35 Burst results for "Titians"

Republican Lawmakers Remind Joe Biden He Needs Congressional Approval for War Moves

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:21 sec | 5 months ago

Republican Lawmakers Remind Joe Biden He Needs Congressional Approval for War Moves

"And as Titian's continue to rise on the Russian Ukraine border, a group of Republican lawmakers. Senator over to The White House yesterday to remind the president that he does not have war powers. By himself, that he must seek congressional approval.

Russian Ukraine Titian White House
"titians" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:13 min | 10 months ago

"titians" Discussed on Here & Now

"Every day and so on but also only in pessimistic ins Never engaging in this social life were volunteering and so on compared to another person for his very optimistic and gauge in their community and Having lots of friends but spreads knuckles so healthy. It's really hard to say who live longer. But it's possible that he may be the couch but they who surrounded by loving others so now we have to really recognize. How important connections are i for health. And of course the best scenario when you're a connected mystic and the calcium exercise but if something had to give completing up on your social life is not a good health strategy. Martha's carr's book is growing young. How friendship optimism and kindness can help you live to a hundred marta. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. thank you. The isabella stewart gardner museum in boston is famous for being the site of the largest art heist in history. But you might not know much about the woman in her lifetime. Mrs gardner a master trove of precious artworks one hundred and twenty five years ago. She made headlines for bringing a ravishing italian masterpiece to boston. It would become the crown jewel of her museum now right before this pandemic that enormous painting the artist titians rape of europa. Left a special gallery for the first time on international loan and now it's finally back home for the last leg of tour. That sheds light on gardner the pioneer to be andrea sherr reports. Isabella stewart gardner had a corky name for art. That caught her. I yes a wacker. She uses this word a few times about extremely important. Extremely expensive paintings. Titians rape of europa was definitely one of those. According to gardner museum curators nathaniel silver. He takes us back to win. Gardner landed.

Mrs gardner gardner museum boston carr Martha andrea sherr Isabella stewart gardner gardner nathaniel silver Gardner
"titians" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:54 min | 10 months ago

"titians" Discussed on Here & Now

"It's natural that it would get processed there but we know the geography and we also know that there's been a big buildup in these facilities since gina. So where does that conversation go. As far as location. We know that the climate picture going forward well. The federal government the epa. The state of louisiana should be involved in this conversation. The problem is these everything we discussed means jobs down there and that is the inherent conflict. You're in eastern texas and western louisiana that there's gas there's oil there's chemicals there's jobs there's plants and if we the people want them to be safer but say having them there. It means a lot of prosperity okay. Llc she msnbc anchor and economics correspondent. Thanks always my pleasure. John have you been looking to restart your health routine. Maybe lose some of those pandemic pounds. Eat more superfoods or get more exercise. Those all may be good things to do but science writer. Martha's rosca argues in terms of living longer. Those changes probably won't help you as much as improving your connections to other people and fact relationships volunteering and simple acts of kindness can help with the process of growing young. That's the title of her new book. And in i spoke with. Martha's rosca via skype so there's a lot of data in your book and like any good journalist. You went on this quest to get scientific answers. Let's talk for a moment about the science. Behind your argument that human contact is more beneficial than say getting more exercise. You illustrate this by explaining how the mind communicates with the body especially when we're under stress. Say more so you know. Humans are social apes we evolved to be surrounded by adder is of our tribe and this when our bodies function the best. When you think about it you know in our evolutionary past. When we were alone it usually meant that we were alone on the savannah so potentially facing of dangers are the lions accidents. That could happen to us and as such we were in a state of stress so our bodies adapted to recognize whether we are safe with arteries or maybe they should be preparing for accidents for predators. And so on so so we have lots of different systems. Nari body for example. The fight or flight response The hp access so-called hypothermic Adrenal access that starts in the signal in your brain. That tells you that there is a reason to be stressed. And then sends all soup of hormones throughout your body. Basically triggering other swan song and all this hormones. Prepare your body to fight and to phase all those dangerous when you are alone. The problem is debts these days hours. Treasuries are very very different. We are chronically stressed by thanks mortgages. You know School reports traffic and work issues. And all these systems so the hp axes the sympathetic nervous system as well. They're chronically activated when you say chronically activated what you mean is that it is basically all the time. We're we're in this fight or flight or the hba accesses is activated and that does something very specific to our bodies exactly the oldest hormones such as cortisol stress. Hormone our adrenalin. They keep flooding our bodies the whole time and with all the mental downstream effects such as for example higher risk of diabetes or vascular disease and at the same time though what we also get from being with other people are so cold social hormones so things such as oxytocin or serotonin endorphins suppressant. Which both make us feel trusting and connected to our people but also have very real downstream effects on our health so social connection helps improve our hormone levels and you give several examples. But there's one the rosetto effect this is an actual place where the death rate at one time was about thirty five percent lower than the general population. They weren't particularly healthy people by western standards. But you're saying they had deep social connections yes so basically. Nobody was dying of heart attacks. Boxing rosetto which started really attracting attention of scientists and doctors back in the nineteen sixties and. We'll they have discovered. It was not the diets note. Eddie lifestyle habits because there were smoking there were drinking. You know and they also didn't have anything particular in jeans but what was special about the place. Was the community so people derry for example had twenty two civic organizations even though there are only two thousand inhabitants. They're constantly meeting each other. They were constantly visiting neighbors. They were really taking care of the public. Space having parties Volunteering helping each other out. And most likely this was what caused this amazing health of the inhabitants and the doctors and researchers back than also predicted. That were they to ever abandon their ways. Their health would deteriorate as well and unfortunately this exactly what happens. Generations narrations later in the seventies and eighties and so on and when people started pursuing the so-called american dream and living in the suburbs buying cars working long hours and stopped being so connected to their community their health also just went back to american average but martha this is especially resonant to me it got me thinking about church groups during this pandemic who have argued that they are essential because they offer a deep sense of community. I mean we learned from your book. That human connection is not just a human want. It's a human need. And all i could think in reading your book is. How do we do this when we can't do it. In the traditional ways we used to right now is this social isolation shortening all of our lives. I'm hopeful that it's not because it's quiet temporary state you know if it will something that we had to live with for years. I would be much more worried. It is true that we need the connection that loneliness has very serious mental effects in our help. People who are lonely have higher blood pressure. They have different gene expression in when it comes to concern for instance so is very very serious issue but on on the other hand you know there are waste still connect even in condemning times. No you can call. You can volunteer your online as well..

rosca louisiana Martha gina hp msnbc Nari epa federal government skype Llc savannah texas lions vascular disease John heart attacks diabetes Boxing
"titians" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:59 min | 10 months ago

"titians" Discussed on Here & Now

"They really were impacted by what they saw at. It made them feel less confident or safe to speak out social learn. Is this a sense that this is a pattern here of intimidating or silencing these scientists it does appear to be so. I've written two stories in the series so far i one was based on for whistle blowers who And that's the majority there there. I believe seven in their division so and for them not all at the same time had worked in this new chemicals divisions so. That's that's a hefty portion there and then since that for his story others have Have also spoken out. Not not with her. Name's verse for were named but in my second story at five people the four plus another end. I'm working on another story now. That has even more. So what's happened to these scientists. Some of them have given their name some of them less. So are they still on. Their jobs have been. They've been kicked out of their jobs. And what's their situation. Well they're all still working at epa but three of the four have been moved out of that division that i was writing about the new chemicals program so of the original four so they all want to continue working epa and. I should note that these are not the kind of folks who you might expect. You know they don't fit the the the sort of troublemaker stereotype. you know. they're they really thought long and hard about coming out and all of them told me that they were speaking about this publicly because they felt that they had no choice. These people who were chose to work in environmental science because they wanted to protect the public from toxic exposure is and they felt that that the american public based real public health threat. One of the really shocking things pieces of evidence that was shared with me was some audio of a meeting that took place at epa where the with a software engineer consultant who is helping them systematize and kind of improve the system said deal with the new chemical risk assessment process and in the meeting that we have audio of one of the managers actually asked for a little button for the for the consultant to create a little button that will enable her to dismiss the concerns of the scientists in a single click. And and so. That's what you'll hear. Now is the discussion that they're having about installing this button.

epa
Inside Frick Madison in New York

The Art Newspaper Weekly

03:05 min | 1 year ago

Inside Frick Madison in New York

"Now on the eighteenth of march. The frick collection will launch frick madison. It's temporary new home on madison avenue in new york until now the collection of our master paintings and sculptures and decorative arts as in the gilded age mansion on central park bequeath to the public. By the industrialist henry clay frick when he died in one thousand nine hundred nineteen and it's more than doubled in size since then mentioned is now closed for renovation and expansion to accommodate collection and special exhibitions so the collection has moved a few blocks but in tune entirely different. Textual realm freak. Madison is housed in the bath. House architect muscle broilers brutalism masterpiece originally built for the whitney museum of american art in nineteen sixty six recently. The home of the met bria so had to bellini and titian van. Dyke rembrandt mir fragonard gainsbourg. Look in these alien surroundings. I spoke to the deputy director and chief curator xavier salomon. Who's overseeing the concept and installation to find out xavier. I wonder if you could cast your mind back to moment the e. I knew you were going to get the boy a building. Full the frick collection. Tell us what he felt at that moment. It was a combination of relief and absolute terror. I think You know relief because you know the plan was to really put the entire collection in storage be closed for a couple of years while we were renovating the building at the frick and then reopened so the idea that we had a place where we could display. The arts was a huge sense of relief and we had talked to a number of museums about getting a few rooms or a floor. And so did they have having an entire building. We could move. The offices and the entire election was absolutely exciting but terrifying. Because you know. Imagine moving the wallace collection to barbican. Oh the jack ready to this on pompidou. I mean it's just the idea of taking something out of its natural context. Let's say as we as we see it and bring it into something that's totally alien so as soon as we made that decision. That was a lot of thinking and a lot of backwards info about what to do with the building. Did you try out in your mind and on paper all sorts of different alternatives in other words. That wasn't a just a preconceived idea. We're going to do it in the way that you've ended up doing it now. Absolutely and the first phase was a lot of thinking a lot of backwards and forwards on various ideas. You know you have a blank canvas and the bank canvas is exciting but at the same time it's also terrifying because you have so many ways you could go and i still think there are other solutions. We could've used. I mean what we did is by no means the only the only option And i'm sure you know people will like it. People will criticize it. People will think it could have been done a different way but out of all the choices together with my team we filled. This was the most logical one for us and the one we wanted to pursue the one. We thought was most interesting but we definitely did play with all sorts of options on at the beginning. We didn't really exclude anything. I mean we started with even the idea of recreating the rooms in a building. The broil yet so just sort of replicating the rooms of the spirit of the rooms and then of course. We went in the opposite direction. And that's sort of why we got to

Frick Madison Henry Clay Frick Titian Van Dyke Rembrandt Mir Fragonard G Xavier Salomon Whitney Museum Of American Art Bria Central Park Bellini Xavier Madison New York Wallace
Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

Science Friday

05:27 min | 1 year ago

Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

"We're talking about challenges for genetic research. 20 years after the first draft of the human genome was published with my guests, Dina Zelinsky, a bio infirm, a Titian with the Paris transplant group. And elite scientists for civil tech and crystal, soc and indigenous geneticist bioethicist with Vanderbilt University and the Native Bio Data Consortium Crystal I introduced you as a co founder of the Native Bio Data Consortium. Which gets to an issue we've talked about in different ways on this program in the past indigenous sovereignty over genetic data, please remind us how big an issue this is. Yeah. So when we talk about precision, medicine and health were always promising that the next advantages and innovations will be conferred to those individuals that contribute the genomic information. The pandemic has shown that preventive healthcare and structural barriers to access to health care probably highlighted more about health disparities than this UN pronounced supposed to future advantages of healthcare. Indigenous peoples have You know, willingly or unwillingly contributed their didna for the supposed betterment of humankind Need I remind everybody what happened after the completion of the Human Genome Project. We had the completion of large scale diversity projects such as the Human Genome Diversity Project and 1000 genomes project, which were denounced by over 600 plus indigenous nations worldwide that went to United Nations because they were concerned. About privatization and commercialization and exploitation of indigenous genomes and what has happened to those biomarkers collected from indigenous peoples from Central South America. Those bio markers are now freely and openly accessible to companies such as ancestry, Didna and 23 Me ancestry. Edna has hosted revenues over a billion dollars every holiday quarter since 2017 so we always have to ask yourselves. What exactly are the protections? Really? This data privacy and commercialization. The rate of technology outpaces our regulations, these new technologies and while we think that these protections are conferred by laws, which is the genetic Information nondiscrimination Act Last change. Companies are bought and sold. So we have to ask yourself what's the commercial value? The data that we're being asked to freely give away and how can we look to communities and empower communities to self directed decisions that are being made using their data? Dina, you contributed your data, and you gave it away freely. Do you not feel the same kind of threat here that exist? Not quite in the same way. No individuals of European ancestry make up the vast majority of genetic studies, and that's really problematic because they only make up 6% of the population. And I, I completely understand the threats to underrepresented populations. We should be sequencing these underrepresented populations, but we should be sequencing them with the idea of Making genomics research more equitable of giving back to these communities, not just taking from them. That being said, I can't even explain how useful data like that from the 1000 genomes project has been. I've used it in most of my projects. I have whole human genomes at the tip of my fingers. When I'm accessing this data, as well as other scientists, I think We generally have good intentions, so I currently use it in a study to better understand Parkinson's disease. That being said. I think in many cases, a lot of this data has restricted or limited access for researchers versus commercial entities. I agree here that we we really should limit what industry can or cannot do with with our data. Krystal. You mentioned preventive care and the pandemic. The human Genome Project. I remember promised to tell us everything about her genome. Doesn't this sort of tell people Hey, we know everything about you now and ignore the nurture part of the nature nurture debate. What I can tell you as a geneticist. My first skepticism and what I always tell tribal leaders is that genetic data is just the easiest type of data to collect. But genetic data does not. Predict as much about disease risk than we think. Other things such as access to care, cultural factors, colonial factors relating to help probably contribute more to the health differences and outcomes than actual genetics itself. Things like diet environment and lifestyle are things that we should be looking at. And definitely socioeconomic status by factors. But these are the hardest bits of data to collect. And so we really can't build truly robust models without looking at these other factors related to health. So looking at genetics and biological factors is sometimes a little bit of a cop out. You don't necessarily properly convey the limitations of genetics and biological research to the lay

Dina Zelinsky Native Bio Data Consortium Human Genome Diversity Project Central South America Vanderbilt University Human Genome Project Paris Edna UN Parkinson's Disease United Nations Dina Krystal
Intermittent Fasting for Menopause with Marcelle Pick

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

05:43 min | 1 year ago

Intermittent Fasting for Menopause with Marcelle Pick

"Welcome everybody to the fasting. Transformation summit rear uncovering the most inexpensive and powerful healing strategy known to mankind. We are talking about fasting. And i'm your host. Dr david shockers and in today's interview. I'm really going to be talking to women who are going through menopause. Maybe peri menopause period of time before menopause. Or perhaps you're younger and you're thinking you've heard horror stories about menopause and you are be prepared. We're going to be seeking directly you and perhaps your man out there and you're married to my going through menopause. this is gonna be beneficial for you. just how how understand what menopause is. We're gonna talk about basically what happens with our female hormones during this period of time of life and lifestyle strategies that can help ease symptoms and help improve the this life Life transition As you get older and have this kind of change up in your hormones recourse. we're gonna copper. How fasting can play a role in adding best strategies fasting. So because it's topic was so important. I reached out to my good friend and literally world expert in this topic. Dr marcel pick and dr marcel co-founded the world renowned women to women clinic in one thousand nine three with the vision and not only treat illness but also helps support her patients who proactively making healthier choices to prevent disease. She successfully treated thousands of individuals three unique approach to wellness and then in two thousand one. Marcel created marcel. Pick dot com great website. They can go check out and her goal is able to reach inspire and educate even more women. Worldwide website offers informative articles on women's health issues natural solutions to some of the most troublesome symptoms experienced today. Marcel also discovered functional medicine very early early adopter in functional medicine movement was honored to be one of the first that he certifies functional masters titian. She's written a bunch of books including the core balanced diet. Is it near my adrenals. And is it me or my hormones create great titles by the way and so these books have been been read by millions of people around world. Made a incredible impact on helping house armor sal. Thanks so much for joining us. Here on doc- transformation summit. Thanks for having me. I feel like. I have loud information to share. Can't wait to get started. Yeah absolutely. I'm really excited. You know we talked. I was sure where your experience with was with. Fasting was many. Let me know how this is something that you practice in something that you recommended and saw really excited to bring you on the summit's region guy deep into menopause obviously about fasting and how can impacted. Let's start with your story though. And i and how you really got into natural health So probably don't even know this. I was born in australia. I grew up in the outback. And i spent a lot of my time with the aborigines. Knee aboriginal caves very early age. I was surrounded by natural and natural medicine and then came to america. One eleven on after having been exposed to know cars. We didn't have toilet. I i should tell that really different kinks america and my parents are both holocaust survivors. They were from europe so we never did a lot of the conventional ways of eating to begin with and from a. You're young time. I knew that i was very interested in going into alternative medicine. I went to a program with harvard. Medical school nurse practitioner. Actually and boston college. Because i knew then i needed have a standard had to do research. Look at double blind placebo. Controlled studies also understand. Where does the notion of nutrient come into play and we started women. Two women in nineteen eighty-five before anybody was doing any alternative medicine. We were the first all women practice in the state of maine. No one had done functional medicine or anything like it in the state of maine and we were equal partners. Md nurse practitioners. so we. I've been on this trail for a long time understanding that if we educate women in particular about their biochemistry in their health and start to understand. What's upstream we will be healthy no matter what age in our medical system now says many times. Here's the drug will get you better well. It doesn't get you better. It takes his symptoms away and oftentimes makes worst symptoms on the other side. So i'm passionate about this. I love what i do. And my goal is to change as many women's lives as i can with information data and also the supportive things like internet investing. Yeah you're definitely making a huge impact your books your website. Everything at you're doing so let's talk about menopause. What is menopause happening with. Female hormones during that stage. What kind of symptoms do many women experiences. They go through a loss you know. It's interesting many years ago. If you'd come to me as a patient the symptoms would have been flashes. Night sweats getting some way. What i see now more than ever before his anxiety. Applications abnormal weight gain an absolute frustration with their body. Many times. they'll come in say. My body's deceiving me. What the hell happened. I feel like a train wreck under depressed can't sleep Hot flashes. I don't have a sex drive anymore. gamal dried up. What the hell

Dr David Shockers Dr Marcel Pick Dr Marcel Co World Renowned Women To Women Marcel America Maine Boston College Medical School Australia Harvard Europe Gamal
How to Repair Your Skin Barrier With Celebrity Facialist Joanna Vargas

Breaking Beauty Podcast

08:12 min | 1 year ago

How to Repair Your Skin Barrier With Celebrity Facialist Joanna Vargas

"Let's start with the basics what exactly is your skin's moisture barrier and why is it there. What is the do well. I mean i think you know we talk so much into butte and industry about like wrinkles and bo talks and things like that we forget the skin actually has a function and its function is to be a barrier between us and the environment so the skin's moisture barrier is the outermost layer of your skin. It helps protect the body It helps retain water and moisture It defends against like bacteria in the environment environmental stressors and you know prevents things from penetrating into the skin so that we don't have a reaction so it has like a a very important function for us. It's the fundamental of what the skin does and we talk about it at the least i feel It is the most important part about our skin because it makes us look plump in juicy and healthy and soft when it's healthy and so yeah it's something that's very important. No matter what kind of skin type you have no matter your age okay. Yeah that was gonna be my next question. Like other certain types skin types or skin eight inches that are more prone to having damaged skin barrier. Mostly i'm talking about like the skin on your face. Well i mean. I think for example like winter is a time of year where i think a lot of people experience to some degree Some irritation due to the loss of moisture in the environment. And therefore your skin gets a bit patchy may be if you are out during the day for a long period of time you'll have like readiness on your face but typically you know there's obviously people that have just in their dna some skin sensitivity. You know some psoriasis eczema. That's that has a genetic component you know and then there like the people who have poor digestion they might have some patchiness in readiness and some irritation. But it doesn't it can happen even if you have oily skin. It really depends on what you're using on your your skin. What your habits are in terms of your skin. Those really affected a great deal. And so how do you tell the difference between an impaired skin barrier versus you know wind. Burn or zima or psoriasis. How do you know if your skin barriers been disrupted. Well you know this skin house tendency to to show sensitivity patches. So i i'm sure everybody can remember a time when they've had like a dry patch on their face and may the rest of the skin feels okay or maybe you have my son. Has that right now. So i'm listening with the keenest ear. How old is your son. He's he's six and he's got a patch right beside his cheek that he's had for about six weeks and it just so drier and rudder. Yeah continue my boy who is now fifteen Have that as a younger person also happens easier because they play out. Fight a lot and that really dries you out. You know rose atia redness itchiness itchy skin and share a lot of people have itchy scalp during the winter all of back stock visible. Sign that your your skin. Barrier is malfunctioning so to speak and it needs some soothing and comfort and some rehydration ximines. Psoriasis are more extreme versions of it. which also occur in patches on the skin But there are a lot of you know that you would have to consult a doctor to really determine if it was something that was in your genetic makeup or if it was something caused by something topical or something in your diet like an allergy of some kind right right. Because i feel like that's with With eczema almost like immunity related. Or it's like almost like an immune response rather than it can be absolutely and it can also just mean that you're something that you can't digest properly and so your your bodies having a little bit of trouble. There are a lot of different causes for it. Which is why you know. You can also have a yeast overgrowth in your gut. But that would be things that if i suspected that if you came meant for facial and it looked like that to me i would just send you to a doctor. Not a doctor. So i don't right. I try to stay in the lame a fair and respect that and so how does the skin barrier become damaged or compromised. What are some of the main you know factors you know. A a very common factor would be over exfoliating. I remember when i first became an esa titian in the late nineties. It was like a fashion to have cholic acid in every single. Step of your routine. In how like in the beauty industry like ingredients. Become like the thing. And you wanna put it on in every step like i had clients that were using a glycol at wash ugly colic toner a glide colleague serum and moisturizer and everybody's skin was like flaky and read and sensitize. It was very hard to give atias to those people but also sun damage can cause it. You know Prescription acne medications and prescription retinol formulas can cause it. I've seen people use essential oils essential oils on their face and they get Compromised if you if you wash your face in the shower shower water is way too hot for your face back could cause it Chemical peels flying too much back in in the before time when we used to travel places on even air conditioning in caused so mike mobs of different causes But usually i would say the number one offender is over exfoliating or over. You know acclaimed being over eager in the chemical kill type department. That sort of stuff now. I i have a follow up question if you don't mind about is the prescription retinol because you know my skin does get extremely dry when i use it and And it starts to become red. And i feel like that's expected you kind of expect this dryness. So what is the difference between dryness and compromise skin barrier. Is there one. Well sure i mean dryness is the beginning of it right you don't you don't want your skin to be overly dry because that that is compromising gonna lead to you know craziness which will lead kind of like the the compromising actors like your. Your skin won't be able to take as much stress from the environment as the result of that overly dry situation. You're creating. I don't have a lot of clients anymore that use prescription retinal because there are so many great over the counter formulas. That don't do that. So i i feel like that you know. I've been in sedition for over twenty years. That's changed a great deal at least in new york. But i think you know the difference between having you know when you like right now. I'm extremely dry. And my skin feels a little bit tight but it's not read in. It's not flakier itchy when it starts to become itchy in certain spots. That's when you know you've crossed over into a compromised moisture barrier and that and you know you really should wait until that point to start treating it if this dried tight feeling. I'm going to have to handle that today. So it doesn't

Psoriasis Eczema Psoriasis Atias Mike Mobs Eczema New York
No acknowledgement, no thanks for Rosalind Franklin who made the discovery of DNA structure possible

The Science Show

05:32 min | 1 year ago

No acknowledgement, no thanks for Rosalind Franklin who made the discovery of DNA structure possible

"It's the centenary of rosen. franklin's birth. This year she who made watson crick's revelation of the structure of dna possible. Her photograph of dna made all the difference and was featured in western. Play called photograph. fifty one with nicole. Kidman who else is franklin. But it was after dna. According to patricia farrer of clare college cambridge that her work on viruses and irony made work like this year's fast production of covid vaccine possible all that worth two nobel prices so far. Thank you think just portrait by malcolm. I'm watson i'm creek. Let us show. You are trick. We have found the seed of life sprang from. We believe we're stew of molecular goo with a period of thirty four angstrom. So just think this means to our respective genes that sakes did not be disgusting or you girls. Try that trick of watson and crick and achieved. Double helix lusting cheeky was recited by james watson and francis creek at a symposium in june nine hundred fifty three to celebrate the discovery of the double helix in nineteen sixty two. They received the nobel prize for this work. Along with morris wilkins. They've been basking in the glory of his saints but there was another crucial contribution to solving the puzzle of deny that of the dock lady of dna roslyn franklin. He's francis creek acknowledging homework on bbc radio in nineteen ninety nine. It was fairly fast. But you know we were lucky. You must remember. It was based off the x ray. Were done here in london. Started off by. Murray's wilkins and carried on by rosen in franklin and we wouldn't have got to the stage of least having a molecular model if it hadn't been for their work will the story is very bleak. She was naps. Brilliant x ray photographer and this was how the physical reality of the double helix model was first. Seen because wont watson and crick quarrel remodelers that that is they were abstract scientists. They were thera- titians so they were making the model as it were in their heads out of those bubbles and sticks that we all know so well which made the double helix model. What roslyn franklin's incredible achievement walls that she was a technically quite brilliant with this new and difficult apparatus of x ray photography and she showed this first image. Hilary rose from city university london. She's been a sociologist. of science. Since the mid seventy s and the image is referring to is the x ray picture taken by rosalind franklin niners photograph number fifty one. It displays a doc. Black spotty cross shape which confirmed for watson and creek. They hypothesise that. The structure of dna is in fact. A double helix. Hilary rose is passionate about rosine. Franklin's contribution and believed her story is one of appropriation and rasiah without her consent. These pictures were taken by the third noble prize winner. Wilkins and they were shown to watson and crick in cambridge and this is appropriation. I mean there are harder woods for it. A ratio of course was dramatic in the nobel prize acceptance speeches. Roslyn is by then dead. So little people forget those no question hoping for price. 'cause they not give them to the dead they given to the living so the three man. None of them acknowledged her work public. What she gets is a footnote in morris wilkin so that's the asia and you would have thought on the occasion art a such a thing as the nobel prize. The woman is dead that there would have been case for little generosity. Not a hint of a three man. Just carry on as if she hadn't existed as she hadn't done the pioneering extra work. It wasn't a pool in shabby story. And there's plenty in the history of science strong views from sociologist. Hilary rose no matter which way you look at it though. The mystery of this dark lady is intriguing author. Brinda medics was so fascinated by rosalind franklin. That she's recently completed a comprehensive biography. He she is with robin williams. Rosen franklin's family very well off for intellectual whether or not they're very wealthy anglo jewish bankers they also had a publishing firm for the sons in the family who actually were inclined to banking rutledge and keegan. Paul you're very distinguished people very proud of their heritage and they trace their ancestry back to king david the founder of jerusalem. So i mean this is a family takes its ancestry seriously and so one of the problems i think was not so much her gender but class. She sounded aristocratic to them. She spoke terribly well very clipped and some people just hated that. And it's one of the many ingredients which actually made her disoriented and not as happy as she might have made a very clever little girl. And i mean as she was growing up quite small. She wasn't very clever. Little girl and i discovered family letter from her aunt mamie. Anyway she noticed rosalyn has a six year old and she rosalind is alarmingly clever. She does her sums for pleasure and invariably gets them right and i thought that alarmingly was very significant because roseland had three brothers but the fact that the girls should be the cleverest really did

Watson Roslyn Franklin Hilary Rose Crick Franklin Watson Crick Patricia Farrer Clare College Cambridge Rosen Francis Creek Morris Wilkins James Watson Rosalind Franklin Kidman Rosine Malcolm Nicole London
"titians" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"titians" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

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"titians" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"titians" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"The Into the shipment was into the crates to to you know another one at another one here. Yes do that. Another painting gives it another big thing goes in He to be said to him. Yes they knew that he liked and An is he repudiated the agreement. You know. I can imagine the. Somebody's scrabbling to to remove the mould from this crate. Very hey today so that they remain to this. Expect it to the ports having them yet as the client A diplomatic incident as just incredible. Because charles i of england he. He is a huge patron of the arts on famously. When he was beheaded all has collection was was sold and dispersed and the money went back into the states. A high funny to think that these touching works could have been part of that. They could've been could've been positive at the stay together. So what's what's net well again. Story tuesday's together Upon from it seems that at some point in the seventeenth century Peskiest andromeda was probably sold but then turned up in the collection of the flemish artists. Donny van dyke abs. Actually that one did come to britain before the rest of them has van dyke that point walls Upi crops Was court painter to charles. The fast the past youth was in his collection and he he apps the duty loved shen van. Dyke titian was his completes hero and things that it was really celebrated perseus sandro but in this collection for for for quite some time and it was copied and so on I'm ben it kinda fell out of favor. and that one perseus andromeda actually resurfaced the nation fifteen when it came up for sale and that point it did stay in the uk so to the marcus of hawford If any of unisons have been to the love desire deaf exhibition. They'll know that it. It was lent the exhibition by the collection. So it was. It is part of the what is collection. It was slow to the markets of hartford generation. Down the line His son then eventually bequeathed ditch to his legitimate son. Which wallis what is collection and richard orleans was the first i probably since van dyke to really treasure titians pest houston andromeda And he treasured it so much that he hung it in his dressing room which was basically his ball thrown. So i like to think of richard wallace soaking in off enjoying the image of andromeda. Because the end because this is correct in thinking what is Peskiest saving andromeda from this Horrific sea monster so it's one the ends happily He manages to release her from chains and carries a rough. But yes it was it was treasured. I think when it was it was in richard wallace collection. He died before his his wife So his widow lady wallis eventually died in eighteen. ninety seven The painting to the nation along with the rest of the waters collection. But that it. It's interesting because i think the national gallery thought that they probably wouldn't be able to include perseus andromeda in the love desire death exhibition because the terms of lady. What's his will with. The what is collection should always remain together. Yeah really enjoy included. I don't know the exact wording but the way that it was interpreted was the united states nothing could be sent out on loan it just had to be as it was a really really fortunate for the national gallery was the actually at the time. They were putting together enough desired ethics issue which must have been several years ago. the wallace collection. Or the trustees for the what its connection with revisiting. The terms of the will and a k. We're actually beginning to think okay. Well maybe we can to to lend things out That the collection. But if there's the rooms sufficient united perhaps it would be okay for us to send something out online And so when they entered negotiations with the national gallery and that could be part of the leftist death exhibition. But i think it was only allowed to be in london really other the exhibition announced. It wasn't going to be in the national gallery this kid a painting You know but you could the hope skipping a jump what is collection national gallery not too far away tool happy days But then they decided that they would lend it to the national gallery. But i don't think that it was due to travel. It's kind of ironic. Isn't it these days. Not traveling anywhere as resigned Against on the time because this brings us onto another coin. I don't think we've mentioned that these sex paintings haven't actually been shown together and a number of years since they were with fellow second and they've all kind of been despair stole over the what. That's what so interesting why that's exhibition. So exciting and then together perhaps maintenace Hops maintain but it's going on lead to water cheered almost so it's going up to eight and bra and then i read somewhere that in england his To to works in the exhibition the In london's perseus andromeda which is in the waters connection and then Donna which was the first painting that titian created full phillip. The second that is it actually house Which basically was because that remained in in spain until Until essentially. The duke of wellington helped the spanish kick napoleon the podiums troops out of spain beginning of the nineteenth. And so they all thank you very much. Have a painting of. That's seven the uk so it started in london and then because the To diana's diner and callisto. Dan action were bought for the nation. Eventually the story in two thousand eight that shed between the national guards of scotland and the national gallery in london so then the exhibition is moving onto to edinburgh. eventually gold. nice when I think to be january now Then because of the works so which one is in venus and adonis is in the product So it's going to project and then of course the rape of europa is in boston. So that's it's it's it's going to all the the places that have contributed.

richard wallace national gallery Donny van dyke van dyke shen van Dyke titian perseus sandro richard orleans charles uk lady wallis wallis hartford britain ben houston london wallace united states united
"titians" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"titians" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"Get onto that. Like i said podcast lennon's such a great person to speak about these pigs. You have a real passion and love for these useful paintings this beautiful series by but she is a great example of how there's more than just what meets the eye within our history is not just an explanation all artists is trying to depict but actually sometimes the real end chase comes in. Who perhaps you own the paintings and what that says the on really used to keep them which you'll thank dope looks in this podcast just afford a warning before we continued at some point in the podcast there seems to be a can of overlap woodland and i speak happens rain the twenty minute mark and then sadly it happens again the forty minute mark just as lennon i or sort of seining often seeing goodbye so we're not talking over each other i just don't understand what's happened is the second team has happened in the reporting so i'm really sorry it doesn't distract or detail from the message and the quality of content within the podcast it just sounds a little bit odd for a few seconds just a heads up okay so but just sit back relax enjoy led i talking about the incredible zia by titian so lent today we are going to be talking about this tension exhibition which happened at the national gallery in and it was cold love desire the thing the obvious fox question to ask you as people lessening he might not know who was session or who has titian yes well definitely who was kitchen he is very definitely dead which is such a shame because oh my goodness would i love to matt sixteenth century venetian artists essentially he was very prolific. He worked for numerous very high profile patrons but never for one single one incredibly good plate spinning titian and yes and and so he was a suit of natural choice for v the second of spain who wasn't king at the time that he first met titian to complete a commission and this is essentially what this exhibition is all about as about as commission that he completed for a fellow. The second Yeah exactly yeah and that in itself is really quite interesting. Actually because it's a commission that was probably largely driven content by titian so we don't really know very much but titian and philip second to was He wasn't king as a point that they met. We know that they met in alsberg. In fifteen fifty fifteen fifty one and it was probably at that point that they spoke about several things including the fact that phillips wounded titian to create a series of a robotic works for him not just works the were religious paintings thrown in there as well but i think the erotic ones were the the most interesting that they saw as you might have gathered the subject of the exhibition of desire death. So yes philip fairly young Kind of wanted to build up his collection a little bit in the shadow to be honest of his father. Charles the fifth who titian hit also known and unpainted they match. They discussed this commission and off titian went to create some of the most extraordinary works in my opinion ever painted telephone A series of paintings High many are in this series to begin with and what is the inspiration. Hang the series. There was six in the series that might possibly it was intended the Six in this series and the inspiration was ovid. Actually ovid's metamorphosis over reggie so Just go back was a roman poet from eight a d. And what he did in metamorphosis with we've together stories from greek mythology. So if you know anything about about greek mythology you'll know the stories already. The material for these paintings already really quite juicy in fact in the lives of the paintings kind of matched the material to be honest so he created stories from from obits metamorphosis. Oh audition took the stories from his metamorphosis but what he wanted to do was he really wanted. I think he was testing himself at today. That he was in his sixties at this point titian on i think he really wanted to elevate the art of painting Because poetry poet this was all considered quite a scholarly arts and something that was very much look up to poets top two but painters artists at that point one more Just craftsman anything cerebal particularly about painting a considered to be at that time. And i think what titian really wanted to do for the second in these works was to to bring the quality teas of poetry into painting to elevate paintings in the works a painter to to the level with the in that. Serve the That would entail so it was very Question wasn't it. no no no no. It's all i thought it was four and i can you tell. I'm passionate about their fantastic. All they're really He got his inspiration from of it. But i think he was. Also his his inspiration will to try to elevate painting. And i think it was a gift petition because i think that he had the freedom certainly scenes in terms of any documentation that has been found or not found a more to the point. The he was pretty free reign which was rudy. Quite impressive dented at today. Yeah absolutely protect that. It was a future king essentially was paying for these and there wasn't really tight. Brealey few wet an interesting that you said that who is where considered these top notch. People in society and artists were no Can't help but lakes of compare that to today. I think people who etry. I think this is very much a flip almost an of a artists and perhaps someone that takes poetry is sue civil interesting so from these poems. This is where the seabees kick their name and this is where i get it wrong at clemson because they put his year. That sounds italian right. Yeah absolutely so Salt they're very.

titian lennon matt sixteenth philip zia national gallery spain ovid phillips reggie Charles Brealey rudy clemson
The Gluten Connection to Osteoporosis and Autoimmune Diseases

Dishing Up Nutrition

04:55 min | 1 year ago

The Gluten Connection to Osteoporosis and Autoimmune Diseases

"I'm Cassie Wenas. I've been a registered and licensed stay Titian for twenty two years and of those twenty two years I've been teaching nutrition classes and Co hosting this dishing up nutrition program for about the past fourteen to fifteen years. I am telling you this certainly not to make myself feel old. But to let you know that I have quite a bit of experience to share and I feel really fortunate to be able to be here this morning to help all of you listening better understand the connection between what you eat and how you feel. And today my co host Teresa and I will be discussing subject that I know a lot about and if we're being honest I know a lot about this topic more by destiny certainly not by choice we're going to be talking about the myriad of health problems that gluten grains cause for a lot of people as many of our listeners know I know a lot about this topic not only because of how gluten has negatively affected my health but what? Really drives, my passion on this topic stems from the fact that both of my kids have a condition called seal EAC and if you're not familiar with this autoimmune condition in a nutshell, it's when your body has a severe reaction to gluten and actually causes your body to begin attacking itself. It's kind of like the immune system goes haywire, and if you swallow even just a tiny speck of gluten, your immune system I begins attacking your own small intestine. So. Now you know a little bit about our topic for the day next, I'd like to ask a few questions just to get everybody connecting the dots as we delve further into what we call the dark side of gluten. So question number one, do you or a close family member have lupus. Do you or a close family member have rheumatoid arthritis or do you have a thyroid condition like? Disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Do you have Raynaud's if you're not familiar with rain odds, I can explain from personal experience. Raynaud's is when the blood vessels in your hands and your feet. Constrict when you get cold and they constrict beyond what's Normal When the weather or the air is cold or it can happen because of stress as well, and then your fingers or your toes might turn white and you get sort of a burning pain not fun. Or is your Autoimmune Disease Scleroderma or type one diabetes. Do you or a loved one have chronic acid reflux or do you have osteoporosis if you can say, yes to any of these questions you're in for a super informative show today theresa and I WanNa help you make the connection between eating gluten grains namely the the Ri- The barley and most oats and your health problems. And as I just mentioned, my co host today is Theresa. I WanNa tell you a little bit more about her Theresa Wagner like me is a registered and licensed AIA Titian she to teaches many of our nutrition classes she of course, Co host this radio program. She's a mom of young kids and she counsels clients several days a week either by zoom or phone appointments because of Covid, nineteen were offering all of our nutritional counseling either by video or phone appointments. Yes. That's right and we are staying busy with those phone appointments and zoom appointments but as it relates to our topic today, cassie. Mentioned earlier that your kids CEAC. Disease. It made me think were you shocked at the many hidden sources of gluten when you started? Living a gluten free life all those years ago I really was shocked I had been a Dietitian for many years at that point by the time our family got diagnosed. So I knew gluten was inbred. I. Knew it was in anything made with wheat flour but I had no idea of the more hidden sources of gluten in our American food supply just to give you a couple. Of examples. Gluten is in some brands of Deli meat. It's in a lot of summer sausage and beef stick brands. It's in some ice creams for heaven's sakes and even in some medicines, not only that but when you have, CEAC, you have to be careful about personal care items to you need to be sure you're buying gluten free shampoo gluten free toothpaste, gluten-free Lotion, and gluten-free makeup. Yeah. It's so crazy to me that gluten is an ingredient in so many every day nonfood products. It reminds me of a client who had ongoing migraine headaches. We have limit. You know we had gone through elimination where we Eliminated. The dietary sources of what we thought causing the Migraines and we went through lifestyle habits that we thought could possibly be causing the migraines when we finally looked at her personal care products and switched to a shampoo without added gluten. Her migraines they disappeared.

Theresa Wagner Migraines Cassie Wenas Disease Autoimmune Disease Raynaud Aia Titian Teresa Thyroiditis Hashimoto Theresa
Stressed Out; Not Sleeping? Nutritional Solutions To the Rescue

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:38 min | 1 year ago

Stressed Out; Not Sleeping? Nutritional Solutions To the Rescue

"As we all know, it's a very stressful and high anxiety time for all of us. Currently, we're in our tenth month of this worldwide pandemic and from all reports, you know this could continue to be the situation for the next few months. Maybe the next year we just don't know some of you are living in areas are locations where the corona virus infection rates are increasing, and we know that's causing a lot of stress. Stress comes from different places and for different reasons. One example is I'm sure many of you are experiencing this or at least know someone who is it's business both old businesses new businesses they're shutting down. So many people are out of work rent and mortgage payments are due in addition to that. A lot of us are worried about family or friends or loved ones. Getting covid nineteen some of you might be frontline workers and worried about your own health. He know this corona virus anxiety can often show up opposite people having a lot of seriously problems. So that is a little teaser about what our topic is today. Yes. Definitely and I WANNA talk about sleep problems for minute. Do you have ongoing problems either falling asleep or staying asleep? Lack of sleep, which means not getting at least seven and a half to nine hours asleep most nights can affect your coping skills engineering. Zayed's level will just continue to climb. So does that sound like you last week I promise you that car and I would come back to the studio today to dig deeper into the connection of anxiety and sleep problems, and we got some questions from listeners and we will get to the. Back last week Joann gave her email and that's right and she didn't get some questions that's going to be interesting. Now, some of you if you're tuning into dishing up nutrition for the first time, we want to just make sure we re introduce ourselves. If you are a longtime listener, I'm Karak Harper and my background I'm a certified nutrition specialists I have a master's degree in holistic health I'm licensed by the State of Minnesota I've actually been a nutritious for thirteen years. The reason that I believe I was asked to be on this show today, and maybe you're listening to it as a podcast is because I have a history of having a lot of restless nights lying awake staring at the ceiling waiting for sleep to come, and if you can relate to that, you know how stressful that is to not be able to fall asleep or more to be waking up in the middle of the night or too early in the morning and not be able to get back to sleep. So today I really WANNA share my personal and professional knowledge and successes and things that have helped me. And I am excited to be back in the studio with Joe? Today? Because we were just here last week together we were. It's good to be back here with you today car. So good morning everyone. My name is Joanne right out and I've been a registered and licensed I- Titian for a very long time many years and I am fortunate to have worked at traditional weight and wellness for the past seven and a half years I always tell people it kind of my blessing in disguise I had gotten laid off from a job and this was a great opportunity to learn a new version of nutrition from the one I used to practice and I'm loving it I spend my time working with clients individually or teaching a number of classes including are popular menopause survival seminar. So to all of the covid nineteen restrictions, all of my client appointments are done either by phone or zoom. And you heard why Kara was chosen to be on today's dishing up nutrition and some of you may be wondering why I was picked to co host this radio show and podcast about sleep and I also have firsthand knowledge of this topic both professionally and personally, and I wanted to share some sleep solutions also that have worked well for me and my clients. Yeah that's another great point sharing. We'll be sharing clients stories. Yeah. Because that's where we get a lot of our knowledge right? We do appliance. During this really trying time, it's critically important to take care of your body and to take care of your brain. At least three habits I'm sure there are more but we're GonNa talk about three habits to take care of your body and brain, and we'll kind of do like the top three that come to mind with our topic of sleep and stress. So, sleeping at least seven and a half to nine hours most nights. Eating real food and moving your body. So we want to just keep this simple and keep focus on the things you can control. There's so many things out of our control right now. But most people have some control over sleep food and movements Joanna and I wrote down some habits and I think we both really try to live by these as much as possible to manage stress and anxiety especially during this pandemic. So we'll share these habits you might WanNa be jotting these down just get a little post it. You can put it on your refrigerator she's going to be three tips.

Kara Joann Joanne Karak Harper Minnesota Zayed Joanna JOE
What Are The Best Probiotics For Children With Diarrhoea

Healthy Eating For Kids

05:47 min | 1 year ago

What Are The Best Probiotics For Children With Diarrhoea

"So, if you've heard a lot about probiotics, but you don't know what they are. They are really live micro organisms so they can be bacteria, but they can also be funky and it sounds really what you might be thinking. Why is it so? Popular if they are live that too. Now, these are actually good friendly bacteria and they do normally live in our dynasty system. So many live in the gut and they can also be found in breast milk. So they are considered to be generally safe to take for adults but also. For Children and in as few if you take them in a certain amount duty to take them in reasonable quantities, then it's store that they could give a health benefit benefit to the child or to the other taking the probiotic supplement, and of course, products that come in drops usually for babies. Then they might come in sachets for children and you can also get them Naga drink, but also capsules and so on. But Dave Begin to focus on. Diarrhea and I wanted to focus on this area because it's one of the best areas dont probiotics have been studied in and I'm talking about clinical trials where there's also been reviews of all of the collection of. Clinical trials and experts now. have. Come together to say, yes, there are specific strains the have been shown by research to say that they can have a role in helping. Manage symptoms of diarrhea now is really important for me to point out before we carry on that if you want to take a robotic or give your child of probiotic to manage diarrhea, then you must always follow the advice off your medical doctor or other healthcare professionals. Of example, if the recommended that you give a specific oral rehydration solution. Awad fluids. Antibiotics and other medications then you must always continue to give those. So the provide providers are not for replacing all of those other important medical treatments. It's more to give a long sided, and of course, if your child has a specific medical condition, then always always run it by your medical team. Before you start to give a property, it's always good to just keep your healthcare. Medical team informed about anything that you're trying. Particularly if your child has a medical condition that sort of. Has An effect on the immune function. So all the probiotics can have benefit on immunity. There are specific strains on that. We're not going to really dive into that today we'll save that for different podcast episode, but there may be some scenarios where your could you consultant, Dr Titian or medical team. Actually hold off of the probiotics at this stage. So thinking about how they really work the way they work is that when you give your child a probiotic supplement, they feed on the fibers offer news called prebiotics that your child eat, and they make lots and lots of short chain acids which helps them feed. It helps them grow and the live in the got, and they can sort of impact on the immune function. They can help prevent the growth of bad bacteria if you like and help the growth of the good bacteria, which will then help with the health outcomes that we wanted to see. So in this case, we want to see Eve giving approach is going to help with diarrhea and the most beneficial effects that we're really going to be talking about his which probiotics are going to help reduce the incidence, but also the severity of the diarrhea at perhaps scene for how for how long your child might have diarrhea four. So the first strain that I want to talk to you about today is one called Lactobacillus Ram noses g g now they have the names they really sound. You'd think what on Earth does that mean but once you start to read a lot more about per ballot you kind of tend to remember these strange but the research shows that this particular strain can reduce the risk of infections and antibiotic. Dahri. So sometimes, you might be prescribe antibiotics to fight other infections, but the side effects of antibiotics is that each child might have diarrhea. So for this instance, you could give a probiotic supplement like lactobacillus from nurses, G G so strain. So just remember if you're looking for a probiotic, the packaging might not say lactobacillus reminisces gee-gee in might have a brand name but this species or the type the scientific name of the probiotic that you want is lactobacillus from noses gee-gee

Diarrhea Dave Begin Awad Consultant Dr Titian EVE
Five Ways To Manage Constipation Even If Your Child Takes Laxatives

Healthy Eating For Kids

06:56 min | 1 year ago

Five Ways To Manage Constipation Even If Your Child Takes Laxatives

"Before I share tips on how to manage constipation. You may be good idea to just quick run through what is constipation and actually you know you may find that your baby or child has large stews and these are difficult to pause, and there's something called Burston stooge shorts. You can either Google that or if you go to my latest blog post on held babies and toddlers constipation, there's a link in that block pose on. How a picture of the Bristol stool shot, we basically grading of the different types of stews. So with constipation, it'll be more rating type one and type two rather stews either separated hawed and lumpy were they all sausage like but with cracks in it and that's conservation. Usually your baby child will experience pain when passing stools and generally if your baby pausing fewer than three movements but week and when they do a poo, if they are in pain discomfort, then generally that's a good telltale sign that they have constipation and is usually at this point, you probably have a chat with your child's GPO pediatrician and for children whether happened Sistan Constipation, they may have been described laxatives I thought we'd focus on laxatives for the purpose of today's block posed an podcast episode because it's the most common type of medication that's prescribed to manage the constipation. The ways of classifying. Constipation could be say. Less than a quarter of the stews all great ones are hard and they're quite separate hard lumps or grade to is lumpy sausage like Pooh that we've spoken about and very few students and less than a quarter of your students would be loose and watery. Some children and adults including older adults may also suffer from ideas and Bowel Syndrome is generally to affect about seven to fifteen percent of the population, and you know quite a majority of they may not even realize that they have insect of had long term problems with constipation. They may have some of these laxatives prescribed and IB sense to be more common in women. Than in men and the reason really bringing it up, is because it sort of wrongs in families. If women are more likely to suffer for my via. So chances are suspected you China might have ideas then you you know I the Mum or Dad may also have. IBS. But really. Many many reasons for constipation and in terms of ideas. That's more functional constipation. That's how the. is working with the GUT is working, and so these all of fear tips if you chocolate has never had a consultation with a pediatric, Don Titian and your doctor has prescribed laxatives to help your child Oakland bows and don't get me wrong they work really well so they should be quite effective in managing. But if you you know you'd thinking actually never really looked that out John's died and love to know what are some things that we need to focus on They are going to go through five things that you can try right now to help your Sean Open Their Bounds. So the first is of course fluid and this lawn tends to be overlooked often we you know we underestimate the power of good hydration and how it can affect your child's stools. If they are struggling to pass a poo and you notice that they also have very dark colored P or urine however, you want to say it or you want is imposing. There's been a reduction in the number of wet nappies. Then it may be time to think about the fluids. Especially, this week has been quite hot. Had A lovely Indian summer. Or delayed Indian weather if you like. So it may be that we just need to amp up the fluids and one thing that we found really effective so when I used to work as renal dawn Titian. And Age Ruins Hospital lovely rain on as used to give families in a four sheet of paper, and it would have say six to eight cups drawn in it, and it was actually the opposite. So often are renal kids particularly with advanced chronic kidney disease day will on fluid restriction. So the idea of having these cops. In the sheet with cops in it was that you know the kids could take than the each cops every time they had a couple fluid and a cup might be a sixty miles. Hundred and fifty miles or whatever it is that's been agreed. So they will have their own fluid allowance for the day. They were just ticket so that they could keep track of how much fluid the drinking and they don't go above their fluid announce it could be the opposite the if we we could use this nice eight four sheet with the cups. Pictures of cops in it by saying much encases China has six of three meals a day and perhaps two to three snacks. So get to make sure that they have a cup of fluid with each each meal and snack. Now, your might be completely different. So your child's Cup Maroney owed hundred mills in which case you may vary the amount of. Cups that he wanted to draw and I wouldn't get to walk down with how much fluids they need often if they're. Or urine is quite. Clear or Straw colored. Then it's a good sign that they are drinking enough and drinking more than what they need isn't necessarily going to benefit their constipation. It's more just making sure that they do get enough.

Constipation Cups Google China Bristol Burston GUT Bowel Syndrome Age Ruins Hospital Don Titian Maroney John Oakland
Trump on ABC News town hall: We will protect coverage for preexisting conditions

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Trump on ABC News town hall: We will protect coverage for preexisting conditions

"Going to Pennsylvania yesterday for a town hall last night on ABC with Bill Clinton's former communications director, George Stephanopoulos. How did it go? Well, here's an interesting moment. A woman asking a question of the president of the United States gets testy with the president for attempting to answer it. Listen to this. Questions on health care comes from the block. She's from Philadelphia and assistant professor who voted for Hillary Clinton. Last time, Mr President. I was born with a disease called sarcoidosis, and from the day I was born, I was considered uninsurable. That disease started in my skin moved to my eyes into my optic nerves. And when I went to graduate school into my brain when it hit my brain, I was automatically eligible for disability. For the rest of my life. I chose instead to get a bachelor's degree a master's degree a PhD and become a professor. It is great. Except I still have similar health care problems. It cost me with copays. I'm still paying almost $7000 a year in addition to the co pay and should pre existing conditions which Obama care brought into brought to fruition be removed. No with that. Please stop and let me finish my questions there. Wow should then be removed within a 36 to 72 hour period without Medication. I will be dead and I want to know what it is that you're going to do to assure that people like me who work hard we do. Everything we're supposed to do can stay insured. It's not my fault that I was born with this disease is not my fault that I'm a black woman and then the medical community. I'm minimized and not taken seriously. I want to know what you are going to do about that. How about a cocked fist? Basically, I mean, it listened to her. Asked that question he tries to even gently answer it, she said. You stop. Let me finish my questions because it's because she's black and he's white. So he's racist. And so she's confronting the man was. I heard that and I thought that that was so rude and I got tired of and she was just one of several who are like because they're black. It's different for them, you know, and I thought President Trump kept his cool the whole time, and she said, I pay $7000 a year in premiums. I'm like I want your insurance plan because that's far less than mine. You know, she's paying less than I'm paying. And you know she's going to take much more out of the system. Then I dio and I'm pretty sure she doesn't understand how a socialist system works like that. Her brain is filled with all sorts of new media manipulation. I mean, it's just like it's kind of interesting to hear her talk. It's like it's like she's regurgitating a CNN segment. We'll glide. The questions were written down, and I wonder when these people asked these questions if they're written for them or if they've been coached in anyway, because there were several of familiar themes that ran through the questions. It wouldn't be the first time that political activists were either involved or made their way into event like this. The Stephanopoulos did say at the beginning that these were their own questions. These questions were written by these individuals and by the way, we totally appropriate for ABC to check on what the actual question is, from a question or prior to the production of this event, because you create a natural flow of topics that way so you can go to somebody who actually has a question that's relevant, something that was just asked. But you know, it's good to be skeptical, definitely, especially in an environment where Bill Clinton's former communications director is the moderator. That does seem like a good idea. Trump was calm in his answer Here listen to the way he talked about pre existing Titian's So first of all, I hope you are taken seriously. I hope you are and we are not going to hurt anything having to do with pre existing conditions were not going to hurt preexisting conditions, and in fact, just the opposite. If you look at what they want to do, where they have socialized medicine, they will get rid of pre existing conditions. If they go into Medicare for all, which is socialized medicine, and you can forget about your doctors and your plans, just like you could forget under President Obama. Said. You can have your doctor. You can have your plan and that turned out to be alive and instead of 28 different times, at least we have 28 different times. You can have your doctor. You can have your plan. Well, it's not true, but what we're doing is we're going to be doing a health care plan pre existing protecting people with preexisting conditions as an example yourself. It sounds like that's exactly perfect. That's exactly what we're talking about. Yeah, Okay, so and he and he hit that again, like look, any plan I come up with any plan we're gonna work on will replace Obamacare, especially the issues of pre existing conditions. I want to protect him. He's been

President Trump Mr President President Obama Bill Clinton Director George Stephanopoulos ABC Hillary Clinton Sarcoidosis United States Philadelphia Assistant Professor Pennsylvania Professor CNN Medicare
a secret wrapped in mystery

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:44 min | 2 years ago

a secret wrapped in mystery

"If you watched or listened to the news, you may have noticed the. Use of the phrase we didn't WANNA panic. The American people the truth is those words usually come out of the mouth will call Titian who didn't want to face the backlash of his constituents over particular decision he made. But what if there was something that was real and not a particular political ploy or conspiracies theory something that could kill you that had been cloaked in secrecy and his only now being acknowledged as a threat still played down. That's something is a disease, a fungus, no less the common name. The one you'll hear used in the news is indeed rs as of the time of this podcast, it remains drug resistant, they don't have a cure. It is rarely caught early because it's early symptoms are fever and chills at don't improve after antibiotic treatment. Think for a moment. How many times have you gotten a fever just sweated it out. As I mentioned KENDEDA RS is a fungus yeast as a fungus that lives in the body. Generally, a fungus cannot thrive or grow embodies ninety eight point, six degree temperature that can deal or a can our body is a sealed system. Artists can live on the skin fairly harmlessly. But if a cut is infected with it or introduced into the blood, it will be fatal. In. Cases those that have been diagnosed with CONDADO RS in the blood have died within ninety days of the diagnosis. In one case it was determined that the hospital room of victim of Candy RS was contaminated with the fungus it was on the hospital bedrooms the phone, the sheets, the doorknobs it was also determined that standard disinfectants used to clean hospital rooms had no effect on the fungus. Because it can live on the skin. This means the doctors and nurses have to find a way to eliminate the risk of contaminating patients just like the FBI with its ten most wanted list. The CDC has an urgent threat list and Candida RS is at the top. Yet. This super fungus is not new. It emerged in Venezuela then appeared in Spain India. Pakistan that it turned up in South Africa. In the United States has been detected in New York New Jersey and Illinois. So how many in the United States have been affected? Will one of the problems with researching something that is cloaked in secrecy is getting an accurate figure. I have been given numbers ranging anywhere from thirteen cases to over seven hundred thousand cases truth more than half the people contracted need. Ours have died within ninety days. So the death rate is six or three, hundred and fifty thousand. Researchers say that as the climate in certain areas has increased, candied orange has adopted to the point that it can live in the human body. They found that it is also related to agriculture as more antifungal are applied to plans to keep them from rotting these plants are consumed incident of data infection will increase. The fungus can be found on meets manure fertilized vegetables. Although there is no cure for an individual that is infected hospitals are adapting to type of robot that uses a pulsating violently. That removes micro organisms including candied office. For the average American researchers, say it is best to consume organic fruits and vegetables thus avoiding the rampant use of fungicides contributing to the surge of this drug resistant fungus.

Fungus Candy Rs Cure United States Titian Fever FBI Candida Pakistan CDC Illinois South Africa New York Venezuela New Jersey India Spain
The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire: Shiva Shakti

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

02:31 min | 2 years ago

The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire: Shiva Shakti

"Hello friends. Welcome back to Daly Brett I'm departure pro. Series is synchronised knee and the spontaneous. Desire or what I call living synchronicity. The six principle of synchronised. The dance of the Gauze Moss? and. It is found in the Sutra Chabad shocked the. Chile is the. Masculine archetype. Of Male energy and shut these the feminine archetype of. Female Energy. At a deeper level these are. The. Carmona's interactions. Of all the elements enforces of the universe she buys frequently referred to as push up your consciousness and chuck these the excite Titian of consciousness, the divine feminine, the vibrations of which. Are. Sensations images, feelings, thoughts, and perceptions. So let's translate. Today's Sutra specifically. To mean. The following I'm giving birth to the Gods and goddesses inside of me. So what other gods and is they're all the masculine and feminine. That exist inside. Every century and being because sensual beings manifestations. Of these energies. So these gods and goddesses inside of me archetypes. That expressed all of their attributes and powers through me. Why so I may live my life freely and fully. I live my life freely and fully by embracing both the masculine and feminine aspects. Of. My being. How by calling upon masculine and feminine archetypes. Archetypes, I inherited memories represented in the mind as universal. archetypes are observed in dreams in medical literature were admit. Is the same as the word? Maya. The story. That expresses itself. As personal life.

Carmona Daly Brett Gauze Moss Chile
The Indie Brands That You Need to Know About Right Now

Breaking Beauty Podcast

04:12 min | 2 years ago

The Indie Brands That You Need to Know About Right Now

"Okay Carleen. So what's up I? We got gotTA lead with skin. Care Right I want to start out by talking about a new K., beauty skin care line that I think everyone is GonNa. Just want to jump on right away. This is the first ever skin care range developed by SOCO Glam labs. It's called good skin days and skin has brackets around it. It's a four piece range. There is a cleanser moisturizer and a vitamin C serum, three of those launched at the end. End of June, but the toner is actually going to drop later the summer cool and so this Soco Glam that's owned by Charlotte. Show right that's right, so you know that's preeminent online K., beauty retailer founded and curated by Charlotte show. She lived in Korea and is herself a trained to ask the TITIAN now. I actually found this a little bit confusing I. Don't know if you did GEL. But because they do say, it's the first range developed by SOCO Glam labs, but But we know that Charlotte launched then I. Met you and twenty eighteen right, right? That's a line that has the calming blue packaging is like censorial textures decisions about slowing down and enjoying the ritual. That's right and so I was a little confused by that, but I guess Soco Glam labs is so I'm guessing there's probably going to be more brands launching out of this? This is the first one out of the labs, good skin days and of course Oh. Charlotte would still. Still be behind dead and it would be all of her brain power, but really I think what sets it apart from that I met you is it's price point break? Everything is under twenty six dollars, so each product comes in at about half the price of then I met you, so that's a big difference. However, it is also considered clean and cruelty free and made in Korea so if people are to buy one thing, what would you say is the thing to buy? Definitely going to be the vitamin C. Serum I think this is GonNa. Be The best seller. The reason why there's a bit of a backstory behind it first of all I'll give you the name of it. It's the good skin. Days seize the day from the see is like the letter C, a bit of a play on words there. It's twenty six dollars us and. and back in two thousand Seventeen Charlotte actually collaborated with costs are ex so I'm sure you know of that brand? And she collaborated with them to create the costs. Are Ex triple? See Lightening Serum, so that's a lightweight fluid. Twenty point five percent vitamin. C, of course just like any vitamin C serum helps to lift sunspots, acne, scars, and just generally correct hyper pigmentation. And when she launched that I think it just became a huge success, right? It was flying off the shelves. However, they did receive feedback from the Soco Glam community that it had a tendency to oxidise when it wasn't refrigerated Oh. We've heard this about a lot of vitamin C. popular vitamin C. Serums Right. Yes, so that's a fail- Yep. So they. Actually what they started doing was recommending to customers to keep the costs Rx triple C. Serum in the fridge, and in fact keep it inside the box that it came in to prevent any light from getting into it. So she listened to all that feedback and created this new serum, the good you know, the seize the day serum, and said to have the same efficacy as the costs are expert at doesn't have the problem of oxidation so in I'll show you the package here or this bottle in a white opaque bottle, and so yeah, you just keep it in a cool place doesn't. Doesn't have to be in the fridge. So did they do the exact same formulation, or is there a different level of vitamin? C, or what's the main difference? Charlotte is now saying that this new serum is even more effective than the costs are serum. However, it only has ten percent pure vitamin C whereas like I said the costs Rx has twenty point five so. Again I think this. Is that idea that you can't just look at the percentage of the active ingredient? There are more factors that are at play

Soco Glam Labs Charlotte Korea Titian
How Joanna Vargas Built a Beauty Empire with Her Hands

Latina to Latina

09:58 min | 2 years ago

How Joanna Vargas Built a Beauty Empire with Her Hands

"I have read about your early morning routine and found it very inspiring. Can you tell me about your early mornings? And how you develop that habit as you and I Both know it's challenging when you have kids and you're working and you don't try to find time for yourself. It's you know you have to be highly scheduled and I've always been an early riser. And so instead of just waking up early and just sitting in bed I decided to make it into a bit of a moment for myself which I found has really helped me tremendously in terms of stress management. And just making me feel like I did something good for myself every day so I wake up quite early and I do sit in bed for a little bit and just look at what's happening in the universe and then I get up and Do a pelleting class which really helps me manage stress. And kind of invigorates me and Gets my day started nicely with some fun music and some dance vibes. You like me a busy mom. What is the bare minimum? We each need to be doing to have good skin. I like to point out people that good skin has nothing to do with your DNA in has everything to do with your lifestyle. The bare minimum would include getting enough rest Exercising and eating not be on a diet but eating things that will give life to you and then on the skin-care side. It will be washing your face before bed wearing sunscreen every day and then I think sort of an essential ingredient in your arsenal would be a vitamin C. Ideally a vitamin C serum for day to help protect your skin against sal mutation and sun damage. You know you could wear it under makeup so those would be sort of like the bare minimum perhaps in exfoliating once or twice a week I bear is also my maximum John. That's how much of one's skin do you think is about what you were putting into your body verse. What you were putting on your skin. You know I'm an ESA Titian. So obviously I believe in product I believe in Facials butts I think. Fat Your Skin is like maybe seventy percent what the rest of your life looks like good products are really important but I think people discount completely how important it is to be healthy in your life. It's such an important part having good skin and controlling breaking out controlling dryness controlling how we age. Obviously I had to learn this as I got older. I'm I'm turning fifty this year and I feel like I understand a healthy lifestyle so much more than I did. When I was young I was so much more willing when I was young to kind of be like. Oh you don't have good skin and in my case. My mother had darker skin than me and I always wished I had her skin. I got cursed with this. You know fair skinned with freckles in Malaysia. And you know we all have our things right and I think when you're younger it's easy to pick yourself apart and when you get older you realize there's so much you can do for yourself some to make yourself look good and I. I think that my skin looks better than it's ever looked even though in my late forties so you do look I just for anyone listening so they know that skin is is is glowing. You grew up in Princeton. New Jersey went to University of Chicago studied. Women's studies is also a women's studies major so I love and Jersey quarrelsome and photography. What did you plan to do with that? You know? I moved to New York with that dream of being a fashion photographer or an art photographer of some kind. I did get jobs in that field at the beginning in the first years I was here. I just really realized very quickly that my personality I was not. I was not made for that lifestyle. I was not made to be a freelancer. I was very shy. I was very quiet. The idea of self promotion embarrassed me and just being on set. I just felt so stressed out all the time and so going to beauty school was sort of like while. Maybe I'll do make up. Maybe I could be a part of the Industry. Some Way and In a different way and when I got to school I really fell in love with the idea of taking care of somebody and that one on one. You share with me. What what's troubling you and I'm going to help you fix it and to this day. That's really what I love about my career and that's why I still do So many facials and I'm still in the mix Because I just love it this Chew Lak- Nice to have you on must be a special reason. Yeah Yeah you know. It's a special reason since I like to be behind all right so when come to beauty decided to come on board. I guess you rushed volunteer to try the products as I know I did. And it's the first time I know but I've already been using the coconut cream for years so I figured I wasn't going to miss a chance to try out sister products. I liked the photo you sent me the other day. You hear literally good and that was just after one shampoo and conditioner. My girls were shiny and smooth man. And my Komo's not full of my own hair after detangle that in the shower even in pictures is coming through. Your hair looks shiny and hydrated and just so healthy things. I really appreciate that. You let me send you those about the chained. So how many products are you using? All told right now. I've got four so I'm using the shampoo. The conditioner believing cream and they can tell you. What my favorite is the wave first of all that name is everything but I love how my waves on my Carl's just are fuller touchable. They're less frizzy. I mean I sound like an ad but let me tell you well you can enjoy the benefits of the gun through beauty haircare line picking up your favorites at target ordering from target dot com. You worked at new organic spa and with a dermatologist. Had those experiences shape your thinking on skin care? I learned a lot about ingredients at the organic spa. I also felt like the stress was more on aromatherapy there than anything else and it was very hard to clinically help. Anybody I also learned. I don't like Enya as much as other people may have. And so me. Getting a job with a derm was kind of like okay. I'm not going to do this. Who Am I and so working there? For the time that I was there was the opposite end of the spectrum. It was somebody who was really passionate about product and beauty which is great But where do I fall in this conversation? I found that I really thought less was more and I wanted to show people that you don't have to turn to invasive things in order to get your skin to be what you wanted to be. And so that's really how I developed my voice however it took you a long time to tell your parents that you were working as an institution and that this is what you were going to do why I think perhaps other people who have immigrant families can relate to this in some way. I'll just speak for myself and I have found that friends who have had immigrant. Parents have related to this concept but really my parents did not send me to school so that I would work with my hands. It's really that cut and dry sometimes for people. Mom definitely knew that aestheticians existed. But I don't think that anybody was happy with that choice in career. They wanted me to be a lawyer or a doctor. Those are pretty much. My two choices. I think that my family would have been proud of me if they could see now what I've accomplished but Definitely it was a hard conversation and it was many years after that I still had to listen to while if you have become a lawyer like your brother Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah. So you know it is what it is. They just had a different world view. And I think one of the gifts that I have in my life is that I'm really good at seeing things from other people's perspectives. Even if they're not my own and I understood what they meant they just wanted what was best for me. It was very dramatic when I was young. But now you know I I really. I really get what they were

New Jersey University Of Chicago Malaysia John Princeton Komo New York Enya Carl
Was Diddy right about forcing Joe Biden to have an agenda for Black people?

The Breakdown with Shaun King

08:35 min | 2 years ago

Was Diddy right about forcing Joe Biden to have an agenda for Black people?

"You never really know who's going to shine during a pandemic during a crisis but A person in a voice that I think has really stepped up in a major way has been Naomi Campbell who has done some amazing interviews and And even just had some conversations herself about the pandemic about politics and Of course I mean she is a woman who's traveled and seeing the entire world but she's just been brilliant throughout the pandemic with just deep insights and thoughts and yesterday she had a conversation with diddy and apart of that conversation was about the presidential race and did he gave his thoughts on it. And I want to play that clip for you now. Black born is now going to be for free. We're going to have to see some promises. What are we in return for? I'll quote nothing has changed for Black America and in order for us to vote for biding. We can't be taken for granted like we always because we're supposed to be Democrats off because people are afraid and trump so I was going to take him out. Community level was to make a deal. This is business at this point. You know we can't truth follow. Titians you know so. We WanNa know very clearly just like trump made it clear that he wanted to build the wall vitamins to make clear that he's GonNa Change Lives in quality of life of black and Brown people else. He can't get the boat. I will hold a vote hostage. Ivine now. I saw and heard that clip earlier this morning when my friend. Sholom in God. He posted it and he posted a loan. Caption if you go to my instagram now or Charlemagne's Instagram I reposted Charlemagne's caption where you could just go to Charlemagne's page and check it out for yourself. I agree with everything they did. He said they're like I. I would say it even stronger. I think it's it's ridiculous to say otherwise but it's a bit of a roar test Which wish if the ink blood tests where you Somebody shows you ink blots and you tell them what you see I heard what did he said. It was like Yep. That's right we need to make sure that Joe Biden actually has an agenda for us and I I heard that and I'm like yeah of course. What other scenario are we saying that we don't care if Joe Biden has an agenda for us because what did he is saying is true? Black people almost exclusively put Joe Biden in the position. He's in right now and he doesn't come close to winning. The presidential election in November without the black vote and all saying is. Hey we need to let him know. Hey if you actually in real life want us to show up and vote for you like in a major way if you want us to put you over the top talk to US clearly about your agenda show us the policies show us the plans show us the strategies instead of just saying that you're going to be different than trump or that. You're better than trump. Can WE BE PRACTICAL. Can you talk to us about your economic policies? Can you talk to us about your justice policies? Can you talk to us about your healthcare community development policies? Can You? Can you speak on these things? And I see several of my friends including Kenny Burns who? I'm doing an interview with later this afternoon saying. Hey Hey that's reckless asked my brother Isaac as the third also posting. Hey everything they did. He said right. There was completely wrong and I was shocked because everything I heard in everything charlemagne heard and and I see many of you even on my instagram debating. It right now. I agree with every bit of it. It's outrageous I mean if it's a city council person if it's a local mayor if it's if it's a state representative if somebody for Congress we should always require of them that they have an agenda that as much as we can make it is binding that they have some type of binding commitment to our concerns and other people are saying no no no. No No. Don't say that. Don't say that you just need to vote for Joe Biden no matter what. And here's the thing. Black folks are gonNA show up and vote for Joe Biden Black Folk vote almost ninety five percent for the Democratic candidate and black folk will show up. But what we know in Michigan in Wisconsin in a place like Georgia Florida North Carolina and others. Is that if you actually want to win? Black folk have to go all out and we saw that in two thousand and eight and two thousand twelve of course with Barack Obama but black folk while black folks showed up to vote in huge numbers for Hillary Clinton in any place where the turn out was depressed even a little bit in in Milwaukee in Wisconsin or in Michigan. She lost. And it's okay for us to say to Democratic candidates to democratic nominees. And let's be real as I record this. It's still April. Were still in the primary. It's okay in April to say. Hey Joe Biden I wanna make sure you actually have an agenda for US okay. Like that's not an let's be real did he is not making threat. He is saying that we all deserve to have a presidential candidate. That has an agenda that actually represents our needs. Our concerns are our biggest issues and that they have to have a plan. And we wanna see it because what we've seen for most of our lives is presidential candidates who desperately rely on our vote but have no agenda for us have no plans for us. They plan on being generally nice. But we need something more than general nicety like we need people that have an actual policy agenda for the concerns and issues that we have and I'm grateful For diddy who didn't say. Hey I'm not voting for Joe Biden he just said Hey We're at the stage. In American history where the Democratic candidate needs to have a serious agenda for black folk and anybody who looks at this situation says otherwise is ridiculous and I see other people saying. Hey He's saying that from a place of privilege I don't I don't understand that. No He's saying it from a position of authority of somebody who generally doesn't go into making a deal with somebody unless the deal is good for everybody in what we want to understand is HBO. We're GONNA make this deal with you. Not only where you are the Democratic nominee but where we go all out to make sure you win the race. Exactly what are you going to do? And if that's a problem for you saying something like that then we need to have a big conversation like we need to go deeper if saying that much Riles you up. And gets you frustrated? Then you have probably been eating crumbs under the table for so long that you are used to people over promising and under delivering. You're used to not getting anything like the U. S. just the standard and so I see a lot of what I think are just outrageous. Criticisms of what he said I think people understandably so so badly want to defeat Donald trump that they are afraid to even ask Joe Biden for favor and is lying. No no we can do. Both we can defeat Donald Trump and in April still argue that they are some things. Joe Biden needs to do and do differently for him to garner our full support.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Black America Diddy Charlemagne Naomi Campbell United States Instagram Kenny Burns Isaac Sholom Congress Barack Obama Riles State Representative HBO
Building a curriculum for educating data scientists: Interview with Prof. Xiao-Li Meng

Linear Digressions

09:57 min | 2 years ago

Building a curriculum for educating data scientists: Interview with Prof. Xiao-Li Meng

"Hi everyone this is Katie. So this week we have a special interview with a guest. This is professor jowly from Harvard. Statistics Department Shelley thank you for joining us then on here once before so. If you haven't heard that episode you should go check it out. It's all about the Harvard Data Science Review which is a new journal that he started that I'm participating in along with a number of other wonderful folks but this episode we wanted to talk about data science education in particular Because is from your spot sitting on the On the faculty at Harvard. I know that you see a lot of needs and are thinking very carefully about this and I know there's probably also of a lot of interest to a lot of folks in our audience who are trying to think about what should education for data scientists look like Whether they are personally on the right track or not for having the right education to succeed in data science so. I think that there's a lot to talk about their so. Thank you so much for joining us. You are listening to linear. DIGRESSIONS is to start out a little bit. Just a bit of background for folks who maybe didn't hear your previous episode. Although you should we'll put a link to that on LINEAR DIGRESSION DOT COM for folks. You want to go dig into that a little bit. More Sierra professor of statistics. I'm very very involved in what's called the Harvard Data Science Initiative which sounds like not maybe a full-fledged department but said kind of this cross functional team of a number of professors across many different disciplines around Harvard who are interested in data science and recognize it as this thing that is growing up that needs to be addressed in some way educationally? So do you want to talk a little little bit about that. Group that you're part of the HD SL sure and the holiday of Science Initiative is Really University Wise Initiative in put together the by By our provost Alan Gobber and particular. Thank him for writing actually and at and Dettori Education for the first issue of a hobby data science review. And so I sing. It probably will be a very good place for me to start talk about the. They're not education because I think Ford Agreement with him in terms of how do we think about education. He basically said there's three groups of students we should sink about and one group of students probably more like you and me. We want to be a data scientist overeat or statistics. Whatever now everybody's data scientist so these another one that we are the full fledged to sort of trying to be experts so we got PhD's do all those things so why prime interest is in data science itself the Second Second Group A lot of students that they themself they understand the power of the data signs and they wanna use that to advance their own? Feud you'd be a physicist biologist. Did you humanity. You know on his feet. So they'd themselves their interest is not necessarily developing that aside aside you know methodologies series but they want to utilize whatever we developed to really advance still few. That's a second group. That's probably probably the largest school but that's for University of that probably is a pretty pretty large group. The group what Allen identified is essentially. Especially everyone else they WanNa have some basic knowledge of data science Being a citizen you can just digital age. You have to know something about what when all of these data side the fussers about basic idea of understanding what they read the newspapers you know. Don't be fooled by all kinds of claims made in the name of AI. I for example but you have to understand what what the real thing is so basically these other groups and the kind of education program you provide to this group of very very different yes right and in fact. What's interesting is that you know? I am currently involved in creating a new data signs and a graduate chorus at harbor. I'm a team. We have a team about a single to computer. Scientists to Titians actress reset dishes to computer scientists that possibly will be more people involved and we happy debating Amano ourself. Do we want to create. Hey this as the first introductory course two data size all we want to create this as a general education course in data science there is actually a real important difference when when you create a general education which is really serving dessert a group you have to designing such a way that what you have reminded reminders. That the only course there would ever take yeah. It's very different related. But it's quite different than say. Okay now we know those people we'll go on like the first or second group and so we. We struggled quite a bit. Because you know we wanted to boast 'cause we're thinking everybody should do that but but these are not easy. Well let me ask you another question that I suspect is. It's a simple question but one that has a complexity at least for me underneath the surface soup for you. What falls within the scope of data science when someone walks out having taken that? Course what abilities do you need them to have for you to consider yourself successful as an educator absolutely I mean that's people always say it's a million dollar question I want to say. That's that's a billion dollar question because we actually you know what we have been discussing this team of faculty and other post Docs is what we recall. What other learn learning objectives? Yeah that's what we do. The backward design. Let's settle down with a linear objective dentists about what needs to be. You know what needs to be covered but I want to answer yours or the big question like a what what other things should be ignored a science right that just to not to be incredibly hard question because by now the term data assigns revolve into what we call an umbrella term. It's a very broad umbrella tree. Okay Yeah it's it's a very broad. It's very much like a signs. You know people understand their assigns. You so what. Someone body is a scientist right that you know roughly where they do. Scientists physicists chemists biologists so it's very much like that. It's very hard to sing the ballot. If you want to design a quarter said introduction to science like yeah what are you what do you put in that so I I will say that you know for me. I WANNA putting the first thing I wanted putting. This is the price I one of the first thing I wanted to putting to have the whoever they are whether there's for jared occasion of four For this kind of introductory closer to be a scientist is to talk about the data quality. Yeah the first thing I want to talk about is to understand that forget. All these methodologies developed later to sink a bell like you know how you collect the data how data and how do you process data where have serious impact on what you do later. Absolutely you can actually teach that talk about that without getting into any eat. Neither computer science. Endorse sticks people. You know people understand right. There's this whole concept of of garbage in garbage out most understand. The only thing gets these as it gets complicated in the media. Obviously help to create his misperceptions perceptions. Oh tons of data anomaly. Matter but in fact the worst part is what I have tons of data confirms all the kinds of Buys Stan so so that will be you know. We can talk about that. He can go pretty far right to get people into dolls thinking about data signs from data. I guess is about data I so I would definitely the starting point for me but now let's people get excited that it's okay now you have to think think about okay understand this causing how did it go about to collect them right. How do you go about it to reprocess and then well? It just seems far outweigh the computer. Science definitely comes in. Because you know you can't just talk about without doing things right. And you know how to process them. It's very impor- and how to analyze the status of the coming and then along the way no by talking about the size of the data all the all the issues you already bring the whole Essex coming right so the philosopher Comoros and kings in all those things comes in you know very naturally the soda. That's where I would start and I would definitely do some basic. Oh computer cise but I think that if if this course is aimed at the general educational level and the analogy I I use for described as is since I've watched I've always using disciplines wine connoisseurs. They can appreciate wine. I have many many of the mattress. Don't really have too much idea how to make one but they can. You know develop the sophistication to appreciate. And that's what I would do at the level mucus because people understand this is not data. Science itself has the deep end there's all these methodologies right but We're GONNA you know you may not be the ones to actually do it but you should develop enough appreciation when somebody tells you all. I did them aggression for calls waiting for his. You know that sounds wrong right. You need to be able go to pick up on those things. So so that's the that's the level for the General Education for the for the one really want introduce them to the next S. level that a we want the potter learning objective. There will be able to actually do something. Instead of just appreciating in it will be different developing kind of projects which you can actually do some analysis interpreter redoubts and show why the redoubts properties is. Wrong

Scientist Harvard Data Science Review Harvard General Education Professor Dettori Education Katie Second Second Group Really University Wise Initiat University Of Professor Of Statistics Ford Physicist Comoros Allen Alan Gobber Provost
Constipation and Diarrhea: When is it a problem?

Dishing Up Nutrition

09:06 min | 2 years ago

Constipation and Diarrhea: When is it a problem?

"So let's get started with our discussion. We have addressed diarrhea so loose bowel movements on other shows. We've we spent entire other shows talking about diarrhea right so we've decided to focus more on today's show in terms of constipation and customization is a common problem in children of all ages so infants toddlers school age kids teenagers and even the children who are now all grown up now. They're adults young at heart. Absolutely we and so actually constipation is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal disorders in adults. So Shelby we see this in in clinic like almost day in and day out with clients who are having. Maybe just a few bowel movements every week and actually when I was going through my master's program program for clinical nutrition. One of my first professor said if you are not comfortable talking about poop with people. You're in the wrong profession absolutely absolutely yes. We have to talk everything digestive from the top to the bottom right. Yeah so this morning we will spend time talking about the causes and some solutions for both children and adults who struggle with constipation issues so joining me in studio today shelby. Olsen who has a license nutritionist. Attrition as we will be talking about adult and childhood constipation which is a very real problem for so many people we believe this information formation that we're going to share this morning we'll help you find a solution. Yeah we'll good morning Leah and good morning to our listeners or good evening or good afternoon wherever you are in the world and listening I was formerly Shelby Hummel but as of about six seven months I am finally getting used to calling myself. Shelby Olsen Elson likely ahead mentioned. I'm a licensed nutritionist. And I actually see clients in our wise at a location. I also spend many of my days teaching wellness US classes for a variety of the companies. Here in the twin cities in the past few years more and more companies large and small are trying to provide nutrition information information to their employees in the hopes that they will remain healthy because we understand just like they do that. Healthy employees are productive employees. So Oh some of the classes that we may teach you know just the within the past week. I've taught a class called mindful eating I've taught classes about jumpstart. Your metabolism awesome eating real food for everyday health solutions. I talk about good foods and good moods that none brain connection to the foods that we eat so we really bring this eat real food message and people find it's a simple message that resonates with them as a result old of attending one of these lunch and learn seminars. Typically about an hour. They learned that they can eat real food that they buy in the grocery store. You know they don't have to buy box excludes or you know packaged things. They can go to the farmers market. They can go to any of the grocery stores in their area And quite frankly it's food their entire family can eat Right yeah that's important so that you're not the only person following a specific plan. It's nice when the whole family when everybody can NBA on board Yeah my mom she would always say. I'm not a short order. Cook GonNa eat what I mix. And that's exactly when we're talking about real foods. Mom and dad can eat it kids and you know teens. Everyone should be eating real food and can notice the difference that when they eat real food they feel good absolutely. Yeah so shelby and I both work with many adults and we both see children. I think I see more children now. Now that I have one of my own. So so maybe it's just that The Laws of the universe attract more kids. I don't know But many of these adults and some of the kids are struggling with constipation. Shen and parents sometimes don't even realize that they have constipation problem and truth be told. Many people don't realize that having a bowel movement every three maybe four days is a problem I would also venture to say I have a lot of clients who come in and they say well I know maybe it's not normal but this is my normal right so this has been me forever. I don't know what to do about it right. And so when we ask them have you had. Do you have a bowel movement. Every day. They say oh no. I'm not constipated my normal is every three or four days. We would identify that as a problem today. We do want to give you guys an idea of what normal bowel habits look like. And of course give you some of those indications of abnormal bowel habits. Now I remember one of our young adult clients who would have a bowel movement once every two. Oh Aw can you imagine her heart a little. I know she thought that was normal. So are you wondering asked this question. What is normal for an Infant or a young child or even for an adult. What does that normal look like? Yeah Yeah Shelby. We're talking a little bit about that before we came on air of like what is normal And when I was first starting this whole mother journey and I would still consider myself fairly new parents even at seventeen months. Yeah I was just a little surprised that I was changing my son's diaper. You know at least three to four times a day. I mean realistically there were definitely days where it was like eight to ten times a day to. You're a pro. You get good at it really fast. And actually. When mothers breastfeed their babies many of those babies have have a ball movement after every feeding and I can attest in those early days? You were breastfeeding breastfeeding sessions. Eight ten twelve times a day. A sometimes all clustered together so There's a lot going on. Yeah And infants who are breastfed are rarely constipated Ed. Right and typically by about age to A child is having one to two formed bowel movements daily By the age of four. They're usually continuing that pattern of one two formed bowel movements a day right and if everything is working right most school age kids teens and adults should should be having one bowel movements daily in fact one or two daily as an adult is what we would consider normal and healthy right. You're eating every day Jay Multiple Times. Actually so you should be eliminating we digestion and elimination because we want to be working through absolutely. Yeah so an infant or toddler who is constipated typically will have a bowel movement that it's hard to pass. Yes they might be straining or they might be sitting on the toilet for a while or in my son's case he's not potty trained yet but you'll notice he will stop in his tracks and he'll be pushing you get that red face then look concentration So if they're doing that a lot or you notice hard little pellets in the diaper or in the toilet that would be. That would be considered constipation right on the other hand a child who normally has a ball movement maybe every two days may not be constipated as long as that ball movement is soft not difficult or painful to pass So it's it's still an easy process process for it to come out. Yeah making that distinction. Yeah exactly so constipation. Tends to be common at three different times in a child's life so the first time is typically after starting solid foods So if you think about that. They're getting more roughage at that point So that might look something like rice. Cereal applesauce are typical foods at people. Start with with those solid foods right another time is during toilet training. And then lastly Ashley usually after starting school right so Leo. Let's talk more about Good concert good digestion and address. More of that childhood constipation constipation after break. Yup that sounds good. So you're listening to dishing up nutrition and this morning our topic was going to be about constipation and diarrhea like I. I mentioned before we've talked about diarrhea loose bowel movements in great length on all their prior shows Sosa Day. We're doing extensive focus on constipation Russian and mainly concentrated concentrating on constipation in childhood so surprisingly constipation in today's world is a serious problem problems for many children. We ask the questions. Why is this happening to children in this day and age perhaps more so than it used to be and our Dietitian titian brains always go to? Could it be the processed foods that our kids are

Shelby Diarrhea Shelby Olsen Elson Shelby Hummel NBA Professor Leah Dietitian Titian Shen Ashley Sosa LEO JAY
"titians" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"titians" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Station, and the center for the defense of free enterprise Bellevue. Washington, we just can't have people floating about unregulated. You now. To the latest episode of free talk live, presented by sickles cei-. Download it for free at freetalklive dot com. This is retired live. You're invited here to join us. The toll free number eight, fifty five four fifty free like freedom, eight five five four five zero three seven three three Compal Titians change their spots. Can they have belief systems that they have, you know, put into place over many years, and then all of a sudden do a reversal and actually be plausible? When you say anything, about politics and staging their spots. I kind of spots, I think of our livers up because they're heavy drinkers or just old. Does that come from heavy drinking? Just an old thing. I think you can contribute to it. If you're in drinker. So Ian Johnson and silver, Dave here in the studio tonight, by the way, if you want to help support, what we do on free talk live, join the program, like Jean the Christian anarchist. He's one of our longest running amplifiers a silver amplifier, which means he gives five dollars a month to the pergram stands for advertise market and promote and is a way for you to get behind what we do here and help us get on more radio stations to bring more people to the ideas of freedom on the radio waves. We got over two hundred stations that carry our show at various times throughout the week right now. We could have three hundred it's just a matter of time. It's just a matter of effort. It's matter of marketing the show, and that's what the program allows us to do more effectively, and you'll get some cool perks also for helping us out, so please go to amp dot freetalklive dot com. Just takes a moment to get signed up makes a big difference for us, when you do it, it's AMP, amp dot freetalklive dot com..

Jean Compal Titians Bellevue Washington Ian Johnson Dave five dollars
"titians" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

The Storytellers Network

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"titians" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

"Says your trip begins at Michigan dot org. And I think it's a really good website. I think we were one of the first in the country years ago to come up with a website that was more of an inspirational website, rather than just informational. And then over the years, we saw other states and other destinations doing a lot better job. So we, we've we all learn from each other can of the point earlier, you gotta see count Titians doing so we have a, a website out there right now that we're constantly not tweaking. But if you go there right now you're gonna see some beautiful video that I think will really inspire you. And then if he click on the various pieces of information you'll find a lot. In one of the things I'm really proud of is that we're about to get into kind of a new phase because, as baby boomers, get older people like me were were having a little bit more difficult time to get around these days. Maybe we're not, you know, wheelchair so to speak, but maybe we are. Or maybe we're having sensitivities you know, two lights or two sounds or whatever. So as we traveled around we want to be able to go to these places in enjoyed them with the abilities that we have as well. So we're, we're about to, to launch a new accessibility program, where when you go to Michigan dot org. You're going to be able to tell quickly whether that hotel or that theater has something that may be suits your needs. Can you truly get around and we'll chair is it something that if, if you have a child with some kind of sensory disorder the, they're going to be able to enjoy it in not have an uncomfortable experience? So you're gonna be able to find that information as well in Michigan dot org. Enosis a small thing, but I'm really proud of it. I think it's gonna it's gonna make sure that people understand that, you know, we don't care what, what age you are, what sexual are what religion or political position. You have, what color skin is, we don't care about your accessibility issue in the degree that we wanna make sure that whoever you are wherever you come from. Whatever position in life, you have, you know that you are welcome in pure Michigan. So you're going to start to see that Michigan or pretty soon. And I think a lot of other media as well. And I'm looking forward to getting that going, it'll take a little while to update everything. But we're getting there. That's awesome. That's a huge thing. I've had friends now as I've kids growing up around me and stuff. It doesn't not my friends having kids that have those issues sometimes or I have parents who are getting up there in age, who as some point you need that that's, that's great. Right. Right. Right. It's really important that we do our best to try to cater to everybody. That's our obligation. I think it's our responsibility. And in, we need to do it in an engaging respectful manner, and make sure that, you know, that everybody has this opportunity to really experience, what we have this place really is special. And we wanna make sure that everybody has an opportunity to come. Enjoy it may men today. Last question. I love to ask. I can't wait to hear this. If someone said to you tomorrow, Dave, you're all done being a storyteller. You can tell no more stories..

Michigan Titians Dave
"titians" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"titians" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"It was a really cool book movie and kind of on Perot. You know. And then so that kind of had a big part of it. What Trump I can see. It's the same kind of he's got the and they're always going. Well, yeah. Okay. Well, we're canceling this, and you don't get to do that. And he had contracts day made a gazillion dollars just on them canceling everything. So he goes, not good. It's not like I don't want. He'll never release his fight it. Yeah. Like IRS anyway, what the hell here it is ten billion dollars. I get to say what I want to spend any of it do it 'cause I'll just lot rule. So this. This is going to be he added some interest to it. But I'm just like I'd rather just watch Ron Paul video of him in the next. I really learned something, but it's going to change the dynamic when you have a Republican up there on stage that from a position of self confidence, strength and resources that you could sit there and say, yeah, and you're not care what the media and everybody's Heke beg. Please keep criticizing me and call Bs on the whole market. I do not support Marco Rubio at all to me. I can almost see the strings of the puppet, but you know, we've got a country here where he gave the response, the state of state of the union few years ago, and he took a drink of water. I mean it's ridiculous. I mean, that's how we're going to judge or the dean scream with Howard Dean, you know, and he lost the whole nomination over that. I mean, this is how we decide or ridicule take patient, patient's doctor, mogayon, takeout. Titians. So here's Donald Trump. When most people be sacrificed and assassinate for drinking water wrong, or laughing wrong. Right. He'll sit there and say what he really believes doesn't care if sponsors leave. And that is something the independence is, is to me, power Mont. And I think this Trump thing and I know you got you and I are best friends with this. And this kind of an, it's a fun debate. We have. But I think my support of Trump is for different reasons than people might think, and it shows the divide of supporting. Joe man go divide with you, because you're looking for the philosophy complete which I respect Donald Trump is not about the philosophies, not speaking anywhere in the eloquence of Ron doctor with. But he represents for me. Many voters, the part that I think the the level was about that. I ask Dr Paul about as well which is not just about the philosophy. It's exposing whatever view, you have the finally show, the young people, how corrupt things are how you have been told who to vote for whether you knew it or not. And Donald Trump is going to expose this. He cannot be shut down and that to me is beautiful. You know what ten billion dollars means? I mean he's got more than one hundred million that raise. Time coordinated I got one hundred million dollars right here right here. It's my. Your hundred trillion and Trump goes, yeah. Yeah. Real money crimes of the crown by captain, Mark the crown cast the world in shadow and claims to be our guiding light cowards clamor for security from boogeyman and go stories. Well, I say these hobgoblins are imaginary, I say those they propped up as our liberators are now subsisting on our bondage. I say there is freedom in the black, and that's exactly where we intend to go. The crown banishes its own officers for exposing its crimes and tortures dissidents to the brink of madness. It dominates the globe and swallows the wealth of generations, leaving only blood and excrement the crown calls it piracy to explore frontiers beyond its grasp. So the time has come for us to define the conduct among pirates..

Donald Trump Dr Paul Ron Paul Howard Dean Perot Marco Rubio IRS power Mont Joe ten billion dollars one hundred million dollars
"titians" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"titians" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"It's just not. They are, there are things that are talked during the Old Testament, people are burned to death things like that. If you're worried about, whether it's an anti Christian thing, it's not our Jewish brothers and sisters have concerns because they, they interpret a few of the what we refer to as Old Testament versus they think. Oh, that's a problem. However, in the Christian, theology, the way, God raises the dead and all that practice. There's no change. And I will give you this for logic and reason that may stick with you. And that is that not to be ugly or crass, but the process that's taking place in a pine box is the same as cremation just over a longer period of time. So whatever's in the box, the organic, the person it's leftover is breaking down getting simpler, and will go and become. Basically ash on its own over hundreds of years. But in this process all you're doing speeding that up. It will not impede anything dealing with heaven. Dealing with God's dealing with you. Ashes dashes dust to dust nothing. No worries whatsoever. God will be able to find. You won't be lost him. He'll still be able to put you all back together. All of those things a lot of people freak out and go. We'll how's he going to know? It's well that's what he made you from in the first place before no trouble. So there's, there's nothing biblical for the Christian. That says you can't be cremated. Not one thing. So if that's how you want to go around in our heads. Sometimes they have to make the Titians ahead of time. And I listened for the topic, but it but I don't hear somebody civically get it clear cut like you just did. No. You is great question. Go in peace, and don't worry about it. And if that's what you choose to do be peaceful with it, it doesn't bother God one bit. Remember, a lot of money things go on in this world. And I get that. But remember, these simple words, I.

Titians one bit
"titians" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"titians" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Only Titians who refuse to act then are going to try to come back today and say we need a middle of the middle of the road approach to online, and he was out gender Cossio Cortez. Talking about the middle of the road approach when it comes to climate change. You know, what she wants the new green deal? Everyone said she's talking about Joe Biden. So they scrambled up to Joe Biden. And he said this cut six. Ever heard me say never. So he feels a little bit defensive should he be worried after all he seems to have a pretty secure lead at this point of Brazil's here done. What do you think about that little exchange her statement about the environment? And Joe by Andrea, you know, every time she opens some out a tweet. She makes news. And so I feel like yeah. You have to respond to it. But at the same time, I think it's incumbent upon Joe Biden to lay out his plan to have his vision. She has one vision, I think is important that we look at the other proposals. Jay Inslee, the governor of Washington state. He is also put forward a proposal on climate change as you well know Baidoa rook west we've put together a very big proposal. So this is one of the big issues in a Democratic Party. I don't think Joe Biden should simply respond to congresswoman a Cossio Kotecha Cortez. He should put out his own proposals. So that we can compare to to give me an example. I'm Joe Biden, and and this sound by was just played for me and some reporter yells at to me, how do I handle that? Well, say look, I respect her. I respect the proposal as she's put fallish put a lot of work, and it's one hundred nine pages read it for yourself. But I'm going to put up my proposal, which I think, you know, expands on the Paris accord, and whatever he believes is his proposal the bottom line is. I think the Democrats as well as other Americans should have a very healthy conversation about climate change. And look at some of the proposals that will get us there within the next ten to twenty years. I see the numbers, and I think Joe Biden's leading does Donna Brazile, see the numbers and things Joe Biden's got the substantial lead the number say, or is it so early you don't even look at it. Well numbers don't lie. That's what my mom. My mom used to say. But it is early in numbers could change. I mean, we can see a different question if he first of all go, and and to New Hampshire and do well if you don't do well in those two early states, you're not gonna get a bounce. I mean, how are you going to bounce in South Carolina, yet might help you in South Carolina. But that's that way too. Big delegate basket is the big delegate basket is going to be on Super Tuesday. Which is March third where California Texas Massachusetts in a number of other states will compete. So Joe Biden has to get a healthy star a headstart now in New Hampshire in order to get the big bounce that he will need to run by campaign. Do you tell him to to adjust his statement on China, not a competitor? I would tell Joe Biden right now the focus on the ground game. He can make a lot of noise and a lot of news. But right now, I want I if I was running his campaign if I was wondering any campaign, let's say focus on the ground game in those early states and get as much as possible. Well, the the press is you know, is is is a salty situation. Donna Brazile, thanks so much. Appreciate the insight so much going on we come back. Governor Rick Perry now secretary of energy Rick Perry, and how energy is making a safer.

Joe Biden Cossio Cortez Donna Brazile Cossio Kotecha Cortez Governor Rick Perry New Hampshire Democratic Party Jay Inslee Baidoa rook South Carolina Brazil Paris Andrea Washington secretary reporter China Massachusetts California
"titians" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:00 min | 3 years ago

"titians" Discussed on 600 WREC

"I get your age resort Soros. And what he does and. And how he attacks and tries to destroy the lives of conservatives. Hell his groups have come after me directly. I have. No love lost for that guy. But this is I don't think George Soros is making every illegal immigrant come across the border. And I don't think that's really the talking points. George source. I think Democrats truly believe that they need illegal immigrants in this country. Give them says and ship. And if they give them says they believe to vote for them. That's what I do believe. Yes, you're right. You're right. That is part of it. I think at some point we gotta do what Russia did and that is to ban this man from donating to our whole Titians. Why are the politicians getting money? But then you but hold on. This is where I got to disagree with you on that. I that would what you just said is it would be a terrible idea. Because then Democrats would do they would start banning conservatives from giving to people you don't wanna stop limiting people's freedoms to give to to cause into organizations, and the people that they believe in that would be a absolutely horrified idea because when you do it to them remember, they can come back and do it to you. I agree. Good point point. I just think that will losing control this country because they're not, you know, obeying are wheel. Because basically, we voted emitted there, but they got all this money coming to them from other. You know, other people that are working, and why would they listen to us after they've already gained their power. You know, if they're gonna, you know, start stock in their war chest with money from different sources other than us than that. That's a problem, and you know, hopefully, we can remedy that in the future. But I think we're losing our country. You know, people say revolution revolution. But are we look this is the reason why I think the presence doing what he's doing here? I mean, that's the reason why the presents not playing anymore. He's like, okay. Look you guys refused to there's a crisis. You refused to fix the problem you refuse to MIT that there's even an issue. We got one hundred thousand people coming across the border every month. Now legal Emerson. Detaining? We will bring them to your cities where you say that you are loving open arm group of people. That's fine. That is what we'll do. We'll bring them to you. And then you guys get to decide what you wanna do after that. I think that is the the definition of perfection by this president because you and I both know this if you bring one hundred thousand people into sanctuary cities, how long would take before the citizens who are liberal in that city cert- calling and saying hell, no. Exactly. So the hypocrisy. I mean, he's been a step ahead of Soros in the Democrats the whole time. This guy's a godsend. Maybe doesn't get reelected. It'll be the end of our country pressured the phone call what other saying, by the way, I don't think it's the end of our country. Didn't get elected. I we survived Obama. We'd survive Cardi for goodness sakes. I I I don't think those type of extreme comments are accurate, and look I think this country, and our democracy is bigger than anyone person, and our founding fathers set it up so that it would not our our country wouldn't succeed or fail because of the election of one person. I don't want anybody else to get re elected. But remember Jimmy Carter gave us Ronald Reagan rock Obama gave us Donald Trump. That's why I love this country. One eight hundred four seven four nine seven three two patriot mobile dot com. Phone lines are open Rodney, you're on the Ben Ferguson show. Hi. Doing well, sir. How are you? Give me your take on this. What do you think about the president's doing? Well, you know, I think it's great idea. Really? I mean, it's he's giving into what they wanted. I. Hey, they're the ones that said we're opening loving welcoming cities. What they what they were asking for now giving it to. You're not too happy about it. You know, that's the only because the open border thing. Go a lot farther than just boats and have an open arms. In two thousand thirteen it was. Did you just all you gotta do is load them up. Just just say here you go California. You want them? Here you go LA you want them. Here you go. Here's fifty thousand. How many do you want? You want to be the opening loving city here. They are. Let's go tell you what I am. I'm a broader third integration. Immigrant. My wife..

George Soros Rodney president Obama George source Russia Emerson Titians Ben Ferguson Jimmy Carter California Donald Trump Ronald Reagan
"titians" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"titians" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Thank you say. Gary and Fairburn has been very very patient talk to Gary before I assumed he would be and always on the air with us. Gary good morning. How are you? Brothers. I don't mean to come negative and dick happy birthday van. You're all do the show Carey's successor in my head a lot of different sauces stuff. But particularly as a let's say. Math night, or whatever hitting Reuters, everything about him talking about moving into the city did this on your show previously. It will not hit people who generational entitlements. Or you know, they're just having a hard time for a little bit. And they go on they're like it's designed to do for widows and orphans originally when they finally take a reduction in their benefits and trust me. It will be a big deal. They aren't gonna pay attention. So when he said this last night or whatever thank for last, it opened my eyes to the fact that. Waitering duplicitous liars, basically. Titians, and they just know the AMC's of the world. The Bernie Sanders utopia man, I want to but guess what? When you suck from that shit, and it's dry it over, and you will have destroyed the greatest thing in of forty four years by doing it. You can't come and sovereignty without borders. I don't get you can't eat inside out. That's the only way we'll be taken down. So these people coming over from God's children, you know, I want the best for potato got to affectively change their government in the nation. They.

Gary Bernie Sanders Reuters Fairburn Carey AMC Titians forty four years
"titians" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"titians" Discussed on AP News

"Again, never ever allow Titians to profit from elected position proponent, Toni preckwinkle isn't going far. She's still the Cook County board president and the pair will have to work closely together in the future. This may not be the outcome. We wanted. But while I may be disappointed. I'm not disheartened Lightfoot. Who's fifty six emerged as a surprise leader in the race to replace current mayor Rahm Emanuel, the two campaigns. Couldn't have been different preckwinkle did a lot of mudslinging well, Lightfoot talk unity and reform while rallying a large base. Also, looking for change from Chicago's typical machine politics on the bottom of my heart. Thank you. A few moments ago, I spoke with Toni preckwinkle in this election, Tony and I were competitors. But our differences are nothing compared to what we can achieve together for a city of more than two point seven million people voter turnout is near a record low with only about thirty two percent of registered voters doing so analysts say it shows large groups in the city is still feel underrepresented especially the Hispanic community, which is growing rapidly, which Kaga elected its first black mayor, Harold Washington. Back in nineteen Ninety-three voter turnout was eighty two percent. House subpoenas. I'm Ed Donahue with an AP news minute. The House Judiciary committee approves subpoenas for special counsel, Robert Muller's full Russia report committee chair Jerrold Nadler does not want redaction. We're gonna work with the attorney general and for a short period of time in the hope that that he will that he will. Revealed to us the entire Muller report. And this is Texas Republican John Radcliffe where in the special counsel regulation. Does it say that the that the attorney general must turn over an unredacted full special counsel report a special council? Regulation doesn't say that. No law says today in Boston actresses, Laurie Lachlan, and Felicity Huffman are doing court to face charges. They were involved in a wide ranging college admissions cheating scam to get their children into big name schools. A small three point six earthquake gave some people in southern California a predawn wakeup near Yorba, Linda, no injuries reported. I'm Ed Donahue, AP digital news back in a moment. Thank.

Toni preckwinkle special counsel Ed Donahue Lightfoot Robert Muller AP Rahm Emanuel attorney House Judiciary committee Cook County Titians Jerrold Nadler earthquake Chicago Kaga Felicity Huffman Boston Harold Washington Texas Yorba
"titians" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

06:05 min | 3 years ago

"titians" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Five. That's why you don't hear that anymore. No. It's kind of funny because there are still a few out there. A few Democrats in the house right now who are really pushing this and yet support for impeaching president. Donald Trump has fallen consistently over the last few months. With all the Titians or the public the public. The new CNN CNN poll, not exactly a pro-trump outlet. Here. CNN poll says that support for impeaching Donald Trump has fallen seven points since December decline from forty three percent in favor to thirty six percent now stems largely from change in democratic views on impeaching the president. Sixty eight percent in December. It was at eighty percent of self identified. Democrats said they were in favor of starting the impeachment process. Now it's fallen to sixty eight percent give me a chance among independents and Republicans support for impeachment has fallen three points over the same time. They didn't really have a long way to go eat away, independents and Republicans have by and large consistently said, no, let's not go through this. And I think right now the change in and people are saying this is the result of Nancy Pelosi convincing democratic voters. That's terrible analysis. Why do you say that? Because I think really what democratic voters are are looking at. It's not that a lot of Democrats are suddenly saying, oh, Donald Trump is the greatest president ever. I don't think there are a lot of Democrats who are saying I plan to vote for him in twenty twenty that being said, I think there are Democrats who are looking at two different things one. The Muller report has so far brought nothing it's it's still out there. And it this the general sense is that nothing's gonna come out of this now, especially when the president now is like release it. Yeah. And then you see how the favorability of Democrats pursuing multiple investigations has fared, so far people are kind of tired of this stuff. The second part of it with democratic voters. I think they're realizing that we're right around the corner from a an election a presidential election. So if you're a democrat, why would you wanna push an impeachment process that could benefit the president could solidify his support. Do you think the public thinks that way like thinks it all the way through to that point? I or just exhaustion of an okay? Yeah. I guess in the in the simple way in simplistic way. Yes. It is the exhaustion of all the investigations. And then also wanting to turn their eyes towards the twenty twenty election. It's not necessarily at all the detail that I tried to lay out there. But it is the, hey, let's just try to beat them at the at the ballot box. I think that's what a lot of democratic voters are feeling right now. That could very well. Be I found this interesting. And I mentioned this a few times it almost feels like I'm getting to a rant type of very which I don't want to do. But in a number of different ways feel like we're at a tipping point. Like people have had enough. Just like the story we talked about with the trans students changing in the girls locker room and hearing this girl saying this guy's looking at me. And then I see his stuff I'm on comfortable. Yeah. And people are enraged when they hear that like this is stupid. Yeah. Where we're at right now. And all of the crazy opinions that get thrown out there. And I think about how much we've heard from a show like the view over the last couple of years outrageous stuff all the time about the president. And I see this story today, and I'm like, wow, Jenny McCarthy hated working on that show. I know especially Robbins, you're like she's a not. Well, she is a not. Okay. Let me ask you a quick question before we get into the story. Okay. You know? She's a nut. Yes. But let's say she moves to your town. And she meets you, and she sorta smitten and she would just like to maybe have coffee or go out on a date to talk. I never said you were not. Janney Markley said. I said your smart. So you would suspend kidding me. She's okay. She's on fire Elvira. Okay. I just wanted to know if you thought she was that good look very attractive, and as she's by the way, she's a age appropriate as well for you. Well, yeah, she's forty seven or eight or something. Yeah. That works. Well, apparently her time on the view was not fun. There is a new book coming out called ladies who punched the explosive inside story of the view. Because so many times Robbins, especially you have made the comment. I don't know. How people do it every day? I don't be around that. I couldn't she's kind of saying that maybe you are soulmates in a way. I don't know. She said what be Goldberg was such a control freak that. She basically pushed Barbara Walters into retirement. Other people would say Barbara was getting older and kind of losing it. But what we wanted to be the sole moderator and had that putting the contract and sometimes Barbara would ask hey, could I moderate today just for old time sake because it was her last year? Jenny said, quote, it broke my heart when Barbara would shuffle and say, please. And what we'd say, no. She said she had an addiction to controlling people's thoughts. Their words the room the table. You're feeling your mood. She had an addiction to controlling all of it and everybody. So it sounds like she would be more of a fan of Barbara. Right. But not so fast. She said Barbara was no picnic either. Jenny said she had to change clothes probably fifty times because Barbara didn't like what she was wearing. Well. Barbara's like, I I don't want. You look in that good on this set. That's not what this is about that sort of thing. This is the show is not about the cleavage possibly. This is the view we take things seriously here. Welcome back to the cleavage starring Jenny McCarthy. And then apparently there was the quote tampon incident..

president Democrats Barbara Walters Jenny McCarthy Donald Trump CNN Robbins Nancy Pelosi Muller Janney Markley Goldberg Sixty eight percent forty three percent sixty eight percent thirty six percent eighty percent
"titians" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"titians" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Exit plan Bala Titians will table a number of amendments designed to change the course of the so far failed negotiations Hillary banned from the opposition labour party says leaving without any deal cannot be allowed to happen. It would cause disruption to our trade. It would result in. Introduction of tariffs, which would be bad for British competitiveness. Sakib parliamentary votes expected on Tuesday. Tom rivers ABC news, London state police are still trying to figure out what went wrong on a highway in Sharon yesterday afternoon that caused a deadly two car crash officials do know that a seventy three year old Rockport woman and her dog both died after the collision set the women's Jaguar off I ninety five and in a tree. The other car was driven by seventy nine year old Brewster woman. She survived. No names have been released a bakery in Washington state is trying to back up the boss after the release of politically charged Valentine's Day cookies gets people upset on social media at issue is a heart. Shaped cookie with build that wall written in frosting, a nod to President Trump's border security plans a post on Facebook has gone viral prompting several angry phone calls to Edmonds bakery. The owners say the cookie was simply a joke not meant to cause a political uproar. Pope Francis celebrates World Youth Day in Panama. He gave a speech to galvanize young followers. The pope part of the country yesterday after taking part in a ceremony with Panama's president and his wife drivers in Arizona can now get a digital license plate the plate digital license. Plate is an LT wireless connected device that looks similar to a tablet the license plate number is constantly displayed on the Arp plate. But it can also display other messages as well, like.

Arp plate Pope Francis Panama Bala Titians labour party President Trump Edmonds bakery Hillary Brewster president ABC Facebook Arizona Rockport London Sharon Valentine Washington seventy three year
"titians" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"titians" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"So I think it's listening to the different things that we get from divine. Well, which by the way, when I say that that were divine. What I am referring to is just the love that is within all of us and is such an easy energy for all of us to connect to. In in all the years. I've been doing the work that I've been doing. I've only met one person who said that they don't love anything, you know. Yeah. So you've been doing this and she were seventeen. And I know you started with a yoga studio before there was even this concept of medicine readings before spirituality met mainstream. I was really inspired by the interview did on my buddy green about your personal journey. Can you share a little bit about how you got to where you are? Right now yet. Gosh, it's like looking back on it. It's it's hard to not feel a little emotional about the process, but basically just happened overnight. Right. Basically, I just I started doing this work. And I really couldn't find anything better. You know? I really couldn't find anything that I loved doing more. And it didn't really matter to me if I was considered like a wack job or like a woo woo. What you got earlier? Oh, totally totally. And it it just was like what I had to do. And so I just really stuck with it in state, very dedicated to it, and it was not an any way like a financial choice or like, I don't know. What else I'm going to do with my life? So I guess I'll do this kind of thing. It was like this is what I had to do. And just really I stayed very steadfast to that. So I also found yoga at the same time. And I hear about are we in right now. So I started practicing yoga when I was seventeen. And then when I was twenty four I open. Nd up a yoga studio in healing center. And the upstairs was a yoga, and I was like, okay. Like, this is one very important part of helping people find balance, and and healing and inner peace, and I in a way looking back understand that I was hiding a little bit behind yoga, and then the downstairs, you know. But like the secret part of it was the healing center. And so it there was rooms for esta Titians and acupuncture, and then I had my healing practice in one of the rooms and a natural thing started happening where people would come for yoga, and they would then wanna spend more time with me. And so my healing practice really started to grow, Ben. But it was still like. Hiding under things like an and also during this time, I was travelling back and forth to the Peruvian Amazon. And I was doing a hall apprenticeship to learn how to lead Iowa ceremony is. So there was a lot of like is it is. It's who I am. This path is at that path is this path. Like, how can I help people in the most powerful way in this lifetime? Because this is just what I have to do, you know? But the context of what is now called the medicine reading was already growing, and you know, and yet it it took a lot of confidence for me to just come into a place of understanding that I just have to be me..

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