18 Burst results for "Tom Edwards"

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:31 min | Last month

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Can I just say, I'm not into it. The booty goes rampant. That's the lyrics. I mean, as correct as he may be about that. I'm not enjoying 20 four ten. But it's an interesting I was reading about and there was even an article on devout about his career and how he comes across and he's very young 22 years. The video is very well filmed. I mean, he's dressed as a Barbie and he dressed as a bride. Basically has many characters in the video. So perhaps a name to be seen in the German music scene. I don't know if he's going to actually be working any other countries. I don't know. I'm not too sure. It's fascinating when you get this slight outliers. I like the fact that 24 term is only 22. Exactly. He's got two more years to go before he catches up or something. I don't know. Exactly, exactly. Fernando, I always ask you to pick a favorite. I think I know where you're headed, but go on, choose one of those 5 to be the standout for this week. You know what? I'll stick with Nina tuba. She, you know, and she introduced me to the world of lied, you know, which I will try after the show. Can I tell? Please do, cheers, Fernando. Cheers. My thanks to Tom Edwards and Fernando Augusto Pacheco. And that's all for this edition of the briefing. It was produced by Rhys James, and our studio manager was Callum McLean. The show's back tomorrow at the same time and don't forget to tune into tonight's edition of the monocle daily, which has at 1800 London time. My name's Georgina Godwin, and I'll be back with you for the globalist, right and early tomorrow. Goodbye and thanks for listening.

Nina tuba Fernando Tom Edwards Fernando Augusto Pacheco Rhys James Callum McLean Georgina Godwin London
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:49 min | 4 months ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"The July August issue of Monaco, we looked amongst other things at the future of food production. One port of call was New Jersey, where oye shy of vast urban farming project is dividing opinions with its $47 punnets of strawberries. Is this a step towards cities feeding themselves or just an expensive gimmick? Monica's Tom Edwards spoke to journalist Tom Vanderbilt, who visited the farm, Tom began by asking, what he expected to find in New Jersey. You know, I had been a hearing about this famous strawberry for several years, and I had not actually sampled it. This was a strawberry that was selling for $50 for a pack of 8 and had to be acquired. Outside of a subway station, the Lower Manhattan after you called in a reservation. So I was very, I was very excited, but I had seen one or two small scale vertical farms in places like Singapore, but so I had an image in my mind, but the first thing I should say is it's what you see when you get there as doctor Lee glamorous from the outside, it's a former Anheuser Busch brewing distribution plant in a not particularly lovely part of Jersey City. So you would drive by and not notice anything about it. You go inside, though, and the whole atmosphere is transformed into this, first of all, it looks more like a Silicon Valley startup office than anything. There's whiteboards, there's break rooms, there's clean rooms, there's sort of high-tech machinery around. And then there's a part where they actually grow the strawberries, and I was not really allowed much access to this for a couple of reasons. Number one is that the growing process is meant to be as free from contaminants as possible. So civilians can not enter that room. The second reason is there's all sorts of proprietary technology and even proprietary plants that I'm not really supposed to have too much access to, not that I'd really be able to steal any agricultural secrets, I think, but so yeah, I mean, it's just a picture an absolute white quiet room, something like you'd imagine on the International Space Station with robotic devices sort of moving up and down the aisles. And bees sort of lazily flying around. And then thousands of strawberry plants and that's what you see when you go to oishi. And of course, then look, Tom, that prompts the big question, which is, what are those strawberries like? You mentioned it, you know, 50 bucks upon it. It's not cheap. But I don't know, presumably that you were at least allowed to tuck in finally. Are they worth every one of those, every one of those 50 bucks? Is it something, I don't know, transformational in terms of what you understand the strawberry can deliver to your palate? Not to get too high flute in here, but the philosopher John Locke back in the 1700s, the pineapple was a thing that was coming to the UK for very wealthy people. It was this new exotic import. And he actually wrote this whole essay, which is fascinating about how do I describe this pineapple to you until you actually eat it. You know, the problems of knowing something that we can't know. So I'm a little bit in that boat where, you know, we all know what a strawberry tastes like. We have sort of an image in our head. And I sort of have two images in my head. One is the average supermarket strawberry, which is usually pretty mediocre, the texture is kind of stiff. They're often white on the inside, which is not particularly appetizing. And they're picked in California. Green and sent via truck and they ripen in these sort of air conditioned trucks. So that's one image. The other images that perfect summer farmers market strawberry, which lasts, I think, a week. And if you're lucky to get there, you have that sort of perfect strawberry. It's lush. It's deep red. It's very sweet. It tastes very nice. So it was closer, definitely to that second thing, but it sort of went even above and beyond that. It just had this kind of, I don't have a lot of great words for texture, but this sort of suppleness to it that just almost felt like it was melting in my mouth kind of like a candy experience. And then it's very sweet. One of the most immediately notable things. But yeah, it was I have to say it was a transformative experience in my strawberry eating. I would feel happier about paying the $20 that it now seems to be priced at whole foods and other retailers. Because the company is beginning to scale a little bit more than the $50 per 8. A $7 strawberry puts a lot of pressure on that fruit. Did you see when you were there? Tom evidence that the tech that is being deployed there, even some of it being kind of kept a little bit behind closed doors. It can help to address some really huge problems, both in terms of agriculture. You mentioned there's bees flying around, you know, bees are threatened in parts of the U.S.. And also these broader questions around sustainability. You know, did you see evidence that they're thinking on that kind of scale? And I guess a sort of corollary point. Also that this is a smart fix, clever tech can be a big Philip for our cities. Cities that really need innovation and new ideas. Did you see lots of evidence that gave you that kind of confidence? You know, it is early days and I think if we look at oishi has sort of an R&D center, this is often the way, of course, innovation works with the products are very expensive in the beginning of catering to this specialized market, but then we do get this trickle down the technology becomes easier to crack the scalability improves and these things that were once considered exotic. The video cassette recorder in the 1980s, at first it was this luxury item that only a few people had, then, by the end of the decade, pretty much everyone had that. It's not going to solve the world's problems today, but it might be answering some questions. You're providing some pathways that really could benefit the world at large. That was Tom Vanderbilt there talking to Monica's Tom Edwards from New York City, and you can read Tom's report in the year July August issue of monocle still on newsstands for a little bit longer. And that's all for today's program. Thanks to our producers Marcus hippie and Emma sir, our researchers Lillian fawcett, Maya renfer, and our studio manager caller maclean. After the headlines, there's more music on the way, and the briefing is live at midday in London. And I'll be back on the globalist at the same time tomorrow. I'm Georgina Godwin. Thank you for listening.

Tom Vanderbilt Tom Edwards Lee glamorous Anheuser Busch New Jersey Tom Lower Manhattan Monaco Monica Jersey City Silicon Valley International Space Station John Locke Singapore UK strawberry
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:25 min | 5 months ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Got the moves. I think I do. I got the ball in the air too. I got them but she's feeling sweet and it's your party take my hand she may shoot me now he's holding me tight I got the moon I do. I got the movie and I get it too. I got the Moses getting laid so I kiss him but he has my name so I say I'll tell her next time I got the move if you're nostalgic there at home. That's amazing. It feels like the 1950s almost. Doesn't it? Exactly what it sounds. And I love the fact that sometimes maybe we didn't hear right there, but there's a little bit of far sea as well in that song. So it's such a variety of genres. I think it's great, especially if you're driving, as I said, a fast car. Love it. That certainly would work up a bit of an appetite. Certainly for a cool refreshing drink in the afternoon, it's apro time, and that's your second boot selection. What fits the moment? They are very interesting on next act. First of all, they are no more. They are LA duel of DJs. They started a career actually playing hip hop, but then they had a complete change. I mean, I wouldn't say complete change maybe, you know, they just wanted to venture in other stages. So they are doing they were doing electro pop for a while. Even bubble magazine called then Z synth porn. I don't know why, but I love this description. Let's have a listen, then maybe you tell me if you felt that vibe as well. Let's see where this ends up. From LA, it's Oliver. Space and sound. It's quite immersive in a way if you think about it. It's nice vibe. Slick, I'm feeling it. For sure. Undoubtedly, porn. Maybe I should have kept the one for Brazilian sunset, right? No, I like that one Fernando. Nice moody stuff. You always talk about imagine that fast car we were in earlier. Changing gears a little bit. A lazy afternoon. Poolside. Maybe the needle, the mercury and the needles rising a little bit. What's the soundtrack? Well, this is a beautiful one. I have to say afternoon Sunday. And it's interesting because this song is by Leon where a French woes. I mean, he's a very renowned artist. He produced for Michael Jackson for Marvin Gaye. And this album in particular mute, it's called musical massage. I love the name of the album already. It was a bit of a flop when it was released in the 70s, but then it became a coat hit afterwards, because it is really amazing. And you know the song I want you by Marvin Gaye, which is an all time classic. It was supposed to be on this album because Leon wear kind of made it and recorded the song. But then I think Marvin Gaye wanted said, yeah, you can have it. But no problem. He had French walls, which I think is a fantastic and very chic. So this is a very chic afternoon sunbathing. Tom, let's have a listen. You definitely need a drink to listen to this. Light funk and a bit jazzy. I love it. That's a great selection Fernando. I really enjoyed that one. I'm less confident as we ease ourselves towards the Euro dance dance floor of an evening. Not necessarily Tom Edwards is natural territory. But tell me, what are we going to find when we get there? And for this particular mood, I was not afraid to be cheesy. I didn't want to be cool because there's plenty of coolness in the playlist already, you know? This is something quite raw in a way. And I love this track, was released in 1994. People were dancing along in Brazilian factory was the number one song from Argentina to the Netherlands. It's one of those songs that people forget. They don't even know who sings it. But I'm telling you here. Player hiti, the summer's magic in the air from Italy. Let's have a listen. So what do you think and in the lovely day the summer is mine is my magic the summer is magic you have to remind you. The summer is magic the summer is my chance the farmer gosh.

Marvin Gaye LA Moses Fernando Leon Oliver Tom Edwards Michael Jackson Tom Argentina the Netherlands Italy
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:28 min | 5 months ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"The city that grabbed the top spot in monocles annual quality of life survey in which our editors rank the world's most livable cities. So good times fort Copenhagen. Earlier this morning, Monaco's Tom Edwards heard from Denmark's foreign minister yep coffered to discuss what makes Copenhagen so wonderful. Country, as you know, and it's, well, here is cheap. It's fast. It's sustainable to get around on bike. It's part of our DNA in Denmark so of course it is a big deal that the tour will begin here in Denmark this year. It is the biggest cycling race on earth and it comes to the greatest biking nation on earth. So in that sense, you can imagine that the atmosphere in all of the mud will be electric. And when The Rain starts, you can feel it already. I mean, people are proud, they're excited. They really look forward to this is happening. And it's also a great opportunity. I have to say for them to showcase what we have to offer, not least on our biking culture, liveable city, screen solutions. And also the green transition is pose a way of flies and also I would say and key element of the business model of Denmark, things companies had a trying to be more and more sustainable. They are leaders in green energy energy efficiency, water, management, food production. So in that sense, things comes together and having this for a fast beginning here in Copenhagen is really, really fantastic. Well, and you probably find it really interesting this idea about the engagement, the deep cycling culture of Denmark. Is it that Denmark is a culture that suits bicycling or is bicycling suited to Denmark if you see what I mean? Well, I think for many countries, many people coming here, they might be quite flat. And not so hilly. So it's easy to bicycle around, but today you also have electrical bicycles. So even if you have some hills with easy. But I think it's part of, as I said, of our DNA and Copenhagen, but also all the Danish students see this we have good biking lanes. We have years, decades of biking culture, and it's also becoming more and more important part of our daily life. It's healthy. It's fast. It's something where you also provide sustainable transformation because you don't use other than your human energy when you're bicycling. So in that sense, it is really, really important for things. Well, and another thing that we at Monaco hope is important for Danes is to have secured top spot for Copenhagen once again on monocles, quality of life, survey and art listeners hopefully familiar with the kinds of things that factor into that success, the cycling infrastructure, that deep cycling culture that you've already spoken about is a big factor, but there were other things that our journalists picked out, the nature, the proximity to water. And there is an engagement, isn't there with the outdoors with the active life, in Copenhagen actually across all of Denmark, which is very fundamental to why it's such a happy, healthy nation. Yeah, I mean, we have for many decades worked on sustainability and green solutions and this has left a positive mark on our CD two nature urban life going hand in hand. You mentioned to the harbor, but also the fact that you can swim in the hopper, you have PACS, you have green areas, it's natural pockets of natural part of city planning. You can drink 100% untreated to clean ground water directly from the tap, for example. Things like that is making it very livable and healthy to live in. And then we also on a bigger level we have very ambitious targets in Copenhagen aim to be the first carbon neutral capital in 2025. And we also have a national target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 70% in 2030. So in that way, the combination of many things make Copenhagen and extraordinary city to live in bike friendliness, short walking distances, or to which culture and gastronomic gastronomic scene, we have clean water fresh air. We have healthy sustainable lifestyle and also a high level of safety. So I think when that comes together, it's what constitutes Denmark in many ways. Well, yes, and you probably want to ask you a bit about exactly the Denmark's successful management of the pandemic because Denmark was more lenient than many, I'm sat here in London, of course. We were all over the shop for large parts in terms of our political process. Copenhagen seems specifically to have reverted if you like back to normal with much less fuss than some other countries. Is that because it was well handled by you and your colleagues, I guess, in part, but does that also speak to a Danish sensibility, a certain degree of phlegmatic, a pragmatism may be about Danes as a nation to generalize a little? Does that help to explain why Denmark has got back to normal so readily? Well, I first have to say COVID has been so harmful to many aspects of life and it goes within my goals. All countries on this planet Tenet and once we can remember that traveling wasn't, for example, impossible also me as foreign minister I couldn't really travel. So it's just a relief that life has returned to normal these past months. But the fact is that we were able to lift restrictions as one of the first countries. And that's what thanks to coordinated approach, but also solidarity among things people should support for dealing with pandemic and of course fundamentally widespread vaccine program that worked very well. So that combination gave us this situation where we can get back to normalcy and life again already from early spring late winter and that was really really good for people living here. Well, as you said, one thing that's decidedly not normal is, of course, to welcome the start of the Tour de France, there's going to be a huge additional scrutiny..

Denmark Copenhagen fort Copenhagen Tom Edwards Monaco COVID London Tour de France
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

05:35 min | 6 months ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"That I have. Finally, today we head to Vancouver, a city that has been steadily climbing our rankings over the years, and this time has managed to crack the top ten. So what is it about this West Coast duel in Canada's crown that secured its place at number 9 in our list? Well, let's hear now from our man in Canada, Thomas Lewis, who sung Vancouver's praises during our selection process. Our very own Tom Edwards, caught up with him a little earlier. Vancouver's regularly made the quality of life survey at monocle for years and years by this stage. And what I found over the years from covering various cities here in Canada is that you know our listeners and our readers here in Canada in those cities do hold both their cities to pretty high standard, but also hold those who cover them to pretty high standard two. So if we say something that's a little bit off, we'll hear about it pretty quickly and be sort of put in our place as opposed to put that in the nicest way. Possible. But I was in Vancouver, I suppose the first time I went since the pandemic began was last summer. And living here in Toronto, Tom, you know, we had one of the longest city lockdowns depending on which measure you look at anywhere in the world. And going to Vancouver felt like a breath of fresh air to put it lightly, there was a real energy there. There were lines outside the nightclubs in the pubs and the bars, and it just felt like there was a real embracing that things were open again. And I think, you know, if you look at other Canadian cities around the country, that wasn't necessarily the case for lots of them. And I think there's a sense of being nimble in Vancouver and in the province of British Columbia more broadly, that I think has really been a model that sort of caught our eye. So that's why we thought it was good to have it in the top ten this year in the quality of life survey Tom. Where the cities are regarded as great places to work and live. Lots of people move there. And one of the challenges therefore is how these big urban centers deal with increasing population growth, but Vancouver looks to have plenty of plans to ensure that it takes that kind of ongoing expansion in its dried. Yes, well it's trying at least it's before looking about this. And I think if you look at the last census here in Canada, it was regions right around Vancouver that are the fastest growing in that of course is going to bring pressures for the city itself. And I think if you look at some of the infrastructure projects that are coming up in Vancouver, of course, with lots of major generation defining infrastructure projects, there's obviously a lot of debate perhaps opposition that comes around those. But I think the more clearer eyed view of some of these projects in Vancouver is that it really is a very forward looking way of meeting the demands that are going to come and it is very heartening to see a city hall be so forward looking about it. And welcoming people to come and live there with open arms in a sort of tangible way is something that I think is worth taking note of and is something that means that the next few years should be quite good ones to be able to meet the increasing population, the number of people who want to piece of the Vancouver life for themselves. Throughout the top 25, there are still could do betters, little hints and tips from our humble crew to suggest ways that these cities can get even better and one of the ones that struck me as interesting is for Vancouver, it's to loosen its collar a little and maybe you look at things like lifting restrictions on drinking alcohol in the city's parks as an inveterate street drinker, you would presumably concur with that. Absolutely very close to my heart here, Thomas, you rightly note. I would say, you know, we did make this note in our entry for Vancouver. The city's parks really became sort of a very important part of life for cities across the country during lockdown measures. And there's a lot of frustration going that the city's councillors can't really wake up the people are going to do this anyway and I'm going to do it responsibly and enjoy the city that they are residents of and that they contribute to the life of too. So in Vancouver it is worth noting there is a pilot project underway at the moment. That has taken a few parks, it's expanded recently, but taking a good handful of the city's parks and made it legal to go and have a drink there to go and have a picnic. And there's a lot of hope that this is the first step really to making this permanent. So yes, we have put as a sort of loose in the collar a little bit of Vancouver, but is worth noting that there are some very positive moves in that direction already. So maybe Tom, if you and I ever find each other in Vancouver one day, we can raise and clink a glass together in the years to come then one of the city's fine array of public parks. Well, that's nice for you, but the saver drink for me too guys. That was Thomas Lewis there in conversation with monocles Tom Edwards. And that brings us to the end of this week's episode of the urbanist, be sure to pick up a copy of the latest edition of Monaco magazine to uncover the full list of our top 25 cities to live in available on newsstands now or simply subscribe at monocle dot com. Today's episode of the urbanist was produced by Carlos rebelo and David Stevens, and David also edited the show. And to play you out this week, his Denmark's own F da clang with Scandinavian love. Thank you for listening, since he loves..

Vancouver Canada Thomas Lewis Tom Edwards Tom West Coast British Columbia Toronto Thomas Monaco magazine Carlos rebelo David Stevens David Denmark
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:54 min | 6 months ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"But Stockholm isn't far off. It sits comfortably in 5th place this year, and earlier monocles Josh Bennett and Tom Edwards sat down with Sweden's ambassador to the United Kingdom, her excellency Michaela kumlin granite, and they talked about what makes a Swedish capital such a good place to set up shop. So we are here to reflect a little bit on monocles. I think it's the 15th edition of the quality of life issue and the survey in our ratings. Stockholm has fed very well once again. It's retained its place in the top 5. Before we talk a little bit more about some of the nuance of this year's edition, maybe for the uninitiated ambassador just remind us why Stockholm is always a perennial on this list what makes the city such a desirable place in which to live and to work. Well, thank you so much first of all for letting me come here and to also to talk a little about Stockholm which is my hometown. And I would say that Stockholm has all the benefits that a large city has, the width and breadth of everything that you can have, the modernity, urbanization, we have the most theaters per CAPiTA, for instance. But at the same time, we have a lot of nature, open spaces, so culture and nature. And then it also has all the benefits that a small town has. So it's very accessible, easy to find your way around, and some intimacy. So I think that that's really what, but I would also add another thing the sustainability of Stockholm. The clean air and the fact that Stockholm was the first ever city to be designated European green capital of the EU, for instance, and also secondly, I think the second year in a row that we are one of those cities that is the most sustainable. So if you go to Stockholm, you will know that the solutions are much in a sustainable way. You can trust that. And Josh, that's interesting because that boils down a lot of the considerations that you and the other editors here have to take into account when gauging these different metrics. It is this idea of big city, efficiency with small city, intimacy, the greening of the city, the neighborhood vibe, the warmth of the city of the ambassador and a rather good job. At boiling down what the key metrics are, hasn't she in a way. Well, in a way, the difficult job is mine because I have to sit here opposite the ambassador and explain why Stockholm actually fell one place in the ranking this year and that your near neighbors Copenhagen also scored very highly and won again the ranking, but maybe the best way for listeners is if we zoom out a tiny bit and just explain what it's for. So we've done this survey for the past 15 years. We rank the 25 most livable cities the best cities to call home and you'll notice that best is a value judgment. This doesn't claim to be an entirely statistical basis, things like the good country index run statistics and they come out with a list at the end. What we do is we form a backbone by looking at ambulance response times crime rates and some maybe slightly less rigorous things like whether the city trusts you to have a glass of wine on the pavement at night whether there is that social capital that the ambassador talked about whether you can escape to the leafy dual garden or go out in a boat in Lake malaren and all of these things are important to the way that cities are experienced, so we don't claim to be entirely objective, but what we do try and do is push the debate about cities. Stockholm did extremely well, you know, in the past, I think it would be fair to say that it struggled with inclusion around the outskirts of the city in a way that the other Nordic neighbors haven't, but that's being addressed. And I think that's the crucial thing that cities can learn from each other and discussions like the one we're having between city halls between nations and hopefully between a nice glossy magazine or two can be important to moving that debate forward. I want to ask you a little bit about exactly how Stockholm is looking forward and addressing some of the challenges it's faced. How do you see those challenges first of all? And are some of them related to exactly this point about a city that is well proportioned, it's also desirable, so more people are coming, the populations growing, to what extent is that the nature of the challenge, learning to grow, but retaining all of these great characteristics. No, I think that's really one of the main challenges for a city like Stockholm that we have so many people moving in to Stockholm because of the opportunities because of course it's an innovation hub and then at the same time keeping the transport system and in that way providing that even if you choose to live further out that you easily can access the city. And of course we've seen that development but also when it comes to the COVID because of course homeworking and home office working so fast that also changed it. We are lucky in a sense with stock of that it's also a very accessible to water to the sea and the marine life. It's a coastal city. And as you mentioned, is to have this mailer and the suites on the same side. So it is the easy act to develop places to live further away that still has that possibility to take a swim because I thought that was one of the things..

Stockholm Josh Bennett Tom Edwards Michaela kumlin Sweden Lake malaren United Kingdom EU Josh Copenhagen COVID
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:03 min | 6 months ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Monaco 20 four's head of radio Tom Edwards has been speaking to Andorra Thea brune Aubrey, deputy ambassador at Denmark's embassy here in London. I think actually that in many ways, it boils down to having a really good piece of well-being. It sounds quite simple, but it brings quite a lot of happiness. In my view, you really live well in Copenhagen on everyday basis. Like you're in a big city, you feel that vibrant city flow and movement. But at the same time, the city feels very safe, actually quite easy and uncomplicated and very clean. And I think one thing that's really striking, if we look at this assessment of quality of life has happened, of course, after two years of the pandemic. But in Copenhagen it sort of feels in the best way, like the coronavirus never happened. The residents seem to have reverted to normal without fuss. There's there is this sense of togetherness that power of the collective that you've alluded to already of collective shared happiness. Is that is that why they've managed to navigate the pandemic with such alacrity? Yeah, I think you're pointing to something very true here. I think the basically, if you go down and you boil it down to what it is about, it's very much about trust basically. I mean, I think the themes are, I mean, think, first of all, considered to have one of the highest levels of trust in each other. Those are like a high general sort of societal trust, which is the ability to trust people. You've never met before. You sort of just give you an example. You'll see quite young children go to school and their own without their pairings having to worry and traffic, you have a young mother actually leaving her baby outside a cafe, believe it or not. This is actually happening. And you'll see sort of ministers walk or even bike around from meeting to meeting from the government of the weather allows. So this sort of there's a trust in each other and it extends to a trust in the nation's institutions like the government and health services. And it gives a sense of safety, but it also gives a willingness to sort of contribute and do your part. So yeah, I think that's very much about that. People who hold power and these positions are actually trusted tech and the best interest of society and we saw that we saw that throughout the pandemic as well as the belief in this. We have a very, very low level of corruption. So it's an important part of our everyday living. Well, does it follow from that then that residents in Copenhagen and I guess across all of Denmark have trust, therefore, in those institutions and in those officials, to navigate the challenges that do lie ahead, because whilst it is a very positive picture in Copenhagen comes out number one, there are challenges ahead like, well, I guess one of them is because it's such a great place. People want to come and live there and that provides a challenge in terms of infrastructure and housing, is there a collective trust and confidence that the institutions and the officials are fit for purpose in meeting that challenge? Yeah, I think we are sort of booming, as you say, and I think that there is definitely a challenge ahead of that where we have to keep developing, but I think, but I think just to go back towards the city in itself and the sense of collective belonging and together as you pointed out, I think that what you saw interestingly enough also sort of post pandemic, you see a lot of sort of young families choosing to leave bigger cities around the world to have a more simple, easy and calm life and smaller town. And this is obviously also in many cases attached to economic cost of living aspects. But I think that on a more value based skill, I think that Copenhagen being vibrant and creative big city, there's also the sort of smaller local community town business around it, where you can actually have a less chaotic and complicated everyday life. So on a more sort of day to today scheme, I think is that a lot of people choose to think Copenhagen even after this pandemic that we've all been through in big cities. And there will definitely be a need to keep exploring possibilities for housing, as you see. Now, Copenhagen is a great city for biking. One of the very few negative points that I think my colleagues were able to find was a bit of a preponderance of rude cyclists apparently. I don't know whether would you challenge us on that one? And if you think that maybe there are one or two who could do with brushing up on their manners, what's the best way to get Danes to be a little bit more a little bit more civil when they're on their bikes? Oh, definitely. I mean, there are at least I would say that I can recognize what you're saying. I think that there is definitely a code to learn if you do take the challenge of going on your bike. We're pretty kind of Viking spell when we go on that bike. And we're pretty used to doing it every day. So we'd like to everything. And we have our way of going about it. So when people that don't come from Copenhagen get on that bike, they have to be very aware of sort of how to maneuver in it. But I think it also shows how we actually make the city a live all the time. We really use the city. I mean, to give you another example, which is not by king, you know, we really keep kind of pushing our limits as to how we can make the city alive and kicking, which has had a royal run with our royal family in the front, making a collective run through the city on a Saturday. And you just kind of pass those historical buildings with your monarchy in the front. It's kind of it seems quite amazing actually, you can do that, which goes back to the level of trust, I guess I mentioned. We have Copenhagen swim, where you kind of do compensations in the waters, and my husband just loves to do pedal himself through the city and sort of just enjoy it. So, you know, you can do all those things because the air is clean and the city is such a green city, but you can also do it because you sort of trust that people will take care of each other. But I do acknowledge that there are code from the biking lanes that are a bit aggressive sometimes. Great stuff. And Dorothea, thanks for being such a good sport. And thanks for coming on and telling us a little bit about why Copenhagen is so very livable. Thank you very much. Great. We have to keep it up for next year as well. That was and Dorothea brunton Aubrey deputy ambassador at Denmark's embassy here in London in conversation with monocle 24s Tom Edwards for the full rundown of the top 25 cities in which you might call home or perhaps you are calling home..

Copenhagen Tom Edwards Thea brune Aubrey Denmark Andorra Monaco London Dorothea Dorothea brunton Aubrey
"tom edwards" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

04:15 min | 9 months ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on ExtraTime

"The gap for Columbus to charge up field literally a 110 yards or a 120 hours however long Red Bull, the pitch is there. Go from one end line to the other. And create a scrum in the 6 and Darlington nagbe taps home. They deserve credit though. Jesse zardoz made two separate runs just in this sequence that were devastating to New York's shape. And then the other one was the patient's Louis Diaz showed on the side of the box to wait for the overlapping. I've never seen Louis Diaz show any sort of patience. If he showed patience at all, given his gifts on the ball, it isn't like he would be one of the best wingers in the league. He's never literally never done that before. So it was really well done by the crew to take advantage when nobody on the Red Bulls shut any of the doors that were just sitting there waiting to be shot throughout this incredible inexplicable sequence of I thought you were then going to say and then Darlington nagbe made a goal scoring run. Well, here's the thing about that too. The Red Bulls had numbers. And then there's two crew players that come out of the midfield untracked to go back to guy's jogging or making tackles that should not be made. And that's what changes it. That's why the patient pays up patients pays off because those two additional numbers Jesse pulls the defense around and all of a sudden the crew have numbers and they're running at pace into the box to ball arrives and bounces around and faster than anybody else. You could just see these sort of the frustration, the just disbelief on the Red Bulls players at that whistle of like my God. What did we just give away? But it was completely just in terms of like run of play. Yeah. Yeah, the crew obviously we said I had those two chances, but over the course of 7 days, the Red Bulls play too good home games and walk away with one point. That's like not a way to win an MLS. So I think there's a ton of frustration there. As you said at the end of the way they reacted, you'd expect this is now a situation where some guys started the season well. But now leukemias probably gets pushed into that starting lineup. Maybe Tom Edwards, maybe back and not playing the back 5 as much because I don't think you saw a ton from Dylan nilas and I thought Louis Morgan actually looked pretty poor out there. It just isolated him at a time when he looks really good with pieces around him, essentially..

Louis Diaz Darlington nagbe Red Bulls Jesse zardoz Columbus New York Jesse Tom Edwards MLS Dylan nilas Louis Morgan
"tom edwards" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

03:35 min | 9 months ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on ExtraTime

"This feels Dave like Gerhard struber has found a little, he's found a little something, a little understanding on the field, a little bit of a production from Lewis Morgan, not a little bit. Just like a better feel for who they are and with personnel that better fits what they are. Yeah, and that's why they made moves, right? They brought in players who fit what they were looking for rather than maybe struber taking over in China fit pieces in that already existed. So now it's his roster. It's his guys. And they have Tom Edwards coming in, which is a big piece for them, defensively. But Aaron long return is huge. When you have the confidence in that backline, you make Sean Neela's life easier. Whoever else is along them, his ability to pass out of the back in, even if you're looking for a knockdown, it's a better quality ball and it's finding the right guy. And it's right now, Tom Barlow up top sort of being that battering ram to knock it down for Lewis Morgan or komala, but it will be Ashley Fletcher, who is a 26 year old primarily striker. And so I think there's a lot of hope for Red Bulls, leukemias has an even play jet and he's a designated player acquisition, but it does feel like they are all players who understand how to be quick on that turnover, how to be aggressive and transition, but also be accurate with that first pass. And it's that first pass for them against TFC that got them going all the turnovers that were dangerous. That first class was clean into the pocket and then whether it was back out to one of the wingers or the full backs getting up the field or again turning from there and attacking from Frankie and Meyer and Louis Morgan or any of those guys. That's been really effective. We didn't see that as much last year and it feels like they have options in the attack for the first time in years..

Lewis Morgan Gerhard struber Tom Edwards Sean Neela Tom Barlow komala Ashley Fletcher Dave Aaron Red Bulls China Louis Morgan Frankie Meyer
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Now what do you make of that one Fernando? It's funny because if you don't even dancing as much of that one, I don't know why. Well, because it's quite sad, the video for that song she goes inside a bar, a lot of couples kissing. And then she's just alone and like looking around. And then I read the lyrics, it basically the songs about finding soulmate, but then here's one of the lyrics by all means we want to find our own soulmate somewhere, but apparently the soulmate is not looking for us. So I mean she's lonely, you know? Everybody's together partnered in the video and she's alone, but she still can crack some great dance moves to it. It's good. It didn't really match actually in the video. Suddenly she goes in a very uptempo kind of dance beat and then she walks in this bar by herself. It's an interesting choice. You know where rosalie needs to go to you go abbos restaurant? Maybe she'll find love there. Maybe we could go past, I don't know, maybe they're married, I don't know. I feel like we should somehow make this happen exactly. Exactly. Quick round trip to Wagyu Fernando? I love that. Yeah, maybe. Fernando lovely stuff very much enjoyed this week's global countdown. Now we were Burkina Faso's chart brought to life by the irreplaceable Fernando Augusto Pacino fai thank you very much. In D that is just about all we have time for on today's edition of the briefing the program was produced by car lotta ravello and Rhys James. Our researcher was Lillian force it, our studio manager, was Chris a black where my thanks to them one and all will be back at the same time tomorrow that's noon in London, of course, that is your Thursday briefing. I'm Tom Edwards, goodbye and thanks for listening..

Fernando Wagyu Fernando Burkina rosalie Fernando Augusto Pacino fai lotta ravello Rhys James Lillian Chris Tom Edwards London
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:59 min | 11 months ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"And is the French election going to be one of these where we always think, oh, it's the economy stupid, et cetera, but actually maybe the electorate doesn't necessarily want to talk about macroeconomics and that big picture. They will talk about Macron's performance. The handling the impact continuing impact of the pandemic, for example, is it one of these elections where the vote is as much a referendum on Macron's handling of the quotidian challenges as it is about these big picture economic questions. Yes, very much. So I think at this point in time that so first of all, my call has announced that officially that he will run. It's quite likely he will, but he hasn't made that clear yet. And he's polling quite strongly compared to previous and presidents in a similar position. So the election this time around is really being fought on social matters and they're all social matters that are quite right wing matters in a way of security, immigration and particularly and this is a very emotional themes and all candidates are playing on those right now. That's why also in this election, the left is basically invisible because they are not capitalizing on the current discourse very well. So social matters are really the main focus at the moment for the electorate. But also what we've seen across Europe, not just in France, that in a pandemic environment in a volatile environment where inflation is going up, and there's a lot of uncertainty populists aren't really benefiting. It actually benefits incumbents, people that promise stability. And as a result, we think that there is an 80% likelihood that it's either going to be Macron or progress and only a 20% likelihood of a far right outcome. So all in all, this election is much more constructive than you would have expected given the 2017 election. Where we had both the possibility of a far right outcome or a far left outcome. Here, the most likely outcome is centrist. An absolutely fascinating campaign is shaping up, isn't it? And no doubt, and thanks for making sense of it for us. That was our friend down a Rosenberg from signum global, joining us here on the briefing. You're listening to Monaco 24 with me, Tom Edwards now, pity wamo the first important event on the global fashion calendar is taking place in Florence. Hundreds of fashion labels and service providers are greeting buyers, journalists, and other industry members, monocles, executive editor, well, he's not missing out Nolan Giles is right in the thick of the action for us, and he joins us. Now good afternoon to you now and you're out and about. Describe the scene in front of your eyes for us. Set the scene for us. They are not just greeting journalists Tom. They're whining and dining journalists like it's had the most incredible press launch put on by the guys at pity. So I'm going to talk very favorably about what they've been doing here. But ya, as you said, it's a massive trade show, four men's fashion happens twice a year. This year it's downsized. Obviously, due to the pandemic, but they pushed ahead, which is quite surprising because there was a lot of other industry events that decided to call it a day. But I guess for the people, for retailers, smaller businesses, whether that's on the manufacturing side in the making side, the selling side, you know, they all need to come together face to face, have conversations about what fashion means this year and what people should be buying and what people want. And this is the forum where it happens. Yeah, absolutely. And as you say, so many events, not just in this sector, but across all many number of industries, continuing to cancel. So important that it's gone ahead even in a slightly smaller format. Tell us though Nolan in spite of that, then who is there? You know, are we expecting to see then? Big international launches. Is it already becoming clear what the kind of ambitions and aspirations for 2022 are from the brands who are on the ground with you? Well, I've made some picks for you Tom in preparation for this because it's just such a big variety and like I said before, is a lot of smaller independent labels. There was actually a little bit of controversy among the Italian fashion labels because a brand brunello cuccinelli, which is kind of a bit of a mainstay at pity. They decided to pull out very last minute, which did have some negative repercussions. There were other buyers and brands that decided not to come after that. But as I said, I'll give you a little bit of a rundown, so you can see the variety. I picked out some silk pajamas for you from coma. Oh, nice. They are absolutely beautifully made. And it also kind of marks a little bit of a trend in the fashion industry. People are buying and spending more money on what they were at home due to the fact obviously we've been spending a bit more time at home so they've also updated their line, the brand's called Sara and they've updated their line with a nice lead that and silk slipper for you Tom. And then you know there's a lot of emphasis being placed on sustainability and I think it's incredibly difficult conversation to have when you're at an event like pity where you know everyone is showcasing new products and there's just thousands of new garments. How can you say, well, this is good for the planet. But there are some smart brands, for example, power boots, French footwear label that we love at monocle. Instead of them saying, well, our products will last a lifetime. So that's why we're launching new products. They're saying we are going to make an effort with sustainability. They showcasing shoes that have recycled rubber and they're using offcuts of leather, but still have that perfect finish that we love. Yeah, I think that's really interesting and it's across the whole across the whole corporate universe, brands are wrestling aren't they with accusations of greenwashing and how to underscore genuine sustainability, credentials, and intriguing that you've picked out already a couple of our favorites Nolan, who are making some strides in that respect. And I wonder, do you expect as the fashion calendar rolls on through 22 that those kinds of concerns are going to be front and center? Because we obviously have Milan..

Macron Tom Edwards Nolan Giles Tom Rosenberg brunello cuccinelli Monaco Florence France Europe Nolan coma Sara wrestling Milan
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"I could see him by doing this. You know, I Tom I have an incredible ability to predict what's inside a wrapped present. I guess you could call it a gift. That's good. Yeah. You see, I like that. Yeah. What is it that you like about it, particularly? Is it just, I don't know, it's something to do with the fact that it's predictable, but you can't quite get there before the teller. Yeah. Do you know what I mean? Yeah, yeah, yeah. Predictability. This is why a lot of children's humor is just repetitive like prat falling. Because the predictability is the thing and I think this taps into it's why we like. Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd, this falling over comedy. Yeah, and that's a sort of literary equivalent of. I'm a little bit upset. You didn't mention my delivery. I was telling. I think that's key. And you'll notice, look, I'm just going to talk myself up a little bit here. You see, there was a change in the volume of the voice. That sort of aim to time to draw you in and hit that punchline. There's a lot of thought that goes into it. And that's equally as important as the actual jug riding itself. Sets performer nicknames. I'll be myself up. Tom, did you hear about the man who stole an advent calendar? It got 25 days. Oh, that's good. That's good. You're a big fan of the advent calendar as well. I like that. You're gonna bust that one out at some stage. I might do. Yeah, I think that's probably my favorite so far. Okay, good, good. I mean, what's the best thing you've got in an advent calendar this year? Can I ask? Sure, you've been doing one. Is there anything else? This is a joke. I'm just checking in with you. You know, I like to call a joyless, slightly style chocolate. Okay. All right. Well, I think my kids open it to have a look at them before and then they go a bit mushy. I mean, the beauty is maybe that's the only chocolate they have accessible, but they should be so lucky. Yeah, certainly I'm assuming you've got some sugar almonds in the pantry. Final one, this is this is my favorite and I'd be curious to I am genuinely curious to hear your thoughts on this. And to be honest, this is a bit of a classic that I've tweaked myself. So it's not quite a nicknames original, but I'm giving you my own tight on it. Why is a fridge such a great Christmas present Tom? Why is a fridge such a great Christmas present? I don't know Nick, tell me. Because the recipient's face always lights up when they open. Oh, that's good. See, I like that, that works on several levels. It's the layers sort of thing. And I think that's I think laughter is also elicited when we're pleasantly surprised. And I think with that, there are multiple layers to the surprise, because obviously your face always lights up. You've got a slightly think about it. A little bit of the beat. And maybe that's what maybe that's what makes the laughter a little bit more rewarding or the joke a little bit more rewarding. But yeah, they're my top 5 what I'd love to see in Christmas crackers this year. Do you have you got a cracker yourself? I quite like this one. You can be the judge. How much did Santa buy his sleigh for? Nothing Nick. It was on the house. I felt like there was such a huge thing. That's a big boom. Do you like that one? I do like that one, because I'm going to blow it. But I was like, there's something to do with the roof. There's something to do with the roof, but obviously. I was close. I felt like I was close. I think that's a singer. But good stuff. Yeah. Roll some of those out. Report back to us in the new year. How you're new Christmas routine is received. I will. I mean, there's a good chance we want the off color stuff, I'll probably get from my uncles as well as that. And a bit of blue at Christmas time, that's fine. We're free to air whatever whatever we like. Nick, there's no barriers to taste and distance here. So I would have thought have become painfully obvious down the ears. Lovely stuff, Nick, thanks for joining us. Best of seasonal, a pleasure comment to you and yours. And I'll look forward to hearing about how your routine is received in the new year. Yeah. We'll regroup then. And that's all we have time for on this special Christmas edition of the briefing. It was produced by Charlie Phil mccort, our researcher was Sophie monon combs, and our studio manager was Steph jungu with editing assistance from Chris a Blackwater. I'm Tom Edwards, goodbye and wherever you are in the world, have a wonderful Christmas and a.

Tom Harold Lloyd Charlie Chaplin Nick Santa Charlie Phil mccort Sophie monon combs Steph jungu Tom Edwards Chris
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Finally to again put a bit more holiday cheer at the end of the program from the new James Bond film to the return of art fairs 2021 has been marked by a number of in person cultural happenings. So we end today's program by taking a look back at our standout culture moments. Earlier Monaco's Tom Edwards caught up with our culture editor Kiara Mina, he started by asking Kiara about her favorite motion pictures of the year. I think that it's interesting to look back first of all to, I guess like the mood of 2021 in culture. You know, because it was also largely a lockdown year when you think about it for many of us. And so a lot of people spent a lot of time in front of their screens still. It's interesting because in 2020, we talk so much about productions being halted and things being pushed and pushed and pushed. And in a certain regard, 2021 was the year when we started seeing a bit of that kind of trickle effect come through. We've seen some incredible things in our screens and finally at the cinema films that had been halted for a very long time, chief amongst them bond, obviously, but others. So it has felt like a bit of a reprise in that respect, but also, as I said, when you think about, when you think back at it, you know, so many museums were shot for months and months on end. The amount of art that we could see were still curtailed under the traveling for our purposes was also a curtailed for a long time, but on the other hand, we also saw the reopening of art fairs, which was kind of jubilant in Switzerland here in London and that has picked up really enthusiastically again. So I think a kind of a year of two halves. And obviously, I guess a lot more question marks over events in the coming in the coming weeks, but a lot to look forward to in 2022 in terms of gig tickets and the events already been announced and things that you can book and put in your diary and just go for. Gigs. I remember those. But should we start then maybe with some small screen standouts for you? Because that has been something where people have continued to take refuge. And what's been pleasant is I guess we've already seen like season two or three of the original kind of lockdowns in 2020 they're like old friends that come back again. But maybe that's a good place to jump in on. Well, I think that for me, personally, 2021 is going to stay as the year of both call my agent and Succession. Even though these were actually years where the respective season four and season three came out, but I only actually started I have to admit this and probably under attack is going to judge me really, really badly for this, but I hadn't watched all my agent until this year. Sorry. Do you know who told how you talk about it? Jamie waters, I think. Me? No. Yes. But you know, good. Anyway, I take the beat. Credit. But how brilliant. And then this is interesting because they're doing, they have done or they are making a sort of kind of more, but they're like new cars, they're mixing up they might do some sort of feature. They're monkeying around with it. But I mean, gold. Gold. Absolutely. And I think that lots of people have complained because season four is the first one that doesn't see the big show runner fanny herrero in the seat anymore, but I think it was still amazing. You know, I watched a four seasons back to back. And so I'm perhaps best placed to talk about the differences that I found between the seasons and I think that the quality was still really high and the emotional moment of seeing the door closed. Sorry for those of you who haven't ruined it. Hey, the door close on the series symbolically. As you say, they're talking about potentially a follow-up in the film, a season 5, but it still felt pretty conclusive. And it was very emotional. Likewise, Succession. I mean, I think that. Too good. Incredibly good. It's so good that I can't even put it into words. Listen, everyone's put that into words. Exactly. I do like it when there's something that is unequivocally. Well, maybe someone listened to a keen eared listeners, well, I'm sure right in. But like everyone loved it, then you watch it and it's like, yeah, it's probably better than I was expecting even. No virtually no dissenting voices almost. I for so many reasons that are very similar to that. I tend to wait to watch these things because I kind of over here you and Andrew on the other table and you're talking about these things and I want to chip in, but I also want to have a little bit like the clarity of mind to watch it in my own time, and this one, I'm happy that I'm able to watch it at the speed I'm watching it at because I just can not stop and I will go through three episodes, which is three hours long. Other than evening, also it's quite unsettling. So it does put you to bed in a slightly kind of it's not chock full of jolly moments. Do you still consume cinema releases on the small screen mainly? I know you were a fan of the experience of going to cinema, but it has changed somewhat, hasn't it? Definitely. I mean, I love going to the cinema. The fact of the matter is that, for a long time, we physically couldn't. And then when we could, it was summer. And so I'm less inclined to go into the cinema in the summer. But we did see some incredible releases that felt very FiLMiC. They felt like they had the gravitas of a release that you would go to the cinema to see. You know, obviously we can all watch Netflix of all times of day. But when Minari came out when nom atlan came out, we did all just watch them. We shelled out and watched them and they are such all encompassing films and of a different I think league that you remember them as a cinematic experience still because they draw you in in a way that is different to kind of the consumption of TV. So I think it's interesting when we reflect about how this film live on TV, how this Netflix live in the cinematic hallmarks of the Oscars. I think it's important to remember that it's not just about format. It's not just about the size of the screen that you're watching it on. It's about the intimate connection that you create with something. And you know, when I was thinking back to these films specifically, we just mentioned Minari, Nomadland. I had created a false memory in my mind that I'd watched him in the cinema. I didn't. I watched him at home. And yet it was so all encompassing was so emotional that you create that connection. And you know, I think that the format still is second to that. We said that we would look ahead. We'd have to be too specific, but just casting an eye towards 2022 can hardly believe that we're heading into 2022, but there we go. What's going to be the big market? This is again going to be what are the next little steps back to the sort of normality that we can take? Is it about possibly one or two of those things, stand out art fairs that maybe can go ahead and in another funny moment right now, but in the shadows ahead? What will 2022 hold in the cultural realm for you? Well, I think it's interesting. I was just checking, I think, first of all, it would be interesting to see the calendar kind of take its own normal shape because I think that a lot of things this year, one of the reasons why we find it so hard to connect the dots about last year is because everything was squashed culturally, really in the second half of the year. And it would be nice to see some things take a bit more room. You know, the Oscars being in the first half of the year in such another events later on in the year so that you can get a bit more room around releases. There isn't just all this cultural crush. It means that things can be relevant dotted around a year and not necessarily all from September onwards. I think that fairs will be an important marker..

Tom Edwards Kiara Mina Jamie waters fanny herrero Kiara Minari James Bond Monaco Switzerland nom atlan Netflix London Andrew Oscars
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"That the way that we live our lives and that we build our cities, which is where most people live, just can't continue in a world with almost 8 billion people. We've got to find ways to build our cities where most of us live in ways that are more sustainable in ways that consume not just less sand, but less of everything. Vince meiser, the author of the world in a grain there, speaking to the urbanist center talk. As we just heard, sand is one of the crucial elements of how we build in our cities. But how can we make construction a more sustainable practice? Well, that's where circular construction comes in. The practice is all about trying to make the best use of the built environments, whether that's using the existing buildings as intensively as possible to trying to retain existing buildings and transform them to meet new needs, rather than knocking them down and starting afresh. Andrea Charleston is the built environment lead at circuit, and eve funded collaborative project between the cities of London, Hamburg, Copenhagen, and vanta in Finland. Through circuit, the four cities work together to increase the uptake of circular construction across them, sharing knowledge and also techniques. Andrea joined Monaco's Tom Edwards, and Tom began by asking her about some of the way cities can capitalise and best utilize already existing infrastructure. We've got a lot of buildings that are underutilized either because they're lying empty and haven't been refurbished, but also this idea that lots of buildings are used maybe part of the day or part of the week. And if we could utilize more of our structures for more of the clock, actually wouldn't need to build as much in the future. And so that's that idea of maximize the capacity of what we've already got from a use perspective. And then if there's things that are empty, trying to refurbish them and transform them first before we start to consider demolishing them. Is it really instructive to look at real world examples of, yeah, these principles of circular construction in practice? I guess it's really important right to take it away from being something that's discussed in the abstract being something that people can really grasp whether they're in development or city planning, or just private individuals. Yeah, exactly. And one reason really exciting example is it's within London and it's a development that's been done by British land and they were supported by Arab and then lease. It's called one Triton square. And this was an existing building, and it was existing office building. It was due for refresh. And rather than knocking it down, the first approach was, well, how can we retain and reuse the existing building? The existing building wasn't that old and it had been designed for this idea that it could be transformed in the future into its initial design, which is kind of why that other part of secularity is so important. And so through the process, they retained the existing building. They did some strengthening and added new floors. And they managed to create twice as much of this space on the same site, but without demolishing the existing buildings. So that's kind of one example of the circularity. But then also coming down more specifically, they also removed and refurbished and reconditioned the facade..

Vince meiser Andrea Charleston vanta Tom Edwards Hamburg Copenhagen Monaco Finland London Andrea Triton square Tom
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Us some of the best parts of our cities such as the humble. The pandemic has also highlighted some of the cracks. And it's clear. These cracks the become paper over density has been demonized in the very concept of what brings us together in. Urban centers has been under threat but more than half of the world's population lives in cities. And they are vital the global economy and the way that we live our lives so what we learn from our moments of isolation. Survival of the city is a new book from harvard. University's edward glaeser and david cutler which examines the threats asses face and also outlines some proposed solutions for the future. Edward and david joined mongols. Tom edwards little earlier. An edward began by explaining how the two authors differences demonstrate. The need for collaboration in order to solve some of the problems that i ahead. I think it is hard to think of a major problem of the day in which one disciplined has all the answers for many problems. Ideologies downright harmful. There should not be a tory or a labor way to fight pandemic or a democratic or conservative way to deal with an infectious disease. There are great important problems and ideology just gets in the way. We'll take it. Yeah let me just bring you in. is it something. That's actually always been a very important part of your work to be collaborative to sort of look beyond reinforcing. What you suspect or no in order to challenge make real progress. Oh that's absolutely the case. I'll just give you an example from this book. Where at an i had quite a number of conversations about if fewer businesses want to stay in inner cities or in central cities. What will that mean for. Cities will be catastrophic. Will it be of minor import so we had a large number of conversations about that. I feel like. I learned an enormous amount of my abused changed. I don't know what i would say. But it's just something where being able to challenge your thinking and say you know my first blush thought. Was this but you know now that we sort of think about it more. I think i have a different view. Is just incredibly helpful. Well let's talk a little bit about what especially it's instructive to look at the full title of the book which is survived at the city living in in an age of isolation on that point the latter point about isolation i i wanted to view from you both about the extent to which the pandemic which is obviously front and center here the extent to which that has exposed or perhaps i'd better say undescored existing fishes pressures on cities in the fabric of the wholesome. Together i suppose it has thrown a lot of these things into ever more sharp relief. But it's not exactly created the problems. Many of them were there already knew so elegantly viewed painting..

edward glaeser david cutler Tom edwards harvard Edward edward david
"tom edwards" Discussed on The How-to Entrepreneur

The How-to Entrepreneur

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on The How-to Entrepreneur

"Yeah it's very rare and you can grow them really quickly The dns others are known once you get into zones. It's very i mean. They're forming clusters and all the metals in the middle of the rich stuff is all formed break space together. So you're very easily It's it's very easy to to treat size on these things so like i said the more. I drill the more expensive as you. Guys have the holy grail of discoveries. All your hands up. I love ems. Let's leave it at that. Is there any impression or information that may be one ad share with the listeners. Before we go to some more roundup like question to get us out of here. Well i think just you know. We're very active on news as we are drilling and nonstop drilling. You're going to see results coming out to market. We've put out several results today. Very well received very very high grade zinc numbers and actually the the deeper. We're drilling the better and bigger the copper numbers are becoming an as we all know. Copper is a huge Dairy interest in this market and degrades are getting really really good. And they're all similar to the zones produced from the past producer and as they went deeper their comfort number it's for staggering and gold number is in silver numbers big numbers for that matter but the copper numbers degrees so we're seeing a lot of similarities here So i believe i mean. It's it's legally. If it's the same structure this might be the feeder source. This might be a supply We also have a Amex member mentioned made the goal discovery while on two weeks so they put out an announcement saying that bates down the ms as well So my like we'll see that a lot and their stock reacted nicely to it and For me i'm just that's the type of thing that wanna see in this area because it's really building four hilarie them to make the sing of big camp and you'll get a lot of attention from the big boys you know. Look forward to what you guys have coming in the next week to months and you mentioned earlier you guys are traded on the canadian and the us exchange. What are your tickets in canada. It's s t. e. sam tom edwards and in the us it's s. t. r. p. Sam tom robert peter frank. Our website is active Byles on they're just. I mean it's a good information source. We we keep things up to date And also you know we have smartphones. So cassie questions. Just call us numbers at the bottom of the press releases or on the website and someone always assets. I answered us. Are you one of the. Ceo's they can get in touch with directly. i. My wife doesn't like the fact that i am so i i don't turn off and i this is a passion for me. I mean i love it. I was a finance guy in the back in my past life and got lucky on a transaction back in two thousand eight which allowed me to come on and put these types of situations together. And i love it and you know having an opportunity to build up of. Ems deposit. like what we're doing is this is this makes my makes my life just makes my career so i'm thrilled about it and if anyone wants to talk rocks just give me a call. Rockstar geologist jonathan stark peak mining guys. He's on the on the toronto and the us stock exchange we're going have tickers in a bio. Thanks for coming on and sharing their company to north. When you guys have planned. I look forward to the good news to come star. Peak one award.

sam tom edwards Sam tom robert peter frank Byles Amex bates cassie us canada jonathan stark Rockstar toronto
"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"tom edwards" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"A quarter century novartis reimagining madison briefing twenty four time now to examine some of the new technological goodies that have just come onto the market with our very own. It says here inspector gadget. David falen david very much thank you. It's very accommodating leads. Say sure let's start with something. This is the big Use the week Some interesting new stuff. That's available including folding phones. This doesn't seem to have come from my perspective. But i'm i wrong. These be the the case crackers for simpson. No you're completely right. They haven't caught on yet but samsung is not giving up each year. They have a an event about this time of year about a month before the next iphone comes out where they usually release a thing called the note which is a a phone. You can scribble on this time. They release two phones. Both of them foldable and the biggest one is compatible with an s. Pensa scribble on that one. The big one is a tablet that fulton off to be sort of phone sized. The other one is a phone that you can fold down into being a much smaller fan. Which i think is a very interesting way to go And there's lots of very interesting things about especially the bigger one call. the fold. Three has an undiscriminating camera. When you open up the the phone tablets is the camera that peeps out at you. You barely see it peeping. Because they've put pixels on top of it so it looks like the rest of the screens. It's an unin- uninterrupted screen icon comprehend. How such things possible but a super compact folding phone. Yes i mean that may be the thing that takes this then to the to the masses because presumably if you're wearing some skinny jeans or whatever you're gonna go small pocket yes how. How compact talking when. It's all folded up. Well it's sort of. If you imagine your phone and folded in half or the the fund that i have here which is the the apply phone Twelve pro max. That's a six point. Seven inch screams the same size as on the samsung and then he folded in half so it becomes a thick but quite small swell small billfold woolens. Yes yes and one of the reasons they haven't taken off as you rightly say is that they haven't yet been durable enough. They or they felt like you needed to treat them with kid. Gloves the nuance. Which i've seen an tested held feel much much stronger and indeed have water resistance in which is all knew this kind of category and i gather They have a smart watch. Something also which will not only tell me how fat i am. How stressed i do i not do. I want this this piece of it's up to you. Yes the galaxy watchful and watch for classic Both all these things coming out at the end of this month. And they have a body composition monitor. Which can tell you from your wrist. What your skeletal masses and your fat content and also your blood pressure. It's a little more complicated. You have to calibrate it with a regular blood pressure cuff once a month. But that is a feature that Even apple watch cannot match. What mention apple. And you've already said something goes in about a month ahead. Presumably that we are at the point where the rumor mill is rolling around with gusto. About what the next iphone and Will be what are you hearing on the ground. Well the the the rumor mills been going for a long time. It has ground almost everything to dust now And what we think we know. Is that the notch that sits on the front of an iphone where the the front facing camera We'll be smaller on the new one. The cameras will be bigger and we'll be able to do. The portrait mode is is common on many fines including The iphone and you can take photographs way. Your subject is beautifully sharpened. The background is artfully blurred. It's seems that that will come to video as well Some funds can do that. But it's not always very effective because you've got to be able to separate the foreground from the background to do it well but if they can do it well it. It could be pretty amazing. And that's i think. The an upgrade to the stills photography including extra filters and things like that will be what apple is going to go big on this time things in recent portraits of me. That other people are taking. I think i need to be blurred focus. Let's see if they can come up with something for just for the tom edwards market just briefly. We've talked to on and off actually. About how changing working practices people being at home. Going back to work has changed the demands. They're making their tag and wanted. She is security at home. Of course people now gearing back to be in the office out traveling more. Do we see the the innovators and the makers of security cameras for example Hurrying new and innovative products to market to cater for people. Hungry to make sure their home is in good order. If on the road a bit more yes. It's interesting you say. Hurry the one of the best brands for this is nest and alcohol google nest and it's three years since they updated their range But rushing no but this week. They did release four new cameras. One one's a video doorbell the other our camera so i think there is a recognition that they needed to up their game. Some of the camera senses are actually low resolution but the chip is now so fast that he can make up for that. He's got high dynamic range on it and indeed. It includes that first battery powered camera so you can put it indoors or out does. It's weatherproof a weather resistant at least and loss for three months between charges. Pretty good. i mrs goods. I understand whether you're trying to keep nefarious burglars out or just keep an eye on. I don't know a dog in the house. Make sure it's not junior your furniture. Yes that's right. That is what. I teach chiefly use it for to see. My dog grumpily moved from one end of the sofa to another when i leave for too long. She's always impeccably behaved. I know this little. She's very very well mannered indeed. I'm david thanks very much. Bring us up to speed. That was one of those technology correspondent. David feel and joining us here on the briefing.

David falen david Pensa samsung apple fulton simpson tom edwards google David
US kills Iran general Qassem Suleimani in strike ordered by Trump

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:11 min | 3 years ago

US kills Iran general Qassem Suleimani in strike ordered by Trump

"It it has been the defining dynamic of Donald Trump's presidency indeed of Donald Trump's life 'cause crisis solve crisis or pretend to then claimed credit nevertheless trump's decision to order the drone strike which killed senior Iranian military officer Kassim Salamone in Baghdad? Doc Dead on January third was a surprise major general. All the money was the long serving commander of the coulds force of Iran's Islamic Revolution in regards core the could force considered a terrorist organization by the United States is the unit largely responsible for Iran's various foreign military enterprises in Iraq Syria Lebanon Yemen Afghanistan and elsewhere Sulejmani was one of Iran's most powerful for men in cities across Iran. His death prompted scenes of mass mourning reminiscent of the one thousand nine hundred nine funeral of Ayatollah Khamenei leader of Iran's Islamic Revolution. Iran was obliged to respond and did so but incuriously circumspect fashion at least for for the moment on January eighth a barrage of ballistic missiles struck two basis in Iraq at which. US forces are stationed but did only the kind of damage that gets done when you're not trying all that hard to do real damage as we go to where it is unclear whether or not the passengers and crew who of a Ukrainian airliner which crashed near Tehran on Wednesday will accidental victims of Iran's retaliation in this episode. Tom Edwards Chaz a special discussion looking. At how the. US and Iran got here and where they might go. Next does the United States killing of Sulamani really make relations relations between Washington and Tehran. Any worse than they already were is Iran. Really willing to call it a draw. Can we expect further confrontation tation as America's presidential election looms and does Iraq get any say in any of this. This is the foreign desk. I I think right now yes. The focus is on the United States because of these airstrikes but the reality is once the dust settles are GonNa be focusing on both again. I it just right now this at this time of tension and these strikes that had come out during the past week is diverting attention which is the taking back. The country of Iraq Iran was on the losing end in many any of these countries in Iraq people were saying we don't want your in Syria in Lebanon and Yemen Iran. Although it seems to be so powerful was on the back foot at the end of two thousand nineteen and and the potential that this strike gives Iran is a way to try and change that so there is a benefit potential benefit. Iran could take advantage of the base has really divided lighted about. US engagement in the Middle East by enlarge. They want the war's end they want the president to focus on the United States and its interest. He has to balance to the looking tough but he hasn't liked to take action that puts us back in the middle of what is really an unsolvable challenge. That is the middle at least at this moment in time.

Iran United States Iraq Donald Trump Tehran Syria Ayatollah Khamenei Middle East Doc Dead Kassim Salamone Baghdad Commander Officer Tom Edwards Sulejmani President Trump America Yemen