27 Burst results for "Todd Rundgren"

"todd rundgren" Discussed on Milk Crates and Turntables. A Music Discussion Podcast

Milk Crates and Turntables. A Music Discussion Podcast

03:59 min | 3 months ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on Milk Crates and Turntables. A Music Discussion Podcast

"That's his best song to me and you, then that's like Todd Rundgren. Bang it drum. Right. And you can dance to it though. Yeah. There's a radio station in Nashville, WCW has. When I first moved there, did you listen to Fridays with Frank? I'm like, Sinatra. Yeah, come on, it's no surprise with Frank Zappa. It's like two hours and stuff, but that's it. It's a hard listen. Yeah, I'm with you, Scott on that. Grab a list of the fucking doctor demento. Yes. Nothing wrong with that. All right, Mark, give me an album cover. Let me just say I get, Frank Zappa, and I think chic your booty has to be one of the angriest, awesome albums of all time. If you have never listened to it, listen to it. That's a great album. It makes you cringe anyway. I'm going to steal this one from Tom, I think, but brain cell surgery. Yeah. When you're a kid, I mean, I'm sure Scott, you went to this when you first start playing albums, you lay down and you look at the album. And so you unfolded it, it had to stencil cut. And later on, I learned that the cover was designed by H.R. Giger, who did alien, came up with the alien creature. That's one sick artist. I have his book. No, that was HR that. And pretend the insight, there was like an insert with the three members. He'd open it up and he would just, it was great. And when you're a kid, the reason I got into Prague just to say real quick is I'm a science fiction nerd too. Star Wars and all that. The lyrics on brain cell surgery are very science fiction oriented. They had the lyric sheet. Everything about that album was quality classy. Yeah. So I have to correct you a little bit. Tom shows it to the live stream. I have to correct you a little bit. I wasn't laying on my bed listening to the music. I was in a beanbag chair. You were cool. We had the orange fucking 70s orange and it wasn't like a felt one. It was like that fucking vinyl. Like you get up. Yeah. The beanbag. But we all studied those out. That's how we learned our shifts. Yeah. Here's a little thing about that album. The original title, Tom, isn't it? Was whip some skull on me, which is slang for a BJ? Yeah..

Frank Zappa Todd Rundgren WCW H.R. Giger Scott Sinatra Nashville Frank Tom Mark Prague
"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

11:58 min | 8 months ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

"The song. And lo and behold because of the way the industry was in those days. If you had enough radio ads and enough pre orders on the single, you charted. A week later, the single comes out and it charts in the 20s. Wow. A week later, after we've a week after we recorded it, you know, nobody's even heard it yet. It didn't take that much longer for us to get the album done than well, you know, the albums, a big giant hit now. That doesn't happen a whole lot. But it's just not the kind of thing that you can depend on. You know what I mean? It's a complete opposite end of the spectrum which was meatloaf. The opposite of like that confidence and knowing what you're going to do when you had to have a master plan to accomplish it. Meatloaf, on the other hand, was just a crab shoot through the entire thing, even though by that album, because any time an anomaly breaks through, it's really interesting to me. And that there's nothing else like that, whatever that is. It's very unique. It's unlike other music going on at the time. Well, it was not completely unlike other music that was going on at the time, because when I went to see meatloaf, I knew who meatloaf was, I had seen them in the Rocky Horror show. I knew who he was. I didn't know who steinman was, Simon actually the genius behind the whole thing. But they did a live audition for me. Simon on the piano meatloaf and two background singers. And essentially did the entire record with piano accompaniment, but did all of the highlights of the record act it out with everything with the histrionics Paradise and dashboard light and all that stuff. And while I'm watching it, and they're giving me the subsurface they said, no producer wants to touch this. The concept is too big, no producer really wanted to deal with it. And so they're doing this for me and in my head I'm thinking. This is a spoof of Bruce Springsteen. It's all the same, you know, ersatz 50s stuff, you know, with motorcycles, switchblades, leather jackets, all that rebel without a cause iconography, and I'm thinking, this is a spoof of Bruce Springsteen, and that's how I'm going to approach it. And he had a label at the time. I wouldn't have taken it on, unless he had a label, but the day before we went into the studio, and we had rehearsed the band for two weeks already. You know, we were ready to just go in there and do it live, which the record was mostly live, not the singing, but although playing on it was mostly all life, meatloaf says, I went off my label. They don't understand me. And whatever. I said, well, I'm not your manager. I can't tell you what to do, but you know we're going into studio tomorrow. And he says, well, I got to get off my label. You know, so I go to was either Paul fishing or Albert Grossman, you know, running bearsville at the time. And I said, well, if you put this, it's too late now, we're already rehearsed. We actually got members of Springsteen's band. We got Roy bitten. Amazing. And Max Weinberg. Amazing. Are in the bands. You know, this is how much it was spoof it is to me. And I say, well, put this on my tab, you know, underwrite the expenses like you would a regular record and we'll give you right a first refusal on the record. We finished the record and bears will turns it down. As does Warner Brothers whose distributing bearsville. And it takes 6 months to find somebody to take the record. They shopping around everybody and everybody says, what is this? A spoof of Bruce Springsteen and finally they find a small subsidiary area of Epic Records called Cleveland international. And they have one act on the label. Ian hunter is the only act they have on the label. Great guy, a great player. I should call him for a collab. You were the first person I ever heard talk about the revolution in the way music is consumed. Maybe it's far back as the late 70s, to how it is today. If you look back at the things that allowed you to understand what was possible, were there any forks in the road where it went either a different way than you thought it was going to go or had a potential to do something better than it did. I put out a thing called no world order. They came out in the late 80s, and it came out in a number of different formats. And it was the first example if you had the right device of actual interactive music, music that you as a listener could get some control over. I came up with the concept through a number of things. But it was not driven at first by the technology. It was driven by the realization that, first of all, music is ultimately going to be repeated. The music is too limited a language that for us to be completely original all the time. So it's just bound to be repeated. The audience no longer is attached to a particular form of and there were two phenomenon that caused me to realize that. One was, Frankie goes to Hollywood, relax. It didn't happen in this country. It never became like the giant hit in this country that it was, for instance, in England. But suddenly, innovation had moved back to England and Europe and stuff. It's particular point in the mid to late 80s. And they released a new version of relax like every two weeks. A new remix of relax every two weeks, and everyone they released would go to the top of the charts. And I suddenly realized now the audience is accepting the mutability of music that it doesn't have to be this way in that sacred and you know it can't be any other way. Now that we realize this, how can we accelerate this process? How can we actually define it and make tools to do it and put them in people's hands? And that's when I came up with the idea of an album that didn't have a specific running order. And that was no world order. I required a certain technology for it to be ultimately realized, but also it could be realized in non interactive technologies, but in a number of ways. But I wrote the songs and with a certain discipline. There had to be a clean break every four to 8 bars, or maybe every two bars, but there had to be clean breaks in the music everywhere, you know. So there was not a lot of songs with like syncopation with a lot of beats, you know, a lot of it's got lots of down beats and stuff like that. And then essentially record like you usually would, but in the compositional part, you make sure you've got these brakes. Then come up with the technology by which you can string them together in real time. And found Philip CDI had just come out and the technology was in it to enable to do that. So I got together with a programmer that I was working with and we came up with the no world order concept. The whole engine that ran it that allowed people to essentially go in and specify how they'd like to experience the music. And even like stop and loop on one piece of the music and change the parameters and that one piece of music. So say, I never did understand what the words were there. Let's take out some of the instruments. And so it allowed you to experience it in that way. It allowed you to utilize it or filter it so that let's say you want to use it for your aerobics. You said it so it never goes below a certain tempo. So you ask me about a fork in the road. Yes. After I did this, I got approached by a Time Warner cable network, which was doing an interactive TV experiment on Orlando, Florida, and a neighborhood, but they had fiber optic to the curb and the entire optic neighborhood, which is not unusual anymore, but in those days big deal in the neighborhood had a prototype set top box that was supposed to be interactive box. And since they were still prototyping the box, everyone got an SGI indigo computer. And if you're not into computer graphs you may not know what that is, but it's about the size of a carry on suitcase. And they're trying to figure out, okay, what kind of services do people want? Pre Internet. This is pre Internet. No, people don't have Internet in their homes yet. So they figure, okay, we'll develop a pizza pie out application. You know, you can go on your television, pick out your toppings, you know, and a piece of be delivered with your topping. But they had reasonable query. What kind of interactive music services would people like in their homes? So they hired me to come up with a prototype so that they could make it part of this experiment. So we came up with an outline for an impossible technological solution for it. But of course, you can't do it unless you got some music on servers. So we went to what was then the 5 majors. So we set up meaningful special products, divisions of the labels. And we went in and say, we're just experimenting here. We want to see what kind of demand there is. So what you got to do is you got to put some music that people would be interested in. Some name artists or something artists of some kind and put their music on a server so that we can connect to it and deliver it to this particular audience, this experimental audience. Not a single label would hear of it. They say no, we don't. Don't talk about this. Two years later, napster. Later. So I had gone in with the hope that somehow the labels would see the light and ease everything into this. New area instead of it just collapsing into chaos, which is essentially what is done and are only now figuring out how do we recover from this. What is the role of the record label now in all of this? Given that artists can do everything themselves. The thing that surprised me about the streaming revolution when it happened. I was really excited about it. And I just imagine as a real fanatical fan of music and going to a record store every day and walking around the record stores and just wanting to hear everything, the idea of living in the record store, where everything was always available on demand when you want it. Seemed like just the greatest thing that could ever happen. And I thought I would want a DJ all day and what I've come to learn now that it's here is that actually I really like being DJ too. And I spend much more time listening to curated music than picking what I want to listen to. I like the surprise of what comes next. You already know what you want to listen to. Yeah. So things that you didn't know were there that you didn't know you wanted to listen to, you know? And yeah, those are the things that I try and find if I'm doing any research for where to move my own music. Well, thank you for doing this. Oh, well done. Okay. Cool. Thanks Tod runner grin for chatting with Rick about his past and present work. You can check out his new song with sparks called your Fandango, along with all of our favorite runners songs at broken record podcast dot com. Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel at YouTube dot com slash broken record podcast. We can find all of our new episodes. You can follow us on Twitter at broken record, broken record is produced help from Leah rose, Jason gambrel, pantala day, Eric Sandler, and Jennifer Sanchez. With engineering help from Nick chaffee. Our executive producer is Neil Lebel. Broken record is a production of pushkin industries, and if you like this show, please remember to share rate and review us on your podcast app. Our theme musics by Kenny beats, I'm Justin Richmond..

Bruce Springsteen Paul fishing Albert Grossman Roy bitten Simon steinman Max Weinberg Ian hunter Epic Records Philip CDI Warner Brothers Springsteen Time Warner cable network England Frankie Cleveland Hollywood SGI Europe Orlando
"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

07:40 min | 8 months ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

"Be the most successful record they ever released. So, wow, that's amazing. Who would have been your contemporaries at that point in time? This was late 1966 early 1967. What would be on the radio at that time? Well, if you wanted to know it would be on the radio, you listen to my album faithful, the first side because what I tried to do on that was that record I did in 1976. Ten years after I first got into the so called music business, and it was all covers, and I said, I want people to remember what it was like listening to the radio in 19 66. There was Yardbirds happening ten years time ago. Bob Dylan mostly you go your way and I go mine. Rain, the beetles. Good vibrations, Beach Boys. I just did dead on covers of all those songs. I have 6 was 9. Jimi Hendrix, you know. That was just like, to me, the golden age of radio. What's happening in music is just more than anybody can keep up with. And so suddenly the cuffs are off for DJs. They can play anything they want. Because nobody can figure it out anyway. You know, how it all goes together. And suddenly radio was such an exciting thing to listen to, because you'd hear like a rock made Beatles song, then you hear Judy Collins after that. Then you might hear Bill Evans after that. They would just, it was wide open. You know, it was just terrific. It was the inception of what they call album oriented radio and when people started playing not the singles, but they cut from the albums as well. That has all gone away and with it, that sort of monolithic view of what audiences want to hear. And it's how I do research for records. I can't listen to radio. I'm afraid I'll hear something. I don't want to hear. It's stuck in there. So instead, I go to YouTube. You know, I asked all this one of my kids. What should I listen to? Yeah. And it'll give me maybe a couple of names and I'll go to YouTube. I'll look it up. And then on the sidebar, and then maybe I'll start clicking the sidebar and say, oh, who's that? And so just by following these threads, is how I learn about what's happening in music. And there's a lot of music out there that you don't hear about unless you go looking for it. But that's different from an era when that music would never get made. Well, that music would never get recorded in the first place. So to me, this is in some sense as a golden age of music in that whatever you can imagine there is it's out there. And if it isn't out there and you can imagine how to make it, then you can put it out there. The entry level is really low now. The entry level is freaking zero. Put it at that way. You can get from 99 cents an app on your phone. That's got four tracks of recording on it. And another app that will allow you to post it to wherever you want it. And another app that will allow you to tell all your Friends where it is and how to find it. Yeah, there's really no excuse if you want to get into the so called music business. But in the end, you won't make any money until you go out and start playing it. In front of people. Sometimes we'll hear something and it looked resonate with us and we won't know why. Do you know what I'm saying? It's like sometimes like can't put your finger on why something's good. Yeah, well, it doesn't even why it's good. It's why it sticks. Because sometimes it's something you want out of your head. That's why I hit the mute button any time I see Taylor Swift. I'm going to hit that mute button right now. The same thing goes for like when Donald Trump comes on the TV, though, I don't want any of that in my head. I hit the mute plan. Do you like curate stuff that comes in? I kind of do. Yeah, there are things that you latch on to if you think that you could learn something from it. Sometimes they are really illogical things, but every once in a while you hear a song and you realize that that was the perfect pop song. We'll be right back with more from Todd Rundgren after this break. We're back with the rest of Rick's conversation with Todd Rundgren. Have you always made music either a commercial thing or an art project? Do you know what I'm saying? Like, when you're starting a project, you decide, okay, this one is for me and it's going to be Artie or this one's going to be. I'm going to try to get something on the radio and I'm going to go in that direction. Well, I tend to think that way when I'm producing for other people. I want to understand what their goals are so that I can try and guide things in that direction, and it isn't always necessarily commercial success. It's like when I did grand funk railroad, they wanted critical. A claim, you know, because the critics just hated them. What stage were they at in their career when you came to work with them? Well, they were a jam band, you know, essentially a jam band. They were like, we're like cream. You know, we're a trio based guitar and drums, and we go out. And we have flimsy little song structures, and then we jam a lot. And their albums were kind of the same way. They would just be kind of flabby long songs. Occasionally something concise and song writerly. Their issue was that their manager, Terry knight, from Terry and the pack, I don't know if she remembered them, but as one of these Michigan bans from the scene that produced Bob Seger and Ted nugent, that produced grand funk railroad as well. Their manager was Terry knight, and he was great from the standpoint of hyping the bands. Everybody knew who grand funk railroad was, he bought the biggest billboard that had ever been purchased on Broadway in Times Square. This was a big thing that only made their reputation more controversial because music critics said, what are they doing up there? They're not the freaking beetles, you know? They're just a jam band. And they made the decision at a certain point to break away from Terry knight. The other thing Terry and I did was produce their records, and he was a terrible record producer. You know, they sounded bad. And he didn't editorial lies anything. You know, I just let them jam away. So they had kind of the success and an audience, and the one thing they didn't have was credibility. That's one reason why they came to me because my reputation at that point was taking projects that had like, for instance, bad finger, where they were on their third try at making a record. If it required me to just go in and completely take over the process, I would do that, but I figured I'm not going to be the third producer to fail to get an album out of badfinger. So for better or worse, they got what they needed out of it. They got a record that had two hit singles off of it and they got the success out of it. They fired me after the next record never had another hit. So the thing with Gran was, we, you know, we need credibility somehow. We need somebody who knows how to make records to get involved in our next record, and they had everything all planned out beforehand. They had already written where an American band, because they knew, okay, we need a single. And I helped them arrange it. So they just sounded more singly, so it sounded less like a jam band, more like a single. They had hired a keyboard player made their sound a little bit bigger and more well rounded. But I remember he was very indignant about the fact that I made him do this. Think we're in our he's like, wait a minute. I'm a keyboard. Anybody can do that, you know? That's as much what makes it a hit record is.

Terry knight Todd Rundgren Judy Collins YouTube Bill Evans Jimi Hendrix Bob Dylan Donald Trump Taylor Swift Artie Terry Bob Seger Rick Ted nugent Times Square Michigan
"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

08:25 min | 8 months ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

"A little bit about what it was like to be in the studio with the band at that time. I understand that there were internal problems going on. Well, we weren't in the studio. We recorded most all of the album, the basic tracks. We recorded on the stage of the Woodstock theater, was at by their choice. There's no bears with studios yet. And it was somewhat by their choice because they didn't want to record in a New York studio. I guess that's where they had done. I don't know what studio say it used before, but there were no studios comparable in Woodstock in the Woodstock area. So, but the studio was under construction. It was not built yet, not fully built yet. But they had bought a remote truck, and so we took all of the equipment out of the remote truck and put it in the prop tent behind the Woodstock theaters. There's an outdoor theater. A summer stock theater. It was indoors, but not heated. Or anything like that. So it would be sweltering on the daytime and the freezing cold at night. And the sessions were just kind of had something of a stream of consciousness quality about them, with the songs written before. The songs are written and rehearsed before the sessions. You know, I had worked on Jesse Winchester record and various people had made contributions to that, but it wasn't like the whole band doing ban material. Anything like that. They were kind of subjugated to whatever was good for Jesse Winchester. But you know, they are very different guys and you know they were 5 very different eyes and each with a certain kind of personality. Robbie was squeaky clean quite obviously in charge of everything, running running the show, writing everything. Sober as a monk, you know, that kind of thing. There was Garth, Garth, never, as far as I know. Did any kind of drugs he was not I don't think I ever saw him drinking anything. Mcarthur had narcolepsy. You know, he would just drop off in the middle of the session. And I didn't know this. Nobody told me this, you know? So kind of like, what's going on here? You know, make them wisecracks, and they're getting angry with me because I don't know that he has narcolepsy. Rick was pretty dependable, Rick, during the sessions, with the pretty dependable but Rick had his own issues that might take over another context and ultimately did. Richard had a drinking issue and I don't think it affected too much the session, but I say that the session would be hours and hours of getting ready and then maybe two takes. And then a bunch of noodling around. And then maybe another two takes. I'm not sure that any song went beyond 8 takes. Just because the amount of fuzzing around that went on in between takes of like getting in the mood to do another take. Which is not that unusual. I mean, a lot of bands are like that. You know, I remember going to a Rolling Stones rehearsal, which they call at around midnight and nobody makes a sound till 4 a.m.. So not that unusual, but sometimes it would be like okay, we're an hour into the session and Richard hasn't shown up yet. What do you think's going on? Finally, we got a call. Somebody found Richard with his car nose down in a culvert. And he's been there all night. Okay. We're ready to do a take. We leave on was here, but where's Levi? We can't finally spend an hour looking for Lee on. Leave on his passed out under a pile of curtains because he has, you know, done a little bit too much of something during the session, you know? And just fell right asleep. So it was, you know, a kind of a thing like a celestial alignment. You know, you have to get all the planets to line up. For everything to come together. And that for me, young whippersnapper, who ultimately like makes records in a matter of days, not weeks and months. You know, it was a bit much for me. And every once in a while I had to be slapped down. How long did the recording take? Tracking? Well, there were the sessions which I don't think we took much more than two weeks. To do the basic Sessions, but that wasn't the end of it. We had one or two other songs to do, which we had to do in a studio in New York because they had finally finished the control room of studio B at bearsville and their removing all the equipment into there. So we did like WS Walcott medicine show. I think it was an accession in New York City, and those sessions turned out to be actually very productive. You know, because people weren't at home. They were away from home. They were in New York City. Sometimes in order to get that authentically. Old timey sound they would, well, for instance, I played the baritone horn on that song, and I had never played baritone horn in my life. All I had to do was squeak out enough notes, you know, to make it sound like an authentic rinky dinky weird band kind of thing. It was my lack of experience with the instrument that was necessary for it to sound authentic. And so there'd be moments of that. You know, where it's like, if you do it too well, it doesn't work. You know, it has to have this sort of authentically kind of creaky, slightly sloppy aspect about it. Then there was the whole mixing episode with Glynn doing some and then me doing some and ultimately I came back with the mixes, his and mine. And they weren't fully satisfied with either. So we started all over again. And studio B, the brand new studio B, which nobody really knew what it sounded like, but we put our faith in John stork and then it was just the worst kind of experience for me. Which I have which I have resolved ever since. You know, in any sort of production, don't have the whole band in the room when you're building a mix. Because people only hear themselves. You know, the drummer only hears the drums, the guitar for only here's the guitar. You know, especially when you're building a mix. And one of the worst was when I was mixing the New York dolls first album. It was compounded by the fact that they were in a hurry because they had to go to a gig, but it was one of these things where they just like, nobody hears the whole mix. They only hear themselves. Everybody wants to be louder. And all the faders are pinned at the top. And you have to start all over again, you know. And so my modus operandi now is like go away. Yes. I will build a mix. Then you come back and tell me what you want different about it. You know? But don't allow them there for the process. Unfortunately, they'd be there for the whole mix, and it would just take forever, you know. And everyone would have an opinion, you know? And it wouldn't make it better. And it wouldn't necessarily make it better now. We might take weeks. And often that kind of like dwelling on it makes it worse. Which is why Andy partridge hated XTC when it was first completed. Because I wouldn't allow that. I wouldn't allow that anal business to ruin the record. It was the first thing I did. I said, you're not listening to the mix. I'm going to build the mix. Then you can come over and listen to the mix. By the time I was done the third one, they said we're going home. Either because they hated that aspect of the process, even though they liked the mixes. Or close they trusted me. I didn't one or the other. But Andy was already determined to hate the record by the time he went home and made a point of telling everybody. How much he hated the record before it came out. And then it turned out to.

Jesse Winchester Woodstock theater Woodstock Rick Garth Richard New York WS Walcott Mcarthur Robbie New York City John stork Levi Lee Glynn Andy partridge Andy
"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

07:42 min | 8 months ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

"It as it was happening in real time. Recordings? Oh, you are. Oh, my God. You're really gonna do this? I don't know. I'm a science journalist, and I wanted to understand what happens to us on a biological level when our hearts break. The audiobook is my story of self discovery. It's filled with interviews with scientists. In fact, the brain region that becomes active when you've been dumped a link with pain also becomes active when you have tooth pain, conversations with my friends. Don't do it alone. And audio diaries from some vulnerable moments. Yeah, just the whole universe of dating is much more dramatic than being in a 20 year marriage. Together we'll explore why so much of the conventional wisdom about heartbreak is wrong. And put together a new way to understand and re stitch our breaking hearts. Heartbreak is available now directly at pushkin FM, audible, or wherever audiobooks are sold. We're back with Rick's conversation with Todd Rundgren. How did you connect with Albert Grossman? The choices that I made later in life were affected by what happened to me very early on when I formed my first band. I got out of high school and I got into a local blues band. Which made me something of a celebrity in downtown Philadelphia. So in that band decided that they wanted to be the Grateful Dead and go to the country and drop acid and that sort of thing. I said, okay, I'm done with that. I'm going to start my own band and I had enough of a name at that point that I could just steal people from any other band. And we had a Quartet called the Nas. We did cover songs like everybody did at first because I had yet to write any material. I started writing songs on the first song. I ever wrote was hollow at me. And I got whisked away from Philadelphia to New York. Our manager was originally a publicist, so he knew every one who edited the teen magazines. So before we were even signed, we were on the cover of 16 magazine, as some new discovery, we were experiencing it as if we had already done it. But we hadn't done anything yet. We hadn't even gotten signed yet, but our manager knew how to publicize it anytime there was a big event in New York City that everyone had to be at. He would get us invited and get us a limousine. And we would show up at that event and everyone would say who are those guys? And so eventually we got signed to a really big contract. That's amazing. Two albums later. Band is done. It's all done. And after that, I started to learn about what the engineer does because after mixing the second as record and having a free run of the console, I'm just starting to absorb all of the basic engineering concepts and after the secondary record, the band blew up, and I'm on the street. And the partner of the guy who managed the naz, about 6 months later finds me, spending my days doing lights in a discotheque, designing lights for a disk, doing nothing at all to do with music. Hanging out with clothiers in the west village. And he says, I'm working for Albert Grossman, and he's tasked me with lining new young talent. I saw how you worked on the last two records. We need someone to come in and modernize a lot of the old legacy artists. Because Albert roseland, he was no longer managing Bob Dylan, but that was how he got famous Bob Dylan and Peter Paul and Mary. He was managing James cotton and then eventually he did Janis Joplin. So he was like, you know, the world's most high powered manager at that point. One of the very first things they did was put me on a Jesse Winchester project. They asked me if I would engineer thinking that I could more experience as an engineer than I actually had. But they liked what I did. I was really quick, I had learned a lot of things about Mike placement during the second as album. And so after that was done, they asked me to engineer stage fright, which was the first really big high profile cake that I had. And there were no producers on stage Friday. It was like anybody who showed up was a producer. Is that the band's third album? It was the third one. Yeah, there was big pink and then there was the brown one that had cripple creek on it. And then there was stage fright. And that was a real trial by fire. Not simply because it was the first major product that I did, but the band was in this state of I don't know whether the characterized it is turmoil, but were they still working with bob at the time or no more? They weren't working with bob now. But they were issues that were starting a fester. Some of them had to do with the band's sudden success. This is a bunch of musicians who, for years and years and years, all they were was to back up and for Ronnie hawks a Canadian who rarely toured in the United States and then suddenly they're thrust into the spotlight by playing with Bob Dylan, and then their first album comes out, and it's a big phenomenon. Second album comes out. By the time stage write comes out, they're probably the biggest band in the world at this point. And maybe most influential as well as popular. Yeah, because it's like Elton John puts out a song called Levi know how obvious can that be? And it sounds just, you know, it's got all of those sort of earmarks of what the band is essentially. I'd like to say fabricating because you listen to the band's record and you think all these guys are all from Arkansas. No, they're all from Canada. Arkansas is leave on. And everything else is fabricated. You know, Robbie, who's writing all the material, is essentially pretending to be levon. In some ways, that might even make it better. You know, sometimes sometimes the distance, the fantasy makes it more thrilling for the rider. They're not just being themselves. An idealized version of this thing. But here's the reason why the band is in turmoil, because Robbie's writing all the material, and not sharing the publishing with anyone else in the band, and they're getting their starting to realize this by the third album. They haven't put out albums of their own before, so they don't know what publishing is. Then it gets a third album. They realize that he's become a millionaire. And they're not sharing in any of that. Because not only are songs appearing on their records, people are covering the songs, and having hit records with those songs. And so turmoil is starting to happen in the band. There's that. There's also the fact that after years and years and years had just been a band out of the limelight and doing this, suddenly these guys are in the limelight publishing aside that more money than they have ever had before. And making some of the guys a little crazy. They are doing things that they never did before. They are taking drugs and quantities that they've never had available before, and drinking more than they ever had before, and that sort of thing. And so getting through the record was something of an exercise as well because they're all dealing with critical personal issues while the whole record is going on. Then the complicated things even further, they have promised Glynn Johns that he will have a chance to make the record. So..

Albert Grossman Bob Dylan Philadelphia Albert roseland Todd Rundgren Jesse Winchester James cotton Ronnie hawks Peter Paul west village Rick Janis Joplin New York City bob New York Arkansas Robbie Mary Mike Elton John
"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

07:57 min | 8 months ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

"That. What do you think the ideas come from? Well, sometimes they just come from the process, like the most financially rewarding song I ever recorded with spaying the drum all day. But that was a song I dreamed because I was in the middle of making a record. When it was time to make I would go back to my house and like hill, where I'd be completely alone with no distractions, and two weeks later, I'd have a record, you know, because you remove all the distractions and suddenly you're thinking about music all the time and the process just starts to set in. My brain starts writing songs when I'm asleep. But it doesn't write the songs that I would write if I was conscious. I would never have thought of let alone written a song so dumb as buying a drum all day. In that sense it was a gift from my subconscious saying, you won't understand why you're doing this now. But years from now, you will understand why you're doing this. Years from now is when we started getting carnival cruise line deals. How's your relationship to music changed over the course of your life? Everybody's relationship to music has changed, you know, mind story is not any different than anyone else's. It's just, I had the advantage of seeing it coming in the way that many artists didn't because of my other interests. My interest in computer technology and media in general and I sort of knew that at one point, music was no longer going to be a commodity. That it was going to go back to being a service because it always was a service. And that we went through this entire illusory period when we figured out how to capture sound. We started selling the artifacts that held the sound on them, and sorry to think that was music. Music is measured by the number of these things that you sell. But for the entire history of music up until that point, the only way you got paid is a musician. You perform. Unless you have the talent of a transcriptionist. A lot of the famous composers actually didn't make money off of writing the music they made. They made money off of writing it down. Wow. Making copies of it. This is the roots of music publishing. All of our recorded music publishing paradigms came from printed music. And before there was printed music, because there were not always printers to print the music there were people who manually transcribe the music and that was how they made a living, and then they wrote symphonies. Unless your vinyl freak or something, you don't think about music as this thing anymore. You don't even think about albums anymore. You just think about songs, and playlists, and podcasts and that sort of thing. What we call the quality time listening experience is no longer a part of the average person's life. When I was growing up there was no such thing as portable music. There was the music that you heard on the radio, but the DJ decided what that was. If you wanted a personal listening experience, you had to go home. Sit in the sweet spot. And once you made the trouble for that, well, The Beatles just released revolver, locked the door, unplug the phone, do not interrupt me. I'm going to sit here and I'm going to listen to it. Probably three times in a row. The Sony Walkman essentially blew all that away because now the music becomes the soundtrack to your life, and you have the option of deciding what it is wherever you happen to be. And while it now services you and all of these other ways that it didn't before, like when your jogging or when you're in the subway reading your newspaper and stuff like that, you're not in the music anymore. Don't pretend you're listening to the music and the way you would if you like shut down all your other senses. A little bit of a side track but it's based on what you just said and I'm just picturing you as a kid and one of The Beatles albums comes out. It's a big deal and the experience of listening to them those first times. Can you remember how different it was each time? I do remember that eventually you got to realize that The Beatles were an evolutionary phenomenon that it wasn't going to be loved me to for ten years or something like that. And I think that started to dawn on me at least around Rubber Soul, because then they started incorporating other instruments, but more than just other instruments other sorts of moods and textures. It was their most acoustic record up until that point, and yet it didn't flag in terms of the song writing. The songwriting was evolving, and getting into areas that weren't just about relationships with girls. And things like that. Yeah, you realize that you could grow to expect that there would be something different every record. Did they ever disappoint you? There are always little disappointments. They're always throwaway songs, and I'm pretty sure the beetles knew they were throw away songs in their catalogs. I know that when The Beatles first came out, I had to know every song. I had to know the guitar solo to every song. But I did not get sergeant pepper when it first came out. Did it come around for you eventually or no? Not in the way that most people did because one of the reasons why it didn't get it was I was like squeaky clean. Didn't take any drugs of any kind and drink and the word was that you had to be on acid to fully appreciate this record. I said, well, then I guess I'm just not getting this record because I'm not going to take the acid to appreciate the record. If I can't appreciate the record without the acid, you know, then there must be something wrong with the record. Later I actually got into it more for the sound of it. Because it was a different sound than their previous records. The previous records all mostly were pretty dry and they didn't use a lot of ambiance or anything like that. Certainly didn't use a full symphony orchestra or anything. And so it was more the sound and a certain way that the voices were placed that gave them that separation that your psychedelic mind would have given it. In other words, I think The Beatles were influencing George Martin, in some ways, in terms of how they wanted the record to sound. We'll be back after this quick break with more from Todd Rundgren. Brought to you by discover. When you have a simple question about your credit card, getting an answer should be simple, right? But then you call your credit card company and you can't reach a real person. How can I assist you speak with a representative? I'm sorry. We don't have live representatives. What? Connect to a representative. Did you say representative? Yes. I'm sorry. There are no representatives available. How can I help? I discover, they believe managing your credit card should be uncomplicated. That's why when you call discover with a question about your credit card, discover gives you the option to speak with a real person based in the U.S., day or night, 24/7. They also give you the option to find help by messaging them through the website or the mobile app. Because having the option to connect with a real-life person beats dealing with the recorded message any day of the week. That's just common sense. And that discover, they think there needs to be a lot more of that. So go ahead and give them a call. Send them a message online or connect with them on the app. They look forward to speaking with you. Live. Learn more I discover dot com. Hi, I'm Florence Williams, author of the nature fix. My new audiobook, heartbreak, tells the story of my journey out of divorce and loss. I recorded a lot of.

The Beatles Sony George Martin Todd Rundgren U.S. Florence Williams
"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

06:38 min | 8 months ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

"Here's Rick Rubin in Tod run grain. I'm in the middle of doing another collab record. So just in the last two weeks, I got stuff from sparks. Oh cool, Adrian blue. Great. This new band that I've done a little work with called the lemon twigs. Then folds sent me like ten things and I got a pick one to focus on. How long have you been doing collaborations like this? Well, my last album was pretty much was mostly all collaboration. Some songs by myself, but I made a conscious decision because I've been making all my records out here. I may come by myself. In my own echo chamber, so I thought him get some more influencing here, do some audience expansion. Does it always start by them sending you something? It was all different beliefs the last time it was different. Different methods. Like for instance, Robin, I thought, you know, maybe I can get Robin to do this song. I think she writes, but I just center the song said you're interested and she said, yeah, I like the song. I'll do the song. So in that particular instance, it was simply like I did the whole recording, and she did the vocals on it. And there were ones in which somebody would send me something like Joe Walsh sent me a track that it's almost always like something that they were working on that went more abundant, you know, so you get excited at the beginning and then somewhere in the middle of the process. You kind of need to move on to something else or you lose interest in it. So a lot of people have these half finished things lying around, and those are actually the most fun for me, because it's their idea, but it's still room for me to do something with it. So it's not completely finished. Even that can take different sort of turns like Ben folds sent me about a dozen versions of a song that he does live which turns out to be different every single night is called like rocked as bitch or something like that. It just turned out to be a gag that he does on all of his shows and then he makes a song up on the spot. But somewhere and they say we're going to rock this bitch in Norfolk and it's something like that. So he said, I've got to do is find one, get rid of The Rock this bitch part. Figure out something else, what it's about and we'll have a song somehow. But it's not the same as doing your own record because I have control over the timeline when you start involving other artists. It's harder to make demands and say finish this now because my record label wants to release a certain artist or first of all willing to collaborate and then sometimes there are conflicting schedules like I think I'm doing something with Thomas Dole being before he couldn't do it because he was too busy doing something else, but now he's got a window, so he didn't do anything for the first record, but we make it something done for this one. That's actually an interesting idea instead of them always being different artists really having a distant band. You and one other artist. Yeah, it's hard to find artists that are fully comfortable with this process. Even a lot of the people that I assume, you know, have the technical wherewithal to do things like runoff stems and stuff like that. You often find that they depend on an engineer to do to keep track of where stuff is and to run stuff off. That's an extra layer that you have to go through. So ideally you find an artist who is as experienced with the stuff as you are and just like take what you give them, turn it around, send it back in that sense I can clear up on any issues or my end by myself because I can engineer. But maybe there's someone you can cast in that role who you really like. You know, someone whose music you love would feel like fun to do that all. Well, it's funny. There's a lot of music out there, like for instance, Trent reznor on the last record. He sent me a whole album's worth of stuff because he and Atticus Ross do a lot of film and TV. Soundtrack work, and so they just archive stuff that come up with idea something that would be a mood for a film and then they archive it. So when I asked them if he had anything he sent me like almost two dozen of these various themes, you know and said, pick one. None of them had any lyrics or anything on them. So yeah, it's funny. The last record there was only one what you would consider traditional collaboration. And that was just a coincidence. I was pretty much done the record and I had this one orphan track, and I didn't know what to do with it. I was just going to leave it. And Donald fagan was on the island and we were out at dinner and I said, oh, I got this orphan track. You know, about to deliver my records. You want to listen to it. He said, sure. And I thought it was a steely Danish kind of thing anyway, a little bit jazzy. So I sent it to him and the next day he starts sending back titles. You know, song titles. Some of them are just like a little blue and ridiculous when we sent back one said tinfoil hat. And then we suddenly knew that's what we have to do. I had the track pretty much all recorded, but we wrote the song together in the way that you would think Paul McCartney and John Lennon would moon, spoon. So that was the only time that I was physically in the same place as my collaborator. Which was fun. But I've had episodes where I was supposed to like write with someone. And I'm not usually not very good at just, you know, sitting down and writing with someone. I had known Donald for a long time, so I think we were a little bit more simpatico than if I was meeting someone for the first time and supposed to write with them. But I remember an episode with like Rick Springfield, who came to my house when I was living in sausalito, wanting to write something. And all we did was just kind of sit there and look at each other. Because for me, in some ways, writing is just a very personal thing. I usually try and find solitude when I have to write so that I'm not distracted by anything, and I can eventually hear what I'm thinking in the back of my head. Making music is the way I learn about myself and make changes in myself because I objective eyes ideas, and once they're out there, you can say, oh, that was stupid. Or okay, that's not so bad, stick with.

Adrian blue Robin Rick Rubin Thomas Dole Joe Walsh Ben folds Norfolk Donald fagan Atticus Ross Trent reznor Paul McCartney John Lennon Rick Springfield Donald sausalito
"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

02:18 min | 8 months ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on Broken Record

"Pushkin. I discover, they believe managing your credit card should be uncomplicated. That's why we discover, card holders can get their questions answered by a real person based in the U.S. day or night, 24/7. They can also get help by using the discover app. Or messaging them on the website. Because having the option to connect with a real-life person beats dealing with a recorded message any day of the week. That's just common sense. So go ahead and give them a call. Send them a message online, or connect with them on the app. They look for speaking with you. Live. Discover. Learn more discover dot com. This episode is brought to you by royal Caribbean. An award winning global cruise line. The vacation is what you make. So are you ready to make the most of it?.

LL Cool J, Carole King, Tina Tuner inducted into Rock Hall

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 11 months ago

LL Cool J, Carole King, Tina Tuner inducted into Rock Hall

"The rock and roll hall of fame has inducted and eclectic class of musicians for twenty twenty one for a show that will be broadcast on HBO on November twentieth marches are a letter with the latest it's Eminem performing with LL cool J. for L. L.'s induction into the rock call Todd Rundgren was a no show for his well Tina Turner accepted by video noting that if she's still getting the words of the age of eighty one she must be doing something right fighters performed with Paul McCartney for their induction Carole King gets in for a second time JZ is in the first time on the ballot Belinda Carlisle and Gina Schock agogo say they're amazed they were ever considered we had no idea what you're doing when we started in nineteen seventy eight so and here we are I don't know what we don't know

Roll Hall Of Fame Ll Cool J. L. L. Todd Rundgren HBO Eminem Tina Turner Gina Schock Agogo Carole King Paul Mccartney Belinda Carlisle
 Jay-Z, Foo Fighters welcomed into Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Jay-Z, Foo Fighters welcomed into Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

"The rock and roll hall of fame will welcome a new class of inductees on Saturday I marches are a letter with a preview Todd Rundgren is not expected to attend his induction into the rock and roll hall of fame in Cleveland he will play a concert in Cincinnati that night the other inductees in the performers category are Tina Turner Carole King the go go's JZ and foo fighters on for Charley Patton and Gil Scott heron will be inducted as early influencers LL cool J. Billy Preston and Randi Rhodes will be inducted for musical excellence the ceremony will be taped and shown on HBO on November

Roll Hall Of Fame Todd Rundgren Gil Scott Heron Carole King Tina Turner Cleveland Charley Patton Cincinnati J. Billy Preston Randi Rhodes HBO
McCartney, Swift to induct new members into rock hall

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

McCartney, Swift to induct new members into rock hall

"The rock and roll hall of fame has announced some of the details on the induction ceremony in Cleveland on October thirtieth our margins are a letter with the latest Angela Bassett simply Tina Turner in the film what's love got to do with it will give the speech inducting Turner into the rock hall Paul McCartney will induct the foo fighters into the hall Taylor swift will honor Carole King well drew Barrymore will induct the go-go's Todd Rundgren and JZ also will be inducted along with craftwork Charley Patton Gil Scott heron LL cool J. Billy Preston and Randi Rhodes the rock call is not yet revealed who will induct those acts

Roll Hall Of Fame Angela Bassett Tina Turner Cleveland Paul Mccartney Carole King Turner Taylor Swift Drew Barrymore Todd Rundgren Gil Scott Charley Patton J. Billy Preston Randi Rhodes
"todd rundgren" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"But that was the last album we did on it. And and and then we went onto david like i said with with the five producers that we had before him we never had never been exposed to a guy who is so brilliant that he would not accept anything less than perfection and so we just worked and worked and worked and worked. We were so hard on that record. Everybody did and i think that's the best record we ever did. And i think you know with talk to you later and don't want to wait anymore and amnesia and attack of the fifty foot woman. I'll god it's so fun it's such it's so great to to To perform it. It's just really really fun. And is funnier pointed out david. Todd rundgren seems to be for. You guys seem to be more obvious choice. So it's interesting to hear because people you know a lot of people we talked to talk about. What a great producer he is. We known him on prairie plays in his band. Sometimes greg goes out with todd on tour and and so we've michelle gray tubes dancer. Mary todd rundgren. You know the the tour the to the one thousand nine hundred ninety six tour. The love bomb tour todd open for us. We went out and toured all over and todd him. Shell fell in love and he ended up marrying earn. So there's a there's a strong connection there and he's you know he's kind of on guard. He's kind of like us. He's constantly doing something different every album. He's got a new new new show in a minute the tiki lounge show or this just he. He's never satisfied. He constantly is changing. And that's really cool. I think it's kind of the love connection in tubes community because prairie also he married a restyled right. The singer prairie never did marry re styles. I don't think oh they were together for reuse our singer from the beginning until Until about nineteen eighty or seventy nine. I think the remote control to her was the last tour. She's just said. I can't do this anymore. I can't leave him the damn bus anymore and and they had been together at that point they had been together. Gosh fifteen years. Maybe i don't know yeah. And then she left the band and then and they stayed together for quite some time after that so you never replaced me as a for funeral. Well we not really We didn't replace. Well we had. We had michelle and cheryl and we had cynthia rhodes and they did some back. There were dancers and they did some background vocals but we never replaced her in terms of of her featured vocalists type person. Then after in the second incarnation of the tubes we had Another singer we had another couple of singers here and there and but they don't last film asked on the road. The road is hard. You know they don't. We had one girl that was so worried about somebody seger naked. Because we're trying to do. Quick changes in sometimes change booth is just like a little plastic shack and she got so upset so nobody cares. Okay just exchange. I don't. I'm not gonna look at you. Nobody's peeking around the corner. And you know you're gorgeous. So what do you care. And but no. She's now sorry work and so she quit moved zealand to new zealand. Why would you do that. there's nothing but sheep. They're going to that far away from the tube really is they're going to be any more acting in the future. We'll i hope so. I wanna do helton. Okay would you. You know anybody on broadway. I wanna play. The king of england are okay. I've got the song right here. Know you'll be back. I wanna do broadway so bad. I'm going to manifest this dream and imagination creates reality. that's the theme of completion backward principle. So but i've done. I've done a lot of you know. I belong to a theater company in gusta michigan. It's called the barn theatre. I'm a barney a number of hollywood actors who are also barney's judge jeff daniels. He one of the. I would think he's from michigan eastern theright. Jeff daniels actually. Yes jeff daniels has his own theatre in michigan and he has performed at our theater at the barn and the barney is a a quonset hut milk barn that was converted into a theatre. It's about a seven hundred fifty seater. Maybe and it's beautiful and it's just all prestige and it's all read like a barn and it says the barn and it's right outside of kalamazoo about five miles in a little town called augusta and augusta little. Oh no stop light. They don't even have stopped signs. It's so small and so i've been performing out there since. Gosh you're twenty years. I first time i did. I went there was ninety. Eight and i did rocky horror. I did franken furhter in rocky horror. And i've done that about a hundred times maybe and i i just i did Spam lot with his funny. I keep channeling tim curry. That's all right. That's a good from all he did. King arthur in spam a lot and i did king arthur and he did franken furhter rocky horror and i did the so anyway usually if i can break away in the summer i haven't it's been a couple of years has an open for a couple years off but i think the last time i was there it was seventeen maybe and we did spam lot. But you know it's like a. It's like a a month long commitment. We go out rehearse for two weeks and then two weeks of performances and Really it's really great. Kid who runs name is brendan rugazi. And his father started. Who was a hollywood actor and.

todd michelle gray Mary todd rundgren cynthia rhodes Todd rundgren david Jeff daniels amnesia greg michigan seger barney cheryl helton michelle barn theatre gusta augusta zealand
"todd rundgren" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

What Difference Does It Make

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on What Difference Does It Make

"Welcome back to the. What difference does it make podcast and our guest fee waybill when a band is playing live so many times it's like they're running on all cylinders and feels like that's probably what you guys were thinking at that time like this is we're playing great. Let's capture this in the studio and it just it didn't happen for you Yeah it just didn't didn't happen and then then we did remote control with todd rundgren and like i said todd was you know he just kind of off. It feels good great. That's you know. i do love prime time though. I think i still think that's a great song. You guys don't play that duet. We don't have any girl in the band anymore. Actually when we pl- we turned it into a punk song. Yeah wasn't two thousand eighteen. I think we went to england and we opened with the open for alice. Cooper in being you know wembley arena and big like twenty thousand seaters and and primetime was hit in england.

todd rundgren todd wembley arena england alice Cooper
"todd rundgren" Discussed on Relentless Geekery

Relentless Geekery

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on Relentless Geekery

"You kind of just listen for what is she interested in? What does she wish for? And then it's a delight to be able to say. Remember that thing said, like last November, I was listening and here it is, you know, that Cafe. So of course, my going first, then Colleen has the opportunity to like, well I can fill the table too, and maybe one extra to be up on you. And she may have been that way, but it's very funny. I tend to like, for instance, for her birthday. We, we saw a great concert with Joe Jackson and Todd Rundgren kind of more acoustic with full bands. You know, on solo, piano, solo guitar, and so forth. And we just loved it. And we've talked about that as being one of our favourite countries of all time. Well, just recently on the market came, a record that have been captured none of the show that we saw one of that tour. And so it was like, I know she's going to love this and you're like squirming with I get her birthday because and indeed we, she's listen to it, she loves it off. We're not forgotten. Like the opening band if you will was a string quartet called Ethel and that they did figure into kind of back up for some of the other things but it the cool recapture of that member. Why one point? I had seen the Rolling Stones in a bar in Chicago. No lie. A place called The Checkerboard Lounge after their concert. They came there because Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy about four. People were going to be there and they wanted to play with these Blues Legends. Oh my gosh, here. We are white Suburban punks, you know, getting into this, gets on the bad side of Chicago southside, like 70th Street. Nothing like that. Maybe somebody eight. Who knows why that's in there. I'm pretty sure it's seventy-eight. And so, we got in before the word got out and then they were charging $100 of the door. And the place is not that big. So, anyway, I had been telling the story for a long time of, I saw him to, you know, got my mojo working and red rooster, and like, of course, everybody gives you the look like, sure. You saw the film in the bus home. And then she got this video that proved this thing had happened and unfortunately it's like, you know, we were in the far-back, right? Looking out from the stage and whatever show they have of woke up with the stage and looking cases out of the audience, it didn't penetrate back to where we were kind of stuff but and so I loved that validation. If you will, I love being able to hear it again. But I know if I have talked about this before I was I could have sworn that, it was these guys did these songs and it was kind of in this order and I had like this photographic phone, no image in my mind, I was wrong but I wanted to stuff. It wasn't Buddy Guy. It was you know, Muddy Waters. It was I.

Checkerboard Lounge Todd Rundgren Joe Jackson Colleen Chicago Ethel Buddy Guy Rolling Stones Muddy Waters
Rock Hall (MM #3707)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Rock Hall (MM #3707)

"The Maison with Kevin Nathan yesterday. I was talking about how my wife was upset about the fact that this is us is ending, and we all have those weird things in life, we really care about. And I guess, you could say, I'm guilty of something, too, because they announced the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees this past week. And I'm not exactly excited the band. I wanted most Devo, one of my favorites didn't make the final round, Foo Fighters. Girl goes Jay-Z, Carole King, Todd. Rundgren Tina Turner all making it. Of course, everybody says Jay-Z is in Iraq, act, but we can argue about that till the cows come home. Neither was the Notorious BIG or even Whitney Houston, but what got me really incensed wage. Was that my favorite band of all times, Kraftwerk went in as an early influence, they were off the main performer about it for years. Never understood why they didn't go in when there's so many bands out there, claiming that they're an influence to them. But now they'll go in as early influence, to me, it's kind of a lesser extent, it's not quite the same thing. It's going in with an asterisk. Next to your name in a way, the Rock Hall upsets me again. As it does everybody, it's those silly things we care about and we don't know why wage

Carole King Kevin Nathan Todd Tina Turner Yesterday Iraq Foo Fighters Kraftwerk Jay-Z Rock Hall Whitney Houston Devo The Maison ONE Rundgren This Past Week Notorious Big Years Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Roll Hall Of Fame Rundgren Tina Turner JAY Houston
Rock Hall (MM #3707)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Rock Hall (MM #3707)

"The Maison with Kevin Nathan yesterday. I was talking about how my wife was upset about the fact that this is us is ending, and we all have those weird things in life, we really care about. And I guess, you could say, I'm guilty of something, too, because they announced the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees this past week. And I'm not exactly excited the band. I wanted most Devo, one of my favorites didn't make the final round, Foo Fighters. Girl goes Jay-Z, Carole King, Todd. Rundgren Tina Turner all making it. Of course, everybody says Jay-Z is in Iraq, act, but we can argue about that till the cows come home. Neither was the Notorious BIG or even Whitney Houston, but what got me really incensed wage. Was that my favorite band of all times, Kraftwerk went in as an early influence, they were off the main performer about it for years. Never understood why they didn't go in when there's so many bands out there, claiming that they're an influence to them. But now they'll go in as early influence, to me, it's kind of a lesser extent, it's not quite the same thing. It's going in with an asterisk. Next to your name in a way, the Rock Hall upsets me again. As it does everybody, it's those silly things we care about and we don't know why wage

Carole King Kevin Nathan Todd Tina Turner Yesterday Iraq Foo Fighters Kraftwerk Jay-Z Rock Hall Whitney Houston Devo The Maison ONE Rundgren This Past Week Notorious Big Years Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Roll Hall Of Fame Rundgren Tina Turner JAY Houston
Rock Hall (MM #3707)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Rock Hall (MM #3707)

"The Maison with Kevin Nathan yesterday. I was talking about how my wife was upset about the fact that this is us is ending, and we all have those weird things in life, we really care about. And I guess, you could say, I'm guilty of something, too, because they announced the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees this past week. And I'm not exactly excited the band. I wanted most Devo, one of my favorites didn't make the final round, Foo Fighters. Girl goes Jay-Z, Carole King, Todd. Rundgren Tina Turner all making it. Of course, everybody says Jay-Z is in Iraq, act, but we can argue about that till the cows come home. Neither was the Notorious BIG or even Whitney Houston, but what got me really incensed wage. Was that my favorite band of all times, Kraftwerk went in as an early influence, they were off the main performer about it for years. Never understood why they didn't go in when there's so many bands out there, claiming that they're an influence to them. But now they'll go in as early influence, to me, it's kind of a lesser extent, it's not quite the same thing. It's going in with an asterisk. Next to your name in a way, the Rock Hall upsets me again. As it does everybody, it's those silly things we care about and we don't know why wage

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Kevin Nathan Roll Hall Of Fame Rundgren Tina Turner JAY Carole King Todd Kraftwerk Iraq Houston Rock Hall
The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Has 6 New Inductees

AP News Radio

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Has 6 New Inductees

"The rock and roll hall of fame has announced its induction class for this year I marquees are letter with the latest the go-go's the foo fighters and cheesy make the wrong call their first time on the ballot Carole King Tina Turner and Todd Rundgren also will be inducted at a ceremony in Cleveland on October thirtieth LL cool J. Billy Preston and Randi Rhodes will be honored with musical excellence awards craftwork Gil Scott heron and Charley Patton will be honored as early influencers

Roll Hall Of Fame Carole King Tina Turner Todd Rundgren J. Billy Preston Randi Rhodes Cleveland Gil Scott Heron Charley Patton
Tina Turner, the Go-Go's, Jay-Z Lead Historically Diverse Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Class of 2021 Inductees

Tony and Dwight

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Tina Turner, the Go-Go's, Jay-Z Lead Historically Diverse Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Class of 2021 Inductees

"2021 class for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has been announced. Jay Z makes the Rock hall not a businessman. I'm a businessman. So the two groundbreaking women Tina Turner and Carole King, and it's It's the go, Go's made it. Hall says hi to Todd Rundgren. See and Foo fighters that Steve Case in

Roll Hall Of Fame Rock Hall Jay Z Tina Turner Carole King Todd Rundgren Hall Steve Case
"todd rundgren" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on KCRW

"Be joined by Todd Rundgren and the go Go's who have each been eligible for decades. 1990 Carole King was inducted as a songwriter but will now also be recognized for her recording career. Similarly, Tina Turner was inducted 30 years ago as part of Aiken, Tina Turner, and she now gets a solo induction is well. Rounding out this year's class is Foo Fighters led by Dave Groll. He was previously inducted as a member of Nirvana. This year ceremony takes place in October in Cleveland, the first time inductions are being held in person since 2019 for NPR news. I'm career Bhatia in Cleveland. I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR news in Washington this Wednesday You are listening to KCRW on Cherry Glaser get heavy here. With vaccinations increasing and the number of new Kobe case is falling across much of the U. S. The focus is shifting to life beyond lockdown. But there's also a growing consensus that the pandemic may not fully and for a while. So where does that leave all the pandemic relief programs you'll find out Come here. Looking for sunshine today after the morning burn off highs in the sixties along the coast seventy's a mid eighties in the Valley's pretty much the same Tomorrow should be cooler on.

Dave Groll Tina Turner Todd Rundgren Carole King Cleveland Dave Mattingly Washington October today 1990 30 years ago Cherry Glaser 2019 NPR Nirvana Aiken Foo Fighters U. S. this Wednesday Tomorrow
"todd rundgren" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Game. This is can't can't We still be friends? Great talk. Okay. Dion Warwick was not married. First back around. Yeah, I was married three times. Dickinson, Carole Bayer Sager and was calling while he's still married. Well way. Got some bad information on Dionne Warwick from somebody. Who's that, Rick? Good Ponzio be in the rock and roll walk. Think of cheesy this because which easy's doing, It's not rock and roll either. Then you're not cleaning the instruments up on the stage. It's like they think, like the anti tapes, but I think, Gary, we appreciate the call. This is the one this is it. This is the one I was thinking of. Oh, yeah, I think when we wait, this is it. What's the name of this? This is the song real man. This is it. This is my favorite runners on although I like a bunch of him. You heard this? Well, I can't tell you tell you This'll is Todd Rundgren to be so different from the last one? Although this something wait for the hooker Stephen Heard it singing falsetto here. Yeah, that's cool song. There's a really cool soft. Gotta Motown sound. Oh, yes, you e Think really Remember when you get to the chorus Which is just after this By deep baritone voice coming up, we're getting close. You do? Fine. There you go. Keep my self value inside. Oh, yeah. I've heard this many times. I'm like it. I really like it. Get about that's the one I was thinking of the whole different town. Alomar. So yeah, yeah. Great artists telling you, dude. I hope that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame doesn't listen to him on. I would hope they would put him in and celebrate Todd Rundgren. I would think they do this year is that dude's that dude's absolutely worthy. I could just sit here, play this and then say so long at noon, but I wanted John and Brookfield on camera news radio with Dave, Rick and Cathy. Morning, John. Good morning. Yeah, I am a huge Todd Rundgren.

Todd Rundgren Dion Warwick Carole Bayer Sager Rick John Stephen Alomar Gary Dickinson Dave
Jay-Z, Foo Fighters and The Go-Go's nominated for Rock Hall

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Jay-Z, Foo Fighters and The Go-Go's nominated for Rock Hall

"The rock and roll hall of fame has named sixteen acts being considered for induction this year I marquees are letter with the latest the go-go's Mary J. Blige Iron Maiden Dionne Warwick and Fela Kuti are first time nominees for the rock hall this year L. L. cool J. has been nominated for a sixth time the other nominees are foo fighters Jay Z. Tina Turner Kate bush devotional could come on the New York dolls reach against the machine Todd Rundgren and Carole King who is already in the rock call for song writing fans can vote for up to five nominees per day until April thirtieth the inductees will be revealed in may the inductions will be in Cleveland in the fall

Roll Hall Of Fame L. L. Cool J. Jay Z. Tina Turner Kate Bush Dionne Warwick Fela Kuti Mary J. Blige Rock Hall Todd Rundgren Carole King New York Cleveland
"todd rundgren" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"That one was really good was okay. Who's that other guy? Cried Todd Rundgren. Yeah, Yeah. Todd Rundgren. Isn't that his name, But there's a Todd Rundgren. Yeah. Is that whose name Todd Rundgren Tze, the guy who was the other lead singer. Any wronger has never been a lead singer of Inhaling Are You sure 100 positive. I know the lead singers of Ah, I think new Know Betancourt was one of them. But I don't know. Todd Rundgren has never been a Van Halen. Who is he? He's a He's got a helo. It's me song that you'd recognize it, Lou. It's me. I think we used it in the Jacob Jukebox. Jeff who's the other Who's the other Van Halen? ISS? It's David Lee Roth. And then there were Sammy Hagar. And then there was what Gary Sharon from all I think. Yeah, I must be thinking of Gary's. From least I don't need a Bengal by row. Nailed it. It's It's early man. Gotta live alone. Who are you? George. Hi, George. What's going on. You tell me big guy You called. I like it better if you all blue conked together like a choir of the final. Yeah, That's a pretty good idea. A really good idea. I need to get my hands on a conk. You don't run into a lot these days, especially in the cove. It era. I think the conch sales have been hit the hardest of all the molluscs. Our Khan smallest. You just gotta run. He's I mean that that served us the best way to do it. You get your point out. We enjoyed it and then get out before it could go wrong. I hope I got that right by the way. Hope the conch is a mollusc. I'm looking up. Whether it's a conch is a sea snail. And it is, um, Alaska in the filing division, so it's not a crustacean. You know, you gotta live alone. Who are you? When something new every day? Crustaceans or crabs and on And what else? What, Mr Crawfish man like that You like crawfish water? I I do it bugs, I I order them like if I'm gonna place, one of these crab place is going to be popping up everywhere. If I'm if I'm there, I will get I will get to cry in my in my boil My dad when he was a software consultant would have gigs where you have to stay someplace for, like a month sometimes too much. So he was two months in Orleans, and when he came back, he brought these garbage bags full of season crawfish, and I remember those things. It feels like those things sat around for years. They didn't I know, but it just feels like for days, if not weeks after that. Any time you want to snack my mom would like, eat some of the crawfish. So you lead them. Yeah, but I won't. I don't think I've had three since. I mean, I'm not like a crawfish at you, faII or it's in something. But I haven't sucked the head and squeezed the tail since I was a little kid, And I blamed my mom and dad for that. I love you, Mom and Dad. Don't get me wrong. But that was that was too much cross for anyone, kid. Well, what I mean, really, when you look at it when you pull the little tail, and it looks like a little baby lobster tail, baby, a little baby baby baby lobster, and then you gotta suck those tiny, tiny tiny Is in the inner city. That's fine. Is it fun? Well, I mean, it's speculated that to you. Yeah, actually, I would love that to Shea. Yeah, but like over here at this, Mr and Mrs Crabb, which I like their seasoning is so strong and so good that when you suck that head you're really just getting like Season, he goodness, but it sees any goodness of brains and stuff's fine innards. And what hope thinking that Well, what's the difference between your okay? You eat? No. You eat a steak, and you're like, Oh, you're eating the thigh of a cast different the thighs differently in the brain of a rat, really freeing organs. I mean, what about liver? No, Rose. I lied it all. I mean, look, if it's well seasoned or whatever, and you're not thinking about it, then, sure why bio means chop it down. But this a thought of it is really what does not appeal to me. My job was having another Friday got a teaching writing, too big operator that would have been in my shop. Sensible man. It's been a It's been a minute based. A lot has happened in this country since we talked to you on bail with a respiration. I don't I don't want to get off on a sore subject. But I heard you had an unfortunate run in with the protesters that tried to break into your garage. It always out of a Studebaker called Old over. You know, I got a little thing going on town. I just figured today's there. Uh, you know, I met Well, Yeah, well, you know, I thought you could get away with certain things while the character I don't think so. Took me right out of your nose. I.

Todd Rundgren Todd Rundgren Tze Van Halen Mr Crawfish George Gary Sharon Sammy Hagar David Lee Roth Betancourt Lou Jacob Jukebox Bengal Alaska Jeff Orleans consultant Mrs Crabb Shea Rose
"todd rundgren" Discussed on X96

X96

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on X96

"You know, he said, If he set of guardians of the Galaxy had a house band, it would be this band Lobos. Yellow yellow, right, Steph says. I'm on delay. I can't play this game. What? Oh, it's red Badfinger. No matter finger. Yeah, all right. That Elton John So the babies babies isn't time. Don't think you'll get this one. Sounds familiar. What is it? T. Rex Spaceballs Ricochet thought it was T. Rex. This's Jethro told yes. I don't think is a brick bungle in the jungle bungalow. I'll get this one. What is it? Utopia? Love is no is no answer. Todd Rundgren. He was utopia. Never been to Spain was written by Hoyt Axton Point Accident region. He originally performed that in 1971 then done in 1972 or so bye. Three Dog night When the weather gets warmer. This will be my.

Todd Rundgren Hoyt Axton Point Accident T. Rex Spaceballs Steph Elton John T. Rex Spain Jethro
"todd rundgren" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Todd Rundgren big hit with the song back in nineteen seventy two but he's still finding new ways of performing it Rundgren has on occasion joined forces with apple the curiously named string quartet based here in New York the focuses on contemporary music apple has had a residency at the met museum where they play in the balcony bar but with the museum closed they're taking that show on line this evening they'll play one of their own works a Radiohead arrangement and Todd Rundgren will join them to sing this old favorite I saw the light by Todd Rundgren he performs the song with the string quartet known as ethyl later today when he's there virtual guest on their virtual concert from the met museums balcony bar get details you sound dot org we could see some showers today about a thirty percent chance of that the afternoon partly sunny high near seventy one showers likely tonight late tonight cloudy skies love about fifty nine degrees good morning happy Friday WNYC at five forty five it's morning edition on WNYC I'm John.

Todd Rundgren apple New York WNYC
"todd rundgren" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"todd rundgren" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You're laughing and watching and over the years to protect your cable listings yeah man Todd Rundgren hello Todd Rundgren listening to Julia here on seven twenty WGN we are live in the skyline studio here until four o'clock four o'clock we'll head over to Bradley place the TV side of WGN and get to an hour's worth of entertainment news from that group of folks and then Bob the route will be here at five to take you through the morning drive and WGN seven twenty WGN here are twenty four seven we're not going anywhere and we're going to be info you know giving you information keeping informed keeping you company and help me get through this and we are gonna get through this raw gonna get through this together but just now the WGN is here for you twenty four seven all right bond girls that's what we're talking about and well we're going to set ranking from screen rant dot com they ranked all the bond girls who are your favorite bond girls in the I'm trying to think of my favorite James Bond movie I think it might be Goldfinger I think Goldfinger might be my favorite of bond movies in terms of the one that I've watched the most casino royale that the Daniel Craig Virginia great no yeah yeah the data card one not the one with it wasn't wrong with Woody Allen in this yeah one sixty seven yeah it was they've been given and yeah but that will again that was not a fully shut sanctioned bond movie so here here's what we got next on this list of from going from worst to best Kissy Suzuki from you only live twice good night is the dumbest bond girl Japanese agent Kissy Suzuki is the most colorless Casey played by Maya Hamma poses as bonds wife one double oh seven disguised himself in bad yellow face to spy on specter despite being a spy in herself her race is the only skill personality trait that the the script gives Kissy maybe screen writer Roald Dahl Roald Dahl wrote you only live twice I thought Japanese was all the personality she needed his script certainly celebrates how those wonderful Japanese women submit to their man unlike those pushy western broads yes he does participate in the final assault inspectors bass but her participation consists of cowering behind her boss while wearing lingerie at least she doesn't do anything it's creepy as in the Fleming novel where she convinces intermediate bond he really is our husband I haven't seen you only live twice I AG in many many many many years so right so I'm Holly good head in Moonraker Holly good head in Moonraker he comes in next on the lower part of the list like several characters in this list good head starts out as a possible adversary but after a couple of encounter she turns out to be an ally she's a CIA agent on the same case as bond Hugo Drax is theft of the Moonraker space shuttle Moonraker by the way one of the worst bond movies of all time good had it was a first for the series a woman who not only has a skill set but one that includes skills bond doesn't have defeating the genocidal Drax requires flying the space shuttle in good had not bond is the one who can do it the good head pope piloting Moonraker bond would have no way to deactivate Traxxas doomsday gas bombs although good heads good competent character Lois Childs placer with a stiff monotone that rarely shows any emotion the performances what places are they're slow coming down on Lois Childs man and that name is ridiculous yeah well I mean that a lot of the bond girl names are ridiculous you know seven oh two Tanya Roberts I've been binging a lot of the bond movies there are kind of cheesy when you watch him so many years later Tanya Roberts which when we she and she is god doing the Golden Gate Bridge view from a kilt view view view view to help view to a kill that's it great show just in that one too right yeah she's the.

Todd Rundgren Julia
Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Reveals 2019 Nominees

Bucket Strategy Investing

01:25 min | 4 years ago

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Reveals 2019 Nominees

"For the rock and Roll Hall of fame class of two thousand nineteen or out and USA's. Chris Barnes reports on some of those that made the list. The first time nominee as our eighties. Rockers def Leppard, John and prog rocker Todd Rundgren. Stevie nicks also on the list as a solo performer, even though she was inducted as part of back in nineteen ninety eight other nominees. Janet Jackson, L L J the cures zombies and craftwork. Fan who vote online for who they think should advance to induction on March twenty ninth ceremonies to be held at the Barclay center. In Brooklyn, New York

Stevie Nicks Todd Rundgren Chris Barnes Janet Jackson Barclay Center Leppard Brooklyn USA New York John