19 Burst results for "Tom Golisano"

"tom golisano" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

08:57 min | 5 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"You know talked about cash. But there's something about the human brain that we do call them mental accounting where we love all if we have people are already being paid a cash salary and then you give them another cash bonus on top of it. That feels good enough but it kind of feels quite familiar and similar and can create the sort of drop in the bucket effect Whereas if you were to offer instead the chance to be part of a top performer trip for example like a really incredible Meeting or travel experience In in a destination for example that feels like something distinct and special and separate and and really worth going for and science suggests that That sense of separation or separate mental accounting actually makes people value that potential reward more highly. We'll have someone from the incentive industry on the on the Radio Show. I want to know what does the word spiff? Actually what's the abbreviation for that? Because I haven't heard that in so long we used spiff. Ibm Yeah I I know. A special performance incentive. I never knew what the F. stood for so I guess I'm still searching the other things you mentioned. Is that a good way to recognize. People is just the simply say I see what she did. I see you there and it's funny because I'm a big pelton trainer. It's like spinning on a bicycle and one of the trainers. She's always calling people and she said specifically I see there. I see there and a lot of people. They if they do a great job they just want to be recognized for doing that. Great job and it could be as simply as I see you there. Yeah and what's amazing about that? Is that intrinsic desire for recognition Is just as effective when it's anonymous so there's some really cool research by one of our partners. Yana DALLAS AT UCLA. Who did study with wikipedia since people who contribute to the WIKIPEDIA website? And as you probably know they do all of this work for Free Community of people who are intrinsically motivated. They just want to contribute their knowledge to The collective and in her study she randomly assigned some people an award that she just made up. That was just like a little badge that says you know. Great Job can contract contributor award. She needed the Edelweiss awards but Found that those who were given this sort of status badge even though they right under anonymous monikers they're sort of ghostwriters. No one knows who they are. But those who got that badge. ended up contributing more and lasting with the site longer than did similar contributors. Who didn't get the batch so it works even when people can't really see or who you are. It's interesting to me because you see on a lot of these sites now like I contribute a lot to tripadvisor where you get different kinds of badges right or if you're a top contributor on facebook right you'll get a badge for that particular site so it's really very interesting. There's a really important subject Charlotte. Where can people learn more about what you in? The organization are doing I would check out. People Science Dot Com. Which is really just a fun website. It's run by a science writer. Who's also a stand up comedian? So that sounds like fun. It's Super Fun and funny. And it's designed to kind of make people as excited about behavioral sciences. We are so that we can kind of continue to grow this momentum in applying the work and really connecting the science to the real world people science dot Com Charlotte's. Thanks so much on the show this is. Am eight twenty W CPT in Chicago. We'll be right back tune in regularly to my show. Then you know that I talk to many different businesses across the country different types of people different backgrounds all kinds of industries. But there's one thing that unites all of us. Searching that thing known as work life balance I get pretty bummed out when a listener tells me that. They haven't been home for dinner and a whole month. That's why I'm so excited to introduce you to V Sita. Vc that does a lot for one little application. It can help you achieve that lifestyle. Vcd's that personal.

"tom golisano" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

08:57 min | 5 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"You know talked about cash. But there's something about the human brain that we do call them mental accounting where we love all if we have people are already being paid a cash salary and then you give them another cash bonus on top of it. That feels good enough but it kind of feels quite familiar and similar and can create the sort of drop in the bucket effect Whereas if you were to offer instead the chance to be part of a top performer trip for example like a really incredible Meeting or travel experience In in a destination for example that feels like something distinct and special and separate and and really worth going for and science suggests that That sense of separation or separate mental accounting actually makes people value that potential reward more highly. We'll have someone from the incentive industry on the on the Radio Show. I want to know what does the word spiff? Actually what's the abbreviation for that? Because I haven't heard that in so long we used spiff. Ibm Yeah I I know. A special performance incentive. I never knew what the F. stood for so I guess I'm still searching the other things you mentioned. Is that a good way to recognize. People is just the simply say I see what she did. I see you there and it's funny because I'm a big pelton trainer. It's like spinning on a bicycle and one of the trainers. She's always calling people and she said specifically I see there. I see there and a lot of people. They if they do a great job they just want to be recognized for doing that. Great job and it could be as simply as I see you there. Yeah and what's amazing about that? Is that intrinsic desire for recognition Is just as effective when it's anonymous so there's some really cool research by one of our partners. Yana DALLAS AT UCLA. Who did study with wikipedia since people who contribute to the WIKIPEDIA website? And as you probably know they do all of this work for Free Community of people who are intrinsically motivated. They just want to contribute their knowledge to The collective and in her study she randomly assigned some people an award that she just made up. That was just like a little badge that says you know. Great Job can contract contributor award. She needed the Edelweiss awards but Found that those who were given this sort of status badge even though they right under anonymous monikers they're sort of ghostwriters. No one knows who they are. But those who got that badge. ended up contributing more and lasting with the site longer than did similar contributors. Who didn't get the batch so it works even when people can't really see or who you are. It's interesting to me because you see on a lot of these sites now like I contribute a lot to tripadvisor where you get different kinds of badges right or if you're a top contributor on facebook right you'll get a badge for that particular site so it's really very interesting. There's a really important subject Charlotte. Where can people learn more about what you in? The organization are doing I would check out. People Science Dot Com. Which is really just a fun website. It's run by a science writer. Who's also a stand up comedian? So that sounds like fun. It's Super Fun and funny. And it's designed to kind of make people as excited about behavioral sciences. We are so that we can kind of continue to grow this momentum in applying the work and really connecting the science to the real world people science dot Com Charlotte's. Thanks so much on the show this is. Am eight twenty W CPT in Chicago. We'll be right back tune in regularly to my show. Then you know that I talk to many different businesses across the country different types of people different backgrounds all kinds of industries. But there's one thing that unites all of us. Searching that thing known as work life balance I get pretty bummed out when a listener tells me that. They haven't been home for dinner and a whole month. That's why I'm so excited to introduce you to V Sita. Vc that does a lot for one little application. It can help you achieve that lifestyle. Vcd's that personal.

"tom golisano" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

02:47 min | 5 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"Get ready for all the craziness of small business. It's exactly that craziness that makes it exciting and totally unbelievable small business radio is now on the air with your host Larry Maltz. Thanks for joining this week's radio show remember. This is the final word in small business for those keeping track. This is now show number. Five hundred seventy five eight is leap day twenty. Twenty another day to get unstuck and really show your brilliance of the business world. This episode is provided by next EVA. The all in one communications platform for your small business. It's also sponsored by linked in the place to generate leads drive traffic and build your brand awareness for a free one hundred dollars credit to launch your campaign go to www dot lincoln dot com slash SB are. We're also sponsored by visa. Sita all you need to run your business in one software try IT FOR FREE AT. Www Dot V. C. T. dot com. That's V C. I T A DOT COM and use buried ten for an exclusive discount world supported by blue summit supplies. Get Your W. twos intended to nine tax forms and all your business supplies at. Www DOT blew summit supplies dot com slash. Sb are use the code espionage ten at checkout to save ten percents off your order well my next guest personifies the American dream. He built a company from three thousand dollars a credit card to having over three billion dollar valuation. Tom Gal Asano is an entrepreneur. Philanthropist civic leader and former owner of the bus buffalo SABRES NHL team. He's also the founder and chairman of the Board of paychecks with more than fifteen thousand employees and one hundred locations nationwide paychecks of the leading provider of payroll human resources and benefits outsourcing for small and medium sized businesses. Active in both business and philanthropy. Tom Currently mentors the entrepreneurs who run businesses in which he has invested and overseas his family's charitable foundation. Today's donate over three hundred million dollars to a wide range of charnel causes. He's just come out with a great new book. It's called built not born. It's a how to guide to help much. Moore's Tom Welcome to the show to be here with US morning. Well I know you've told the story many times but please go back for our listeners. And tell us how. Did you start a company on three thousand dollars in credit card? Well I was a sales person the sales manager for a payroll processing that specialized in doing payroll processing for larger companies. One hundred employees or more. But you drive down any street. In the United States you'll.

Tom Gal Asano DOT Larry Maltz United States one communications Sita founder and chairman of the Bo sales manager SABRES NHL Moore
Tom Golisano Shares How to Build a Successful Company

The Small Business Radio Show

01:24 min | 5 months ago

Tom Golisano Shares How to Build a Successful Company

"My next guest personifies the American dream. He built a company from three thousand dollars a credit card to having over three billion dollar valuation. Tom Gal Asano is an entrepreneur. Philanthropist civic leader and former owner of the bus buffalo SABRES NHL team. He's also the founder and chairman of the Board of paychecks with more than fifteen thousand employees and one hundred locations nationwide paychecks of the leading provider of payroll human resources and benefits outsourcing for small and medium sized businesses. Active in both business and philanthropy. Tom Currently mentors the entrepreneurs who run businesses in which he has invested and overseas his family's charitable foundation. Today's donate over three hundred million dollars to a wide range of charnel causes. He's just come out with a great new book. It's called built not born. It's a how to guide to help much. Moore's Tom Welcome to the show to be here with US morning. Well I know you've told the story many times but please go back for our listeners. And tell us how. Did you start a company on three thousand dollars in credit card? Well I was a sales person the sales manager for a payroll processing that specialized in doing payroll processing for larger companies. One hundred employees or more. But you drive down any street. In the United States you'll

Tom Gal Asano Founder And Chairman Of The Bo United States Sabres Sales Manager NHL Moore
"tom golisano" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

02:47 min | 5 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"Get ready for all the craziness of small business. It's exactly that craziness that makes it exciting and totally unbelievable small business radio is now on the air with your host Larry Maltz. Thanks for joining this week's radio show remember. This is the final word in small business for those keeping track. This is now show number. Five hundred seventy five eight is leap day twenty. Twenty another day to get unstuck and really show your brilliance of the business world. This episode is provided by next EVA. The all in one communications platform for your small business. It's also sponsored by linked in the place to generate leads drive traffic and build your brand awareness for a free one hundred dollars credit to launch your campaign go to www dot lincoln dot com slash SB are. We're also sponsored by visa. Sita all you need to run your business in one software try IT FOR FREE AT. Www Dot V. C. dot com. That's V C. I T A DOT COM and use buried ten for an exclusive discount world supported by blue summit supplies. Get Your W. twos intended to nine tax forms and all your business supplies at. Www DOT blew summit supplies dot com slash. Sb are use the code espionage ten at checkout to save ten percents off your order well my next guest personifies the American dream. He built a company from three thousand dollars a credit card to having over three billion dollar valuation. Tom Gal Asano is an entrepreneur. Philanthropist civic leader and former owner of the bus buffalo SABRES NHL team. He's also the founder and chairman of the Board of paychecks with more than fifteen thousand employees and one hundred locations nationwide paychecks of the leading provider of payroll human resources and benefits outsourcing for small and medium sized businesses. Active in both business and philanthropy. Tom Currently mentors the entrepreneurs who run businesses in which he has invested and overseas his family's charitable foundation. Today's donate over three hundred million dollars to a wide range of charnel causes. He's just come out with a great new book. It's called built not born. It's a how to guide to help much. Moore's Tom Welcome to the show to be here with US morning. Well I know you've told the story many times but please go back for our listeners. And tell us how. Did you start a company on three thousand dollars in credit card? Well I was a sales person the sales manager for a payroll processing That specialize in doing payroll processing for larger companies one hundred employees or more. But you drive down any street. In the United States.

Tom Gal Asano DOT Larry Maltz United States one communications Sita founder and chairman of the Bo sales manager SABRES NHL Moore
Tom Golisano Shares How to Build a Successful Company

The Small Business Radio Show

01:24 min | 5 months ago

Tom Golisano Shares How to Build a Successful Company

"My next guest personifies the American dream. He built a company from three thousand dollars a credit card to having over three billion dollar valuation. Tom Gal Asano is an entrepreneur. Philanthropist civic leader and former owner of the bus buffalo SABRES NHL team. He's also the founder and chairman of the Board of paychecks with more than fifteen thousand employees and one hundred locations nationwide paychecks of the leading provider of payroll human resources and benefits outsourcing for small and medium sized businesses. Active in both business and philanthropy. Tom Currently mentors the entrepreneurs who run businesses in which he has invested and overseas his family's charitable foundation. Today's donate over three hundred million dollars to a wide range of charnel causes. He's just come out with a great new book. It's called built not born. It's a how to guide to help much. Moore's Tom Welcome to the show to be here with US morning. Well I know you've told the story many times but please go back for our listeners. And tell us how. Did you start a company on three thousand dollars in credit card? Well I was a sales person the sales manager for a payroll processing That specialize in doing payroll processing for larger companies one hundred employees or more. But you drive down any street. In the United States

Tom Gal Asano Founder And Chairman Of The Bo United States Sales Manager Sabres NHL Moore
"tom golisano" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

06:33 min | 5 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Is a resounding absolute loud no yes Tom Golisano the author of the brand new book built not born a self made billionaires no nonsense guide for entrepreneurs founded Paychex philanthropist ran for governor of New York state three times founded the Independence Party there and lastly Tom I cannot finish this interview without talking about the Buffalo Sabres growing up in buffalo huge Sabres fan still M. and the Buffalo Sabres for many many years I mean they were really just a great team the French connection lot of history always well supported by the fans in western New York and your sports fan but not necessarily a hockey fan and I know that down actually I got involved with the Buffalo Sabres they had seen three NHL games in my life I was what you'd call a fan and but understanding the problem with the Buffalo Sabres having gone through bankruptcy in buffalo and the danger of that potentially leaving the area I got involved what are we truly from the required must have done a great sales job on you because again we see three hockey games but tells the process because it didn't happen when he said Tom you should buy this team it really was went there some time that went by before he finally said maybe I'll do this yeah well I got together with Larry Quinn and Dan the pokey they were introduced to me and having much experience in the field it was a good match but when they should be the cash flow and the and the profit projections I said who wants the only thing and I could see why it would bankrupt the only had about five thousand season ticket holders at the time but I said on the idea I began to realize how important it was to the city of buffalo metropolitan area not to lose this team as seven what the heck let's give it a try and Larry and dance to their leadership and my health and we turned the whole thing around we went in one year and a half we went from five thousand season ticket holders to fifteen thousand season ticket holders and a year and a half in the waiting list now winning games was the key thing but we also did some things for the fans we you know new new scoreboard new ribbon boards we put into a program of pricing we're dependent on the the importance of the game that was the one who played Montreal and Toronto I guess our prices were higher who played team like Atlanta or Tampa if they would be lower so families can enjoy the the the the game as well as the other fans so we did a lot of great things and we turned the thing completely around where it became a profitable organization then Leri develop some hard issues and his health was it was a question and I know because the self inflicted pressure you know he still want to work hard and so forth I became a little concerned for Terry Pluto came along and said he'd be interested in buying the team and we gave them the price and Terry said okay so the team now I'm happy as heck because Google is going to guarantee that team is going to be there forever at least for every time he's so we accomplish something very very important and we transferred over something to him that was much better shape than when we got it well I know the buffalo say the National Hockey League did not want the sabers to leave because of the great fan support over many years but there is a possibility that it could have show by Larry convincing you and you coming in not being a big hockey fan but my understanding was from Larry told me after a after eight years of owning the team you kind of became a pretty pretty Die Hard hockey fan I do watch all those favorite games and TV when I can't be sure and I know a lot more about the game now than they did that right absolutely one last thing when you talk about like what is IT exactly I remember when when the Tampa Bay Lightning first started here in Tampa I was at the very first game new philosophy zero at the time I had some radio stations and we'd carried an exhibition game and we had we had signed up to carry the lightning game so obviously I was in attendance at many of the games of the first game I'll never forget the fans in Tampa we're new to hockey whenever there is an offsides and icing people started applauding they thought it was a good thing they had no clue now tap was become a really tremendous hockey town and it's great to see because it really is a great sport when you see it in person there's really nothing like it but lastly I want to bring up something that you bring up a negotiating tactic or something that can be used whenever you're questioning people the pregnant pause and actually use that without Larry Quinn and the other members of the Buffalo Sabres during a little retreat down to your home in Naples so let's talk about the pregnant pause and then kind of that little squeak story about how you used it with the management of the Buffalo Sabres sure the pregnant pauses I don't know where the name came from I don't know if I coined it or somebody used it with me on the road but anyway it's called a pregnant pause and basically what it is when you're interviewing somebody or negotiating with somebody or making a sales presentation you get to a point where it's time for you the presenter to shut up and give the person on the other end of the table a chance to speak and the main reason is so you can find out what they're thinking well we had a problem with one of our contracts of a player we traded for in the contract it called for a two hundred fifty thousand dollar bonus for a player if he got traded to the Sabres and played so many games he would get that bonus and we would be responsible for it well the people that they go to the contract for us didn't realize that because of the contract we ended up playing on the phone the young man enough so that he earned the bonus well we didn't intend to keep the player very long so we thought that was really a mistake we made the customer company organization a lot of money and the general manager of hockey his name was Darcy this year had the overall responsibility for managing these contracts so I think what Larian Dan and and Darcy down my house in Florida and we said a little room and.

Tom Golisano
"tom golisano" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

02:03 min | 5 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

"Formally the Buffalo Sabres philanthropist with a new book that just came out built not born a self made billionaires no nonsense guide for entrepreneurs I had a chance to speak with Tom earlier this week at length fascinating great book it's an easy read it's not one of these books that you're going to read and you know one five minutes you're you're I brought your eyes are gonna start drooping very conversational a very interesting book light brighten tight just exactly the way I like it had a great conversation and those of you that are fellow alphas there are entrepreneurs business people professionals you will find what Tom had to say quite interesting we've got a great conversation as always I extend to you my long ash leap day greetings and salutations a long ash snappy salute semper dilatation always pleasure even in the midst of quite the crazy week make America great again make masculinity great again keep America great screw the enemies of pleasure screw the nanny state as always it is your global five star general and alpha male and she from command center out for now we're going to do something a little bit different because we're gonna get to Tom Golisano the bottom of the hour long conversation with him that I know you will enjoy and I do want to get to what president trump had to say in the corona virus in some very important things that we as Americans need to be straight up about regarding China so before we do that what's changed the pace a little bit showing let's conduct a national with an online petition sure supply place your sticks available for the general to enjoy it's time for national cigar like hello I'm Johnny Cash and the reason I'm doing my Johnny Cash impression and playing Johnny Cash ring of fire is because months ago today has Johnny Cash whoops.

America Tom Golisano trump Johnny Cash Buffalo Sabres president China
"tom golisano" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

02:18 min | 5 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"Gullikson on his brand new book built not born self made millionaires No-nonsense guide for entrepreneurs my good friends at nonprofit one fully live dot. Org Dream Plan and live your best life. Check THEM OUT AT ONE. Life fully live Dot Org. Also want to remind you about my Marketing PODCAST lockhead on marketing. And what makes it different is? It's one of the few marketing podcasts. On strategy and mindset most episodes and others might be hard to believe are short fairly to the point and We were lucky enough to make number one in marketing number. One in business on Apple podcasts. So check out. Lockhead on marketing. Also my dear friend Duska Zapata and her best selling book how to be ferociously happy and other essays a podcast. I love with Jaime J. Culture eats strategy. Check it out another podcast. I love grumpy old. Deeks with my friends. Jason Filipo and Brian Show Meister. Check them out also. Check OUT DRYER DOT COM. It's what legendary entrepreneurial people are reading today grow wire dot com my friends at crash dot co one help you crash your career and catapult your Career and your job search to a whole new level checkout crash dot co slash different. That's crash dot co slash different today. And if you're in Australia check out my buddies at rapid media DOT COM dot. Au Legendary Marketing Media and communications in Australia rapid media DOT COM dot. Au all right. I need to remind you that. Today's information is provided you solely for informational purposes in this odd cast is the sole property of the lockhead odd cast network and we deeply deeply appreciate it when you tell your friends about this odd cast and you share it on. Social Media. Thank you so much on being nice to your mother. Support your local entrepreneurs. Don't forget to buy John's crazy. Socks tell to people. You love about podcasts. You love remember. Don't be lame. Get Out of the passing lane. Listened to the tragically. Hip only by pastor rage raged pastor raised free range. Eggs member chickens are people to thank. You can't Dandy..

"tom golisano" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

12:41 min | 5 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"Capital and try to build the next facebook. Or what have you and so? I love that that sort of where you start because those small entrepreneurs are the backbone of our economy. Well exactly right you know. Paycheck says his client six hundred seventy thousand businesses in the United States of America that our clients and the average size company that we process the payroll for had fifteen employees. Who did you say? Six hundred seventy thousand yes. That's how many clients paychecks so processes a pair of four and the average size client has fifteen employees. So you can see. It's very endearing to me the small business environment that we have in our country and the opportunities that it presents to our population. Yeah I mean if you look at the statistics and you know people like brookings and others do. I think really important research in this regard but if I'm remembering right about fifty percent of all of the New Patents created in the country. Come from small to medium sized businesses hybrid that to yet and we all know with all due respect to you know. Ge and IBM and so forth. And I don't have the number off the top of my head. Maybe you Tom that. The vast majority of new job creation and new wealth creation comes from start ups and smaller businesses. Exactly and you know entrepreneurs have doesn't necessarily mean you have to own the business. Because small companies have fewer employees the more entrepreneurial attitude or perspective. They have in their small company. The better so are you an employee of a small company it really does well to Be Entrepreneurial Yeah I've always felt the same way and I think I understand what you're saying on the risk side because I always thought like if you're an employee of a company you have to live in a world where you know depending on the size of the company somewhere between three and maybe sixteen or twenty people get together in a room typically on a Monday and make strategic decisions about your life and if you're not in that room that's a bad scenario for you. It's not the most comfortable feeling. I agree with you. And so if you're trying to help encourage new entrepreneurs you know if you are selling me. Maybe Tom on entrepreneurship. What were the thing? What was the things that you would say as to why I should maybe not go work for somebody else and swing? Swing hard at the puck in my own business. Well let's assume first of all that you have a concept or an idea for another prize that has a chance to be successful and one of the basic ingredients. I think that's so important for an entrepreneur is to have industry knowledge For example if you WANNA say you wanted to be an entrepreneur because you eat dinner once we what's tonight that you're going to open a restaurant that's not a good foundation for opening a business My personal situation paychecks. I sold accounting movie scenes that did payroll applications. I and then I also worked for a company did payroll processing for larger companies and sort of ignored the small end of the market at the lower end of the market. So I had drawn industry knowledge before I started. Which of course was very important to my success so anybody. Who's considering being an entrepreneur of the first thing I would ask is. What's your industry knowledge? You know enough about this industry. You're getting vengeance that you could ABS- absolutely make a difference or are you gonNA end up getting Very serious and costly education. Because you got it into something. You really didn't understand. Yup we see that a lot and I think in Silicon Valley. A lot of people talk about that as founder category founder market fit. I think it's just very very important So than encouraging people to Piatra preneurs and trying to make sure that they have sufficient industry knowledge of the industry. They're getting into and then of course. Things like financing sales management sales management. I think is one of the biggest issues with other preneurs. You've heard I say gee I have a cash flow problem. Well generally speaking that cash flow. Probably because you're not selling enough of your product you're not making enough sales and you're not creating enough revenue so you walk into a bank or a potential investor and you say you have a cash flow problem many times. It's a sales problem. So sales practice and sales management very very important and then the Entrepreneurial Environment and what would you advise me five? Maybe I was more of a technical founder or kind of a product oriented inventor type founder. And that wasn't my natural skill set. What are the things that you think are not a person with without sales background would need to know as a founder? Ceo Well first of all as the founder. I would suggest heartedly that you start making sales calls yourself and learn as much as you can about the process and not going to be able to develop a good sales team unless you have that knowledge yourself so you might as well dig right into it. Start making sales presentations and sales calls. Then if he's still don't think you're the right person to be doing that. At least you'll be in a position to train somebody that you hire to perform that function. Salami test this on you. I've long had this theory that I don't care if you're an engineer and inventor or an artist or whatever sort of you view yourself as in the non sales world as a founder you have to become the best salesperson in the company and you have to figure out how to get those initial sales and understand what motivates the customers in what resonates with them and what features and capabilities are. GonNa really make this thing go etcetera etcetera. That you SORTA have no choice. Frankly I think it's a tremendous amount of fun and a lot to be learned when you're in the very early days engaging with those customers and if you're a non sales-oriented bounder I think you just have to decide. This is going to be a core skill set. I I believe that for a long time Would you take it that far? Or how do you think about it? Chris I wholeheartedly support what you just said First of all if you're uncomfortable at the more you do it the more comfortable. You'll be calm so you shouldn't be afraid of it. You gotTA JUMP. Right in and get ready to that sales process and makes them barely cells. What we'll do for your confidence or not only yourself but for the employees you have in. The company is significant and substantial. But I can't see anybody becoming an entrepreneur and being afraid of the sales process. They have to get into it. I couldn't agree more now. I'm also curious. You have an interesting take on sort of what most people. I think might call your personal life and how it fits into being a business owner. Could you sort of elucidate? Maybe a little bit on your thoughts. There you mentioned things like having a pre-nup and a post nup for your business and always gets people's attention I think a pre nup posting up is very very important because the reason for it is somebody. An entrepreneur can build a very successful business. And if they have a spouse I you know based on history in our country. The number of marriages that have been divorced at some point because people change or needs change their motives change whatever it may be necessary to split apart and nothing could be more harmful to a small business the separation of ownership and they difficult situation. So if you get that ironed out first before you go too far down the road. I think it's a real benefit to nothing is worse than being a situation where you've got to sell the company for Marital Settlement and have the seller that low price. And a time when you don't think it's the most appropriate time so post pre nup. I think are very very important by couldn't agree more people. Forget that if if Tom and Chris go into business together. Well Chris is now in business with Tom's wife and Tom Right. That's a that's an expansion. That happens a lot and it's a very unfortunate situation when it happens the other one and I'm curious if you have any particular insight I've also seen how a state planning in planning for your You know I don't know how to say it. Untimely death is also critical if you're going to have partners or ambassadors at because how you handle that situation needs to be thought out in advance if God forbid happens absolutely key man insurance or key person. Insurance is a very important aspect of when you have partners So that's the partners. The surviving partners can afford to buy out say you know the equity in their entrepreneurial venture from the essay and that has to sell the company or break the company up to satisfy the need. It's so critical and yet it doesn't get done very often It should be done quite often now. If this is too personal feel free to kick be under the table but now we're on the topic of spouses. You are married to an extraordinarily accomplished incredibly famous. Incredibly well respected woman. Could you tell me a little bit about your wife? Everything he said about her is true. First of all she's very accomplished being a number one world championship. Champion in any sport is very very oppressive. But the thing about the Monica is. You wouldn't know it by knowing her people that spend time here company or just can't believe how personable she is how down to earth she is. How else will tears and so on so forth so Have had a little experience. America's my associate with Monica is probably the best thing that ever happened to great and I love hearing a little bit about her. Of course I remember her as a fan and I'm no expert on tennis but if I'm remembering her career right I mean there was a period of time. Where not only was she the most dominant female tennis player in the world? She was really one of the most dominant athletes in in any sport male or female for quite a long period of time. Yes she had eight Grand Slam championships. before she was twenty one years of age she was just a ferocious tennis player. Well respected in their field. And you can't give her enough Kudos for what she accomplished. Look I don't embarrass you but it's obvious you have had a rockstar. Entrepreneurially business career. There's just no way around it and your wife has one of the most storied sort of athletic Lives or careers in history. And so you know you guys are like to rock stars together. What what's it like being married to each other? Well when we walk down the street in the United States or at least in upstate New York and South West Florida. I'm probably the one recognized. Firt but on the rest of the world everybody recognizes Monica before they do me even though she'll wear hats sunglasses and so forth that to show off but It's fun and it's great because people are so nice to both her and me as we walk down any avenue in the United States and and then the rest of the world. She's just so well known and the rest of the world. Nobody knows many outside of the United States and so you know as a man and certainly as a seriously accomplished man. What's it like if you're in some parts of the US or fear in France or you're wherever you are and You know your wife's face and name is pretty house household and and and to your point you're not and yet for most of your life and most of your career your study. I gotTA believe you're used to be in the rock star in the RU. Well the The big advantages at least internationally and I don't mean to sound facetious but we do get a choice of our tables. Quite frankly and we get reservations. Where probably we should restaurant. I love it. It sounds fantastic. Another thing I was curious to ask you. It seems at least based on my kinda reading and and trying to get to know you that philanthropy means a lot to both of you and you've invested tremendously in education and a whole bunch of other areas that. I'd be curious to hear a little bit about your thinking..

founder Tom Right United States sales management America Chris I brookings facebook Monica tennis Paycheck Ge Piatra preneurs IBM Silicon Valley business owner New York Ceo Marital Settlement
"tom golisano" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

01:53 min | 5 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"To help. People make the decision whether or not to be an entrepreneur the ramifications of the so called risk the so called Our Chip Times that you're going to have and so on and so forth. That's where I started and I have Encourage her of entrepreneurs for example in the book. I talk about sometimes. It's riskier or many times. It's riskier to work for somebody than it is to be your own entrepreneur for example. If you were for large company you know you can do very well as an employee but your baby. Your department doesn't do so well reflects on you or the division of the company doesn't do well or even the company itself and then all of a sudden you'd find your so the company sold its value and far less than everybody thought it was going to be worth it central. If you have your own company you're sort of set aside for those kinds of risks and the great thing about owning your own company is Sometimes you can sell it for value or you can pass it onto and hair a son or daughter or some relative There's so many advantages to being an entrepreneur over working for somebody now a lot of people associated. I degrees of risk. Be An entrepreneur. If Your Business concept is well thought out else and you're very well qualified to run your company or your medium size company. Whatever then I think. That's the best of both worlds will end. I love that you have this sort of smaller. Business Entrepreneurial Mindset you know I lovingly refer to them as a small entrepreneurs as distinct from a living out here in the Silicon Valley area what we refer to as Biggie entrepreneurs the entrepreneurs who go and raise several hundred million dollars venture capital and try to build the next facebook. Or what have you and so? I love that that sort of where you start because those small entrepreneurs are the backbone of our economy..

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"tom golisano" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

01:52 min | 5 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"Thanks for pressing play. This is Christopher lockhead failure different. And we're an award winning podcast and some people call us an odd cast for people who value real different conversations about how to build a legendary business and a legendary life on this episode billionaire. Tom Golisano he's the founder of thirty billion dollar market CAP paychecks. And you're gonNA love this guy. He's got a new book out a smoke. A new book that I really enjoyed reading built not born. A self made billionaires no-nonsense guide for entrepreneurs and we dig into the book. He shares his insights on a ton of stuff. Including when and why you should build. You should start a company how to build a long term successful business and we get a little bit personal. It turns out that Tom is married to tennis. Legend Monica Celis and she won eight Grand Slams and at the age of sixteen. Monica became the youngest ever to win the French. Open so he tells us a little bit about that. We also talked philanthropy investment strategy and what Tom Learned by owning and turning around. Nhl Hockey team the Buffalo Sabres and when it came time for Tom to sell the team why he sold them for sixty million dollars less than he could have pay special attention to Tom's message for us. Senator Elizabeth Warren As I'm sure you know we are in an election season here in the United States and NAM. Tom has some thoughts for her. This is a legendary episode for more on Tom. His book go to Lockhead L. O. C. H. age EA D. DOT COM and. Check out the show notes for this episode. Now what do companies like ring hint into Kovas have in common? They all use my friends at Oracle Nets we'd to accelerate their growth successful companies founders.

Tom Golisano Senator Elizabeth Warren Monica Celis Christopher lockhead Buffalo Sabres Lockhead L. O. C. H. Oracle Nets Nhl United States Hockey tennis
"tom golisano" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

11:36 min | 6 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"With Tom Golisano can you hear me better now Tom thank you yep you're coming inside okay so so now what talk about how paychecks go up big in the four one case space and in human resource you don't just you pay roll that's correct as a matter of fact human resource services and products of paychecks now very close to about forty percent of our revenue and growing at a fairly fast about I guess about twenty five years ago the fellow we talked about before Jean Palestinian one is in subordinates came and saw me and said time we should be interested in the four oh one K. market and I've you know have them explain to me how it might operate what the profit potential was the sales revenue and so forth and I listen to them for about an hour and I sat down okay let's do it but we don't have any software to get started with so we decided we would do things manually for awhile until the software was developed we also thought it was a good idea to develop the software leader would we thought we would know more of the issues revolving around that product in its operation so we started now today I think we have around ninety thousand companies that we do for one K. administration for how we sell more new four oh one K. plans per year than anybody else in the in the business and the same thing the thing that makes it really great Josh is if you do the payroll processing you have all the information in your hands electronically to do the operation for the four oh one K. not always get the money to the investors and keep track of their accounts by individual for example we could do the payroll for maybe thirty thousand companies on a Monday Monday evening and by Tuesday morning at six o'clock in the morning we've got all these things transmitted to the investors for all the deductions that were taken that day plus any employer matches so we're really efficient and we really expedite the process so that makes sense that a really good purchases service the other thing that's like it is that workers compensation insurance all right you know employees are responsible for calculating their workers comp insurance I do not necessarily very very good at doing it is expeditiously as they could so we offer a service the actual insurance plus the ability for us to actually pay to calculate the premiums on behalf of the client now they don't also hold other ray of products to come under featured ministration things like cafeteria plans if the employee handbooks unemployment reckons representation those kinds of things and it's really rounded out paychecks his customer base yeah thank you check his customer base and what it does it makes the client it is here's the client more to us than if we were just doing payroll because we're doing so many things for the client intestine so yeah I have an idea for you well to talk off line yeah I I get calls from paychecks all the time emails from them so while I was there are you a client or not I think we were but I'm not sure anymore but you know we were a close friend Vikas and then also when I worked with a non profit that my parents worked for and they were the paycheck the customer so interesting so maybe we'll give some synergies and some ideas democratic presidential debate this week what this court in this end US a billionaire the troubling thing I see is this war on wealth it's almost reached you know French Revolution type propaganda of the the some of the billionaires are apologizing for their well I mean you you hear the debates this week N. rather than Bloomberg say you know when he was questioned on his billions hate Hey Bernie I employed twenty thousand people you've never imported person a day in your life and really going on the attack the billionaires are good for both the Democrat and the Republican Party why why this demonisation of wealth and what can be done by the billionaire community that you know I don't know get better press or something I was started demoralized to that he was very much very defensive and he should have been much more offensive if I were a politician and I guess they have a long history of it you're not having people that are extremely successful I think is great for the business world and the consumer world because it provides inspiration for people that this is a wide open economies if you do some things right in new timing is good you could become very successful when I started up in paychecks I had no idea that it ever was going to grow to the point of what I was trying to get three hundred clients in Rochester New York and lived happily ever after but then I saw an opportunity and then opportunity involved or number years where we process now the payroll for six hundred and seventy thousand companies we have over fifteen thousand employees that have a good working atmosphere and have economic security we have a lot of shareholders that have done extremely well we paid for a lot of college education to lot of retirement homes a lot of retirement I don't think there's anything to be ashamed or embarrassed about also this idea about paying your fair share of taxes I know how much I paid I wish somebody could define fair share for me because I think I'm way over at and what I've had to pay over the years and I'll also look what it does when you get successful entrepreneurs like even like Bloomberg I mean he is so generous and has so much Phillip philanthropy even said on the air that he's given it to the states only away after he after he passes so why you would vilify those people then the great they like to use the argument well Amazon doesn't pay any taxes well I haven't looked at the financial statements of Amazon if indeed they don't pay any taxes income taxes corporate income taxes you must be a reason and I'm sure they're within the law and we have to remember Congress makes the laws so when you have people like Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders getting up there and criticizing people for having tax loopholes they make a lot so it it's just seems foolish to me yeah I I don't like being vilified I don't think I deserve it I don't think other people deserve I mean when I when I grew up I mean we want my parents to declared bankruptcy in on my high school years my father was disabled we had we went through a period where six months we had to move in with my sister and her husband sleep on the floor in one bedroom I thank god for them or else we'd be homeless and I learned so much through that experience of my mom and dad they never vilified wealth that they were you know that there was a successful a business owner that my parents worked for who help the mount I mean they didn't make a fortune but you know help them out during tough times number one Christmas the guy got me a basketball hoop they did all privately no one knew about it but my mom kind of figured out who was so for me millionaires of our town not necessarily billionaires made our Christmases they they paid our paychecks I never got a job from a poor person I've heard said so I think I think we need to go on offense as the business community and also the sole of the about pay paying the fair share Amazon or any company names on makes wood symbols with you you know US postal service although I said that a week ago right I got an email from a guy who was very high up in the postal service saying that that's not true that they actually do the same volume discounts they give to you P. at U. S. UPS and FedEx and without Amazon you know the US postal service one B. as functional as it is today so even there we're we hear negativity it could be you know just for press but if you think about the average small business owner where the average big business owner you're paying even at today's trump tax cuts you're paying thirty seven percent on every dollar you earn federally you're paying eight to ten percent of the state so that's like forty seven percent right there then you're paying self employment tax on the first you know one hundred and twenty grand of income you're paying Medicare tax you're paying all all these very sales taxes income taxes property taxes I mean my company paid hundreds of thousands of dollars in local taxes they don't show up on the federal income tax issue I so I mean I just think that more and more of people and business need to educate the average consumer nobody's getting over on what they're what they're talking about is if you want to call a loophole is it when you sold what we sell paycheck stocks okay you might pay twenty five percent tax instead of thirty seven so what I mean that's not a that is an integral business we have to remember that that twenty five percent capital gains tax rate and the lower corporate income tax rate were put into play by Congress for very good reasons they wanted to encourage people to invest in Wall Street and investors are major companies and they also wanted to make our corporations competitive with the rest of the world that was the rationale for lowering the corporate tax rate and I can tell you for paychecks as a shareholder I did not get an increase in dividends but I know what paychecks did they make tremendous investments in product development and I. T. both in their I. T. organization so it didn't go rolling into everybody's pocket it stayed within the company created though I think we heard about two hundred more people than we had of the prior year so we have to remember the rationale but back to these politicians give you the expression if you rob Peter to pay Paul you always get the credit to live Paul well that's doing you know they take through if you promise to give it to the rest and they think that's the way they get elected it's it's an old story since the beginning of time yeah and then just so people know yes the capital just to bring this in the long term capital gains rate for most people's fifteen percent but for those in the higher bracket it's twenty and even twenty three point eight with the obamacare surtax which I don't know if they got rid of the exact sur tax I think it's still twenty three point eight and then you have state capital gains rates like in New Jersey there's a state capital gains you're talking at least you know twenty to twenty eight percent and that's what they're exploiting as this.

Tom Golisano
"tom golisano" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

12:03 min | 6 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on 710 WOR

"With Tom Golisano can you hear me better now Tom thank you yep you're coming inside okay so so would not now talk about how paychecks go up big in the four one case space and in human resource do you know just you pay roll that's correct as a matter of fact human resource services and products of paychecks now very cool into about forty percent of our revenue and growing at a fairly fast about I guess about twenty five years ago the fellow we talked about before Jean policy in the N. one is and subordinates came and saw me and said time we should be interested in a four one K. market and I've you know have them explain to me how it might operate what the profit potential was the sales revenue and so forth and I listen to them for about an hour and I said okay let's do it but we don't have any software to get started with so we decided we would do things manually for awhile until the software was developed we also thought it was a good idea to develop the software leader would we thought we would know more of the issues revolving around that product in its operation so we started now today I think we have around ninety thousand companies that we do for one K. administration for how we sell more new four oh one K. plans per year than anybody else in the in the business and the same thing the thing that makes it really great Josh is if you do the payroll processing you have all the information in your hands electronically to do the operation for the four oh one K. in other words get the money to the investors and keep track of it accounts by individual for example we could do the payroll for maybe thirty thousand companies on a Monday Monday evening and by Tuesday morning at ten o'clock in the morning we've got all the things transmitted to the investors for all the deductions that were taken that day plus any employer matches so we're really efficient and we really expedite the process so that makes sense yeah really good purchases service the other thing that's like it is that workers compensation insurance you know employees are responsible for calculating their workers comp insurance they're not necessarily very good very good at doing it is expeditiously as they could so we offer a service the actual insurance plus the ability for us to actually pay the calculate pay the premiums on behalf of the client now you've got also a whole array of products to come under HR administration things like cafeteria plans if the employee handbooks unemployment reckons representation those kinds of things and it's really rounded out a Texas customer base yeah please check his customer base and what it does is it makes the client here's the client more to us than if we were just doing payroll because we're doing so many things for the client I don't know since testing so yeah I have an idea for you well to talk off line yeah I I get calls from pay checks all the time emails from them so why are you a client at I think we wore but I'm not sure anymore but you know we were a close friend Vikas and then also when I work with a nonprofit that my parents worked for and they were the paycheck the customer so interesting so maybe I will give some thirties and some ideas okay democratic presidential debate this week what this court in this end US a billionaire the troubling thing I see is this one more on wealth it's almost reached you know French Revolution type propaganda but but some of the billionaires are apologizing for their well I mean you you hear the debates this week N. rather than Bloomberg's say you know when he was questioned on his billions hate Hey Bernie I employed twenty thousand people you've never imported person a day in your life and really going on the attack billionaires are good for both the Democrat and the Republican Party why why this demonisation of wealth and what can be done by the billionaire community that you know I don't know get better press or something I was started demoralized to that he was very much very defensive and he should have been much more offensive if I were a politician and I guess they have a little history of having people that are extremely successful I think is a great fit for the business world and the consumer world because it provides inspiration for people that this is a wide open economies if you do some things right and your timing is good you could become very successful when I started out the paychecks I have no idea that it ever was going to grow to the point of what I was trying to get three hundred clients in Rochester New York and lived happily ever after but then I saw opportunity in their opportunity involved or number years where we process now the payroll for six hundred and seventy thousand companies we have over fifteen thousand employees that have a good working atmosphere and have economic security yeah we have a lot of shareholders that have done extremely well we paid for a lot of college education and a lot of retirement homes a lot of retirement I don't think there's anything to be ashamed or embarrassed about also this idea about paying your fair share of taxes I know how much I paid I wish somebody could define fair share for me because I think I'm way over at and what I've had to pay over the years and I'll also look what it does when you have successful entrepreneurs like even like Bloomberg I mean he is so generous and has so much Phillip philanthropy even said on the air that he's given it's a state Kohli away after he after he passes up so why you would vilify those people then of course they like to use the argument well Amazon doesn't pay any taxes well I haven't looked at the financial statements of Amazon if indeed they don't pay any taxes income taxes corporate income taxes you must be a reason and I'm sure they're within the law and we have to remember Congress makes the laws so when you had people like Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders getting up there and criticizing people for being having tax loopholes they make the laws so it is just seems who's correct yeah I I'd I don't like being vilified I don't think I deserve it I don't think other people deserve I mean when I when I grew up I mean we were my parents to declared bankruptcy in my high school years my father was disabled we had we went through period we're six months we had to move in with my sister and her husband sleep on the floor in a one bedroom I thank god for them or else we'd be homeless and I learned so much through that experience of my mom and dad they never vilified wealth that they were you know that there was a successful a business owner that my parents worked for who help the mount I mean they didn't make a fortune but you know help them out during tough times number one Christmas the guy got me a basketball hoop they did all privately no one knew about it but my mom kind of figured out who was so for me millionaires of our town not necessarily billionaires made our Christmases they they paid our paychecks I never got a job from a poor person I've heard said I think I think we need to go on offense as the business community and also has all the about pay paying the fair share Amazon or any company names on makes wood symbols of the U. you know US postal service although I said that a week ago right I got an email from a guy who was very high up in the postal service saying that that's not true that they actually do the same volume discounts they give to you P. at U. S. UPS and FedEx and without Amazon you know the US postal service one B. as functional as it is today so even there we're we hear negativity it could be you know just for press but if you think about the average small business owner or the average big business owner they're paying even at today's trump tax cuts you're paying thirty seven percent on every dollar you earn federally you're paying eight to ten percent of the state so that's like forty seven percent right there then you're paying self employment tax on the first you know one hundred and twenty grand of income you're paying Medicare tax you're paying all all these very sales taxes income taxes property taxes I mean my company paid hundreds of thousands of dollars in local taxes that don't show up on the federal income tax issue I so I mean I just think that more and more of people and business need to educate the average consumer nobody's getting over on what they're what what they're talking about is if you want to call a loophole is it when you sold what we sell paychecks stocks okay you might pay twenty five percent tax instead of thirty seven so what I mean that's that's an integral business we have to remember is that that twenty five percent capital gains tax rate and the lower corporate income tax rate were put into play by Congress for very good reasons they wanted to encourage people to invest in Wall Street and investors are major companies and they also wanted to make our corporations competitive with the rest of the world that was the rationale for lowering the corporate tax rate and I can tell you for paychecks as a shareholder I did not get an increase in dividends but I know what paychecks did they make tremendous investments in product development and I. T. both in their I. T. organization so it didn't go rolling into everybody's pocket it stayed within the company created though I think we heard about two hundred more people than we had the the prior year so we have to remember the rationale but back to these politicians the expression if you rob Peter to pay Paul you always get the credit to live Paul little feeling you know be careful if you promise to give it to the rest and they think that's the way they get elected it's it's an old story since the beginning of time yeah and then just so people know yes the capital just to bring this in the long term capital gains rate for most people's fifteen percent but for those in the higher bracket it's twenty and even twenty three point eight with the obamacare surtax which I don't know if they got rid of the exact sur tax I think it's still twenty three point eight and then you have state capital gains rates like in New Jersey there's a state capital gains you're talking at least you know twenty to twenty eight percent and that's what they're exploiting as this for the rich which isn't really a loophole which if they really wanted to solve it I guess they could equi capital gains rates with income tax rates but they've tried that before that actually slows down economic growth so I mean that that's that's been tried before so very interesting to hear your take on Tom Golisano the author of the book built not born if you have a question for billionaire.

Tom Golisano
"tom golisano" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:40 min | 6 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on 710 WOR

"We're back with them and I'm Gary Goldberg on money matters and I have the opportunity to talk with somebody of Tom Golisano's quality I love to share what I find interesting and when I can talk about entrepreneurship when I can talk about the opportunities that lie in front of you my listeners perhaps in the franchise area I think I'm doing a service not only do I manage money I also manage people's lives in many ways and I have a lot of experience in doing this so that's what money matters is about it's not just self promotional stuff it's informative and we have an array of wonderful guests that we've had for years and years and years the show's been on for three decades and then some and we've had people like Jeff Bezos on we've had people like Richard Branson on we have had people who are leaders in corporate America on got a son who is one of those individuals one of the people I really missed talking to which Jack Bogle the founder of vanguard who passed away about a year ago and I miss the opportunity of talking to legendary figures I'm gonna share story with you when Jack Bogle and I spoke about two years ago I said Jack I would love to come down and meet you I was looking for a photo op and I was very honest with them I said I put you on the mount Rushmore of financial people along with the likes of Warren Buffett and he said that would be great Gary I said well I'll come down in the city we can have lunch she said you're gonna have to come a lot further than the city I live in Pennsylvania and I was going to go to Pennsylvania just to have lunch with Jack Bogle the founder of vanguard and I was going to bring Peter Dale ahead of our trading department to join me for this photo op but unfortunately when we set it up Jack was not able to meet with me because of failing health and ultimately our year a so ago he passed don but he's the kind of person I love having come on this program now he was a real buy and hold investor and I'm mentioning Jack Bogle because he also loved dividends I love dividends and it's not as simple as just going out and buying a dividend yielding stock if you bite just on the dividend you are setting yourself up for failure you need a system that is going to allow you to discern or your adviser to discern in this is the kind of research I do what companies will outperform over a longer term while they pay you dividends if you're gonna fish in the dividend pond make sure you have enough time to wait for the fish to bite so you want to go with companies that will continue to pay the dividends will increase their dividends and I love dividend growers these are stocks that outperform as a group most other companies they have a history of increasing their dividends they do better overall and you want companies that increase their dividends because of companies have flat dividends they tend to perform on a very average basis you want to own shares in companies that are likely to continue hiking their dividends you also want to find a company or your adviser should find companies with a long history of investing smartly in their businesses so when you look at a company that has a high return on their own capital that's with a Homer comes in that's the kind of stock you light also do not go with the highest dividend paying stocks go with moderate dividend yields I have found excessively high dividend yields often come with return of your own principle they come because the stock has come down and it's a sign of trouble ahead so in order to identify promising companies you want to find companies and you can find them now in the utility area and in the oil area the quality ones and if the stock comes down and if they have a high return on their capital you can buy them because their dividends are typically secure what I look for so look for strong balance sheets I go for companies that can pay these dividends can increase their dividends yes it takes homework that's what you want and then I find that spreading your risk over too many dividend stocks is unnecessary hold good quality dividend stocks concentrate your money in a few very good ones and then put them in different categories of industries again for industries that pay high dividends utilities oil health care they each have their own risks but that's okay when you're earning more than you are in the bank you're taking on some level of risk also I suggest hold for the long term portfolio turnover in these utility stocks is not necessary just make sure that they continue to raise their dividends if they stop raising the dividend stock will come down that's usually a sign this cell you're not gonna get out at the top but you won't get out at the bottom in my opinion so a lot of homework when you're looking for income it's not like just buying something because it's paying a high dividend when I see dividend yields of eight nine and ten percent I scratch my head and I say oh what's wrong with this company this is something that I have to look at before I invest in it for myself for for clients and you should do the same and so should your adviser and anytime you want to explore with me your portfolio in relation to your income what is it generating for you how stable of these companies you can call me again I'm gonna give you the number is eight eight eight four four one two zero three three eight eight eight four four one two zero three three you're listening to Gary Goldberg on money matters you're listening to money matters with Gary Goldberg income matters and it can come from many sources we had money matters like dividend paying stocks we prefer high quality dividend paying stocks not for everything in your investment portfolio and not all of the time still if you're seeking income after retirement look for companies with a history of raising their dividends on a regular basis call me Gary Goldberg.

Gary Goldberg Tom Golisano
"tom golisano" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

05:44 min | 6 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Seven one six along with my job I am the bulldog Sabres and blue jackets coming your way a little bit after seven yeah I'm tonight's and host of former players even former owner Tom Golisano as well as partners managing partners Larry Quinn and the and the pope is going to be a part of the ceremony on the ice pre game you've got a holds the players here Danny Briere Tim Connolly lots of others Jamie key all here to take part in tonight's festivities so should be a fun night to reminisces how we spent most of our regular show today or is doing exactly that talking about that decade of the the two thousands here in enjoying a lot of that but current day of course let's get to the locker room in here a couple of interviews first up we've got coatis Lazar with our Britain will Booker is obviously your role as expanded a little bit on the roster now you're you're playing the second line center right behind you know Jack Eichel's line primarily but how does it feel to kind of be taking on that expanded role yeah I know it it it feels good obviously our coach Hasenfus the means in key situations but nothing really changes from him again standpoint you know I'm so happy that her nose you know north so style in the hope we can translate is it is it weird that to think back and and look at how it started the year you were in Rochester playing down there and try to work your way back up here now having little more responsibility up here in in the NHL level yeah I mean it it just shows that you know it's a long season a lot can happen and you can ever take a day off I know for myself that you I did have a strong training camp but you know I I stuck with it and you know I I use the time in Rochester kind of grow my game which you know as all three lead to this opportunity what about what about during the off season I mean Jeez about twenty sign use and said it was an opportunity for you to come in and and really prove yourself and and it had been struggling past few years playing with cal Granada about this experience of buffalo when you reflect on it overalls isn't isn't the lightning for you in any way just with with how you know things kind of changed for you yeah of course I mean I am I got some experience in my belt now I guess you know is may sixth your pro you know I mean I know the ins and what's the league and what you know what it takes and the margin between you know you'll be successful it's it's pretty slim and for myself just sticking with the X. the good habits the gym throughout the summer and also I just want that opportunity and soon to get a true opportunity here and this organization it's been great to me I've been able to kind of take and run with it how's it been adjusting back to the Eastern Conference you start out your career in Ottawa in the east you go out west where you played all your junior hockey out there but how's it coming back out east it's good no less travel for sure but no I'm again any anything you play there's challenge every nights I think uses low more speed oriented compared to you know have your Western Conference but you know I'm able to adopt over still the is a part of my game and again everyone's playing the same leagues than that regardless in that Easter the west so again I just wanna listing when your playing Columbus tonight obviously you face them quite a short time ago but what it what's the focus in the heading into tonight's game I think just put can you please strong defensively you know their team that it also you know with places you know very good their own ends you know it's gonna be a bit of you know it is a chess match out there but again stick to our principles you'll build off last minute you know just kind of get on really coaching staff helped you kind of rejuvenates rejuvenate your game they've been huge I mean everyone throughout the organization and you know the guidance and helping me out again I have the resources here that's allowed me to kind of take that next step and because of the coaches immigrate no teaching me how long it's a you know learn from my mistakes and then also just working from hard work you did going down the Rochester kinda you know they always talk about when we send someone down we tell them what to work on and how much how much of that kind of help that it was huge again everyone thinks you're on American you know it's a demotion or you know you can't really keep up to the league up here and stuff like that but so I've always looked as a positive it's a chance you're on you gets you increase minutes in and more opportune to play with the pop what's a just like you said is you know go down here and usually they give me three things to work on which is someone never had before and just really keen on on that knowing that you know if I do the work in that you'll stick to the process than I'm at the opportune McAfee which I have and it's good just kind of see things come full circle crystals are on the pregame guys back to you all right Britain thank you very much I think you know there's not a lot to really clean to this year so far but it was always been a nice story that so that's it god it was a a team Canada world juniors star in a pretty high pick and I know all high hopes without a will and you know his career to this point in the NHL is not really gone like I think he probably was hoping it it would go but I think he's got the right frame of mind and I think he's been a nice nice player what he's a he's a player that I think can contribute to a good team not in a prime role like he's going to be asked to do right now that that's a temporary thing but I think that's a he's he's he's a nice role player I would say corpuscles are is the first of our two blue and gold Walker reports delivered by speed global services around the corner or around the world speed delivers visit speed GS dot com was get right back to the room the return of Victor Olson here he is with our brick walls the gun anywhere whether you're playing tonight or is it still up in the air I'm in the lineup for for tonight so looking forward to it I'm really excited how's it feel that to get the chance to get back on the ice after having no fifteen games off from you know no unfortunate injury yeah it's been it's been tough of course being being.

Tom Golisano Larry Quinn
"tom golisano" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

14:55 min | 6 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"I Hate Winter Ski. I didn't like Ice Skate. Take another that But that was my conflict but you ended up staying in Rochester. When you got family and friends rely friends funds were long time? It's hard to leave so we stayed in Rochester. Once once twice during our history we thought about moving out of state Mainly because because of tax reasons so we decided it's just too big of a move to many people stayed Rogers interesting interesting. E there was a quote I remember remember reading about when you bought the Buffalo Sabres and that no one else was stepping up to the plate to support that community. So it seems like it's it's entrenched in you'd at to help that always that like purchasing a professional sports well first of all I only see three. NHL Hockey Games in my life. So I know nothing about the game. I wasn't real excited sighted about it. I never watched Like that but the city of Buffalo is in trouble. I mean this. This hockey team was important. Part of their culture and and people demonstrated that to me and I became interested same time it was also running for governor. It brought brought about quite a bit of conflict because everybody thought I was interested in buying the sabres. Because I was doing it for political reasons which is not the case uh-huh But the result was we ended up by the team and I became much more of a hockey fan. I why did the team to run at least break even didn't necessarily have to make a profit but I didn't want it to lose money and after I tough year are we really turned it around. Would he bought the team. We had fifty five hundred season ticket oldest by the end of the second year. Fifty thousand and that you know obviously turned and financial picture at a competitive nature in your exactly now. One thing. I'm so intrigued. By though is running paychecks you so you mentioned the run for Governor and then the hockey team. How are you possibly able to manage that? I'm good delegator is that is that the key to it all. I think it is the key to it all. I always thought it was my responsibility to be a good delegator Accomplish more because if you put it all on your shoulders unders you're gonNA limit yourself but being a good delegator bringing in the right people to execute than you give a lot more done. How early on did you identify? Dentist this from the early really early. Yeah I'm so intrigued by that because you see so many people who are just so stuck controlling controlling their entire business and they can't grow. That's just an incredibly aware of you to be able to do that early on you know it's funny you ask that question because I'll tell you a story Several years this guy's asked to do Presentation to group of entrepreneurs right here in Naples was about three hundred people in the audience he had at the end of the presentation tation and that at the end of the QA. Women's up and said Mr Gallison she said the. How many people did you have to stop down on while you're the corporate ladder? And my immediate response was Ma'am the key is not the trampled down keys debris with you. And that's what I felt. I did with my eighteen or nineteen partners in franchises and all the rest of the heroes didn't do it just for myself. I brought everybody along and to me. That's the Keel at. It's so funny just reading the book and then you mentioned all of those original partners if they kept all their stock doc if you were I think it was two hundred fifty million dollars. What's that like being able to step back for a minute and see the value created not just for for the employees toys the shareholders but the number of people that you've truly impacted over the years with has like it's two things it's first of all extremely gratifying? It's also creates a lot of pressure yourself to continue. You know 'cause you brought a people belong to a certain point you on new ones that you just brought brought in to be as successful as earl's so it creates responsibility which I think is great. This is what makes the world go round. It seems like a reoccurring theme that keeps keeps coming up. Is that growth mindset. You have Y- you mentioned can continue to devote evolve and develop and I'm really intrigued about the growth mindset when you took the company public until you take a company public. You've never done it before. So then how do you learn quickly. Enough that to navigate all the things that come with public company. Well first of all you need a really good support person chief financial officer because they are responsible for the day to day. Contact the banks in Wall Street so you gotta they have a person that really knows their way around in that arena a second. You gotTA keep an open mind you gotta learn yell. Stock analysts to some people revere them some people dislike them. I haven't a revere them Mainly because I thought it was important that they understand the paychecks story that they understand where we're going in how we're going to get there and that will drive the stock price to a more positive rate. When I hear people talk about being a public the company everybody quarterly results? We didn't fear that because it created disciplined structure for us. We wanted to continue to grow but we wanted to do at disciplined structured way so that Wall Street understood it was supported so it was more of a marketing challenge. If if you will because if you don't find a way to promote your stock in a positive way nobody's GonNa let you mentioned having that that vacation that long-term vision does that get down to the culture that you create within that company she. I hope so The one thing about growth as you brought up is when you have growth in the company. People are excited they try. Harder is very less us. politicking backstabbing. Everybody's upbeat soon. As Your Company's growth starts to level off then the spirit it starts to diminish politics begin to creep so so far so it's a very important reason to have both just to keep people's attitude and spirit in the right direction. So let's talk about that. I know paychecks of for the majority of the time everything was seventy percent year over year increases. Many years how do you develop L. AP- that positive mindset and that belief when things aren't going necessarily great at the time you gotTa have basics. We have a strong marketplace. I mean the numbers. Small businesses in this country compared to how many of them are using a payroll service. It's a wide open market. So if you have that situation that's very very important. Secondly if you run the business well and you can show prophets Without out being over over demanding but you can be a profitable company in prophets can grow and people could benefit from that We have a lot of people in stock options in the company and of course that drives a lot of their efforts to you mentioned delegation a few minutes ago. And I'm wondering what what your role looks like a CEO of Public Company. How much time were you able to dedicate to thinking about the future of the business? You never stop thinking about you. Just never stop thinking about And I was a little unique. I guess you know running for Governor three times lows still. CEO that was a very unusual situation. Zabel to do it. It obviously strong support staff. Everybody knew our objectives business goals so it was fairly easy from the from that point but it tastes good quality people and they have to understand the goals objectives as well. I mean you have to have some unique skills as well. I mean even thinking about just being able to compartmentalize as you might be leading board meeting. And then all of a sudden you're on a political campaign how are you able to get in that mindset in each different circumstance. You'd.

Hockey Public Company Rochester Buffalo Sabres NHL CEO Buffalo Rogers Mr Gallison Zabel Naples chief financial officer earl
"tom golisano" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

04:28 min | 6 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"WG Y T for twenty percents off your order so Tom Welcome guy there. How you doing today doing very well today? How could you not do well? Sunny Florida in November. Yeah we're we're fortunate enough to be here in your home Just admiring the gorgeous landscaping the unbelievable water scenes and I. I'm fascinated by this because I really did. Enjoy the new book and it resonates so much. 'CAUSE will come out of you in this book. Is that entrepreneurial it so I have to know where did that H I come from when you first realize you had that entrepreneurial gene gene. Well I guess going back to. Even when I was a young boy I had a paper route I collected bottles. I collected newspapers. I did all kinds of things because my parents were having a tough time financially. So there wasn't a lot of money to spread around so I went out and started doing those. Things got a level of satisfaction. Tim Enjoyment out of it. But serious thing happened to be one day. I was about seventeen years old. My father was a salesman for macaroni Company in Houston. This deliver macaroni two small supermarkets around the city in a big truck. So I used to helping leaves sixty five sixty six years old but one day we were back at the distribution bution point my father headey very degrading conversation with his boss and I had to sit stale neared and listen to it and it really affected me so I sort of made two commitments. One I wanted to have my own business and number two. I never would talk down to people. I finally got talked down to that day so what college it offered. Stay Tech thought about it. All the time I was in college came out Look for opportunities. Today I got out of school and it just continued from there. It's remarkable a story like that. The impact in the lasting impression impression that can have on you I N interested. They'll prior to that. The did you have any idea what you might do. When you're older specifically glee? No I knew I wanted to be the business world and took business at Alfred Tacke Which is the college I went to a two year college? I worked a year before I went to school because I didn't have any money to pay for room and board books and all that type of thing But I was pretty sure right from the beginning that I want to have my own business and control my own destiny. So I'd love to hear the origin story paychecks. Here you have this incredible circumstance where you view something your father father happening. And then you get that real id so then. How does paychecks come to be well I had worked for a company called electronic counting systems will call? Es for sure and they were a payroll processor they were typical of the payroll processes. Back in the fifties and sixties. They went after large companies. Their thought was larger through the company. The more checks they will produce in the more revenue. While I went to work for that company they started in sales that made me sales manager and then when they have just driving down the street I said you know we have an opportunity so a lot of small business but our product doesn't fit very well and I went to the library and found out ninety. Ninety eight percent of all American businesses are less than one hundred employees and I said why are we knockin heads against lawler competition at the high end of the market. Why don't you come up with the product for the Woah the market especially when the fifty employees? So I dreamed up a product definition very simply The way we get information from declined to press baron hadn't called him on the telephone instead of filling out of combat complicated computer input. She that has to be then picked up process and of course some back. So why don't we just add calling on the telephone. We'll read the employees in the. Let's let's just tell us a verbalize what they want to accomplish. Typical twenty person payroll takes about two or three minutes and the client doesn't have to learn how to do anything. Okay secondly if you're an employer in the United States of America you are really an unpaid tax collector. You collect taxes from your employees you remitted to the federal and state governments ever bits. And if you don't do it correctly or untie so heavy fines you panther. You have to pay well. Why not accomplish that for the clients pay the federal estate taxes forms? They never get behind. Never get caught up or forget to.

salesman macaroni Company baron Florida Alfred Tacke United States Tim sales manager lawler Houston America
"tom golisano" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

01:59 min | 7 months ago

"tom golisano" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Owner of the previous owners at called this Laurel and what I took it over. We decided we'd leave the name the same because it does do a certain amount of charter business and we didn't want people to lose track of the boat load because we changed the name the wake and I wrote pricing per minute. Oh absolutely you'd like us to raise your prices. You feel better. No no no hello paychecks. Also no no no no no wife and I. We've talked about this and we were saying this is years ago. It's like how in the world do they do it so inexpensively expensively and obviously you guys have gone and got more efficient time. But how'd you go out there and get your first ten customers. Did you just cold call. Did you show up were you doing you know what I did. I ace put together. A mailing lists from the Roster Chamber of Commerce out about three thousand letters early November nineteen seventy and I was hoping to get sixty clients out of best mailing. I ended up getting six. Wow I I had gone true all my money by that ended up with six plants so from that and it was you know Beg Barrow and all the other thing but It took me forty years to get my goal. Three hundred clients. I ended up the first year with about forty so it was a long haul went for years without our payroll check. Good thing my wife took on a job and a charitable organization but we survived it and then it was just a matter of Eddie clients here after here. What was your low point when growing the business because doctors you started your first business? I started my first business. I worked at Applebee's target and direct ATV when I was starting. DJ CONNECTION DOT COM. And I remember vividly eating Rama noodles having no disposable to speak of being in a in a tight spot sharing during the one car. That barely worked Tom. What was your absolute lowest point when building.