18 Burst results for "Tj Rodgers"

"tj rodgers" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

04:11 min | 3 months ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"This is a little test. . If you're a fan of craft of things that require years of patients to pay off, say , a Christmas tree farm, , a newly designed luxury car or an eighty year. . Old Scotch time is a worthwhile investment to you on the other hand. . If speed matters more to you than craft, , you may see years invested in, , say those Christmas trees as so much wasted time. . It's much faster to make an artificial tree after all and you can still hang lights on them but what if you could have convenience and craft at the same time? ? Seems impossible doesn't well, , not anymore at least for one particular beverage, , scientific innovation has come to whiskey. . There's nothing about whisky that's new. . The date of its invention is a little fuzzy but historians say may have existed as long ago as fourteen hundred ad or maybe even further back than that today, , the longer it ages the more expensive it is and two connoisseurs typically the better it tastes but not to the founders of silicon. . Valley's bespoke in spirits, , Stu Aaron, , and Martin. . JANACEK say they've come up with a laboratory process for making whisky and only a few days if they took my made quiz being the second group, , they call the years it takes to age say mark antiquated and wasteful. . bespoke spirits doesn't call itself a distillery. . Rather the company is Spirits Tech Company intended to help other distillers, , grocery chains and celebrities create custom spirits that can move like lightning from lab to store shelves. . The name speaks to its intent bespoke means custom-made. . The startup uses the lab to bring the barrel to the spirits rather than the other way around in other words, it's , using material science massive amounts of data analysis to. . Create spirits according to Forbes rather than putting spirits into oak barrels. . The company places selected tiny pieces of wood in precise combinations in a kettle with spirits in char- heat and churn or apply again with scientific precision to mimic the aging process much much faster. . The company claims they can create seventeen thousand different flavor combinations in three to five days. . Most whisky is aged in barrels for about five years according to CNN. . So far spoken has made whisky Tequila Rum and brandy mostly for other companies but they also do sell spirits to consumer specifically a line of different whiskies from classic Bourbons to one made with Ron Whiskey of course, , the biggest obstacle, , any food or drink made in a lab faces scepticism about and quality when it comes to that question bespoke in his taken home about two dozen awards from spirits tasting events since they launched early this year, , that's the social proof. They . think they need to grow the rest of the business, , not just custom blending new products behind the scenes, but , also helping distilleries rescue batches of expired beer or spirits from distributors that aren't quite right which seems. . To be a good foundation for a promising business, , still it's hard to grow a whole new category of anything without enough money. . Early, , this month, the , small business one, , two point six, , million dollars in seed funding from hall of fame, , Baseball Star Derek jeter, , and Silicon Valley scientists TJ Rodgers purists may turn up their noses at spoken in America. . Popular rival maker's mark is not only one of the oldest whiskey brands. Its . history is at selling point founder bill. Samuel . senior bought a distillery in Loretto Kentucky in nineteen, , fifty three but that distillery began making whisky as far back as the early eighteen hundreds. . Maker's marks message today is still it's one bottle at a time every time. . And an oppression bit of copy anticipating the changes coming to the Industry today they also say it's been a widely held belief around here that character isn't made by machine. . Ouch. . Regardless of an expected war between purists and innovators, , the time may turn out to be just right for bespoke in the pandemic is spiking demand for spirits but trade wars are making them more expensive to import according to CNN. . And when you can't import easily making new spirits here, , bottles that can get to the shelf in the blink of an eye could fill a growing demand. . and to that investors like, , Derek. . JETER may well say, , cheers. .

Spirits Tech Company CNN Ron Whiskey Derek jeter Stu Aaron TJ Rodgers Forbes Samuel Loretto Kentucky founder America Martin
Forget Barrel-Aged Whiskey: This Company Whips Up Instant Aged Spirits in the Lab

Business Wars Daily

04:12 min | 3 months ago

Forget Barrel-Aged Whiskey: This Company Whips Up Instant Aged Spirits in the Lab

"This is a little test. If you're a fan of craft of things that require years of patients to pay off, say a Christmas tree farm, a newly designed luxury car or an eighty year. Old Scotch time is a worthwhile investment to you on the other hand. If speed matters more to you than craft, you may see years invested in, say those Christmas trees as so much wasted time. It's much faster to make an artificial tree after all and you can still hang lights on them but what if you could have convenience and craft at the same time? Seems impossible doesn't well, not anymore at least for one particular beverage, scientific innovation has come to whiskey. There's nothing about whisky that's new. The date of its invention is a little fuzzy but historians say may have existed as long ago as fourteen hundred ad or maybe even further back than that today, the longer it ages the more expensive it is and two connoisseurs typically the better it tastes but not to the founders of silicon. Valley's bespoke in spirits, Stu Aaron, and Martin. JANACEK say they've come up with a laboratory process for making whisky and only a few days if they took my made quiz being the second group, they call the years it takes to age say mark antiquated and wasteful. bespoke spirits doesn't call itself a distillery. Rather the company is Spirits Tech Company intended to help other distillers, grocery chains and celebrities create custom spirits that can move like lightning from lab to store shelves. The name speaks to its intent bespoke means custom-made. The startup uses the lab to bring the barrel to the spirits rather than the other way around in other words, it's using material science massive amounts of data analysis to. Create spirits according to Forbes rather than putting spirits into oak barrels. The company places selected tiny pieces of wood in precise combinations in a kettle with spirits in char- heat and churn or apply again with scientific precision to mimic the aging process much much faster. The company claims they can create seventeen thousand different flavor combinations in three to five days. Most whisky is aged in barrels for about five years according to CNN. So far spoken has made whisky Tequila Rum and brandy mostly for other companies but they also do sell spirits to consumer specifically a line of different whiskies from classic Bourbons to one made with Ron Whiskey of course, the biggest obstacle, any food or drink made in a lab faces scepticism about and quality when it comes to that question bespoke in his taken home about two dozen awards from spirits tasting events since they launched early this year, that's the social proof. They think they need to grow the rest of the business, not just custom blending new products behind the scenes, but also helping distilleries rescue batches of expired beer or spirits from distributors that aren't quite right which seems. To be a good foundation for a promising business, still it's hard to grow a whole new category of anything without enough money. Early, this month, the small business one, two point six, million dollars in seed funding from hall of fame, Baseball Star Derek jeter, and Silicon Valley scientists TJ Rodgers purists may turn up their noses at spoken in America. Popular rival maker's mark is not only one of the oldest whiskey brands. Its history is at selling point founder bill. Samuel senior bought a distillery in Loretto Kentucky in nineteen, fifty three but that distillery began making whisky as far back as the early eighteen hundreds. Maker's marks message today is still it's one bottle at a time every time. And an oppression bit of copy anticipating the changes coming to the Industry today they also say it's been a widely held belief around here that character isn't made by machine. Ouch. Regardless of an expected war between purists and innovators, the time may turn out to be just right for bespoke in the pandemic is spiking demand for spirits but trade wars are making them more expensive to import according to CNN. And when you can't import easily making new spirits here, bottles that can get to the shelf in the blink of an eye could fill a growing demand. and to that investors like, Derek. JETER may well say, cheers.

Spirits Tech Company Derek Jeter CNN Ron Whiskey Stu Aaron Tj Rodgers Forbes Samuel Founder Loretto Kentucky America Martin
"tj rodgers" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

03:39 min | 3 months ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"See years invested in, say those Christmas trees as so much wasted time. It's much faster to make an artificial tree after all and you can still hang lights on them but what if you could have convenience and craft at the same time? Seems impossible doesn't well, not anymore at least for one particular beverage, scientific innovation has come to whiskey. There's nothing about whisky that's new. The date of its invention is a little fuzzy but historians say may have existed as long ago as fourteen hundred ad or maybe even further back than that today, the longer it ages the more expensive it is and two connoisseurs typically the better it tastes but not to the founders of silicon. Valley's bespoke in spirits, Stu Aaron, and Martin. JANACEK say they've come up with a laboratory process for making whisky and only a few days if they took my made quiz being the second group, they call the years it takes to age say mark antiquated and wasteful. bespoke spirits doesn't call itself a distillery. Rather the company is Spirits Tech Company intended to help other distillers, grocery chains and celebrities create custom spirits that can move like lightning from lab to store shelves. The name speaks to its intent bespoke means custom-made. The startup uses the lab to bring the barrel to the spirits rather than the other way around in other words, it's using material science massive amounts of data analysis to. Create spirits according to Forbes rather than putting spirits into oak barrels. The company places selected tiny pieces of wood in precise combinations in a kettle with spirits in char- heat and churn or apply again with scientific precision to mimic the aging process much much faster. The company claims they can create seventeen thousand different flavor combinations in three to five days. Most whisky is aged in barrels for about five years according to CNN. So far spoken has made whisky Tequila Rum and brandy mostly for other companies but they also do sell spirits to consumer specifically a line of different whiskies from classic Bourbons to one made with Ron Whiskey of course, the biggest obstacle, any food or drink made in a lab faces scepticism about and quality when it comes to that question bespoke in his taken home about two dozen awards from spirits tasting events since they launched early this year, that's the social proof. They think they need to grow the rest of the business, not just custom blending new products behind the scenes, but also helping distilleries rescue batches of expired beer or spirits from distributors that aren't quite right which seems. To be a good foundation for a promising business, still it's hard to grow a whole new category of anything without enough money. Early, this month, the small business one, two point six, million dollars in seed funding from hall of fame, Baseball Star Derek jeter, and Silicon Valley scientists TJ Rodgers purists may turn up their noses at spoken in America. Popular rival maker's mark is not only one of the oldest whiskey brands. Its history is at selling point founder bill. Samuel senior bought a distillery in Loretto Kentucky in nineteen, fifty three but that distillery began making whisky as far back as the early eighteen hundreds. Maker's marks message today is still it's one bottle at a time every time. And an oppression bit of copy anticipating the changes coming to the Industry today they also say it's been a widely held belief around here that character isn't made by machine. Ouch. Regardless of an expected war between purists and innovators, the time may turn out to be just right for bespoke in the pandemic is spiking demand for spirits but trade wars are making them more expensive to import according to CNN..

Spirits Tech Company CNN Ron Whiskey Derek jeter Stu Aaron TJ Rodgers Forbes Samuel Loretto Kentucky founder America Martin
"tj rodgers" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

10:42 min | 9 months ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"I just interesting just Eric reading this year an op ed piece in the Wall Street journal from TJ Rodgers founding CEO of cypress semiconductor corporation who did the his own study with a couple of other engineer researchers right and he said to do quick shut downs work to fight the spread of covert nineteen we set to quantify how many deaths were caused by delayed shutdown orders on a state by state basis you and I talked about the fact there's going to be a ton of analysis like this it's going to be done hi we are not saying I need to preface this every single time this is not the be all end all of studies that will be taken none are what we have looked at though is when you look at all the evidence that has been accumulated from the very very beginning on this from what we were told to what it is now we have seen it only moves in one direction right they set out to quantify how many deaths were caused by delayed shutdown orders on a state by state basis to normalize for an ambiguous comparison of desk between states at the mid point of an epidemic we counted deaths per million population for a fixed twenty one day period measured from one the death rate first hit one per million and that would be three dozen Iowa nineteen in New York state a state's days to shut down was a time after a state crossed the one per million threshold until it ordered businesses to shut down we ran a simple one variable correlation of deaths per million and days to shut down which range from minus ten days some stayed shut down before any sign of cove in nineteen to thirty five days for South Dakota one of the seven states with limited or no shutdowns the correlation coefficient was five point five percent so low that the engineers are used to employed are that that I use to employ this would have summarized it as no correlation and moved on to find the real cause of the problem the trend line slope downwards state said delayed more tended to have lower death rates but that was also a meaningless result due to the low correlation coefficient so what they're saying is that the the trend sloped downward states a delayed more trendy to have lower death rates but they said you even though they were lower they fit within the plus or minus it didn't matter okay right no conclusions can be drawn about the states that sheltered quickly because their death rates ran the full gamut from twenty per million in Oregon to three hundred and sixty in New York this wide variation means that other variables like population density or subway use were more important than a lockdown R. correlation coefficient per capita death rates versus the population density was forty four percent that suggests New York might have benefited from it shut down but blindly copy New York policies in places with local vet nineteen death rates such as my native Wisconsin didn't make any sense and then continues to write Sweden is fighting coronavirus with common sense guidelines that are much less economically destructive than the lockdown in most U. S. states since people over sixty five account for about eighty percent of the cove in nineteen deaths Sweden asked only seniors to shelter in place rather than shutting down the rest of the country and since and since Sweden had no pediatric deaths it didn't shut down elementary and middle schools from Sweden's containment measures are less onerous than America is so we can keep them in place longer to prevent cold in nineteen from recurring Sweden did not shut down stores restaurants and most businesses but didn't shut down the mobile automotive plant which has since reopened while the Tesla plant in Fremont California was shuttered by police and remained closed how did the Swedes do so far they've suffered eighty deaths per million twenty one days after crossing the one per million threshold level with ten million people Sweden's death rate without a shut down and massive unemployment is lower than that of the seven hardest hit U. S. states Massachusetts Rhode Island Louisiana Connecticut Michigan New Jersey and New York all of which except Louisiana shut down in three days or less despite stories about high death rates Sweden's is in the middle of the pack in Europe comparative France better than Italy Spain and the UK and worsen Finland Denmark and Norway older people in care homes accounted for half of Sweden's death we should cheer Sweden to succeed not bash them they may prove that many aspects of the U. I. shut down or mistakes ineffective but economically devastating and point ways to correct them well I'm again you know this is the again we're we're looking for that ballots were looking for that threshold the risk that as a society we're willing to take I've given based on the information we have at the time and more more again we point to the downward trend in terms of the fatality rate you know this is something that has not gone the other direction which is good that's a that is a good sign the more tests we do the lower the fatality rate so we get back to that threshold point and with that threshold as we continue to push more and say we're willing to take these risks in this type of outing or gathering or behavior or activity that political pressure is heard on well local level first but that's something that is a good thing by the way I hope it's a positive that stays around for a while in terms of buying local government being immediately accountable to you and why we should be able to hash this thing out anything out on a local level long before we get the federal government involved you know I just thought about this side and I saw this a lot of blogs and nobody had an answer they were saying though that they hadn't seen where any government has ordered it has is there any if you test positive for the antibodies from our is are any municipality telling you the once you test positive you have to stay for example fourteen days in quarantine just to make sure that your past it you know we were asking this when what was the airline that was saying they were going to do anybody's tests I forget which one it was yeah and we end and we're asking okay what does that mean though one of the low one of the local rules dictate in terms of a you know maybe being able to get on board a flight again the policy may be different but one of the local rules say if you test positive for the anybody's because at that at what point are you no longer contagious right is the question you know they will tell you with many viruses that you have to be a symptomatic for what twenty four forty eight hours or whatever no fever for twenty four hours or forty eight hours or you have to be on certain treatment for at least twenty four forty eight hours before a you are no longer contagious they will tell you that whether it's strep throat or or or any other type of virus or infection that will tell you all right this is what you need to do this is how long you are contagious generally speaking what about with this if you test positive for the anybody's are you still contagious I know I and I haven't seen anywhere where they have where they have where they've taken the test in New York where the people to test positive they said we look you need to quarantine for three days because that was a thing somebody said I thought we heard three days and everybody else in the blog I was reading it on social media said we haven't heard that at all and I really don't know any government that's that said if you test positive you need do you stay indoors and totally self you know isolated for a period of of time that's it and so I just wonder if you heard anything so I better watch out though I don't want to just be asking questions like this and I better have a direct statement otherwise the media may take out of context what I'm yeah exactly but again those are the questions that well because because people need to be able to know what the director is going to be as these antibodies tests become more available what are you being what are they being told if they test positive what are they being told they have to do at what point are they no longer contagious let us go to Ron in Ohio run you're a runner radio welcomed route route I want to go to run his run was was going to say that we needed to we needed to lock down even more in order to prevent a second round right there's going to be it there's it go look I I don't know about said Ron I don't think you and I look at the projections that show by June first you know by our by August first zero deaths you know when I when well how can I make that projection you're going to have this virus if you especially if you've kept people inside let's say if you didn't keep people inside you might have had more deaths up to this particular point right but you would if you were down the road because you have more people that at that point have gotten the you know the F. have have gotten immunity to it mmhm and therefore at that particular point they wouldn't be passing it on any longer which would actually make older people safer right so I don't know if you just heard our conversation decide to hang up or whatever but we'll get to more your calls and comments coming up if you'd like to get in lines open now eight six six ninety run I.

Eric Wall Street journal TJ Rodgers CEO cypress semiconductor corporat engineer
"tj rodgers" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

10:35 min | 9 months ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Op ed piece in the Wall Street journal from TJ Rodgers founding CEO of cypress semiconductor corporation who did the his own study with a couple of other engineer researchers right and he said do quick shut downs work to fight the spread of covert nineteen we set to quantify how many deaths were caused by delayed shutdown orders on a state by state basis you when I talked about the fact there's going to be a ton of analysis like this it's going to be done hi we are not saying I need to preface this every single time this is not the be all end all of studies that will be taken none are what we have looked at though is when you look at all the evidence that has been accumulated from the very very beginning on this from what we were told to what it is now we have seen it only moves in one direction right they set out to quantify how many deaths were caused by delayed shutdown orders on a state by state basis to normalize for an ambiguous comparison of deaths between states at the mid point of an epidemic we counted deaths per million population for a fixed twenty one day period measured from one the death rate first hit one per million and that would be three dozen Iowa nineteen in New York state a state's days to shut down was a time after a state crossed the one per million threshold until it ordered businesses to shut down we ran a simple one variable correlation of deaths per million and days to shut down which range from minus ten days some stayed shut down before any sign of cove in nineteen to thirty five days for South Dakota one of the seven states with limited or no shutdowns the correlation coefficient was five point five percent so low that the engineers I used to employed are that that I use to employ this would have summarized it as no correlation and moved on to find the real cause of the problem the trend line slope downwards state said delayed more tended to have lower death rates but that was also a meaningless result due to the low correlation coefficient so what they're saying is that the the trend slowed downward states a delayed more trying to have lower death rates but they said you even though they were lower they fit within the plus or minus it didn't matter okay right no conclusions can be drawn about the states that sheltered quickly because their death rates ran the full gamut from twenty per million in Oregon to three hundred and sixty in New York this wide variation means that other variables like population density or subway use were more important than a lockdown R. correlation coefficient per capita death rates versus the population density was forty four percent that suggests New York might have benefited from it shut down but blindly copy New York policies in places with local vet nineteen death rates such as my native Wisconsin didn't make any sense and then continues to write Sweden is fighting coronavirus with common sense guidelines that are much less economically destructive than the lockdown in most U. S. states since people over sixty five account for about eighty percent of the covert nineteen Dez Sweden asked only seniors to shelter in place rather than shutting down the rest of the country and since and since Sweden had no pediatric deaths it didn't shut down elementary and middle schools from Sweden's containment measures are less onerous than America's so what can keep them in place longer to prevent cold been nineteen from occurring Sweden did not shut down stores restaurants and most businesses but did shut down the global automotive plant which has since reopened while the Tesla plant in Fremont California was shuttered by police and remained closed how did the Swedes do so far they've suffered eighty deaths per million twenty one days after crossing the one per million threshold level with ten million people Sweden's death rate without a shut down and massive unemployment is lower than that of the seven hardest hit U. S. states Massachusetts Rhode Island Louisiana Connecticut Michigan New Jersey and New York all of which except Louisiana shut down in three days or less despite stories about high death rates Sweden's is in the middle of the pack in Europe compatible to France better than Italy Spain and the UK and worsen Finland Denmark and Norway older people in care homes accounted for half of Sweden's death we should cheer Sweden to succeed not bash them they may prove that many aspects of the U. S. shut down or mistakes ineffective but economically devastating and point ways to correct them well I'm again you know this is the the again we're we're looking for that balance we're looking for that special the risk that as a society we're willing to take I've given based on the information we have at the time and more more again we point to the downward trend in terms of the fatality rate you know this is something that has not gone the other direction which is good that's it that is a good sign the more tests we do the lower the fatality rate so we get back to that threshold point than what that threshold as we continue to push more and say we're willing to take these risks and this type of outing or gathering or behavior or activity that political pressure is heard on well local level first but that's something that is a good thing by the way I hope it's a positive that stays around for a while in terms of buying local government being immediately accountable to you and why we should be able to hash this thing out anything out on a local level long before we get the federal government involved you know I just thought about the subject and I saw this a lot of blogs and nobody had an answer they were saying though that they hadn't seen or any government has ordered it has is there any if you test positive for the antibodies from are is there any municipality telling you the once you test positive you have to stay for example fourteen days in quarantine just to make sure that your past it you know we were asking us when what was the airline that was saying they were going to do anybody's tests I forget which one it was yeah and we end and we're asking okay what does that mean though one of the low one of the local rules dictate in terms of a you know maybe being able to get on board a flight again the policy may be different but one of the local rules say if you test positive for the anybody's because at that at what point are you no longer contagious right is the question you know they will tell you with many viruses that you have to be a symptomatic for what twenty four forty eight hours whatever no fever for twenty four hours or forty eight hours or you have to be on certain treatment for at least twenty four forty eight hours before a you are no longer contagious they will tell you that whether it's strep throat or or or any other type of virus or infection that will tell you all right this is what you need to do this is how long you are contagious generally speaking what about with this if you test positive for the anybody's are you still contagious right now I and I haven't seen anywhere where they have where they have where they've taken the test in New York where the people that tested positive they said we look you need to quarantine for three days because I was a thing somebody said I thought we heard three days and everybody else in the blog I was reading it on social media said we haven't heard that at all and I really don't know any government that's that said if you test positive you need do you stay indoors and totally self you know isolated for a period of of time that's it and so I just wonder if you heard anything so I better watch out though I don't want to just be asking questions like this and I better have a direct statement otherwise the media may take out of context what I'm yeah exactly but again those are the questions that well because because people need to be able to know what the director is going to be as these anybody's tests become more available what are you being what are they being told if they test positive one of them being told they have to do at what point are they no longer contagious what is going to run in Ohio run you're a runner radio welcome right right well I want to go to run his run was was going to say that we needed to we needed to lock down even more in order to prevent a second round right there's going to there's it go look I I don't know about said Ron I don't think you and I look to the projections that show by June first you know by our by August first zero deaths you know when I when well how can I make that projection you're going to have this virus if you especially if you've kept people inside let's say if you didn't keep people inside you might have had more deaths up to this particular point right but you would if you were down the road because you have more people that at that point have gotten the you know that I have have gotten immunity to it mmhm and therefore at that particular point they wouldn't be passing it on any longer which would actually make older people safer right so I don't know if you just heard our conversation decide to hang up or whatever but we'll get to more your calls and comments coming up if you'd like to get.

Wall Street journal TJ Rodgers CEO cypress semiconductor corporat engineer
"tj rodgers" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:58 min | 9 months ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Six six nine the of right I coming up on the bottom of the hour I just want to get to some analysis that was done about the result but who was said to TJ Rodgers and the the Wall Street journal do lockdowns save many lives in most places the data says no and this is some of the twenty twenty hindsight that we're gonna be looking at as a nation and I think we're looking at it right now and he's making the point and and I'll read you how they how they did this they're looking at all different states insane really there was no significant difference except if you look at places like New York where you have extremely high density and subway systems but really they looked at those cities states it locked down early and those states of lockdown a lot later and in some cases a month disparity and they're saying in the statistics no recognizable differences between basically the the amount of people who have been infected per one hundred were you know a million residents mmhm and they said and there are you know there are the the difference is all there are the hot spots New York one of them but they're saying in most areas that just going to work in a normal way and not having a subway system or the kind of density in New York statistically you really couldn't tell the difference between the states doing it earlier or later well that comes out and I'm sure they'll be more an Alice is that just one study on it and who knows the accuracy of that particular study my point is as you do more of these things that from the very beginning you can look at maybe one of the studies are two of the studies and say that might not be accurate that might not be accurate but all along as we found out more information what have we found out that it's not is that it that it's not as deadly and maybe in some of the reaction of the government they over reacted it's moving down that path whether big time.

TJ Rodgers the Wall Street journal New York Alice
"tj rodgers" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:55 min | 9 months ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Six nine the of right I coming up on the bottom of the hour I just want to get to some analysis that was done about the result but who was it TJ Rodgers and the the Wall Street journal do lockdowns save many lives in most places the data says no and this is some of the twenty twenty hindsight that we're gonna be looking at as a nation and I think we're looking at it right now and he's making the point and and I'll read you how they how they did this they're looking at all different states insane really there was no significant difference except if you look at places like New York where you have extremely high density and subway systems but really they looked at those cities states it locked down early and those states of lockdown a lot later and in some cases a month disparity and they're saying in the statistics no recognizable differences between but basically the the amount of people who have been infected per one hundred were you know a million residents mmhm and they said and there are you know there are the the differences so there are the hot spots New York one of them but they're saying in most areas that just going to work in a normal way and not having a subway system or the kind of density in New York statistically you really couldn't tell the difference between the states doing it earlier or later well that comes out and I'm sure they'll be more Alice's had just one study on it and who knows the accuracy of that particular study my point is as you do more of these things that from the very beginning you can look at maybe one of the study's error to the studies and say that might not be accurate that might not be accurate but all along as we found out more information what have we found out that it's not is that it's not as deadly and maybe in some of the reaction of the government they over reacted it's moving down.

TJ Rodgers the Wall Street journal New York Alice
"tj rodgers" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:59 min | 9 months ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on WJR 760

"Six six nine the of right I coming up on the bottom of the hour I just want to get to some analysis that was done about the result but do who was it TJ Rodgers and the the Wall Street journal do lockdowns save many lives in most places the data says no and this is some of the twenty twenty hindsight that we're gonna be looking at as a nation and I think we're looking at it right now and he's making the point and and I'll re choose how they how they did this they're looking at all different states insane really there was no significant difference except if you look at places like New York where you have extremely high density and subway systems but really they looked at those cities states it locked down early and those states that live down a lot later and in some cases a month disparity and they're saying in the statistics no recognizable differences between both basically the the amount of people who have been infected per one hundred were you know a million residents mmhm and they said and they're you know there are the the differences so there are the hot spots New York one of them but they're saying in most areas that just going to work in a normal way and not having a subway system or the kind of density in New York statistically you really couldn't tell the difference between the states doing it earlier or later well that comes out and I'm sure they'll be more an Alice is set just one study on it and who knows the accuracy of that particular study my point is as you do more of these things that from the very beginning you can look at maybe one of the study's error to the studies and say that might not be accurate that might not be accurate but all along as we found out more information what have we found out that it's not is that it that it's not as deadly and maybe in some of the reaction of the government they over reacted it's moving down that path whether big time when it comes to the deaths and the number of.

TJ Rodgers the Wall Street journal New York
"tj rodgers" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:02 min | 9 months ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"He is honey I'm Gary McNamara eight six six nine the of right I coming up on the bottom of the hour I just want to get to some analysis that was done about there is that bad it wasn't TJ Rodgers and the Wall Street journal do lockdowns save many lives in most places the data says now and this is some of the twenty twenty hindsight that we're gonna be looking at as a nation and I think we're looking at it right now and he's making the point and and reviews how they how they did this they're looking at all different states insane really there was no significant difference except if you look at places like New York where you have extremely high density and subway systems but really they looked at those cities states it locked down early and those states of lock down a lot later and in some cases a month disparity and they're saying in the statistics no recognizable differences between basically the the amount of people who have been infected per one hundred we're you know a million residents mmhm and they said you know there are the the differences all there are the hot spots New York one of them but they're saying in most areas that just going to work in a normal way and not having a subway system or the kind of density in New York statistically you really couldn't tell the difference between the states doing it earlier or later well that comes out and I'm sure they'll be more an Alice is that just one study on it and who knows the accuracy of that particular study my point is as you do more of these things that from the very beginning you can look at maybe one of the studies were two of the studies and say that might not be accurate that might not be accurate but all along as we have found out more information what have we found out that it's not is that it that it's not as deadly and maybe in some of the reaction of the government they over reacted it's moving down that path whether big time when it comes to the deaths of the number of people that.

TJ Rodgers Wall Street journal New York Alice Gary McNamara
"tj rodgers" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

12:47 min | 1 year ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"I want to transition to a little bit of a discussion about The experiment that maybe won't agree that there was an experiment. Launched but with the Reagan administration. One thousand nine hundred eighty president. Reagan comes to office inspired informed by the work of Milton Friedman University of Chicago economist whom you praised on during our our debate and you praised on our stage and and you often praise Catherine as as the guy who came up with the intellectual foundation for getting it right and When President Reagan came to office again the reason? I'm not saying you might agree. It's a perfect. Experiment is not a perfect world and there are lots of compromises with Friedman ISM them but basically President Reagan went to put into effect System with much lower regulation much lower taxation much more freedom for individuals and individual visual Corporations to throw off some of the fetters of government do you think that that experiment got a fair run Catherine and how do you think it turned out or or is turning out. I would say as the years between Reagan and the present elapse his reputation seems to be declining among and fans of free markets I don't know if that's Too Small of a trend to signify much but for one thing Reagan can absolutely did do Many of those things he also increased spending overall must much of that went to the defense budget which You know I would say is you're probably not going to find too many people saying Gosh. We should have spent less money on defense during the Cold War. But the fact is that the sort of the Friedman case if you WANNA call it that or or just a more general pro market and government case asks not only that tax rates cut but that spending because commensurate That the the size and power of the state is not measured only in taxes and regulations but also so in what it extracts from people's paychecks. or rather what it spends in people's lives and so. That's that is certainly an asterisk on the Reagan legacy You know but you can also just ask that question about what's going on in the economy right now which You know I am not a fan of Donald Trump. I don't think that he is executing a rational and well-thought-out economic policy and yet the economy's pretty good by many people's estimations certainly and by many measures and And so there's a you know there's a there's a real question of while are we. We're just waiting for the bill to come do on these policies or is there something to the idea that cutting taxes leads to growth which is which is valuable can eh so My view is an economist is. The economy is not great across. Unless you're in the one percent or one tenth of one percent. GDP trump promised that three four five percent six percent economic growth Growth has been going about two percent excess touting about that is how low that number is given that we are having a massive fiscal stimulus. We're going to have a trillion dollar deficit this year the largest peacetime deficit when we're not in a recession again. You get any disagreement from me so well the point I'm making is He tried to hyper charge the economy in an unsustainable way. And what do we get two percent to percents next lower than we had in the decades after World War. Two his hyper charge you talking about tax cut. Yeah dozen seventeen thousand which went to the billionaires and corporations nations and increased inequality increased the number of people without health care Health Insurance Weaken the economy. So if you look at what's happening in the lived experience of most Americans between Two thousand seventeen in two thousand eighteen the latest data that we have We don't have the data for two thousand Nineteen Yeah Real disposable income in the middle median stagnated so there wasn't any growth but let me emphasize again. There's there's like there there is a real Dependence on how you slice these numbers I mean you could also say just as true. The typical family's income is higher today than it's been you could say corporate Robert Prophets as a percentage of the share of the economy Peaked in two thousand twelve in have been falling. I mean there are other unemployment rates obviously especially for women and minorities Low unemployment rates are go but labor force participation rates are also much lower than they were saying that the lived experience variance the economy at least for many people is is good again not defending the trump legacy either. I don't think he's conducting policy best way of of seeing what how people feel is what's happening to life expectancy and that's what I began with and I talked about how that's been going down and and When we talk about this experiment that began you make with supply side? Economics Reagan's reform deregulation lower the tax rates. Have the top. We have forty years. Forty years is a long time you think about capitalism in the form where you know modern capitalism's uh-huh over two hundred years. So so that's a large chunk of time and what we can tell. UNAMBIGOUSLY is the growth is slower in the last forty years than it was in the decades after World War. Two when tax rates were higher and government regulated the Financial Sector Jour- much more strongly we in that period after we instituted strong regulations. We didn't have any major financial crises but once as we deregulate and we had the financial crisis the S. and L. Crisis and then the biggest of all the crises of two thousand eight crisis to the worst crisis that we've had in seventy five eighty years the problem with Milton Friedman and the ideas that he brought to the table was they weren't based on sound economic science. They were ideology. You Know I. It ignored the importance of collective action. It ignored ord the importance of the nature of the rules of the game. So in order for market economy to work in the way our textbooks say exposed. Supposed to work you need. Competition and markets gravitate torch market power. Even Adam Smith talked about it Way Back in seventeen seventy six but what we see today. Is this normal growth of market power. Monopoly Power Exploitation Russian of a whole variety of Kinds but even when you look at the basic rules of the game Like what should firms do do Should they maximize just the wellbeing of shareholders. That's what Milton. Friedman advocated or. Should they worry about bowed. The wellbeing of the workers the customers of the community which the operate a broader set of stakeholders orders. So and the analytics of this economics absolutely clear even as Friedman and was trying to change the laws. Corporate Governance shareholder value maximization does not lead to societal well-being and they really interesting acting thing. Is that in the last few months. Even our corporate leaders have now agreed on that proposition. Business Roundtable the business roundtable with the vast majority will all except a few said shareholder value. Maximization is not been serving America. I think that was as a public relations. Move as opposed to a sense. Here impulse Both it was both I think among some of them it was a PR. I think they were sensitive. Go to the point that our conversation began that more Americans think that the rules of the game is set up in the Reagan experiment and the decades. After that I've not been serving most Americans Catherine you've been very patient in the last few minutes because I know you've been I'm trying to break in and you're not in the same location as I wanNA give you Possibly the last word to say what you wanted to say but I also have a question for you to launch it. Can you be a progressive capitalist. Still be a capitalist. Well it actually. That question perfectly launches what. I was going to pop in and say which is that back. In two thousand five reason ran a debate about Social responsibility and business and it featured Milton Friedman Whole Foods John mackey? who was is my debating partner at IQ squared and Cypress semiconductors TJ Rodgers and? I think it's important to note that in that debate. Friedman was the moderate This this portrait of Friedman as someone who says you simply maximize shareholder value in. Colladay is somewhat complicated by his comments events in this two thousand five debate which is well before this. Maybe you learned that. He was abroad unusual. But but maybe hustler. What we what we saw that debate is John mackey? Saying What he says? which is that You know there is a there is a doing well by doing good putting customers. I putting sailors I And that his his success is proof of that model I don't think anyone would say A. He's not a capitalist. He certainly is and and yet You can certainly Offer a more subtle version. But but you know it was even Friedman's contribution he both says listen. I think the best outcome broadly will be ee. If capitalists tried to make money for their shareholders the system is set up in such a way that if everyone follows incentives it tends to benefit people and all people including customers the most he still stands by that. But by of Purdue Drug Company has uh-huh pushed Places where the diabetic places where that proves untrue. I think are typically places is where the next sector as it mechanisms products distorted companies as they destroy Environ. Okay government intervention and But yes I in conclusion. I think that there really there really. Is there really is work to be done on capitalism. I absolutely don't I don't disagree. Okay and I think places where Where capitalists are colluding with government? As we you know nothing sends chills up my spine. More than seeing Mark Zuckerberg face Ah You know a panel of Congressmen. And say I would love to work with you that that is not going to end well for consumers and I will put my marker Parker down now that If that is what we are looking at in terms of a future where we have more regulated markets That are more responsible. It's not gonNA work But I think there's an alternate model in which we make more space for free action. We shrink the size of government and we let capitalists and entrepreneurs contribute to society in their own way where we get much better outcomes than we have now okay. I said at the beginning. This was not going to be a debate. It's going to be a chat and it has been a chat but I can see the potential here one one more time Justice Stiglitz. I would love it if you could come debate on our stage. Sometimes it would be. It'd be terrific and Catherine We would love to have you back. I want to remind our listeners to this podcast that just stiglitz's article is in the current issue of Foreign Affairs magazine. It's title is is the starving statewide. Capitalism Salvation depends on taxation and reason magazine is always out there online and on newsstands in real physical. Physical form edited by Catherine Bangor. Kathryn thanks so much for joining us. Just Diglis it's been a pleasure and a half year here. Thank you and I'm John Van..

President Reagan Milton Friedman Friedman Reagan administration Milton Friedman University of Catherine We John mackey Donald Trump Catherine president reason magazine Justice Stiglitz Catherine Bangor Adam Smith
"tj rodgers" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"A smell coming from there can only be a decaying human body, and you have to hold the Hanky to your face because the stench is so thick that you think you're gonna faint even then don't come knocking. Following has been rated PC for allegedly. Correct pay attention. You just may learn something. It's the sage Larry elder. Larry elder here. The say from south central the prince of PICO union czar of common sense, the great elderski, Don Lorenzo, welcome to the program. No victicrats allowed because we've got a country to save. So let's get her teed. Go triple eight nine seven one S A G E, triple eight nine seven one seven two four three Larry elder, relieffactor dot com. Studio later on the program, we will be interviewing the former CEO of cypress semiconductor TJ. Rodgers. But his piece. Would you talks about the latest dumb tax plan? From the great state of California more on this in due course. The press secretary Sarah Sanders says. On whether or not there's going to be declared emergency. She's asked if there is an emergency. Why did you wait three weeks to declare it? Talk about Trump's approval ratings. Have you seen Nancy Pelosi's lately? And CNN's Jeffrey Toobin says that the possible entry into the presidential race by Howard Schultz. The former CEO of Starbucks is a gift from God to Trump. But I. Now, this is a poll.

Larry elder CEO Sarah Sanders Trump Jeffrey Toobin Nancy Pelosi Don Lorenzo Howard Schultz Starbucks TJ CNN press secretary Rodgers California three weeks
"tj rodgers" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"You on. Let's take a break. I'm not a big fan. But what did he do? Bill Gates as well. They started the company. Had let's say twenty percent of the soccer less. Maybe ten percent of the stock. And they went and hired tens of thousands of people. The alarm, very high wages. That's why the prices of houses are going up here. And then they held onto their stock. They don't particularly really spend a lot of money and number ten percent of the sock is worth one to three billion bucks. So the money that's in their hands is is in the hands of the people who created that money in the form of stock Enron company. And there's a lot of people in those conference enjoy that will that creates the wealth is positive. It's not negative TJ. Rodgers we were talking about Ford ability. You also spent a lot of time in your article, call and other California tacked grab which is up on my website. Larry elder dot com. Talking about homelessness. You say we could solve the homeless homelessness problem with government got out of the way, tell us about that. Well, start out with the housing price. Yes. You have the inability to build houses because the governance in your way, right? Then the price goes up to a million four and San Mateo county. Then you decide to buy a house, and maybe you finance twenty percents any mortgage payment, literally six thousand bucks a month. Yes, what unless you can say six grand a month. You don't get the house, and in many cases, that means you're homeless and you're working homeless person you need money from food banks need food from food banks and feed your family. And and therefore it's just the prices that have created people that can't afford a home in Silicon Valley. And you say that the homelessness problem we have enough money. We have enough intellect to solve it only. The government got out of the way. Exactly what what what would we do? What? What should we be doing? Well, I'm an engineer and. Ogling problems that are problems about what people wanna do what they want to control. Then never about their offensive problem. People don't have a home. So when San Jose city of San Jose level, a three hundred person campus called jungle a level that a couple of times, and they've leveled other ones as it happens over and over it was a rainy nasty cold period. I'm thanking God does there are people out elements right now, they took their throw them away. You know, they went through and kind of scraped everything up in the valuable, but, but, you know, positive things you need to survive cook food a lot of that got thrown away and to me that was an abomination. And so I said, look I will build I can build a small house for ten thousand or twenty thousand dollars. I can mean factor. I know how to do factory manufacturer. So I will build five hundred houses, let's say twenty thousand dollars each. I'll give them the city. And all you gotta do is give me the parts of the city of parcels all over southern down in people who have small house, it'd be powered by solar panel. I I was one of the founders of one of the biggest solar companies in the states, even on the guy, I hooked him up to the internet. And and they're they're having sounds, and basically it's a small kitchen a small bedroom place to sit think about an RV, but even small RV, and I couldn't get that done. They wouldn't take wouldn't take the guest. Wow. TJ? Rodgers have been my guests the articles another California tax graph TJ. Final question. Have you ever thought about politics and don't tell me you're too old because Biden thinking about running and he's older than you? I get I get asked that question all the time. My problem is. My problem is causing me to go crazy. Problems that that solved. And I I'm honest straightforward. Blustery sometimes, and I just wouldn't fit in. I be disastrous politician. I have everybody know within within a couple of months TJ Rodgers. I I can help with you. Good good. Good answer. Good answer. TJ? Rodgers. Thank you very much for joining us. We appreciate it. Now when I was asked to endorse a weight loss product, my response was but then I read the science behind Richard zone spoke with chief medical doctor. And I'm now convinced which is on is a great way to lose weight. Look, it's not a stimulant. It contains a single ingredient that naturally occurs in the body, which increases your metabolism. And then sends a message to the brain to curb your appetite, which is made from a component of olive oil with an ingredient called only as a natural metabolite of olive oil produced in the body. That means you produce it, I produce it even your pets produce it. But you'd have to drink a half a bottle of olive oil to produce enough in the body to reap the benefits..

TJ Rodgers Biden California Bill Gates soccer San Jose San Mateo county Larry elder dot stimulant Silicon Valley engineer Ford Richard zone twenty thousand dollars ten percent twenty percent
"tj rodgers" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Please welcome to the program. Mr. T, J Rogers. Mr rogers. Thank you very much for taking the time. I appreciate it. Well, Mr. Rogers, why haven't you left, California and your company relocated? Elsewhere where the tax burden is less. Well, I have friends who've done just that. I have often talked about it. But the fact is I I was born in Wisconsin. I went to school in east coast and came to California got the weather got Silicon Valley. I heard determine the first time Silicon Valley after college. You've got good things. Here you got venture capital to put the money on smarts. And building companies you've got people that aren't embarrassed about talking about making it profit, which is an honorable immoral thing to do. And you kind of just put up with the BS because the benefits outweigh the downside. Mister Rogers says, you know, we've just finished eight years of being governed by left wing, governor governor Jerry Brown. Now, we have another governor who in my opinion is even more left wing than he is. What do we do about this? Well, from my perspective, it's unfortunate because California's is a blue state. We know, you know, you get the vote between democrat number one a democrat liberal Democrat number one ultra liberal Democrat number two in many elections. If you believe that democracy is the right thing, you basically, I am out of step with many of the people here, the shift tectonic shift to spend it used to be the central valley people in manufacturing where the conservatives that the grand years of industry now industry has turned in large to a large extent towards software and those executives have made a huge amount of money because. Doesn't cost that much to make software, but you can sell it for a lot of money, and they tend to be liberal, and therefore they vote and they elected government. And that's the way it is. And I wouldn't challenge that I go away. I before I try to do anything. I I do believe I in my life. I saw the same stuff happening. And there's a guy named Ronald Reagan took over governor, California and news to me amazing transformation. One took over as president of the United States. Who was another amazing transition? I was injected during the Carter years, and I said my God. This is what life's gonna look like for the rest of my time on earth and Roddy turned it around. So we need a leader. Who's commonsense leader who is willing to put up with being a politician who can lead us back from from this socialistic of this. Gotten into my guess is TJ Rodgers former CEO cypress semiconductor TJ, you built a huge business and important groundbreaking business. Could you have done that in two thousand nineteen you started in one thousand nine hundred two given the tax and regulatory environment of California today. Could you have started it today? And then just a successful. No for for my kind of business. I'm chip guy. Take silicon wafers and I make amplifiers in logic chips in computers and memory stores chips. And that requires factory requires workers that requires, you know, having all this stuff because he's a complete company turns the elements of the periodic table dirt in into things you can sell and manufacturing is is been hammered out of existence in California. There are almost you know, we call it quote Silicon Valley, but there are almost no silicon fabs weapons in Silicon Valley, and the ones that argue are obsolescent they role factories and still make value products met everything be state of the art. But you cannot you cannot start a company David create thousands of blue collar jobs and succeed. I really hope that that you must can't succeed. He's kind of trying to defy the odds right now. But he's he's finding out. A company that makes hardware and has a bunch of blue collar jobs and pays well. Niamh the possible in California these days. T J Rogers what's caused the so-called affordability housing problem in California. And what can we do about it? Sure. Well. My hometown is is guys Wisconsin. I kept my family house. I'm currently rebuilding it, and I'm an rebuilding it. I'm talking about four thousand square feet, and I'm doing a really great job on it. And you know, all the amenities. And I'm building that house for about five times less money than the equivalent house in California. And if you if you ask wire is so expensive in California. Basically, they're extremely difficult to get launched to get a building permit and California is very difficult. The average house in HALE county, which is in the center of Silicon Valley. Is it costs one point four million, which is nine hundred dollars a square foot? Anybody can build a house for a nice house for two hundred dollars a square foot or less. Quite a bit less could even be. So there's there's a profit of seven hundred dollars per square foot times, whatever number two thousand square feet to be made for building house in the reason, there's a huge properties the government prevents people from some building houses. He's basically if you go back to comes from us look in the mirror were nimbies. And therefore, we create all kinds of rules that make it difficult expensive to build things one. The traits people understand that you're going to spend literally million bucks on a house. Not a chance is going to be less than that a million four for meeting. Awesome family, Mr. Rogers, we're gonna we're gonna take a break. Here. We come back. We're gonna finish your thought about affordability. You also say the.

California Mister Rogers Silicon Valley governor governor Jerry Brown Wisconsin TJ Rodgers Ronald Reagan Mr. T CEO cypress semiconductor TJ United States Roddy Carter president David HALE county seven hundred dollars nine hundred dollars two hundred dollars
"tj rodgers" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Homeless problem could be solved. TJ? Rodgers is my guest don't leave town. News. Patrick fos talks are expected to start Wednesday on border security. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell says he's opened legislation to bread another government shutdown left the door open about what President Trump delivers his state of the union address next week. He'll be facing a country where seventy percent say America's headed in the wrong direction. That's according to a new AP poll. The White House is insisting that the diapers or guilty pleas and the Russian destination has anything to do with President Trump. British Prime Minister Theresa may is trying to salvage at Brexit deal on Tuesday bay one a few weeks to salvage a Brexit deal, but headed toward a clash with the European Union. The NCA football rose going to consider changes to the overtime four bat. The goal is to make it less likely to go beyond two extra possessions. That concerns about player injuries for details at s renews dot com. I'm here with Bob Bolya, president of the Detroit campus of Online Trading Academy and Bobby ever seen a market like this before there's never been one this long or this straight up, and we're really wondering what's going to happen next year. Well, you know, what's going to happen at some point. Don't you? Well, you know, what's gonna happen to the market while we don't know what's going to happen to the people that are in the market. Most people are doing what they did in two thousand and two thousand eight and most people lost money in two thousand and two thousand eight hundred buying holding diversifying dollar cost averaging and listening to financial planners stockbrokers. Well, why in the world did they do that? We'll because of benefits the industry more than it benefits. The individual the second most profitable industry in the United States is wealth management. There are only outpaced by the tobacco industry. So the strategies that are applying by Wall Street have been great for Wall Street, but not great for the individual..

President Trump Mitch McConnell Rodgers Brexit Patrick fos Senate United States president NCA European Union Detroit campus of Online Tradi Prime Minister White House Bob Bolya America Theresa Bobby seventy percent
"tj rodgers" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Dot com studio next segment. We'll be speaking with the former CEO of cypress semiconductor T, J Rogers who wrote a piece for the Wall Street Journal scathing about California politics about the new governor Gavin Newsom in about all the taxes and regulations he intends to impose. TJ? Rodgers ends the column this way. Quote. It comes down to politics, Mr. Newsom Owl's his election as governor to a collection of radical environmentalists nimbies unionized public employees whose demands leave almost no room for the flow of free market capital to create new housing projects since Mr. Newsom can't punish his own supporters. He wants to exhort another blank check from business. Even though California's already approved proposition one in two thousand eighteen which authorized four billion dollars for affordable housing that funding remained unused more than a year later because California politicians prioriti- polishing their images over truly solving problems. He argues it's more than enough money to solve the problem of homeless this. If only the government got out of the way, we talk into TJ Rodgers in just a few minutes. The Las Vegas shooting. Remains a mystery. The FBI has now closed its investigation. They say they can't find out anything more about what motivated Stephen paddock today. What he did? You said it had nothing to do with the Mandalay bay casino casino. The special agent in charge of the investigation. Aaron rouse. Says we don't know what caused him to carry out the shooting. We don't know. Why he did what he did. Sixteen months of study analysis by agents behavioral specialists, still don't know, quote, it wasn't about MGM Mandalay bay or a specific casino or venue. It was all about doing the maximum amount of damage and him obtaining some form of infamy. Las Vegas police. Also closer investigation back in August. Also without establishing a motive. Remember, he was a retired postal service worker accountant real estate investor on property and homes in Reno. Held a pilot's license. Fifty eight people were killed. Police called him a loaner said he had no religious or political affiliation. Despite reports reports he ranted about FEMA. Thority said he began to stockpile weapons about a year before the attacks spent one point five million dollars in the two years before the shooting. He said his girlfriend to visit her family in Philadelphia in the Philippines, rather two weeks before the attack took place also wired or one hundred and fifty grand while she was there. She returned to the US. Authorities at paddock complained that he was sick. And doctors told him he was suffering from an incurable. Chemical imbalance close quote. Despite finding Twenty-three weapons in his room for the shooting. He left no note the FBI said to explain why he did what he did. The terror group. Isis initially took credit for the attack. But authorities said that we're just being opportunistic making that claim bottom line. It's neither of the. Local authorities nor the FBI have been able to come up with any kind of motive. And after all these months they've decided to shut down the investigation. Getting back to politics, commonly Harris. Would not answer. Whether or not people will be able to keep their insurance under Medicare for all. I would imagine that's assume that they wouldn't be able to because Medicare for all means there's no room for private sector insurance. Follow up on that. And correct me if I'm wrong Tarita rate, you support the Medicare for all Bill. I think initially co sponsored by Senator Bernie Sanders. You're also co sponsors onto I believe it will totally eliminate private insurance. So for people out there who like their insurance. They don't get to keep it. Well, listen, the idea is that everyone gets access to medical care, and you don't have to go through the process of going through an insurance company having them give you approval going through the paperwork, all of the delay. That may require who of us has not had that situation where you got to wait for approval and the doctor says, well, I don't know if your insurance company gonna cover this. Let's eliminate all of that. Let's move on. All right. Let's go to the next question that too. Let's eliminate all of that. Let's move on. Honestly. What's it gonna cost? Who's gonna pay?.

Aaron rouse Gavin Newsom FBI TJ Rodgers Thority Las Vegas California Mr. Newsom Owl Medicare Stephen paddock MGM Mandalay bay Wall Street Journal Mandalay bay Harris cypress semiconductor T Senator Bernie Sanders CEO FEMA
"tj rodgers" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Hook me up. Like. Following what it said? Let's take soccer, Brooke. I'm not a big soccer fan. But what did he do Bill Gates's wealth? They started the company. Let's say twenty percent of the soccer went maybe ten percent of the sock. And they went and hired tens of thousands of people. Those people all earn very high wages. That's why the prices of houses are going up here. And then they held onto their stock. They don't particularly really spend a lot of money and novel ten percent of the soccer's one two three billion bucks. So the money that that's in their hands is is in the hands of the people who created that money in the form of stock in their own company. There's a lot of people in those companies that enjoy that wealth that creates no wealth is positive. It's not negative TJ. Rodgers. We were talking about affordability. You also spent a lot of time in your article, call another California tacked grab, which is on my website. Larry elder dot com. Talking about homelessness. You say we could solve the homeless homelessness problem with government got out of the way, tell us about that. Well. Housing price. Yes. You have the inability to build houses because the government's in your way, right? Then the price goes up to a million four and San Mateo county, then then you decide to buy a house, and maybe you finance twenty percents any mortgage payment, literally six thousand bucks a month. Yes, what unless you can say six grand a month. You don't get the house, and and in many cases, that means you're homeless, and you're working homeless person, you need money from food banks need food, some food banks to feed your family, and and therefore just the prices that have created people that can't afford a home in Silicon Valley. And you say that the homelessness problem we have enough money. We have enough intellect to solve it only. The government got out of the way. Exactly what what would we do? What? What should we do? Well, I'm an engineer and in community. All problems are problems about what people want to do what they want to control their never about their offensive from people don't have a home. So when San Jose city of San Jose level, a three hundred person campus called jungle level that a couple times. And they've leveled other wants to say it happens over and over. It was a rain nappy cold period. I'm thanking God knows there are people out elements right now, they took their chance may throw them away. You know, they went through and kind of scraped everything up in the valuables. But, you know, positive things you need to cook. Food a lot of that way to me that was an abomination. And so I said, look I will build I can build a small house for ten thousand to twenty thousand dollars. I can mean factor. In fact, you sign on a manufacturer. So I will build five hundred twenty thousand dollars each. I'll get to the city, and all you gotta do is give me the parts of the city of parcels all over seven down in people who have small house, it'd be powered by solar panel. I one of the founders of one of the biggest solar companies in the United States even on guy. I hooked him up to the internet. And and they're they're they'd had basically is small kitchen a small bedroom. A place to sit think about an RV, but even smaller than RV, and I couldn't get that done. They wouldn't take wouldn't take against. Wow, TJ. Rodgers have been my guest the articles, another California tax graph TJ. Final question. Have you ever thought about politics and don't tell me you're too old because Biden thinking about running and he's older than you? I get I get asked that question all the time. My problem is. My problem is causing you, go crazy. Problem solved. And and I my honest straightforward blustery sometimes I just wouldn't fit in. I did as a politician. I'd have everybody peeled within within a couple of months. TJ? Rodgers. I I can help would you good? Good answer. Good answer. TJ? Rodgers. Thank you very much for joining us. We push it. Now when I was asked to endorse a weight loss product, my response was but then I read the science behind zone spoke with our chief medical doctor. And I'm now convinced riches on is a great way to lose weight. Look, it's not a stimulant. It contains a single ingredient that naturally occurs in the body, which increases your metabolism. And then sends a message to the brain to curb your appetite, which is known is made from a component of olive oil with an ingredient called Oei only as a natural metabolite of olive oil produced in the body. That means you produce it I produce it even your pets it, but you'd have to drink a half a bottle of olive oil to produce enough in the body to reap the benefits..

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"tj rodgers" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Rogers. Why haven't you left, California and your company relocated? Elsewhere where the tax burden is less. Well, I have friends who've done just that. I have often talked about it. But the fact is I I was born in Wisconsin. What school needs coast and came to California. Got the weather got Silicon Valley. I heard determine first time Silicon Valley after college. You've got good things. Here you've got venture capital to put the money on smarts. And building companies you've got people that aren't embarrassed about talking about making profit, which is an honorable immoral thing to do. And you kind of just put up with the BS because the benefits outweigh the downside. Mister Rogers says, you know, we've just finished eight years of being governed by left wing, governor governor Jerry Brown. Now, we have another governor who in my opinion is even more left wing than he is. What do we do about this? Well, from my perspective, it's unfortunate because California's is the blue state, we know, you know, get the vote between democrat number one a democrat liberal Democrat number one ultra liberal Democrat number two in many elections. If you believe that democracy is the right thing, you basically, I am out of step with many of the people here, the shift tectonic shift to spin it used to be the central valley people in manufacturing where the conservatives that the brand years of industry now industry is turned a large to a large extent towards software and those executives made a huge amount of money because. Doesn't cost that much to make software, but you can sell it for a lot of money, and they tend to be liberal, and therefore they vote and they elected government. And that's the way it is. And I wouldn't challenge that I go wait for before trying to do anything. I do believe I in my life. I saw the same stuff happening. And there was a guy named Ronald Reagan took over governor, California. News to me amazing transformation. One took over as president of the United States. Another amazing transition I was injected during the Carter years that and I said my God. This is what life's gonna look like for the rest of my my time on earth and Roddy turned it around. So we need a leader. Who's the commonsense leader who was long to put up with being a politician who can lead us back from from this socialistic of this. We've got new my guest is TJ. Rodgers former CEO cypress semiconductor TJ, you built a huge business an important groundbreaking business. Could you have done that in two thousand nine hundred? And you started it in one thousand nine hundred two given the tax and regulatory environment of California today. Could you have started today and been just as successful? No for for my kind of business. I'm chip guy. I take silicon wafers, and I make amplifiers logic chips and computers and memory stores chips. And that requires factory requires workers that requires, you know, having all the stuff that goes through the complete company turns the elements of the periodic table dirt in two things you can sell and manufacturing is is been hammered out of existence in California. There are almost you know, we call it quote Silicon Valley, but there are almost no silicon fans leapt in Silicon Valley and the ones that are here are obsolescent. They role factories is still make value products met everything be state of the art. But you cannot you cannot start a company David creates thousands, college jobs and succeed. I really hope that the musk can't succeed. He's kind of trying to defy the odds right now. But he's he's finding out. The company that makes hardware and has a bunch of blue collar jobs and pays well Niamh the possible in California. T J Rogers what's caused the so-called affordability housing problem in California. And what can we do about it? Sure. Well. My hometown is is guys Wisconsin. I kept my family house. I'm currently we rebuilding and I'm an rebuilding. I'm talking about four thousand square feet, and I'm doing a really great job on it. And you know, all the amenities. And I'm building that house. So about five times less money than the quivalent house in California. And if you if you ask why houses, so expensive in California, basically, they're extremely difficult to get launched to get a building permit and California is very difficult. The average house in family tale county, which is in the center on Silicon Valley. Is is cost one point four million which is nine hundred dollars a square foot? Anybody can build a house for a nice house for two hundred dollars a square foot or less. Quite a bit less could even be. So there's there's a profit of seven hundred dollars per square foot times, whatever number two thousand square feet to be made for building house. And the reason there's a huge properties the government prevents people from from building houses. Because basically if you go back to where it comes from us. Look in the mirror were Nimby. And therefore, we create all kinds of rules that make it difficult and expensive to build things. One. The traits people understand that you're gonna stand literally a million bucks. Not a chance is going to be less than that. A million four for meeting. Awesome. Mr rogers. We're gonna we're gonna take a break. Here. We come back. We're gonna finish your thought about affordability. You also say.

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"tj rodgers" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"tj rodgers" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"About California politics about the new governor Gavin Newsom in about all the taxes and regulations he intends to impose. TJ Rodgers in column this way. Quote, it comes down to politics. Mr. Newsom owes his election as governor to a collection of radical environmentalists nimbies, unionized public employees demands leave almost no room for the flow of free-market capital to create new housing projects since Mr. Newsom can't punish his own supporters. He wants to exhort another blank check from business. Even though California's already approved proposition one in two thousand eighteen which authorized four billion dollars for affordable housing that funding remained unused more than a year later because California politicians prioriti- polishing their images over truly solving problems. He argues there's more than enough money to solve the problem of homeless this. If only the government got out of the way, we talk to Jane Rogers in just a few minutes. The Las Vegas shooting. Remains a mystery. The FBI has now closed its investigation. They say they can't find out anything more about what motivated Stephen paddock to do. What he did? You said it had nothing to do with the Mandalay bay casino casino. The special agent in charge of the investigation. Aaron rouse. Says we don't know what caused him to carry out the shooting. We don't know..

Gavin Newsom California TJ Rodgers Aaron rouse Stephen paddock Jane Rogers Las Vegas Mandalay bay special agent in charge FBI four billion dollars