25 Burst results for "Tolstoy"

"tolstoy" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:44 min | Last month

"tolstoy" Discussed on WTOP

"Is one 48. That would be good weather on the 8s and when it breaks, let's check it out with rich hunter and the WTO traffic signal. It looks like they've shifted the paving project in Great Falls. It's now going to be between old dominion drive and the intersection with Tolstoy road where there are alternating traffic one direction at a time through the work sound again doing milling and paid misses over by difficult run stream. The trail and the park there. So please be careful. You're gonna come upon it around blind curves approaching so be extra careful there as a result. Now elsewhere on the bellway and Alexandria in the loop before Eisenhower avenue, the crash cleared all lanes were open. Last check they were still blocking the left side on the added loop just after river opened it looks like they may have gotten everything over to the right shoulder now so all lanes are open. Unfortunately, no change over on the beltway in landover, analytic approaching two 14 central avenue, crash, clean up and investigation continue to block the three right lanes so you get by single files left and again, the exit two central avenue also closed as a result of this crash still heavy response on scene. Now if you're traveling a 95 of the Baltimore Washington Parkway both free and clear to 70 south near 85 Bucky's town pike, single right lane passed the work there. If you're traveling in Virginia, 95 between Fredericksburg and the ballet good start no incident, express sign should now be open to northbound traffic three 95 north between the Balboa and the 14th street bridge also looking good southbound three 95 coming off the 14th street bridge in the Virginia. They're doing overhead work that works on blocks a single left lane rich hunter WTF traffic. Storm team four tracking the start of September, we call that meteorological fall, September, October, and November, those three months. It's not gonna feel like fall, though, high of

rich hunter Great Falls WTO Baltimore Washington Parkway landover Alexandria Virginia Fredericksburg
"tolstoy" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:00 min | 2 months ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on WTOP

"From here to the moon, it could see that it could see the infrared coming off of a bumblebee at that distance. That's how he described this new technology to students like Gideon Laverne, at Lake Braddock secondary school in Burke today. Like this is also mind-blowing and new, what else is there out there? It's a mystery, but with Webb's technology, these students have a better chance of finding out. I'm hoping this lights a fire in some of these kids, right? So they go on and pursue a career. Gigi Barnett, WTO P news. Good Wednesday morning, July 13th, 1238 in the morning. I'm thinking whether all the apes here's where each other. All right, traveling in Northern Virginia's Toyota a couple of closures outstanding from yesterday storm's old dominion drive at last check still blocked between Tolstoy wrote in Bellevue road in McLean that was due to down wires, also to stretch a hundred mill road closed east of baron Cameron avenue as a result of storm debris and downed wires as well, so just be where you can not continue through on hundred mil route between Kroll road and the dulles toll road and route 6 O 6 as a result. Now, George Tom pike over top of the bellway stay right past the work in each direction. If you're traveling in Maryland, still haven't got the all clear of westbound 28 between Bauer drive and Avery road, that's been closed for several hours because the storm damage inbound river road just after Westport avenue looks like the downed tree has been removed from the roadway and the eastbound or inbound lanes have been reopened, belly and Maryland added loop approaching route one in college park, can you buy the work center two lanes to ride Virginia beltway out of lip headed south to route 7 toward I 66, still getting by that work single file to write for now, no major issues reported in the district long I two 95 or D.C. two 95, south capital street and suitland Parkway also without early issue rich hundred WTF traffic. Flood warnings continue for our southern suburbs of culpeper Madison and orange counties until three 45 in the morning, so if you hit any flooded roads,

Gideon Laverne Lake Braddock secondary school Gigi Barnett George Tom pike Burke Webb WTO Northern Virginia Tolstoy McLean Toyota Maryland suitland Parkway Virginia D.C. orange counties culpeper Madison
"tolstoy" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

02:33 min | 5 months ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"Always like, are you sure I'm going, guess I'm sure. I mean, Tolstoy wasn't worried about not being Russian. No one was asking Tolstoy. Oh, by the way, you're going to continue to write about Russia. It doesn't end a little weird. You think maybe you could write about that's hilarious. You could write about yoga. Tolstoy, this is a bummer, do you think we could get maybe we can get Adam Driver in here? Yeah. It's so funny. God damn. I need a T-shirt like that. I know you ever told Tolstoy not to be rough. I know. Fucking hate it. I'm getting so funny. I hate it. I think it's in your head though, bro thinking about because people are always like, oh, I don't want to write too many Asian jokes, but I've been writing more and more of them recently. You're going to get better. You're going to become famous. Trust my words. But I'm just like, why? Why can't I just talk about these things? You know, a lot of people, we were going to talk about this later, but a lot of people were kind of hating on one of the funk brothers because they had a little stand up set come out. And people were kind of hating on them about like, oh, well, you know, there's too much Asian stuff. And I go, I'm never, I never get tired of Asian stuff. I never get tired of me. I never look in the mirror and go, man, I'm tired of this. You know, I never get tired of Vietnamese food. I never get tired of Adrian food every time. Dude, that's a great point. Your own food. So I feel like you can never get tired of this topic because it is who we are. And if people keep saying, well, can you stop talking about that? I haven't even started talking about that. Yeah. You know what I'm saying? I can't even, you know, but we can't get into it if people keep telling me, I do a joke about to a joke about, you know, living in New York instead. And I'm like, fuck. Anyways. Okay. Damn, dude. I'm sweaty. But you know what? Talking about the stuff that really interests you. It's your best material. And as a matter of fact, the more particular the more universal becomes more universal. We always have. You always say that. We always have. And I think it's a truly true. More particular and also, I think you should only write this up that only you can write that not anyone else can do. Like no one can rip my stuff off. Nobody. No one can go for sure. No way. I'm like, this is my stuff now, and it's the stuff that I want to write about. If you want to write about go right ahead, but I know it's really hard. I feel you and I, we can do the thing where we merge like in Dragon Ball. Fusion. There's too much agent. Hollywood's like, no. Unless it makes money. And if that makes some money, they'll be like, ship.

Tolstoy Adam Driver Russia Adrian New York Hollywood
"tolstoy" Discussed on Brain Inspired

Brain Inspired

04:56 min | 6 months ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on Brain Inspired

"When is that future that you alluded to when we will understand the I'm going to use the word optimal again the optimal sleep wake cycle read Tolstoy right before sleep and do math problems right when you wake up, et cetera how close are we to that? And where do you see this field in terms of the end goal, right? Well, I think it's an exciting time to just be exploring those questions more than we have in the past and bringing it in and you know, I think an important principle of sleep is that there isn't just one reason why we sleep. And that's been a mistake that I've seen some sleep researchers take as they say, well, what's the reason we sleep? And they look at different animals and they say, well, it's really to keep out of dangerous situations for safety. Maybe that's true for some animals. Wow. But look at the biology of a whole body. There doesn't need to be one reason for a thing. There can be many reasons. We have respiration to help us get oxygen. But look, it helps us communicate to we co op the same apparatus for communication. So I think sleep is beneficial for many reasons, not just one, and I'm focusing on the memory benefits of sleep, which had been controversial because other people were saying, well, no, that's not the main thing. The main thing is something else. And it took a long time for sleepers to be convinced that, oh, actually, memory is something that's connected to sleep, and that there's improvements as a function of getting sleep. And part of that was the methodology as we had weren't so good. For example, if you just had sleep deprivation of your method, you'd say, well, either people get sleep or you make them stay up all night and what's the problem of a person that's been staying up all night, you know, they're not paying attention well, they're not remembering well. All sorts of things. It's very crude.

Tolstoy
Why Russia Is So Very Different With Paul Kengor

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:23 min | 6 months ago

Why Russia Is So Very Different With Paul Kengor

"Let's pretend it's day one of poor kangas communism in Russia one O one course. What is the first thing that neo fights that amateurs need to understand about Russia explain why Russia isn't like France, Russia isn't like Switzerland, is France isn't like Canada explain why Russia sorry, explain why Russia isn't like those countries and why it is so very, very different. And also the importance of the strong man. Yeah, it is so very, very different. And it's really kind of deep seated. In fact, our old friends, the late Richard pipes, who was professor at Harvard forever for a long time, going back to 19 50. He just died a few years ago. He wrote books on the Russian Revolution, the Russian Civil War, communism, a history. And he was in kind of a battle with Alexander Solzhenitsyn of all people, right? Who we also greatly respect because pipes made comments like this and souls in its and thought that pipes was making a comment on the Russian people generally, right? That this is a people that's kind of destined for authoritarian leaders. That this is part of Russian culture. This is how they are. And I'm not going to go that far. I'm not going to say that. But let's just say God bless pipes who is a giant in your field. But there's not a lot of evidence to the contrary that it isn't. Something deep seated in Russian culture from Ivan the terrible all the way to Putin, this atavistic innate proclivity to follow a strong man. That's not a statement unfounded by empirical data, is it poor? No, it's right. In fact, I remember in the 1990s post communist Russia period. And I was talking to somebody from there and he said, look, there are no Thomas jeffersons in Russia, right? You have this country so rich and playwrights, writers, literature, a pianist composers, right? Tolstoy, dostoyevsky, right? And some of them with great statements about morality that dostoevsky among them. But they've never had a Milton Friedman. They've never had a Thomas Jefferson or James Madison.

Russia Richard Pipes Kangas France Alexander Solzhenitsyn Switzerland Harvard Canada Thomas Jeffersons Putin Ivan Tolstoy Milton Friedman Thomas Jefferson James Madison
"tolstoy" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

Mere Mortals Book Reviews

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

"When someone does something good it tends to have a good chain of events and this is a story so obviously other things happening in here but it's really just trying to highlight. I guess once you do do some introspection and rumination in the russian version you can see. Oh if i'm doing small good things here. It can have small good effects worldwide. And if i'm doing small bad things. I can see having larger effects bad effects vice versa. So i really do like that. Room rumination aspect that is covered in these so introspection comes out on top. Seems to be a good thing to be doing i. I'm looking at the good things that i'm doing seeing that having good effects and going oh i should reinforce that and vice versa. If i'm doing bad things seeing the bad effects You know what. I should probably cut that out once again. Though the russian aspect really jumps in every time a character in the book is looking deep within it always does seem rumination. That ruminating on something. They're looking deep within themselves. But there's always like a suffering aspect attached to it and once again why that is. I don't know that. Just seems to be part of the russian literature at the very case and in this book the tolstoy literature onto my personal observations takeaways. My favorite story of the bunch was father. So jesus and i actually did a podcast episode with juan on this particular story on the memorial's podcast and looking deepen to the aspect of going all in that mentality of really devoting yourself to one thing and seeing if it has pragmatic benefits to this and what that mentality is of like so if you want to check that out that is episode two hundred and thirty the other thing that i really missed out on when talking about all of these stories was right at the end that once again totally russian thing is to really focus on the suffering..

juan
"tolstoy" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

Mere Mortals Book Reviews

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

"You see this in haji murat. Where he's really in love with the horse riding and this aspect of being wild and free really as appealing and seems to dampen down any of the negative thoughts that go through in this head with his family being kidnapped and ransom and you know what was going on and things like that. We see it with the stereotype of russians heavily drinking so this is trying to novel. Dull the pain with vaud current. You know they get into it very hard. We see it with the religiosity. So this is. I suppose examining your life and really trying to find that spiritual connection that higher power subservience is another one so this is where you will be saying. Oh the russian emperor does this. I'm going to do this as well. And then also being almost like a half wit so in alyosha the pot which is probably almost the happiest of the stories. You can see that alyosha is an. I'm definitely pronouncing. That wrong is a half wit. He's a guy who doesn't really know what he's doing and he's sort of a mix of a lot of these things heaves very subservient just does what people he wants and he lives. I guess you could say a very good life up until his death. Because he doesn't have that anguish. He doesn't have that feeling inside of him of like suffering. Oh god why. Can't i be doing this. Why these things happening to the etc etc. So all of these more physical remedies not so many of them really diving deep into your own mind. Maybe the religiosity is slightly like that. But it's quite fascinating. Just seeing that the characters in this book in the methods that trying to implement not directly the stories contain other aspects and themes but what i took out from it was really looking and being like oh. They're trying to extinguish anguish that feeling and they're doing it through these methods some of them semi useful some them obviously not useful drinking for example. But it's quite interesting just going into that and looking going. Maybe these are some things that i'm doing in my own life as well finishing off this aspect of as well it really does seem like.

haji murat alyosha
"tolstoy" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

Mere Mortals Book Reviews

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on Mere Mortals Book Reviews

"This is authentically. Caution the pressing bleak a touch of divinity and more than a little strange..

"tolstoy" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"How's that for transition. I'm doing my best here do you. You mentioned they used to love literature when you're younger and you're even Or hoping to be A writer yourself. That was the motivation. And some of the books. I've seen the you listed that were inspiring to you was was from russian literature. Like i think tolstoy in right Maybe generally you can speak to your fascination with his russian literature or general you from those not surprised you picked up when the russian literature your background but still when when when when. You should be surprised. That didn't make the entire conversation about the real surprise when when I didn't really become a physicist. Who wanna go on science. Until i started college so when i was younger i was good at math. And that kind of stuff. But i didn't really i came from a family. Nobody went to college. And i didn't have any mentors so but i'd like to read when i was really young and so when i was very young i always carry around pocket book and read it and My mother read these mystery stories. And i got bored by those eventually and then i discovered real literature. I don't know what age about twelve or thirteen. And so that i started reading good literature and there's nothing better than russian other sure of course and heard reading good literature so i I read quite a bit of russian literature at that time and So you asked me about the. I don't know fewer said dostoevsky. So what about dostoevsky for me Thus to have ski was important in two. I mean a lot of literature. Because it's kind of the other thing i do with my life. And he made to incredible an edition to his own literature. He influenced literature tremendously by having I don't know how to proud polyphony. So he's the first real serious author that had multiple narrators and that's that he absolutely is the first and he also was the first He began existential literature so The most important book that. I've read in the last year when i've been forced to be isolated was existential literature. It was decided to reread komo the plague all. Yeah that's a great book. It's a great book and it's right now to read it. It's about love. actually. I love for humanity. It is but it has. It has the key you should. If you haven't read it in recent years. I had read it before. Of course but theresa during this causes about a plague so it's a really fantastic to redoubt. But that reminds me of you know he was a great existential but the beginning of essential literature was dostoevsky..

tolstoy komo theresa plague
A Conversation With Carlo Rovelli On quantum physics

Science Friction

05:46 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With Carlo Rovelli On quantum physics

"This beautiful closing same in telling quantum physicists color ravelli's bestseller the order of time where he reflects on beethoven's mississippi lameness. The song of the violin. He writes is pure beauty. Pure disparition pure joy. We are suspended holding our breath. Feeling mysteriously this must be the source of meaning that this is the source of time. It's very color ravelli. These intellectual free spirit with radical routes and a passion for poetry and literature art and science. The whole rich smorgasbord. Caller was recently named one of foreign policy. Magazine's one hundred most influential global fingers. He works in italy. France canada trying to understand the deep mystery of how gravity works at the quantum level. He writes popular opinionated columns in italian newspapers and popular sites books that have really struck a chord with fans worldwide amongst them seven brief listens on physics. And he's two new books. Are there places in the world where rules are less important than kindness and out this month. Ease helgoland color joins you an eye on science fiction from canada this week on the tesha mitchell and we started out by reflecting on the way in which this pandemic as tiny virus with a will spread is challenging the hubris faces but then we got bigger or a bigger. Thank you for having me. I love how you describe. We humans as being the species of little creatures living on marginal planet of peripheral star in one of billions of galaxies in the cosmos a senior in an essay that you've written about the astronomer copernicus and he's he's a revolutionary challenge that with and so us with was center of the universe. But somehow i it seems to me that we leave with these pre copernican prejudice that certainly at the level of the ego. At least we do. Yeah as a spacey's we still cast ourselves at the center of the universe. And i wonder if you think if we didn't do that if we sensed that we would just an arbitrary player on an arbitrary planets round by hundred million galaxies. Do you think we would position. Different eggo formerly yes. The fact that we are obviously irrelevant on the larger scale of the universe. It doesn't mean that we have no meaning. It doesn't mean that we care about is meaningless we are. We're certainly nothing right. Our son is one out of two billion stars in our galaxy is nothing in our galaxy. One out of probably a billion billion golics's in in the world just creating team prepared killing. Someone is actually candid that right in the last decades it was realized that it was many more than what we saw today. So so we're even smaller than we thought we were more inconsequential. That's something we scanned by that. But that's not the trolley deal of us that make what we care about important for us. Thinks are important for us just because what we are. I love the woman i love. Not because she's universe because she's the woman i love that and so it's for for us. We are important for ourselves. I find it to if i give me. Serenity doesn't give me anguish it sort of relaxing to know that we do our best. We share what we can love what we can. And that's and we appreciate the this life. Yes your initial university studies in the classics i think and then and then onto physics and then onto a phd in meaning to the world of of quantum theory and quantum gravity. Bit on curious to know what that classical training brought to your physicists. Self from early on because all have read do who have raised. You know that you have a great passion for poetry and literature and physics sees is part of all that fear sciences. It's a complex center price that requires the collaboration of different people in different kind of minds. And i have appreciated a scientist which are extremely technical. Or which have an extremely analytical. Mind that just going to details and split the the arguments over and over again find the little truck. I'm not particularly doing good and doing calculations or going into details. But i think that science also needs People who look the things from from a larger perspective and and see where the the two problems where the good directions and full. That's a nation which is not strictly scientific. I think it's it's it's so important to look into Into the great scientist of the past the many of them had an extraordinarily wide culture. So i think they were. The over specialization of modern education does all how help from the middle sized to go ahead. Let's just physics. Tolstoy in biology and medicine in In in other scientists. I believe that. I don't like science teaching completely focus on solving little problems. You know you have a ball. Rolling down a slope but the speed How long does he go and come on. This is so boring is interesting. What isn't is understanding. What is the structure. We're using for understanding the wall. What is a force. What does it mean to have an energy.

Ravelli Tesha Mitchell Canada Beethoven Mississippi Italy France Tolstoy
"tolstoy" Discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

Maureen From Quarantine

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

"I told my daughter to always in in my heart. Her home is always in my heart. And so we learned from the kids too and so we can breathe in all that love to and the kids feel. This makes us better at what we do. Better parents and so when we're Equipped and even to teach the kids when they're going through life changing time such as college beginning college that it's one day at a time one day at a time. It's a good idea to have some food in the fridge. King in kids so we're realistic with our one day at a time and are one moment at a time but put some food in the fridge. You what i mean and embrace the moment and so Yeah look to some of those cool. It's cool works of art that are out there and so We can embrace a moment again and if you are in need of help and again with regard to addiction do go to check out some of the twelve step programs that are out there and i know in quarantine not No meetings really going on and But there are online so you can look online and Let's remember to stay in the solution. Indeed there is enough trouble in the world and so we don't negate that And so we must again not engage and remind ourselves and the kids that yes there's evil in the world there's toxicity and people don't always play fair. We're not living in a world of denial and that's a huge part again of all kinds of recovery. If you will to uncover discover and then discard and so we don't deny Realities that are in existence and so Again the best way is to go back to this moment. This beautiful beautiful moment right now. And what's in front of you. Do you have a glass of water in front of you and nothing like a glass of water to. I've learned to really appreciate water really important and again grateful for the basics and so this beautiful present moment this present moment one day at a time We don't give the evil ones who attempt to rain on our parade our energy so It's not as if we're waltzing off into the sunshine as susie sunshine here. We're dealing in reality. Going in in knowing about how horrible certain people behave and with that knowledge We're even more empowered again. As tolstoy mentioned to have the these sense of patients yance patients. So how can we be patient. Can you find a way to tap into the can start with the breath and breathe again breathe in right now. And what can you do. We each have our own way to go to that place. Ios a slow at town moment to moment to moment and end. remember time. it's one day at a time..

susie sunshine tolstoy
"tolstoy" Discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

Maureen From Quarantine

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

"Things and So tolstoy said the two most powerful warriors are patients and time and again. I always talk about the turtle. And because it's a good idea go easy solo it. Down and three patience and time powerful warriors. Yes so let's not rush through life or anything slow it down one day at a time one moment at a time patients.

tolstoy
Alex Halberstadt: "Young Heroes of the Soviet Union: A Memoir and a Reckoning"

Bookworm

06:31 min | 2 years ago

Alex Halberstadt: "Young Heroes of the Soviet Union: A Memoir and a Reckoning"

"In the course of my reading. I found a recently published book by a writer who frequently appears in The New Yorker New York magazine in many of the glossies. He's a wonderful writer. His name is Alex. how number stat? He was born in the Soviet Union when it was the Soviet Union and he's written. A cross between memoir and history called Young Heroes of the Soviet Union. Since I, am myself of Russian descent and I know some little about what it was like to grow. Walk in the Soviet Union. I found the book. Fascinating. When learned. In its first stone ten pages. Than Alex Humber stance grandfather was one of Stalin's personal bodyguards. That he in this book would travel to the Soviet Union. To meet this previously, UNMET! This grandfather once combed his hair and gave him a bath. How old were you? Then I was three months old Michael. and. You had barely spent time with your biological father because he stayed in the Soviet Union while you and your mother and your mother's parents came to America. Yes, that's right, Michael? How old were you then? I was nine years old. And where did you lands? How did it go? Well we left Moscow in the fall of nineteen, seventy nine, and after about six months Austria in Italy. We ended up in Queens County New York. In addition to all the other things. I have in common with the writer of the spoke Alex. Halberstadt I grew up in Queens to not the same part of Queens and you grew up in the projects. Yes, I did I grew up in the ravens, wood houses, which were part of New York City public housing. Your family was helped to America by an agency. Whose what would you call it? Specialties central issue was helping Russian Jews to leave Russia. Yes, that's correct. It was called highest the Hebrew International Aid Society, and it's still it's still going strong and actually doing a lot of activism right now, behalf of immigrants and refugees now. Wake my audience up. What is it like for? Alex Halberstadt to wake up and find himself in America having grown up near to Moscow. was. It was wonderful. I'M NOT GONNA lie, you know as as a nine and ten year old I thought America was amazing. It was every every kid's dream. You know unlimited consumer goods based. Professional wrestling on television now it was really it was. It was a wonderland. You grew up. In Russia what did the Russian novel mean to you control? It was a huge. Influence on my life does go ski in particular but Tolstoy, so tell me about your relation to the Great Russian literature. I think my relationship was a little ambivalent I tried to read. And I think, I have read most of tolstoy industy upscale entered. In, Russia which took. Eventually started to take a lot longer than it did in English and I loved reading those books. But it kind of you know. I found that also a little confusing because it kind of. I think in some ways overlapped with my experience of having grown up in Russia and kind of taught me about kind of the version of Russia that I was that I only got to know through books. I lived there in the nineteen seventies during the heyday of Soviet Union. You know surrounded by. Socialist realism and this was kind of a rush that I was only getting to know through books innocent I? Think one the things that fascinates me about your book young. Heroes of the Soviet Union it's an memo R- and reckoning the subtitles The You Come. To consciousness. After the death of what I was taught growing up was the great solve fullness of Russia. The Soviet Union. With the secret police and the thongs. parentally, your grandfather was a murderous thug. he certainly was. Who was himself. Murdering Jews and the other so headed your family. Your mother's side was Jewish. Yes, yes, so what happens then to the Russians so? The Russian soul. Well, you know it's funny. A part of writing this book was kind of trying to reckon a I think it's subtitled reckoning because. It was an attempt to reckon with what that country means. WHOA, how Howard was formed, and it's also a nation of readers, a nation of people who? Love jokes anecdotes, and you know they are indeed a very soulful. People, but also simultaneously it is a country that has an uninterrupted history of despotism of cruelty of. Secret Police of. The government that treats its people essentially as vassals, and you know so it is, it is a very. Confusing and ambivalent legacy, you

Soviet Union Russia America Writer Alex Halberstadt Tolstoy Queens Alex Humber Queens County New York Secret Police Alex. The New Yorker New York Magazi Moscow Stalin Wrestling New York City Michael. Alex Hebrew International Aid Socie Ravens
"tolstoy" Discussed on So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

"Mental health or your for your well being, but if you make bad choices or bad, things are done to you. It could be different every time. So the idea that if you have bad emotions, bad parents in bad feedback, it will actually have more impact on you than if you have good parents or good feedback, or whatever else is going on, so is a hypothesis more than a proven and tested principle, but it is something that discussed elsewhere outside of the world of literature. Interesting I hadn't heard. It used in like that. Many different ways like the economy. Or the Marquette. Yeah so apparently, not just families. Especially, talking about how this fits to the world of Gilmore, girls. Let's do it. So now, especially with an extra tidbit that you shared about Tolstoy, leaving his estate to one. Of His children. It makes me think that Lucas probably right that tolstoy was busy dealing with his family whether it was his fault, or there's too busy to comply. Although he did technically complete, his thought 'cause is in the book, but. He definitely could have been preoccupied while writing it. Yes. I think that's probably true. And something I read about in. Just watching the story unfold in the movie. It does seem like everybody's unhappy in some way or another. At some point, it doesn't seem like anyone is perfectly happy. which is probably true to life, but it's also like. A lot of unhappiness is caused by someone trying to be an individual while still being in a family unit. So. I feel like. It seems like Tolstoy is saying. Maybe nobody's happy. Because everybody's GonNa Struggle with us at all times, so everybody trying to make decisions that make themselves happy, but then it makes the people around them unhappy that kind of idea. Right, but it's like we are all individuals, and we are all part of families usually so. How can you ever? I Dunno be, both you have to sacrifice in both areas I suppose. And it seems like that's kind of. How Lebanon finds happiness in the end is choosing to be part of a family unit. Even when? It doesn't mean he gets to do everything he wants says an independent man. Would think. So yeah, I mean in Gilmore Girls. The Gilmore's are unhappy, but they figure out a way to be together. Luke and his family. UNHAPPY, but also they end up relying each other on the lot. Luke on his sister to in the end so. So he doesn't obscene, okay well. Maybe maybe I need my family a little bit too, but certainly in this. In this moment he's really frustrated. But yeah I mean the families more girls. They're all. They all have their bouts of unhappiness and happiness. It does feel like Anna Karenina great thing to reference in Gilmore. Girls just because. So, much of Gilmore Girls, I mean it is about family that's it's whole crux whether it's just Laura, and or you're looking larger, but even in this episode I mean this is win lane and her mom have their falling out. That's going on. And that's another example of lane, trying to find some independence and see where she still find out who she is and fit in with her family I mean just has come back to town, which means just a tornado of emotions for everybody surrounding him, and he's someone who's like I. Don't want to be part of a community or family at all. Seems completely unhappy at the same time. and. This is also an episode where law rely is trained to say hey. I'm dating Your Business Partner Dad. And that just completely in a hilarious way, just completely the bottom falls out on that and she had to be honest about that. Yeah! Yeah Festival says a good one for. Everybody's unhappy, but everybody's unhappy in very different ways almost episode with their family. Good Job Ashby. Yep. So Taylor soon. That's our show. That's our show. Watch Anna Karenina enjoyed yes well and one last fun fact for you. This episode may statistically be more relevant to you, but if we had recorded a a few months ago. I read an article in Fast Company, saying there is this. Recommendation engine called tastes dive, and they follow people's interests, and it sounds like people have been going back to the classics in quarantine. So for example. People are less interested in listening to Billie eyelash than.

Gilmore Girls Tolstoy Gilmore Anna Karenina Luke Marquette Lebanon Fast Company Billie Partner Taylor Laura Lucas
"tolstoy" Discussed on So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

"And thought about a book by a Orlando Physicians could attaches dance cultural history of Russia, and there he talks a lot about how Russian Society of the time live their lives upon a stage that they were constantly. They had a bit of an identity crisis. And they and so they kind of attached themselves to a kind of French persona. And the idea I found quite interesting, and also I found quite interested in the idea. Of all these characters, as we all do always performing so in this situation I'm performing the role of director and you the journalist and and will perform different roles where we go home. And and and I found that that was quite an interesting way into Anna's character that she was you know I'm playing a role of dutiful mother, and and wise, and somehow was feeling miscast. I really appreciate the thought that went that it wasn't just this'll be cool. Let's do it, but about train. Your Life is a performance I did think of, is it? The Shakespeare quote all alive sustained. I did think of that as we watched the movie and I thought it was really cool. They had details about how like people walk it up in the rafters, kind of symbolizing them walking up and down the street, her brother and his family basically live underneath the stage. That's their home. which I think is really cool so like the first half hour forty five minutes in the movie. I don't think you leave the theater at all until you start going outside I think maybe when Levin goes back to his country estate yeah. Yeah, it was an even moments with cure nightly and her son. They were always on this little smaller stage. In a house though so. Yeah. Yeah is really cools really throughout. Let's talk about tolstoy. Let's do it. Tolstoy tolstoy tolls say that five times fast also talked. To a kid. A interesting guy. His marriage also not so great as it turns out, but in the end it'll lot yeah, but they dirty Harry. Yeah Yeah they like wrote diaries to each other read each other's diaries. At first it was okay, but then it was. Intruded on each other's privacy. anyways interesting setup there, but you said you had a little more on that. Yeah, it sounds like things started fairly well like when the book Ada Karenina came out actually the Levin Katie relationship was modeled after his own marriage and was very personal to their relationship. Like you said they felt comfortable reading each other's diaries, they would sometimes like respond to each other's diaries in workout. There are frustrations and quarrels through them, and it sounds like when this book came out like they were pretty happily married, they had thirteen kids. Ten of them lived past young childhood. And it sounds like both Lebanon Katie the characters themselves were. Inspired by the people in this marriage so kitty, of course, not a perfect person, but she's. Very Romanticized, I think in the movie and it sounds like in the book as well. His wife was actually a countess from Russian aristocracy, so she had also that sort of lavish upbringing, also that very well respected upbringing with the title that Kitty has the story. And apparently things did not. Continue to be going well. They were married for about fifty years. Also if you just read the biography of of Leo Tolstoy. Will have one enter temblor, but it sounds like. His. Experience in life also like it doesn't sound like it was just their marriage. That took a turn. It sounds like he became increasingly unhappy as he got older. And He also, he was opened a new political ideas, but then he for a while he really leaned into religion, but then so he was a Christian in was part of the Russian church, but then he basically like edited his own Bible and started coming up with his own ideas about what religion should be like throwing out significant portions of the Bible and saying that they were irrelevant which. I'm not saying as one who grown up a jerk. I'm not saying that there are not difficult things. In the Bible, but also whenever people in history like him or Thomas Jefferson, just like we're just gonNA throw the parts that don't work for us. I might feel like you really understand how this works. Which I think is true for all religions, not just Christianity like. If you're not gonNA like it, deal with the things that you don't like I. Don't really know what we're doing here so anyway I. Think there were a lot of things going on in his life, and he kept a lot of detailed journals, so we know this, so we could along with him, and at the very end of his life I guess after fifty years of marriage. He left and he left everything to one daughter in weirdly enough a few days after he left his wife, he died at a train station yet. That's crazy. That is isolate. You ended up modeling Anna Karenina I know, and it was natural causes. It wasn't that he threw himself under the train. It was that he. Left his family in just a few days later passed away. which is crazy? So I. said to have it read these books. You can bet I have not readily tolstoy's journals, but it sounds like there was a lot going on in his life besides his marriage, but it was very unhappy at the. Pan Fifteen years of marriage. That's long now. In that he left as far as I could tell. He left everything to one daughter, which makes I don't fully understand how like..

Leo Tolstoy Anna Karenina Tolstoy tolstoy Levin Katie Russian Society of director Ada Karenina Orlando Russia Kitty Lebanon Thomas Jefferson
"tolstoy" Discussed on So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

08:46 min | 2 years ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

"Messes. It's like spill. Drink keeps spelling. YOU GOTTA keep cleaning it up against describing your scrubbing just at the state up. Show me a happy family. Just just want I. Mean doesn't that Tolstoy say something about families? Probably famous thing, he said it's like all families are unhappier or happy on the surface of unhappy in the same way or Incomplete! Maybe, it couldn't complete the thought stealer stinking family tailored. Could you have filled in the blanks of this quote for Luke? Maybe I mean I've definitely heard the actual real quote that he dances around before. I may not have gotten it word for word, but basically yes I had heard this quote before. Nice, maybe that's come. Reading several hundred page books I, however was not and I did not know this quote at all. Tolstoy I knew off there probably. Yes. In High School I watched a film adaptation of war and peace with Audrey Hepburn. Because as we've discussed, love me some Audrey. However, the movie adaptation is not very good by all accounts including my own. And I think in general I've just been sort of. Reluctant to dive into the lengthy world of Tolstoy for that reason, because if even the movie is not that great. Then, why would they wanna read? One Thousand Page version of the movie I didn't like while many people well as people I always go to movies with that are based on books. Have already read the book, and of course I never have. Always say Oh, the book was so much better and even your comment last episode about you. Don't if you wouldn't have read Harry, Potter than you think that you wouldn't have known what was going on, but I've been washing. The Harry Potter movies I've Read Harry Potter and I feel like I. Get it and but I think you're right. It's like it's magic whatever? Yes I think magic covers a multitude of plot holes in that world. I think high level. You can totally understand what's going on in Harry Potter. However we can get into a whole thing about how them cutting out. The backstory of the marauders map in the prisoner of Azkaban just really cuts. It's emotional weight, but we'll do that another time I gotcha yeah. The map was just kind of like a cool magic thing meet. I have watched the Harry Potter movies several times before, but I'm rewatching them because quarantine. Yeah. Totally Fair. Well! So bottom line. Neither you nor I were very familiar with tolstoy now. Do you feel like you get the big picture of what he's saying in this moment. Yes. I understood what he was saying basically. All families are a little unhappy is what he was getting at. But but yet did know about tolstoy. I think yeah big picture. Can annuities getting, but why not just say that? Unless you're going to quote somebody, in which case we gotta learn about the reference Yep so we watched the twenty twelve adaptation of Anna. Karenina Starring cure nightly as Anna Karenina. Yes will here let me I. Want to give you a little overview and see if any of the sounds familiar. We have. Here nightly Matthew. Mc Faded Dome Hog Listen. In a movie directed by Joe Wright. Does any of the sound familiar? I know that they did movies together, but I do not personally know the movies, so but I'm sure. That's where you come in Taylor. One of my all time. Favorite movies like all-time. Pride and prejudice thousand five. CM director seem like a bunch of the same cast I can watch an oath that person for prejudice, and I did have a little moment where in this movie Matthew mcvay incur- nightly airplane, brother and sister. But they enter a ball in dance together in a little part of me was like this. is like for Elizabeth and Darcy the. Anyway so I needed out a little bit. But we also have Alicia Candor Michelle. Dockery car. And Aaron. Taylor Johnson playing count. Vronsky, who was in avengers age Abol Tran. And Jude Law MMA boy love that guy. and. Also won an Oscar for best costume design will definitely be talking more about that, and it was also nominated for best cinematography original score in production design in holy cow. This was a beautiful movie law Yes. It was so well done so artful so rhythmic. Beautiful it was. It was a piece of art. It wasn't just you know a movie with the plot it was. Visually. Stunning. And if for some reason you don't WanNa Watch this version, there are over two hundred results. A I'm DB for Anna Karenina including at least eight miniseries movies as early as nineteen ten, and you can watch people like. Lee Greta Garbo Jacqueline beset play in a in like a thousand options, but I'm really glad picked picked this one because. It was just gorgeous. Yeah, I. Agree and I love Keira Knightley. So. Good love her. Should be a little bit about the plot of inaccurate yeah. So first of all, you've got Anna Karenina. Here nightly hasty were case you were wondering There is a character demand. Qiren and she's married to a very upstanding citizen of Russian society and this was based in the. Nineteenth, century Yes. The book came out in the eighteen seventies, and that's what it was set. Yeah, there are seemingly happy couple. They have a son and cure nightly. Here's that her brother is. She has been cheating on his wife and she's going to rush off to Moscow Kush. They live in Saint Petersburg says she's GonNa. Rush on over to Moscow to visit with her sister-in-law and say hey. You should forgive my brother because back in the day. What other choices their? Let him back in. And so on her way though. She lock size. With. Count of Ron Ski, who okay upon first glance. I was like I was a little. Put Off, so you got this blonde. Unnatural looking blonde curly hair weird shape. And this little little tiny stash, which at one point in the movie, 'cause they have a love affair spoiler alert. She licks that little stash and I was just like. Oh! Don't do that. Just that moment and I'm not sad. I did 'cause. I don't remember that but. I digress, so they lock eyes, and yes, at first little off putting to me, but then like as you see him more, and they just keep locking is locking is like his eyes are piercing and just when he is looking at her. Like I'm just so staring back at him so intently. Did. You feel that from him. He. Yes, he has lovely. Is I have no complaints? I and I don't say that in a like objectified way. I just mean like he truly has lovely is and as an actor. He knows how to use them to keep your attention law. Yeah, just like feel like being pulled toward him. Which worked with with this whole movie. But in that train station, a worker on the train dies gets crushed by a train. Your whole gross I look. I intentionally look at that moment. Yeah, that was sad and just kind of pointed to like the different status of the people there because the rest of the..

Anna Karenina Tolstoy Harry Potter Audrey Hepburn Luke Keira Knightley High School Alicia Candor Michelle Moscow Kush Lee Greta Garbo Jacqueline Saint Petersburg Oscar Taylor Johnson Taylor director Dockery Mc Matthew mcvay Aaron Vronsky
"tolstoy" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on KTOK

"Some advice from Leo Tolstoy I'm Leigh Matthews and you know him he's the famous Russian writer that war that wrote war and peace and Anna Karenina sometimes when I'm waiting for a printer to print out I feel like it's printing more in peace but Leo Tolstoy had some very basic rules to live by that still apply to us today get up early for him it was five AM go to bed early for him it was nine to ten o'clock eat little and avoid sweets try to do everything by yourself have a goal for your whole life goal for one section of your life a goal for a shorter period and a goal for the year a goal for the month a goal for the week a goal for the day our goal for the hour and a goal for the minute and sacrifice the lesser goal for the greater keep away from women I'm not sure I like that one kill desire by working be good but try to let everyone know how to not let everyone know it always live less expensively than you might and change nothing in your style of living even if you become ten times richer some good advice and you can hear more stuff like this weekday afternoons from five to seven PM right here on news radio one thousand Katie okay this stream and I heart radio bill o'reilly here you are listening to the weekend edition of the o'reilly update all fifty states are beginning to re open the economy after three months of shut down at the height of the pandemic half the country was ordered to stay indoors but some places are opening much slower than others here are the most militant spots for cold food restrictions right now New York City number one where mayor de Blasio is threatening to physically dragged people from the beaches over Memorial Day weekend the mayor also says that there will be in the city quote no swimming no parties no barbecues until further notice on quote sounds like a fun summer here in New York thanks Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti warning the nation's second biggest city will never reopen until we quote have eight sure Angelinos may be waiting a pretty long time doctors have been working on a cure for HIV and the flu for more than thirty years California governor Newsom publishing a list of quote acceptable outdoor activities for the state's forty million residents walking on the beaches are sitting in the sand knoll you can't sit and that's an even if you have a blanket outdoor meditation allowed put yoga No Way New Jersey refusing to let folks get back to work the governor they're threatening severe penalties for business owners who defy his executive order Michigan extending its locked down indefinitely governor Whitmer facing a huge backlash from our own sheriff's one lawman calling with ms executive order the same as an unlawful arrest there is insurrection in Michigan the judge in Oregon tossing the state's ban on religious services deciding governor brown's order is a blatant infringement on a citizen's first amendment rights to worship Washington state also militant despite the eastern part having very little cold with virus summing up politicians love power but the people are revolting in a moment Georgia's on my mind houses stay doing after re opening right back you know me as a news guy but today I'm a science guy I've accumulated my share of aches and pains over the years which started my quest for a natural solution I found it in omega XL the stuff works and it has thirty years of research to prove it a mega excels a powerful natural anti inflammatory supplement that helps relieve joint and muscle pain there's nothing like it omega XL has health benefits way beyond joint comfort here's another reason I take omega XL research shows that it.

Leo Tolstoy Leigh Matthews
Recovering from coronavirus

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

01:14 min | 2 years ago

Recovering from coronavirus

"We're GONNA turn now to our Dr Jen Ashton for final thoughts on this Wednesday. Dr Jen Amy. I really wanted to spend today focusing on recovery. I've been hearing from people on Social Media. Who HAVE HAD MILD KOBE? Nine thousand nine hundred and they're feeling almost unheard and ignored because it's implied that recovery is so easy we have to remember that people all recover at their own pace regardless of whether their case was mild moderate or severe that recovery can take weeks in some cases three or more weeks obviously those patients who are critically ill in an ICU. Setting it can take months or even longer. There's something called Post. Icu Syndrome which can affect the body as well as the mind in patients who have been on ventilators the longer they're on a ventilator the longer can take them to recover but I really want people to remember that recovery whether it's physical whether it's emotional whether it's economic it will occur. It's not an easy path. It might not be a linear path. You might take one step forward two steps back. But the positive be patient and to quote Leo Tolstoy the two most powerful warriors. We have our patients and time

Dr Jen Ashton Dr Jen Amy Icu Syndrome Leo Tolstoy Kobe
Finding connection in solitude Margaret Atwood & Mark Haddon

VINTAGE Podcast

08:39 min | 2 years ago

Finding connection in solitude Margaret Atwood & Mark Haddon

"First into younger share with you is mark had author of the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime most recently the porpoise. He's talking about book. We published that. He contributed to stop what you're doing and read this. Which is an excellent but by the way is one of the books already as go as a bookseller in one of the books that made me want to really work vintage books and he talks about how he believes in the power of a good novel. A term he defines as a piece of work is humane and generous. I particularly found comfort in his description of reading as a compensation a reader and a writer sitting opposite each other. In each other's company I can write plays and films and even poems in which some of the characters are genuinely unsympathetic for which you and the reader feel no empathy partly because those forms are spectacle to a certain extent. You you can sit back and watch it from a distance but I think all novels A conversation I I tend to picture a novel as you. The writer and the reader sitting in adjacent chairs talking quietly to each other. You know a novel is never declaimed or acted out or overheard. It's it spoken quietly to the reader and of course a really long conversation and to make the long conversation work you've really got to you with a like the narrator. You're gonNA like the person who's talking to you. They can be taught or scathing satirical. But they've got to have an underlying warm both towards you and and towards the people they're talking about and I think you can see that. All great writers and Dickens in Jane Austen George Eliot in Tolstoy and in fact in Warren Pace. You can see where it doesn't work because when he does start declaim in those separate chapters about his theory of history he can lose you completely and it's one of the great novels in the world where no one reached the last chapter. Because he's just telling you stuff you don't really want to know. I think this is particularly true of Virginia Wolfe It's not just her warmth than her interest in the people she's talking about but the speed the ease with which she seems to flow in and out of different people's minds in and out of different consciousnesses in a very short period of time often around dining table in and out of the minds of people talking with with one another and I think the way in which she does. That makes you very aware of something about your own mind personally. I'm always reading Virginia Woolf and thinking Yes yes yes that's what it's actually like to be a human being not just that stream of consciousness stuff which she does so well the way you flick from memories of Childhood Your plans for dinner to the fear of death all within thirty seconds the way we move from sense of loneliness sudden empathy with people around us the way we feel sort of sealed in one moment and then suddenly we dissolve and we realized that we members of a group of people or we members of a family and a part of verse exists within all those other people in the room at the same time the way we move from our past to our future back into our president. I think there are other right to have a wide range of characters and a wide range of situations. By doting. There is anyone who understands articulates what it is like to be a person from one moment to the next so the other interview. I found interesting was one. The Margaret Atwood gave on stage all those years ago when she'd written novel taxied. If you don't know already exceed is retelling of Shakespeare's tempest in the interview. Margaret Talks about the theme of exile in tempest. And how she explores to have writing the contrast between freedom. I'm confinement. I know a lot of us feel like we're in a very strange very necessary. Exile from our normal lives in big. I'm small ways so I hope like me find this interview. Refreshing or at least a little comforting. Let me start by asking about the genesis of high exceed. Of course it's part of the hogarth Shakespeare series but why the tempest yes. Why the tempest Luckily I was early on the list of people who are asked so I got I got my druthers and that was my brother because I had thought about it quite a bit before. It even written about Prospero before in my book on writing which is called oddly. Enough a writer on writing it used to be called negotiating with the dead but I think the day word was a bridge too far for some people in the publishing industry. They don't like the D. Word. No no not always coming to say it does what it says on the tin it. Does I think what it says on the tin. So it's not about my writing and it's not about how to write about. Who are these writers? What do they think they're doing? And how are they different from other kinds of artists and The chapter in which Prospero of here's is a chapter on diabetes. Magicians because of course writers are dubious. Magicians they create illusions and are those illusions always benevolent. So that's what I what I was writing about in that book and one of the other ones in that chapter is the wizard of Oz. Who has he says is A good man but a bad magician he has no real magic. He's an illusionist. So what you need to ask about any writer probably is. Are they a good man but a bad magician or have bad man but a good magician? Which is often also true or possibly. They're good at both but Prospero in the tempest is very ambiguous. And therefore the he's been open to many different kinds of interpretations. It's also play with a lot of unanswered questions. And it is the one play above all in which Shakespeare is writing a play about what he actually did all his life. He's writing play about a director producer. Putting on a play with the aid of a very good special effects man called aerial. So that is what happens in the book and a director producer puts on a play by means of which he hopes to get revenge on the people who have done him dirt twelve years before them. Light on the setting. Because it's one thing. It seems to me to consider prosper on his magic in an essay. It's another to construct a whole story which you could read perfectly plausibly. I think without even knowing that the tempest existed I think it helps to know that the tempest exists and by the end of it. You're certainly going to know that the tempest exists. Because what they're putting are isn't is the tempest. So how did I come to all of that? The epilogue has always been very intriguing to me which Prospero's steps out of the play addresses the audience. But he's still prospero. He's not saying hello. I'm an actor playing Prospero. He is still prospero and that play is about guilt and forget and forgiveness and and and liberation because the last three words of it are set me free. But it's a bit puzzling in the epilogue of what is Prospero guilty. Why does he feel guilty? And from what is he being freed now that he's outside his own play

Prospero Writer Shakespeare Margaret Atwood Virginia Mark Virginia Woolf Margaret Talks Diabetes Warren Pace Director President Trump Dickens Jane Austen George Eliot Producer Tolstoy
"tolstoy" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on KTOK

"Tolstoy I'm Leigh Matthews and you know him he's the famous Russian writer that war that wrote wore and P. use and Anna Karenina sometimes when I'm waiting for a printer to print out I feel like it's printing more in peace but Leo Tolstoy had some very basic rules to live by that still apply to us today get up early for him it was five AM go to bed early for him it was nine to ten o'clock eat little and avoid sweets try to do everything by yourself have a goal for your whole life goal for one section of your life a goal for a shorter period and a goal for the year a goal for the month a goal for the week a goal for the day our goal for the hour and a goal for the minute and sacrifice the lesser goal for the greater keep away from women not sure I like that one kill desire by working be good but try to let everyone know how to not let everyone know it always live less expensively than you might and change nothing in your style of living even if you become ten times richer some good advice and you can hear more stuff like this weekday afternoons from five to seven PM right here on news radio one thousand Katie okay this stream and I heart radio millions estimate their benefits online so they can do what they want offline social security securing today and tomorrow see what you can do online at social security staff go bill o'reilly here you are listening to the weekend edition of the o'reilly update super Tuesday is over Democrats across USA have now voted in eighteen different states allocating about a third of their delegates any woman charged people to judge quit the race before Tuesday now backing Joe bide Elizabeth Warren probably wishes she had got out she got clocked in our home state of Massachusetts by Mr Biden and Bernie Sanders Mike Bloomberg ended his campaign as you know following is terrible performance the billionaire spent more than five hundred million of his own money to take on president trump earning just forty four pledged delegates in a few states mayor Mike didn't win one contest American Samoa if you do the math that's more than eleven million dollars per delegate Mike Mr Bloomberg now worth fifty nine million dollars instead of sixty Democrats feel that started with nearly two dozen candidates is basically down to two so now it's mano a mano between Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden but as we reported yesterday the fix is in against Bernie Sanders the media already hailing Joe Biden as the come back kid I throw back to bill Clinton's resurgence after a tough start in his campaign the democratic establishment will do anything to prevent Bernie Sanders from becoming the party's nominee they are convinced correctly that running a socialist against Donald Trump would lead to a Republican landslide forget about taking the senator keeping the house Joe Biden's impressive win on Tuesday will help the former VP raise money of course because March is a very busy time the candidates will compete next Tuesday in Idaho Michigan Mississippi Missouri North Dakota and Washington state then there's a mini Tuesday March seventeenth St Patrick's day primaries in Arizona Florida Illinois and Ohio no jokes about snakes okay the current delegate count is mostly split between Biden and Bernie a trans likely to continue all the way to the convention where if he can make it I predict Joe Biden will get the nomination in a moment the real story Joe Biden is surging ahead of Bernie Sanders it doesn't really have to do with the vote so much it has to do with those dreaded corporations right back today's rates are near historic lows before now you have to go back to two thousand twelve to see anything lower which brings me to a very important point at no time in modern economic memory have mortgage rates been able to move significantly lower than they are right now this is it so there's no need to.

Tolstoy Leigh Matthews
"tolstoy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

09:43 min | 2 years ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Of our family through Jesus Christ our lord who lived on earth in a human family and knows the joy of being family with you on that Leo Tolstoy began his novel on and Karenina with this well known opening line happy families are all alike every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way for years commentators have tried to explain what Tolstoy meant by that statement happy families are all alike every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way but it may be simpler than we think Tolstoy's story shows that what makes for a happy family may be as simple as faithfulness in ordinary little things and and unconditional love as for on happy families the families in Tolstoy's novel are unhappy alright each in their own way and that after all is the stuff of a good story in other words unhappy families make for good drama is if we did now as we bring our genesis sermon series to a close with chapter fifty we realize that each of the families of genesis from Adam and eve's family at the beginning to Joseph's family at the end each family is unhappy in its own way that after all is the stuff of good drama Hey this is history not fiction this is Adam and eve Cain and Abel Sarah and Hagar Jake up and he saw Joseph and his brothers as the saying goes you don't get to choose your own family these folks did not choose their family but god did god chose each of these families to Kerry god's promises in that sense these families were all happy or blast in the same way god was busy with them god was working through their ordinary everyday dysfunctional sinful and not happy life together to bring the world it's messiah Jesus Christ savior and lord we see this no we're better than in the story of Jacob son Joseph and his brothers this is a family story of epic proportions taking up a good quarter of the book of genesis Joseph is first left for dead and then sold into slavery by is jealous brothers but why did the father Jacob saying Joseph was killed Joseph is brought to Egypt by slave traders in part by part of far captain of pharaoh's guard is then falsely accused with raped and imprisoned then called on by pharaoh to interpret his dreams and ultimately appointed to be prime minister of Egypt while administering the sale and distribution of food during a famine he meets his brothers who come seeking food he immediately recognizes them but they don't recognize him eventually he reveals himself to them the shows and kindness he made his little brother Benjamin brings them all to live in Egypt and there is reunited with his father Jacob dies in Egypt having blessed his sons ended his request is buried at Mach pila in Canaan or Abraham Isaac Sarah Rebekah and Leah were also period this is where our techs picks up in verses fifteen to seventeen of genesis fifty the word of god when Joseph's brothers saw that their father was dead they said it may be that Joseph will hate us and pay us back for all the evil that we did to him so they sent a message to Joseph saying your father gave this command before he died sated Joseph please forgive the transgression of your brothers and their sin because they did evil to you and now please forgive the transgression of the servants of the god of your father Joseph wept when they spoke to him now remember earlier Joseph had reconciled with his brothers now though Jake up his diet has been laid to rest in Canaan and the brothers wonder of Joseph will turn on them with a vengeance they tell Joseph that Jacob commanded them to ask for his forgiveness for what they had done to him Joseph's responses one of deep emotion we're told that he wept when his brothers asked for forgiveness the depth of the family's love is often seen in the tears we shed at weddings baptisms funerals graduations reunions in moments of reconciliation that was certainly true with Joseph no less than seven times in his story in genesis Joseph spills tears sometimes uncontrollably in most of these tears are not shed for sadness but for love the tears of Joseph are testimony to his love for family and for god in this god who chose his family let's trace Joseph tears in the genesis story Joseph cries the first time in chapter forty two when his brother stand before him to buy grain and the famine again he recognizes them as his brothers but they don't recognize him he accuses them of being spies he demands that one of them Simeon stay behind until the others returned bringing with them their youngest brother Benjamin the brothers talk among themselves thinking Joseph doesn't know their language Joseph overhears them recalling what they had done to Joseph and that this now was their punishment on hearing this Joseph had to turn away from them to cry they had never forgotten him they knew they had wronged him terribly they were living with guilt he was overwhelmed so we cried Joseph crisis second time on the road to reconciliation in chapter forty three his brothers have returned with Benjamin when Joseph sees Benjamin the only one of his brothers who was also a son of Jacob and Rachel seeing Benjamin were told he was so moved with love and compassion that he had to leave the room and try as eyes out watches face and come back in the third and perhaps most profound tears of Joseph coming chapter forty five is he makes himself known to his brothers he had set it up to make it appear that Benjamin it's stolen a chalice it was a test of the brothers would they turn on this new favorite son of Jacob the way they had turned on him remarkably Judas steps forward to take the blame offering his life for Benjamin's rather than break his father's heart again with the loss of a favorite son this act breaks the cycle of jealousy and violence Joseph clears the room except for his brothers and lets them know who he is the scriptures say and he wept aloud so that the Egyptians heard it in the household of feral heard it later in chapter forty five Joseph is moved to tears again his fourth tears he embraces Benjamin and weeps and then kisses each of his brothers with his tears falling on them notice if these tears like those have come before we're not tears of sadness or regret but tears of deep emotional compassion and love Joseph's fifth cry comes as he goes to Goshen to see his father would so deeply loved him when he was a child the scriptures say that he presented himself to Jake up and fell on his neck and wept on his neck a good while simply put the phrase could read he wept on his neck more that is longer than all the Christ before longer and deeper as father and son who was thought dead are now reunited and that brings us to the last two cries of Joseph here in chapter fifty verse one tells us that when Jacob died Joseph fell on his father's face and wept over him and kissed him if you've ever lost a family member you know what that embrace in those tears feel like in Joseph seventh tears come in our text as he hears his brother's ask for his forgiveness throughout all seven of Joseph's tears we can't miss how deeply he loves his father his little brother Benjamin and even those brothers who it's so wrong can there is something steadfast in durable about family shown so well by Joseph's tears in genesis within our families we can wrong each other we can spend days even years not talking to each other in some families as in Joseph's violence threatens life itself yet through it all the love within a family process the ancient Greeks had a word for this family love the word for it was store gay it was a deep love for family rich with devotion unrelenting even in tragedy those store gate is not used in the New Testament at its opposite is and at one point in Romans twelve ten Stargate is joined with the word for friendship love as Paul writes that Christians must love one another with brotherly affection that is love as deep as family from the get go family was god's idea for creation family is at the very essence of who god is his father son and spirit despite all of our struggles in all of our bad days god is at work in our families through family god.

Leo Tolstoy
A History of Seduction

The Book Review

15:04 min | 2 years ago

A History of Seduction

"Clement. Knox joins US now from London. His new book is called Seduction History from the enlightenment to the present Clement. Thanks for being here so your day job. I want to start there. Because you have a book oriented day job you work as a nonfiction buyer at waterstones which is of course a major British bookstore teen. What's your job like there? What do you do so their tour of managing nonfiction and about two hundred and eighty stores? My job really is just to get the the right books and the right stores. I'm responsible for history philosophy politics Papa. Johns I mean about nine categories overall and so. We do a lot with the publishers booksellers as well. Did you get to pick which categories you're responsible for? No when I got the job I was just assigned and then they'll kind of a reshuffle if he has got a few more categories as well they kind of work perfectly because it more or less alliance with what I'm interested in reading and what I'm interested in writing see you're deciding which books go into waterstone's the chain into which stores and how many copies are ordered exactly that to you. So that's a very powerful position. It's very structured is a very fair how we how we do it and is a constant communication publishers stores and sometimes even the authors as well we very even-handed brushing away and there's no kind of mysterious. What would probably shooter who understand. What's your typical day? Like a lot of meetings a lot of looking at science because a lot of reading of publicity plans and back and forth people. He wants us to buy their. Berko by book or by even more so. Are you living months ahead of time looking at? What are the books coming out this fall? Oh Oh yeah. We're tasked with trying to look as far as possible. So wig about to start. Looking at the timber Tiber November on average would normally thinking three months ahead of the east. And what happened with your book? The decider like we're going to order a hundred thousand copies of seduction. Yeah I I wish it was it by my boss has taken over that completely and utterly redeem. Oh look thing I try and pretend you know having to stay in a total of ignorance about one's own buck. I agree. Yeah but let's talk. Let's talk about your book. This may seem like perhaps a silly question but let's define seduction exactly. How is it action separate from courtship? How is it different from something? Maybe more creepy and less mutual like sexual harassment. Like what is seduction? I think the crucial aspect is selection. It's psychological and fumes kind of like confrontation between the minds and the passion of two different individuals in English law. That was a whole body of law do seduction discussing in some detail and wish would later it was. It came to America with with the mayflower that was developed in an extraordinary way and in those laws there was a distinction made between between rape which is obviously a What is coercive violent and seduction was seen as distinct from rape and she assumed that consent had been obtained that consent was in some way vitiated or somehow degraded by the techniques by which it was one so seduction carry that burden. That somehow someone's being over and perhaps the method used to win them over the Underhand but that's only one definition. There's a whole other definition which would say you know. It's just about courtship and game playing and it's fun and this is dawn which is dawn sexual freedom. Did you focus on that fun? Dance in this book or did you cover the full gamut the way the book is kind of structured is the. There's like a dialectic. Going on and one half of the history of seduction is about people worrying about sexual freedom worrying about things going wrong about the collision desire empower the capacity for abuse and wrongdoing. That is one of the history and the other half is about sexual freedom being this exciting enjoyable thing which which is buried lighthearted and people Is The insurance of the church. Will the government so the book kind of structured around the kind of dichotomy and not conflict between our two years of war sexual freedom is and what that means deduction your subtitle is history from the enlightenment the presidency? You're focusing mostly on the modern era. But let's start just briefly with that premodern era talk about what our earliest ideas of seduction were. Maybe perhaps grounded in with Allah G. And then how that changed as you moved into the Judeo Christian era the reason I start in the enlightenment. There's no because seduction didn't exist before seventeen hundred is because that's when seduction narrative as we understand it was born and the book is about this very powerful strange and modern thing seduction narrative which was basically invented in the eighteen th century and the product of a response to a whole new wave of ideas about the human mind about what we now think of. Feminism will prototype eminem and also about the discovery of sexual freedom as part of the blue celebrating our freedom and the enlightenment and before then you had a situation where sexuality was heavily pleased. It was subject to legal and religious interrogation and you know in America. Of course you had The puritans were very big on sexual policing but also in and the rest of Europe as well and over the course of the eighteenth century that whole value system changed. By the end of the Eighteenth Century Sexual Freedom was for granted and to be cleared. Sexual Freedom for them was not the sexual freedom that we now cherish worry about. That really meant that women go to choose. Who They married. That's where the foundation sexual freedom was not explains basically every Jane austen novel for instance. That is the undependable. The plus. They're out of plenty other novels besides and then more generally a kind of increasingly faraji towards male sexuality in particular so you see the rise of the double standard would be in spectacularly bad behavior of the rates of London and Paris Venice. You say that there were three modes of thought that really gave rise to the modern seduction narrative liberalism materialism and feminism. Let's talk about liberalism for example. How does that bring us? But we consider to be seduction as it is today in John. Look Letter of colouration. He He makes us interesting comment race. Is that basically? Everyone is going to have to look after their own. Their prospects of their own souls so liberalism is no longer going to tell people how to live their lives and what to do and instead they're going to have to have their own moral accounting and if in the religious view if they'd be living badly that we dealt with in the off the world it's not gonNA dealt with by the government and the President and obviously if you think about it back then because up until that point they'd be bathing policing sexuality quite a lot and sexuality was once you're saying okay. Everyone's GonNa look after their own moral well-being and the government's going to step out of it. The second and third order consequence of that include a increasingly hands off attitude towards sexuality and basically people are left to make their own decisions and see how how ends up so. It's not that people sat around in the late seventeenth century and said we're going to invent liberalism and one that includes sexual freedom sexual freedom flowed quite logically from this this view that we're not going to try and make everyone lived where he wants them to and that's because they tried that in Seventeenth Century. Europe and being horrific bloodshed and wars and everything else and they wanted you to move beyond that how it's addiction flow from materialism again because we'll be philosophers like like Locke and hume. They were kind of operating on the assumption that we're living in a godless world and they they were very careful how they frame that and Voltaire as well. Then we're castle how. They framed that because of course you won't read out to be an atheist but once you get to the position where we're saying. Okay they're not angels and devils and there's no Holy Spirit brought in the world and instead it's just individuals with brains achieving reality once you make those leaps you can move from new Ford away from this moralistic view of sexuality and towards an idea and that's like psychological view of reality and that's seduction narrative dramatize is this internal monologue about reason about passionate about desire and not basically the entire genre of the novel possible. And if you read these early novels like Richardson who had discussed at some length. Those books now in the more or less unreadable right ABBA time now. If you're named Pamela centrally forced to read Samuel Richardson so you know it comes with the you've read it that I have read and Shamanov so yes so been down that unfortunate path. To what extent is the history of seduction also a history of power and power dynamics? One way of looking at it is that it's not a matter of about power. One way of looking at it is that in fact sexual freedom is empowering and people who practice sexual freedom or taking control of their lives and our free liberated individuals and not seeing a strain and food since the Enlightenment Henry Fielding Mary Wilson Kroft Plus He Shelley Mary Shelley Khatri at all the way up to the present where people you know saying well. People shouldn't be telling me how to live my life. So I'm not I'm not part of it. Basically rejects the idea that seduction is about power and it says actually selections about about freedom and choice but obviously power is a complex thing to discuss. But I root it's about coercion and seduction it about agency. And as soon as our collides with especially in situations where you know that sexual inequality economic inequality there's racial inequality very quickly. We can see how adoption courtship can shade into something daca. You go into issues around race and seduction and in particular America's laws and attitudes around race in the book talk about those parts of the book America in the nineteen. Th Century developed this very extensive body of state laws placing seduction and eventually America how to federal law. The man act which was essentially a seduction Laura in everything but name and in the American south. Clearly it wasn't just a question of the law there were lynchings and these lynchings were often justified by reference to alleged sexual assaults or you know interracial relationships happening not not as true all the way up to an until so. It's not just that was seduction literature. Racial is clearly that was a very serious and horrifying epidemic of racial violence. Often had a sexual subtext. But in the case of the laws the laws designed to empower kind of racial scrutiny of sexual relationships and the mind acts was used to in California was used to prosecute lots of Japanese immigrants who had interracial relationships in the northeast and the Midwest where there were lots of Jewish immigrants or Polish German immigrants. It was used to kind of put further scrutiny communities and then the story. I tell about Joe Johnson who was the first black heavyweight champion of the world it was used to basically hound this man who they couldn't lynch or there were several attempts to do so until they tried to to get him in the courts. Did You keep the book focused on heterosexual seduction or do you cover sex relationships as well? I mentioned overseeing the enlightenment though. Is this on Abrasion of sexual freedom. I should have a code of that. Which obviously it was a celebration of heterosexual. Freedom of sexual freedom was not tackled until the nineteen sixties and seventies and beyond. So I do keep a focus on on heterosexual relationships but the simple reason is that that's deduction narrative of itself was born about this new idea of celebrating sexual freedom without sexual freedom did not include the same sex and curious about the origin of this book. Like is this something that you began before you were at waterstones is the nonfiction or a one of the nonfiction buyers or did this kind of evolve. Why hasn't anyone written about this? And getting all these other books about these other things but there's no good history of seduction. The funniest seed of this book was what I was living in America just finished Grad School in DC. And I was just reading novels like dangerous liaisons and a hero of our time and I kind of kept on coming across this theme of the Seduction Narrative. And it just wouldn't go away and it kind of knew it away me for several years and I kind of this whole history of the seduction laws which I find well fascinating and weird and then of course in in our own time. A lot of things have happened. The rise of the pick up this online dating or the rest of it. I had this of intuition that there was a story And it was the story larger than just what was going on now that it had a history and yeah. I was pretty much convinced that every day. Open the newspaper and someone in Britain the book but they never did give it a go. Well this segment is going up on Valentine's Day so it feels appropriate to ask you about your favorites seduction narrative. Dangerous liaisons novel is is is absolutely amazing. I would recommend twenty one I. It's incredibly that it was actually written two centuries ago and there have been several great adaptions of it and they were to the nineteen eighty s and then those cruel intentions made out of it in the ninety s which I think is fantastic film still. I mentioned briefly a hero of our time by lemon of again. I think everyone should read that book. And it was an incredible and the Russians were really heavily influenced by the English narrative. They will read some Richardson. They'd read Palmer and Clarisa. Bridgeton is name checked in Eugene Oregon. And of course they wrote obsessed with Byron who was a kind of mythical seducer lifetime and so the whole Russian tradition wouldn't really exist without those two figures and he said in London. Tolkien postgame also tolstoy as well all right well. I guess plenty of people to read over Valentine's Day maybe not moves people's chosen activity and this particular day but if if you are alone with book those are the ones to pick up in addition to of course deduction clement. Thanks for being here

America Samuel Richardson London Europe Johns Clement United States Waterstone Clement. Knox Eminem Jane Austen Rape Seventeenth Century California Harassment President Trump Eugene Oregon Midwest Britain Paris Venice
"tolstoy" Discussed on ScreamQueenz: Where Horror Gets GAY!

ScreamQueenz: Where Horror Gets GAY!

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"tolstoy" Discussed on ScreamQueenz: Where Horror Gets GAY!

"Someone literally with their facing the microphone? Young wow you guys at cheap. The little treats then you'll be like walks into the cave and you're like this is Batmans gave this job. This is the entrance to the Batman. The bad case. I'm a DIY queen. I respect that I respect that. Ah Make It work you gotta use it. These people are going to see. See these things once before rebroadcast. Four years they won't remember there will never be a format where where they can watch these things anytime they want. He'll want to watch this thing again. Anyway yeah so while. They're on his out on this trip. All these things are going wrong. The votes shouldn't be out anyway. Because this technical problems with it and there's a storm coming and there's a shark and missed all his stuff but on the boat is Egyptologists Ray land and I love. Also this is a nineteen seventy six. They're always had some scientists and everybody would know who they would be like the world's most famous archaeologist. Oh yes I know him. Why why you know this person? And everybody's read everything he's written exactly that when they're not reading tolstoy they're reading beating. His Archaeological Dostoyevsky Dostoyevsky. Thank you stacey. You're you're my dramaturge honesty. I hate that word sounds gross. Dramas her honesty why did mean dramaturge tolstoy and is tolstoy in Waldo outfit Savor The star cast..

dramaturge tolstoy Batmans stacey Ray
What Stephen Currys on-court antics say to Warriors fans

San Francisco Chronicle Sports - Spoken Edition

02:47 min | 4 years ago

What Stephen Currys on-court antics say to Warriors fans

"You're listening to the spoken edition of the San Francisco Chronicle. The San Francisco symphony proudly presents a new season of feature films with live orchestra featuring Jurassic Park law La Land, Mary Poppins and more. Visit SF symphony dot org slash film for details and information. What Stephen Curry's on-court celebration say to warriors fans by Scott Oastler from sports. What was the message Stephen curry delivered to his fans during the most recent home game? A when he strolled alone into the spotlight after he had eight thirty one foot jumper late in the third quarter against Washington on Wednesday. The wizards called time out and curry sauntered to the midcourt circle. Flapping his arms up and down. The noise already had reached classic oracle din level, but curry wanted more. What was he saying to an outsider at might have seemed like look at me curry celebrations of himself and his team have become a signature to warriors fans. They are expressions of pure joy to critics. They are I roll worthy. Hot dogging with no access to curry right now. I'm gonna take a guess the crowd was really really loud the way curry was shooting. Seemed as if he might start launching threes from behind mid chord nothing shakes the dust off the oracle rafters like curry going deeper than Tolstoy. My guess is that curry was saying this remember last season when we all got bored us players, and you fence to even though we all knew better, we all just got a little bit blase pal about if we go back to the old way where it's all new and unbelievably cool, and none of us can believe it. We all know what kind of talent we have. But I need you guys to know that this won't be as easy as we sometimes make it look, and we could really use your help. Are you in Steve curse lectures to his team on mindfulness might be taking hold dig the moment because even the most rock solid team is nothing more than a dandelions waiting for a hurricane. Curry started the season ready to rock it every night. And he and the boys though, not yet in perfect sync are playing with purpose with mindfulness that night against the wizards. I don't think Corey was saying look at me he. He was saying to his teammates and two warriors fans. Look at us. The San Francisco symphony proudly presents a new season of feature films with live orchestra featuring Jurassic Park. La La Land, Mary Poppins and more. Visit SF symphony dot org slash film for details and information.

Stephen Curry Scott Oastler San Francisco San Francisco Chronicle Mary Poppins Jurassic Park Midcourt Circle Steve Corey Washington Tolstoy Eight Thirty One Foot
Putin campaigns in Crimea, snubbing the west ahead of Russian presidential election

Today

02:58 min | 4 years ago

Putin campaigns in Crimea, snubbing the west ahead of Russian presidential election

"Foreign ministry accused london of launching an anti russian campaign deliberately choosing confrontation over dialogue wolong moscow has denied any link to the poisoning insisting there's no proof the sanctions imposed by the british government has changed nothing here on the sixth floor of the russian parliament heading along one of the endless corridors with a long long red carpet to the office of kilter tolstoy who is the deputy speaker of katamon see what he makes of theresa may statement michigan sinecure media deer license up a cigarette the mp describes what's happening in britain as theater nothing for russia to worry about because there wasn't a single piece of evidence in what mrs may said there was only a collection of assumption she's made based on the idea that russia is bad the kremlin is awful and putin is dictator who poisoned this turncoat it's a joke what mr tolstoy does agree with is the damage all this has caused to relations with britain just three months ago boris johnson came here on a mission to reengage now moscow is deciding how to react to british sanctions in houston brittania vietnam england will of course receive a response to these actions and it will be quite harsh you're dealing with a great power here even if the uk cuts off diplomatic relations with russia it doesn't matter we don't give a damn well i think that it should be viewed as healthily mortar reaction over on the other side of the river analyst andrei cartoon off says moscow had been expecting a more robust response from britain diplomatic expulsions a serious he says but definitely not fatal i think one of the characteristics of the current russian leadership is that it doesn't yield under pressure i recall for years ago when the ukrainian crisis had just started there were many speculations at we should impose sanctions and putin will change or the russian economy would fall apart the system demonstrated resilience and i think that this is likely to continue career pga ibm putin he spent the day on the election campaign trail ending with a concert this is crimea the territory he annexed four years ago to an international outcry europe and america united then to impose sanctions but russia's position never changed in the case of segues clip how britain alone seems unlikely to do better raynsford reporting from moscow will unders for rasmusen is the former nato's secretary general is on the.

America Andrei Houston Reengage Boris Johnson Michigan Theresa London Nato Analyst UK Mr Tolstoy Putin Russia Britain British Government