with sucking the life out of him do any of these sound familiar. Your sales won't budge. In spite of your best efforts you have few new leads for customers. Coming in and existing customers are fading away. You're burned out and completely exhausted. It's no longer fun and your family suffers as well if you're one of the millions of small business owners facing these problems every year. Berry has the answer. Check OUT BERRY MOLDS DOT COM slash unstuck to subscribe to his six part video series. That's Berry malts. M O L T Z DOT com slash. Unstuck stick around to get your small business unstuck more small business radio with Barry Moles now. W CPT h twenty. Chicago's progressive. Talk while there's a lot of discussion recently about how behavioral science can be used in business to help us Charlotte blank. Who's the chief Behavioral Officer at merits? She leads the company's practice of Behavioral Science Innovation through xr applications of social psychology and Behavioral Economics Incentive magazine named Charlotte Visionary and one of the two thousand sixteen twenty five most influential incentive industry charlotte. Welcome to the show. Thanks so much barry. Happy to be here. Why did you with a mouthful? What is Behavioral Science? So we can all understand behavioral sciences sort of an umbrella term to catch studies like social psychology and Behavioral Economics Ways of thinking about how people really make decisions And those include some interesting sort of sub conscious and environmental factors Influence the the way we make decisions or died how to focus our energy and resources Not all of our decisions are perfectly rational or aligned with economic theory in the traditional sense. Say not perfectly rational of course very much so what is doing in this area. Why are they so interested in incentive firm merit doesn't actually I have kind of a broad portfolio business solutions? But broadly speaking where people in performance company we help to understand enable and motivate people to really unleash their potential We work with large companies in all industries and essentially Bring out the best in their stakeholders be they. Sales people sales partners like Distributors and wholesalers dealerships and the like As well as consumers. So there's many ways to do that some of the traditional ways where it's really started over one hundred years ago is this whole field of incentive recognition and reward is extra levers that we can pull to influence people and sort of offer carrots and sticks But there's a lot of nuance and subtlety to this as well. So there's a whole practice of of Professional Services Consulting That would be That go to support that technology and rewards practice really at the core of all of it is an understanding of human behavior so If our job is to help you a corporation get the most out of your people and the way we do that is by investing in a deep understanding of what makes those people tick so we can apply those learnings from from academia into industry. So if I'm a small business owner how do I really design a system? So the people do Strive. Their best to achieve the goals that we've mutually agreed upon. Is it all about money? Get not even close. Yeah so So we pretend thank you know traditional economic theory if we were to think that you know people were rational economic utility maximizing calculators Then this would all be really easy that we would just sort of assume a straight line that the more money you offer someone the harder they work in the more you get out of them and you wouldn't need this whole sort of study around what actually makes people work But we know from psychology that things are much more complex than that Money's important you know. People need to earn a fair living. you know. No one's suggesting that we just kind of throw out cash compensation of the foundation of our kind of salary system but when it comes to what we do merits and sort of We work with people to find that extra ten percent. That's sort of extra lift or helping people to find that discretionary effort and go beyond the nine to five That's where cash can have sort of a diminishing return And start to feel like just more of the same in his less special than some of the other Nontraditional non-cash reward mechanisms. We might look at a love the idea these Haniya get the extra ten percents this crushing effort. Because I really think that's what it's about. That's what it is going to separate your team and your employees off from the next small business owners and you say it's really not about money it'd be easier was about money. What kinds of things should I have in my company so I can get that extra little bit? That's going to put me ahead of the competition. Well I think stepping outside of the whole space of incentives and reward is starting first by thinking about intrinsic motivation. There's a whole body of scientific research on based on self determination theory that suggests that we find our greatest Sort of motivation from within From an intrinsic desire to be our best so I would start as a manager or leader of a small business by looking at the culture of the organization and the systems. I've designed Throughout the company to help enable this intrinsic motivation through lovers like giving people a sense of autonomy or control or choice Giving them a sense of purpose like they're connected to something greater than the work they do. be that a greater societal. Good or really. Just a clear connection to the company's bottom line And also social connections humans are an incredibly social species and we're at work for so Such a large portion of our day That if we feel that we have strong connections with our peers As a social system at work that can go along way as well so those are a few areas that I would focus on before even thinking about Issues like compensation and extra nick incentives which can be a nice sort of juice to get people focused on a goal if you have a really High-priority sales item for example in particular months. That can be great for focusing attention. if there's room to be gained on the intrinsic motivation side. I think you'd get more bang from your buck kind of starting. They're totally agree with you. And I love the three things you listed out and they really bear repeating one. Is You know atonomy choice. In their job. A sense of purpose in what they're doing then social connections and I think most of these are very difficult for a small business owner to execute on as a leader. Because many times I go into small business owners Companies and they haven't really define what is the greater purpose of what we're doing. I know that we make widgets. But what are we really doing? Just like when you see on the side of the waste management truck right. We create landfills or on the side of the come of Edison. Electrical truck says we create warm homes. What's the what's the purpose? They've really got to create that so we can all get behind something right indeed. Yeah there's some really cool research suggest once you've got kind of a vision for that purpose. Is that the way you explain that the way the language you choose to frame? That vision is important as well. So there's some early research on the difference between image based words and abstract words and I know you talked to a lot of business folks and you probably hear a lot of really generic kind of buzz terms from the leadership Lexicon like synergies and innovations and we are going to make a difference and community and things that could really apply to any company and aren't very specific And so this research suggests that if you can paint a picture Like a great and sort of the iconic example is JFK speech. We're going to put a man on the moon and really something that people can picture in their minds That that can be not only clearer but more motivating and get people sort of collaborating toward the same goal that they can experience a sense of shared cognition where because people really especially at work or whatever they spent a Lotta time doing they wanna be part of something that is greater than themselves right That's key human condition. The other part I think it is difficult to small business owners. You say they need to have a sense of autonomy choice and I think a lot of owners say I want them to do exactly what I tell them. Do exactly what I told them to do it. That they don't want to give people autonomy choice. But why is that so important So I I think there's lots of ways to do it you know by the way that it's It can be that we can find ways to frame up choice opportunities in surprising ways. Like one of my favorite areas is called Job Crafting where we let people sort of reframe how they think about their role. Some of that research suggests that people who might have a job that one might consider sort of menial tasks like cleaning the hallways for example in a hospital setting if they are encouraged to think about that kind of connection to the purpose again and reframe. That role is like my job is keeping this environment safe and sterile and clean Which is an important part of the healing process for these patients and so maybe even allowing them to kind of Create a title that reflects that versus Let's say custodian and the traditional sense. That would be like an example of a creative way that you could give people autonomy in a way of thinking about their job That isn't so isn't really so difficult from a management perspective. You also talk about another key. Lever is social connections and I think again a lot of small business owners. Don't want to see people socializing because they wanna see him working but we have to really understand that if people can get close to each other they will go the extra mile for each other sometimes more than they'll go to the company. Yeah and you know I. I don't think that The having a social connection with people is mutually exclusive from. You know we're giving your all in focusing on your work. In fact I think they really go hand in hand. Our Chairman Steve Merits has a Sort of phrase that that we use as our kind of corporate values which are work hard. Have Fun get the job done. And he's purposeful about framing it that way which is different from work hard. Play hard which suggests that there's like a separation from work and you know there's work time and then there's fun time because the way he thinks about fun is that hard work is a part of it and that are most positive memories with people are not time where you know. The Sun was in your face and everything was lovely. It was times when you know things were tough and you work together to solve a tough challenge. That's those are the memories that we take forward with us and make us think fondly upon our our social connection so to him and I think to us as a company culture working hard as part of the fun that we have together and that can be part of a meaningful social experience. So what kinds of from your experience. Charlotte let's say we're working on a special project. What kind of rewards are best to roll out inside of a company though really make people feel good about what they achieved? Because that's part of it. I think too many times. We don't pause to celebrate if we have cheese something great. So there's lots of ways to think about rewards one way to start could be the intrinsic an extra Zik components we discussed earlier so Just sort of recognition. Just saying I see what you did And I appreciate you is a really valuable form of reward having that sense of recognition from a manager and also from peers And then when we talk about extra rewards again that's more about focusing effort on some discretionary kind of above and beyond extra ten percent kind of situation in the sales landscape where we're heavily involved. You might Use the term or short term incentive. I'm we want people to really gather around Rally around something important than Extrinsic motivators can be super Motivating and we. You know talked about cash. But there's something about the human brain that we do call them mental accounting where we love all if we have people are already being paid a cash salary and then you give them another cash bonus on top of it. That feels good enough but it kind of feels quite familiar and similar and can create the sort of drop in the bucket effect Whereas if you were to offer instead the chance to be part of a top performer trip for example like a really incredible Meeting or travel experience In in a destination for example that feels like something distinct and special and separate and and really worth going for and science suggests that That sense of separation or separate mental accounting actually makes people value that potential reward more highly. We'll have someone from the incentive industry on the on the Radio Show. I want to know what does the word spiff? Actually what's the abbreviation for that? Because I haven't heard that in so long we used spiff. Ibm Yeah I I know. A special performance incentive. I never knew what the F. stood for so I guess I'm still searching the other things you mentioned. Is that a good way to recognize. People is just the simply say I see what she did. I see you there and it's funny because I'm a big pelton trainer. It's like spinning on a bicycle and one of the trainers. She's always calling people and she said specifically I see there. I see there and a lot of people. They if they do a great job they just want to be recognized for doing that. Great job and it could be as simply as I see you there. Yeah and what's amazing about that? Is that intrinsic desire for recognition Is just as effective when it's anonymous so there's some really cool research by one of our partners. Yana DALLAS AT UCLA. Who did study with wikipedia since people who contribute to the WIKIPEDIA website? And as you probably know they do all of this work for Free Community of people who are intrinsically motivated. They just want to contribute their knowledge to The collective and in her study she randomly assigned some people an award that she just made up. That was just like a little badge that says you know. Great Job can contract contributor award. She needed the Edelweiss awards but Found that those who were given this sort of status badge even though they right under anonymous monikers they're sort of ghostwriters. No one knows who they are. But those who got that badge. ended up contributing more and lasting with the site longer than did similar contributors. Who didn't get the batch so it works even when people can't really see or who you are. It's interesting to me because you see on a lot of these sites now like I contribute a lot to tripadvisor where you get different kinds of badges right or if you're a top contributor on facebook right you'll get a badge for that particular site so it's really very interesting. There's a really important subject Charlotte. Where can people learn more about what you in? The organization are doing I would check out. People Science Dot Com. Which is really just a fun website. It's run by a science writer. Who's also a stand up comedian? So that sounds like fun. It's Super Fun and funny. And it's designed to kind of make people as excited about behavioral sciences. We are so that we can kind of continue to grow this momentum in applying the work and really connecting the science to the real world people science dot Com Charlotte's. Thanks so much on the show this is. Am eight twenty W CPT in Chicago. We'll be right back tune in regularly to my show. Then you know that I talk to many different businesses across the country different types of people different backgrounds all kinds of industries. But there's one thing that unites all of us. Searching that thing known as work life balance I get pretty bummed out when a listener tells me that. They haven't been home for dinner and a whole month. That's why I'm so excited to introduce you to V Sita. Vc that does a lot for one little application. It can help you achieve that lifestyle. Vcd's that personal assistant on steroids? You never had it sinks your client information appointments and payments. Vcd Sends Automated Appointments and payment reminders. Making sure your clients keep appointments and get paid on time to understand. Today's consumer making easy for them to book an appointment and pay from literally anywhere. A website facebook emails. Even your Google my business profile. It's also compatible with Google G. 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I immediately plunged into depression anxiety and lost a third of my body weight and attempt to control my blood sugar. Needless to say it was really a nightmare. But my next guest David. Winegarden was diagnosed with type. One diabetes the age of thirty six well training for a survival race as an avid athlete. David committed to rebuilding his life and providing positive energy to diabetes community coping with his condition. David helped found through certified diabetes educator named Cecilia his experience receiving meaningful education and support from her sparked the idea for Cecilia help to leverage technology. To scale the patients reach of adherents outcome improvement programs for Sarma cynical payer and provider organizations. David welcome to the show. Barry thank you for sharing your story pleasure to be here. Great to have here. So talk about the diabetes crisis. That's really going on in this country because it's getting worse. Yeah really is an. It's important for the listeners. To know this is two types of diabetes type one Where the body stops creating and so and and type two where There's a lack of regulation of insulin if you're type one of the thirty two million. Us It's about two million of those and type two is the majority. And you hear when you're on. The News. Diabetes typically talking about type two diabetes. Where with some medication and some exercise and nutrition. You can keep it under control and avoid the complications from the disease heart. Your heart disease Neuropathy we lose feeling and the arms and legs blindness and other really serious complications so we really are in a state of crisis because there's now a trend sort one in three Americans having diabetes within ten years and most people are very overwhelmed. They they need help. Yeah and I think the hard part is I guess. I feel you know when I was diagnosed. I was fortunate because I had symptoms where I thought I was going. Blind add blurred vision. Because my blood sugar was too high but a lot of people they call the silent killer. Because they really don't know the anything's going on until they have a blood test or something really tragic or reversible happens to them. Yeah absolutely with type one. The the Side effects that you had with version weight loss really. Kinda try people to get to the hospital. So you have to get on insulin or you basically is right. So it's it's a life for that Scenario with type two it is progressive and people have to go see their providers and get their lab tests and if they think they have diabetes or their doctor said you know you're you have diabetes and your family needs to be careful. It's that much more important to go get tested regularly. And it's just an annual blood tests part of the regular labs doctor with do and they look your butcher levels and determine if they're getting Going higher and then again by catching it early and Working you know on weight management and exercise and nutrition especially Really can avoid medication. And if you have to go on medication it's okay. We just have to take it and a lot of the serious complications with diabetes can be avoided. It's really funny. Some people say to some of my friends sent me. I don't understand how you stick like five times a day. Stick a needle into your stomach. How can you do that? And I'm like well. Do you WanNa live right. Do you want to survive? You'll do that but David tell us about your journey your training for this survival rates. Tell us about it. And what happened to you? And how you came this realization that you had diabetes and what happened to you immediately after that with a certified Diabetes Educator Cecilia streaming for eighth survival rates running swimming biking More of a like expanded triathlon and I just lost thirty pounds. I didn't even realize it. I just put on some shorts On the way to the doctor's office and they were huge. I didn't even understand it. And you know it's it's interesting because diabetes when it's not controlled the fact of the mind this well I mean I I look back and say how could I not realize that was thirty pounds lighter than my average wave and you know thankfully there is insulin nowadays and once I got on insulin. I started to get my weight back and started to rebuild my life and you marathons and I meant triathlons again. Ford's raising money for diabetes and got involved community or really made. A huge difference to me was A lady named Cecilia a nurse. Who is a diabetes educator who gave me the education and support and compassion that I needed to live that? Empowered life with diabetes. And I really She was my inspiration for founding this company at the time I was working at Microsoft and it was all about technology. I said this doesn't make any sense. There's only thirty thousand CECELIA's in this country. There's only three thousand chronologies. Why how are we gonNA really scale and reach? You know. Thirty two million people with diabetes. If we're not using technology to scale them and that's really when the company Started about ten years ago and we've been innovating reigning big change and helping people around the country ever since so what goes to your mind that you're you're an executive at Microsoft and now you're going to leave Microsoft and start something totally new that no one's ever done before. What does that decision making process? Look like and what did your family and friends tell you about that Portugal. I had a supportive family and I three young kids so I made sure we signed our first client which was paid air diabetes. Back then But you know it's like almost when the me. It's like starting a triathlon race. Where you kind of have your wetsuit on and you jump in the water. It's like you just gotTa go and I just like it was no it was there was no way. I was not going to pursue this because people need help and I just saw it wasn't about money it was about giving back. I mean this this country I is great and people. Every day are diagnosed. Then they're overwhelmed. Fifty percent of the patient. You know they're not taking their medication. They don't understand what the doctor told them They're in denial. Diabetes is the job no one wants and the only way to really engage. Them is to have you know. Cecilia person you know. Virtually you know fit into their schedule. And their world language and their socio-economic group engage with them and helped teach them and do that in a way. That really makes the difference in my wife and I. I just had to do it. I think that what you mentioned is so true because I found that when I first found out you know the doctor told me. He sat me in a room and he gave me this very complicated medical textbook and basically what it said was all the horrible things are going to happen to me of the next twenty years and it does get really lonely. Got Too much of the food who go in your mouth yes. They're taking daily medication. You've got to think about it. And and I think that having someone to share that journey with you whether it be person or in this new case really a I that really helps tell us about how Cecilia helps people with diabetes. Yeah absolutely so everyone's different and what we've found is we need to engage in a human way I with. We always have the same. Clinical expert. diabetes educator with the patient engaging building trust finding out. What's going on in their life? Are they taking the medication what barriers? What challenges are they having and then over the engagement where we will start to teach them how to use technology like how to test their blood? Sugar had use continuous glucose monitoring devices which get real time data so that we could see how they're doing to discuss the changes in blood. Sugars relate to the To the food they ate or their lifestyle health and make healthy choices. Our our clients are either pharmaceutical medical device companies who want their patients to stay on their medication and process. Further doctors Care Plan or health plans that want us to engage with the patients in order to get them healthier and You know lower the costs who want to keep patients out of the hospital. WanNa keep them as healthy as possible and we need to do that. In a way. That's compassionate we need to make very personalized so it fits into their schedule and their language and their culture And that's that's really what we're doing. We're really at digital health company. And we optimize the human and electronic touch to get patients to a really good point. So what does the electronic touch David Look like for someone? That's you know Using your service though as we engage with a patient where we got to a certain point they may say you know what I just have questions from time to time and so we have one way to a text messaging will use email. We'll send them links to videos. That are very personal to them if they're doing with You know getting on a weight management program. They may be links to helpful content That's around that also. Now with continuous glucose monitors and of course blood glucose meter which help pull the the numbers. The diabetes numbers the amount of sugar in the blood that data can be collected by US through the cloud. And we're able to look at patterns that the patient is having and then engage with the patient much ritual level because it's one thing to have a conversation with somebody and say you know I'm Wade and miss and help them through that. It's another thing to have that same conversation. Well looking at the patterns of their blood sugar over the week and discussing the meals or how it came down after they went for a walk in the evening and that helps motivate the patients so being able to communicate with the patient digitally so that fits into their schedule. And the way they liked to be communicated with and be taking data in about how things are going with them and monitoring them and then engaging with them with a much more richer conversation are keep carts about digital strategy. You know it's interesting with the data because witness data as you said you can have much more rich conversation because think about what these conversations were before someone had a bad blood sugar readings or they had a bad a one C which really says after three months. You know how you really taking care of yourself if you don't have any of the data. What does the diabetes educator or the doctor say? You should eat better should do this. But if you have all the data continuously about how the blood sugar's going up and down. That makes much more richer experience and then the individuals. David can really practice their own. Self care and I found with diabetes. Self care is really what it's all about. It's not up to my doctor. It's not anybody else. I've really got to take responsibility for it. And I think it's different when you're thirty. Five or forty five or fifty five years old. Then when you're five or fifteen or twenty five to take responsibility for yeah absolutely. I mean diabetes. At the end of the day you have self manage the disease. The physicians have maybe ten minutes. Fifteen minutes with you when you come in. And that's enough to kind of check on the mets but not enough to do the behavioral conversations that you need to really understand what you need to do with all these devices and miss when you go out there I mean. Insulin is a very powerful drug. You know monitor it improve supply sugars but it's also very you have to cover hydrate counting. Take the right dosage. You can go if you're about today if you take too much or your exercise or walk while you have a lot of insulin and so it's really something that we have to get people to self manage and be empowered and watch. Well David appreciate your work on this adventure. So important for the millions and millions of people like us who have diabetes where people more look learn more about Cecilia and your adventure. Yeah please come. And join the health community Cecilia HEALTH DOT COM which is spelled. C. E. C. E. L. A. HEALTH DOT COM. We also have a very active wing thin community and facebook community. And you could always post pet questions. There and our clinicians will be able to help Wishing everybody a very empowered life with diabetes. David thanks so much for joining us and thank everyone for joining us for this week's radio show. I want thank our sponsors next EVA. The all in one communications platform for your small business. I WanNA thank linked in. It's the place to generate leads drive traffic and build your brand awareness for free one hundred dollars credit to launch your campaign go to www dot lincoln dot com slash. Sb are. We're also sponsored by V. Sita all you need to run your business in one software try IT FOR FREE AT. Www dot V. SITA DOT com. That's visa dot com use the code buried Tan for exclusive discount and finally were supported by blue summit supplies. Get Your W. Twos ten thousand nine tax forms and all your business supplies at. Www DOT blues summit supplies slash SB are and use the code espionage ten at checkout to save ten percents off your order? I want to thank our incredible staff are booking producers stairs. Shafran are in studio producer. Today is Devon our marketing manager. Courtney Gilchrist if you're serious about being more successful here in two thousand twenty you gotta give me a call. My phone line is seven. Seven three eight three seven eight two five zero or just email me a berry at mullets dot com. Remember love. Everyone trust a few and pal your own canoe. Heavy profitable and passionate week. You can find on the web at Perry DOT COM or more episodes of small business radio and small Biz radio. Show DOT com.

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REShow: Jeff Van Gundy. Hour 2 (10-21-19)

The Rich Eisen Show

43:37 min | 10 months ago

REShow: Jeff Van Gundy. Hour 2 (10-21-19)

"Off the dry cleaning pick-up some milk here's an idea let's add save hundreds of dollars on car insurance to that list and the good thing is you don't have to drop off or pick up anything thank you for listening to this podcast one sports net production available on apple podcast and podcast wine everybody's got a to do list drop watching some of these guys make something of themselves whether they was expected of them or not so you are right jeff I I do would just get gutted if not have your seasons and I mean Michigan's big ten season is essentially over in terms of trying to make it to the big ten championship in the week seven of the NFL campaign we've got Patriots and jets on Monday night football tonight which NFL with the chiefs winning in in Denver but losing Patrick Mahomes for a couple of weeks we'll talk to Kelsey Travis about what that's all about then you need to try babble the language learning APP that you can try for free Babbel's lessons are just fifteen minutes or less and you can go at your own pace you'll be amazed kind enough to understand that I was half a half there while watching all of these proceedings I did have two. TV's on amazed at how easy babble makes it start your first lesson in the language of your choice for free download the Bible APP or text begin to forty eight forty eight forty eight text warning to do you do today missing data rates may apply TMC terms can be able dot com slash terms. Please don't text and drive do you want to learn to speak a new language but don't have enough time in my office with Cooper my my eight year old sitting next to me at one point like I I would watch shape Patterson get sacked and E. G. I N. Two forty eight forty eight forty eight hour number two of the rich Eisen show is on the air and our number one we went over much of what happened so you know and share and we'll take your calls this hour of you know the worst sports day in your in your existence or recent memory where two of your teams two losses in in in conference right now I was a tough one man they came back in almost one at Travis Kelsey and the chiefs kicked off week seven and the you guys gave it a good shot so you know what you don't feel good about the the year you had no I mean no I know and I feel that way you know one hundred win season and I just love tomorrow night the NBA season tips off and I wanted to call wanted to chat some of the NBA Season Got Kenny Smith the jet in studio tomorrow from based on what I just revealed at the end of last hour should be detri- factor finish of sports weekend that just left me absolutely gutted earner and from ESPN front of the program which I'm pleased to say and Big Fan of his work from not only behind the mic from the days when he was coaching my favorite Basketball Eighteen Jeff van Gundy back here on the rich Eisen show how are Jeff Goodrich you know you shouldn't feel so bad about the Yankees losing to a superior team in the Astros is Michigan lost to Penn State and the Yankees got eliminated from the postseason in about twenty minutes time just boom boom at one point before I went to the dinner party where all of my friends on one TV and judge leave to on striking out like true like boom boom by taking a two hits like that so I wanted folks to call in and say I and I never know darnold can the jets could show up and surprise on the same way they did it against the Dallas cowboys last week but literally within a span of twenty minutes game winning streak came to a halt at Notre Dame they went on an eleven run I think at the end to beat Bill Walton that was like the worst why was that the worst day as a as a sports fan remember my birthday in nineteen seventy three UCLA adhd three to go without a shot clock usually never losing this game and I knew they lost before but I didn't believe it when I when I was watching it on replay I thought I had misheard it we've won every game that's what I jumped on the bandwagon in California I was in northern California at the time growing up I jumped on the bandwagon with Ucla that for you we ucla fan and it was on tape delay so they were up like eight or nine ten with like and then it ruined my birth it was like my twelfth birthday you know it was a bad day what did you love about Ucla so much jeff like what what spoke to you about that you know I was coaching I never met him but I was coaching the Knicks in the playoffs and Walton was doing one of our games and somehow so we were posting them up a lot so anyway Bill Walton this is right before the game like an hour and a half before the game calls coach wooden up I get on the phone gain of course it was I mean it was amazing here in southern California Dick Enberg and and an obviously Vince Gully and you know just some of the legend so that's it was very simple and only men are back then there was no TV except on like local teams so the only games we got was ucla he was Dick Enberg called the voices calling Games here in southern California Did you ever come across with John Paths with John Wooden Jeff Jeff meet him came up I was a ucla fan and so he called and this was a post ewing so we were playing spree well in Houston where best players right with them I'm like fawning about like you know him and he goes you know what I'd I'd rather see though I'd rather see Houston spree well face the basket more you've seen in the NBA since when would you say going into this campaign starts tomorrow Jeff Well I think you know obviously pre I think particularly in the western conference injury can really determine whether you make it or don't what seed you get home court advantage or not so I'm really I'm interested to see how it plays out I'm also interested to see which teams try to have a really good regular season or which teams it's likely they'll be the top seed or even you could make a case for Philadelphia but I'm really interested I'm really interested in who makes the playoffs because and for you in the Vogel Jason Kidd scenario that has been put together by the front office where Vogel's the head coach and kid arc instead of Play with their back to the basket I went in I said hey guys you know like a coach wouldn't say like you guys to play with your face up a little bit more tonight we wouldn't see all the injuries we see in sports so yeah I don't like to give load management any credence at all Jeff Van Gundy here on the rich Eisen show any like I don't have a good feel on who I would say the favorite would be I know everybody's saying you know the Los Angeles teams and maybe you feel like it's Milwaukee because the pre warriors once they had a role in but even back then there's always been favorites I just don't see any dynamic that might be playing out on the bench and he may be very surprised because I think as a former head coach Jason Kidd understand make suggestions that you think strongly about that will not get adapted the head coach doesn't agree and I think he probably went through that with his own assistant coaches both in well I don't know what their dynamic is because I don't know what you know Jason Kidd thinking but I think Jason then he went to Orlando and they they were trying to rebuild so they lost a lot but I thought it was an inspired choice and to have success you have to play your role and as an assistant coach that means you have to at times our game that's that is a that is humbling Jeff Jeff Van Gundy here on the rich Eisen show okay so most wide open season through Steve Kerr's mind as he gets started for the season I think probably in some ways Steve is really excited about the year mm-hmm and the Lakers here in Los Angeles obviously have all the is on them for all the obvious reasons how is it going to work however is there a concern kid is a very good it was a very good head coach at multiple spots he smart I thought teams played tough but anybody underestimating Indiana who did a magnificent job and the only thing that stopped them from getting to the finals was kept running into Lebron James in Miami Vogel and his skill With People Number One and coaching acumen number two they would be underestimating him greatly this is a guy the we can win this game yet so my only time ever got a chance to talk to him G so did you win a game that night did they face up more based on your I have no idea to pick him with the Lakers I think he's going to work well with their roster I have no worries about their roster Frank Vogel at all so and no worries about the is the assistant that a lot of people assume is the choice of Lebron and Vogel's the choice of Safe Phil Jackson in the ear of the front office what do you say to that Jeff Van Gundy it's GonNa be obviously more of a struggle to win more of a struggle to qualify for the playoffs and you know the western conference is hard it's going to be difficult it's GonNa it's different it's the dynamics different the expectations are different I'm sure he's excited about teaching so many young guys being on on the same page in time to make a push what's the biggest challenge do you think for coach that has this now on their plate I think Philadelphia is Brooklyn in Milwaukee I think he understands his role in his place I'd be surprised if there's any problems Jan here on the rich Eisen show and what do you think's going be a challenge But I think Steve is terrific terrific coach I got to work with him in the World Cup this summer I saw firsthand how good he was a be A challenge I think Brett Brown all these had there is huge challenges he's got a point guard who's not a range shooter in Simmons but more so it's a spectacular opportunity for the athletes both our student athletes at Nazareth and special Olympic athletes to get the train ah first of all the audacity of Walton to call up John Wooden John Wooden was actually watching the practice floor more I think he's going to have an MVP season but I think you know when when all you've done is win and win big eight that term like it we've tried to make load management seem like there's some science behind so there's not it's all guessing if there was science and we could prevent injuries than we would see a and in this particular facility what what's going on up there back in my own opened up Tom Golisano in his foundation where the lead donor to this both benefit the student athletes at Nazareth college but more importantly rich the special Olympic athletes are students here at Nazareth truly as an NBA center The health issues of embiid so I think there's so many questions such roster turnover not sure watching throughout the season tell me about this Golisano Training Center opening at Nazareth College Jeff I know you're very involved with the Special Olympics New York Nazareth College and Special Olympics of New York and we couldn't be more proud to be here for the opening of the building today and see the possibilities that can the Lakers and clippers have done the sixers a lot of people like what they have done which do you think is the biggest coaching challenge to get together and get everybody they're a huge team their depth has been diminished. They don't have a Lotta Shooting Horford is gonNA play at the power floor but his and the health and Human Services major are going to be working directly with the Special Olympic athletes and it's a truly spectacular building Golic Sano Training Center at Nazran College which is my where I went and graduated from college and it's a spectacular fieldhouse that's going to make the playoffs or advance in the playoffs and in terms of just teams that have put together rosters to try and win a championship Houston obviously we saw what so I have no doubt that they'll play very very well encourage could have an MVP season and yet it could still be a struggle To just putting it all together but just off the bat you know embiid and Simmons and Horford and Tobias are trying to pay their players throughout the regular season are you going load management on me there jeff is out with that was yeah I just don't like it because I just so Sara Lee that the roster fits great together but they are certainly talented I'm I I think that is the team that I'm most interested in Jeff Van Gundy here on the rich Eisen show how about that Philadelphia is the one and also if Brown's got the challenge Anson fans today well you know what a tough loss for him and I went at my buddy Murph on text who lost they were thirty one point favorites happen and I would I would you know all your listeners if they wanna see what great things are happening with Special Olympics just go to join the Revolution Dot Org Taras that's a pretty strong four and certainly eagles at three and four and Bryce Harper's watching the nats ah going to school is that what you're saying what do they call that back in the day with my age finding yourself and my dad going into the fifth year past the the first quarter white out at twenty one nothing right off the first quarter whiteout did somehow did include the big ten officiating it's join the revolution dot org congratulations on being part of that and going back to the spot that's meant so much to you and being part of something that's so remarkable jeff they so richly deserve and you know this is a very inclusive and cooperative venture between the Gala Sano Foundation Rolling by the Game Day morning crew on Sunday so it's fine I had none okay Michigan Michigan didn't get it was twenty one nothing final score twenty eight three jeff not to later in life very helpful jeff thanks for the call appreciate always enjoy our chats we'll chat throughout the season that enjoyed that grind for you got score would have been nonstop right but Michigan came back and almost won the damn game and played very hard and unfortunately just couldn't come up with it in the end and couldn't get the worst they're the worst I know PAC twelve officials or saying always hold my beer terrible yeah you bet I'll say that into this microphone it said I hope you finally found yourself because it's the last year you're on the payroll in my house so that's too bad if you're finding yourself you didn't cross paths with wooden and Walton Sports Double Dip you've taken again my wolverines essentially had their big ten season come to a close on Saturday night twenty minutes later the Yankee season that I put so much into nations on rooting for one of the all time greats is exactly that that's next on the rich Eisen show your phone calls at eight four four two zero four rich as always a big thank you according to the show we'd like to ask a small but very important favor of you it'll only take a few minutes and if you're one of the first people to do it podcast one we'll make it worth your time we need you to complete a short sea Springer comes to play draws the walk and I said out loud as out Tuesday steps late worst possible guy worst or on conversely for the Astros best possible guy congratulate you enjoy in life over there man I can't just I just cannot express to you just how difficult that was being Saturday night by the way how is the uh-huh yeah buddy opening night presented by auto trader Begins Tomorrow Five Thirty PM Eastern on T. and t. what's the worst wasn't neither one that has the ball was bouncing on the rim in Toronto last year and we were waiting for twenty four forty eight hours to see if he would have the chance to come back survey because the information you gave us can help make things better for the show and you as a listener just go to podcast one dot com slash survey and everything will be right there for you that's podcasts dot com slash the answer some questions and potentially make some money along the way from all of us here at podcast one thank you for being a dedicated listener bald the second biggest comeback I mean David beating Goliath and the history of the big ten or something like that man by the way the NBA returns on had free money. It's a win win. Our shows are supported by advertisers so filling this out will really help us catered to the needs of you as a loyal listener go to podcast one dot com so I surveyed must be pretty yet when I went to four colleges and I finally I was like one of those perpetually like finding myself type of guy sure so I I is GonNa be a lot poured into this Philadelphia Seventy sixers team that starts tomorrow it's a good thing their fans are all calm and rational and everything that goes on there are just enjoying life over there it was truly amazing and worthy of going deep right there which is brought to you by capital one which is reimagined banking and also offering savings and checking the I two hundred and fifty people who complete the survey we'll get a ten dollar gift card to Amazon Dot Com and two Grand Prize winners will be selected at random to get one hundred dollars Amazon gift card weekends and did okay so what is the rule in the NFL. I hate the most I mean hate the most you while currently TNT as well our buddies at TNT have added Pelicans are trying to crash the Raptors Ring Party and then Lebron the Lakers take on choline the clippers going deep raiders drawback Rogers Quick Toss left side gotta span I out extending on my home I went I was I don't know about you but I did college in five years we didn't four again I did it in for it but so you're a journeyman is that what you're saying you were journeyman in the loose before his knee goes out of bounds and the ball doesn't bounce in front of the pylon it just bounces just beyond the pylon through the end zone ball belongs to Green Bay to do is go to GEICO DOT com and in fifteen minutes you could be saving fifteen percent or more on car insurance extra money in your pocket of course this may be the most I don't know why you constantly blame the the officiating because it always crops up and it's not just for Michigan it's F F ask any big ten team they always inject themselves into yeah where's the WISCON- Green Bay scores makes it at twenty one ten game and that was the end of that raiders didn't even come close to having the lead let alone being just on and by the way also well done and it led to eventually a crucial turnover derek cars we all know as done it before too doc at the ball back for being stupid Derek Carr trying to be aggressive let's be positive here trying to be aggressive k. down fourteen ten trying to take the lead in and out beyond the pylon ball goes the defense that has been so so one would think so pressured and performing not as well as six inches but too bad or the defense gets rewarded for forcing a fumble for all or somebody foolishly reaches for the pylon well you should liked to the point where more often than not they're on their own goal line for reason and the NFL's like hey yeah I know it's just a difference of just real estate came to close off the bat of Jose Altuve and I knew it was gonna come I knew was going to happen I saw it coming I thought springer was gonna hit the home run you know what is your doling boost that was Wayne Larrabee what a what an incredible incredible performance by Aaron Rodgers he is the one where if you fumble and it goes through the back of the end zone touchback it's a touchback so somebody's reaching for the end zone ball comes loose at lambofield going for the pylon to his right reaches out with his left hand his non throwing hand when would think non writing hand as well and ball comes also you know Darren Waller got taken down at the one yard line looked like he was going to score so think it was will redmond with that play for Greenberg counted no fees or minimum one of the nation's best savings rates capital one what's in your wallet I've been taking a lot of moments for myself today I've Chris more usually add one of those depending on this no one will catch a touchdown a seventy five yard touchdown pass there and if it goes at the one yard line or the half yard line of the quarter and she'd lie the ball belongs to you but if it goes another half a foot into the end zone years ago with seconds to go trying to beat Dallas reaches for the pilot to his right reaches out with his left hand whole country watching on a night game and ball comes loose before his knee goes out of bounds ball doesn't bounce in front of the pylon it bounces very optimistic download our jails dream preview every week on apple podcasts and podcast one dot com I'll say it for the people in the back at the NFL front office you don't penalize somebody for fumbling if for Derek Carr trying to make a score or second down for Derek Carr trying to make a score it's now second goal from the twenty same down different a horrible rule an arbitrary rule if it bounces right in front of you you got the ball back if it bounces six inches further you don't give the ball back goes out of bounds in the one hundred yards field of play it goes out of bounds it belongs to the person who last possessed it but if it rolls into the end zone into a different piece of real estate that I understand is the end zone it's a special zone if you get there you get six points I get it so what B- back to the player at the spot of the fumble or if you think that that is not enough of a penalty reverse touchback than it would be if that was third down that's not this happens one hand a season I know but others who plays so punitive that you need to fix it so patriots uniform they tell them don't they coached that they don't do it again I think it's a terrible rule I'm from five yard line did he really think he was GonNa make it you did you heard it and again if he was fortunate enough to just have the ball no way from concerns here you go from a competitive standpoint I'd try it but with better technique two hands I don't know but something to wear only the get no points you get no possession and as a matter of fact the team that gets the ball doesn't have anything but greengrass behind them because lose the game but from making that decision I think I'd go forward again Mike do you have Derek Carr after yesterday's football game here go this is Derek Carr after trying it again no House the headline in December twenty second two thousand seventeen wow I'd try it again let me get the exact quote for if you don't mind a day like it's really hard in that situation as you're running like I'm not thinking about anything else but oh man I can get in right but it sucks man you know it's my fault I let my let me they get it on their own twenty it is so hard tough that's the way it goes I can't stand it but Derek two hands or don't do it anymore until they changed the assistant but this play this is exactly like the Bachelor in the NFC championship game you're trying to change something that never ever happens team vallon that still not going for it with two hands nope you know who's not going to do it tonight anybody and Brady anybody these guys to stop doing this stupid play where they died for the pylon with one hand or it's aggressive and seen aggressive play I want reward card jumping I'll do it one more time we can't say for the people in the back and by the people in the back it's my buddy Al River on S. everything I've ever been in my life is try you know maybe I I gotta go through Hands Right you know trying to extend with one isn't smart as stupid you know about the the distance if you WANNA make it but at least they hold onto the ball you shouldn't be rewarded for fumbling but what I'm saying Chris Hey so my worst beat in sports December first two thousand seven I personally my team lost the state championship I think that was two thousand seven for the brand yeah speaking of which I mean we didn't even talk on on uh roll out of bounds four inches further up the field that's it he gets the ball back but no no no no no I went beyond the pylon I'm sorry not football and then later that evening. Wvu lost a pit for a chance to go to the national championship in West. Virginia that's gotTa hurt man you lost all I'm working on it eight four four zero four rich number two dow Okay let's go to Evan and West Virginia you're here on the rich Eisen show what's up Evan seven undefeated dolphins feet my redskins I'm a season ticket holder makes matters worse where the viewing party they pull names fraud very much about the fake punt the Denver tried one of the worst fake punts I've ever seen against that was not branch city traffic Kelsey has no part of in his word put the headline Kenny after that game the headline on Nfl Dot Com Derek Carr on fumble out of end zone I try it again Super Bowl Super Bowl III bill and wait a minute I'm a student at the University of Maryland Okay then the same afternoon or teams I was watching it with a friend of mine last night Red Sox fan so it was a little tough but you know I gotta say I wasn't I wasn't really upset a bill man that is wow that is worth remembering in two thousand Nineteen Day January thirty thirty that moment is telling you it's so hard for your right they are in your plan a tough team you know where you're going to need all the points you can get it's like man is so hard not to try you know that'll be joining us later on Bill in Maryland you're here on the rich Eisen show what's up bill thanks for taking my call making it goes back a little is your own personal state championship and then your favorite team goes down the call all right that's Avenue West Virginia I think our friend McAfee missed a game winning kick in that one did he really I think redskins recover to make it a one touchdown game and if this drives redskins fans nuts and I'm sure bill in Maryland totally crazy they're all like you know what if he and having the same result everyone's patting me on the head on the sideline like you're just trying to make a play time and I I understand like the the ending of is a fumble sucks you know but in is little bit further I think it was January thirty first nineteen seventy three K. Carolina's state won three Maryland one hundred on you're GONNA go they're just the best team in the League but I'll tell you this I'm pretty sure the boss is turning over in his grave because at the deadline didn't do that and he made the field goal perfect symmetry they go seventeen zero and win seventeen and nothing in the super bowl and that ruined it it gets this nice suite at the Sheraton I win I win that but my wife is nine months pregnant and they have a first job two days later German eight terrific pickup he just one of those guys when it came down to it in the in the postseason when you're going against hard-throwing There was a perfect dolphins dolphins went seventeen butto A and I'm sure how how it bill like it when he hears your Dolphin fans go fine how and Brian Cashman went out and got anchor Nazione and no pitcher well John his elimination game they're throwing up you hear that Oh God okay so sorry you're symmetry got ruined John in Boston Massachusetts we're here on the rich Eisen show what's up John Hey rich and calling commiserate a little bit about the those Yankees all John appreciate it see with a great instagram post today by though everyone should seek that out saying farewell and Gardner I hope the Yankees keep him he should finish his career with the bullpen game will at blue jeans were John Nothing in the rotation John both teams were it now look encarnacion was a terrific pickup from cash Okay Connecticut Yankee Fan and you live in Boston I'm I'm sure you're not saying you're not getting too many too much commiserating going on now you know what man Gary Premium that's the famed moment the famed football folly where it's a botched field goal attempt and he whiffs on the throw and the the loss or how the season played out but I was a little disappointed and I've figured that they were gonNA lose to the Astros and you just have a better team he'd rather just bring people out who could throw a hundred miles an hour and sometimes just can't get there they're all speed stuff or sometimes even their their fastball over the plate let's get six of those lcs should not be able to game what the hell yeah that there's no fourth starters anymore in major league baseball and the crazy thing ace and hopefully they can you know these guys are the world's he's been his entire career with them and they need his experience and all that stuff with the savage seven guys together and remember that one come on now but the just bring it all full circle cashman did not get a and Steinbrenner's turning star and his turnover in his grave everybody any old school baseball guys turn over in their grave game six of them on the team and it was really tough now seeing him and seafood go out this year not GonNa know their shot at the at the series actually what was it thirty I wasn't very I blocked the day out of my mom great call Bill Bill in Maryland well done right there is correct me if I'm wrong wasn't Charlie Morton technically a fourth starter for the Astros couple years ago right I think so I might be completely off like sure versus burland start a world series win that be mazing to former tigers going at it like that Sherzer Ver- lander together guys and cobbling together and try and get to a game seven come on now baseball's gotta be better than that as far as I'm concerned but maybe get them that same way you know maybe let me ask you one other thing about the Yankees real quick by can go forward Brett Gardner what what what are the Yankees is in the box and you saw the Yankees when they would reach base they would mimic the whole banging the the bat on the dugout roof I mean he's a out they keep them Movin we'll figure it out but they need better arms and guess who's got better arms nats do have we found out what the star is going to be ladies like the the Astros could put up there he had holes in his swing that he couldn't fix and they should have seen that come and maybe maybe and wow that's fall classic stuff cranky Corbin game three okay so that means they're going to go green a game seven if necessary okay maybe Verlinden game seven what are you going to go to and then seven we're going to try and bullpen it to six to get to seven on an old school guy and Elsie Esa game six let's start let's start our bullpen guys oh yeah I remember I remember when the Yankees try to cobbles just in my memory because I'm just trying to keep many facts in my head these Wade Miley didn't even make the roster for the lcs I mean I it's reached the point where we after what happened last week and and with the jets taken on the Patriots tonight that is Notre Dame week as we say in the University of Michigan that's next on the rich Eisen show point they gotta figure that one out because both those guys are going to be in the same ring of honor whatever they might call it up there in Seattle more of your phone calls eight four Oh man we'll see it's going to be great I'm very much looking forward to eight series I'm very very much looking forward to it Graham US given hugs to everybody just walked right past be Carol talked I mean would you talk to somebody who flipped the bird at you on the way out the door all boys over the Eagles Sixteen Percent Colts over Texans twenty four percent ravens most impressive win from the weekend forty six percents sure was man starter at the deadline I don't know why they didn't pull the trigger on one other than the fact that I can only imagine the gleyber Torres kept coming up in the answer that his pound sand cay they should face off against each other Sherzer Garrett Cole K. aim on it's too bad game to Strasbourg Berlin oh man come on Essner just wanted to take a minute to thank all of my great sponsors and all of you great listeners for supporting this podcast certainly couldn't do this show without either of you I wanted to remind you that up to Seattle it's tough one him in the mouth to in the rain just pounding and Earl Thomas did you see the the old way with in the so you can support my sponsors by going to my show page at podcast one dot com clicking on the support this podcast button and there you'll see all of my wonderful sponsors help make this show possible so thank you for downloading subscribing and of course supporting now back to the show batteries have no timeouts they can't stop it it just completely ruined a dream or an entire season I guess Mrs O'Leary's cow was in Illinois oh just just God by all there's no doubt Wisconsin was looking past him towards the House Day Right which is this weekend no question and I hope Jonathan Tellers and hold it against us what's in your wallet what do you have over there Chris most impressive win from the NFL Sunday Colts Cowboys Ravens. 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