19 Burst results for "Tina Brown"

"tina brown" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:08 min | 4 months ago

"tina brown" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"His novels are often overly long lack craft for not driven in the slightest way by plot really. It's almost as if the volume gets turned up on bellows interior preoccupations and you accompany them for a span of four to six hundred pages and and then the volume goes down I like him at shorter length. Seize the day is a masterpiece of concision and and dramatic focus in a way. I recently discovered a collection of such works at the most random thing in the world. My daughter fifteen year old daughter and i were driving in maine in a little rural community. And there's a white tent with a bunch of books underneath and there's no mistaking it. It's a public library book sale. We go over one hundred percent on the honor system. You leave whatever you please in the little jar. Nobody was there from the library. And you take whatever books you want. And so i was like listen. Let's get the cart. Let's get the horse before the cart here. I put ten bucks in the jar. And i said if we take a book we take a book. Go ahead and we went and both look to. I think we both walked away with a book. Mine was a collection by saul bellow called him with this fitness mouth. Which i'd never read before and it's him at kind of short longer than short story shorter than novella length. And they're also from a period that i don't think anyone would call his heyday. I mean this mostly stories dating from the seventies and eighties including one. He wrote for a very early. Tina brown issue of the Vanity fair and the nineteen eighties. And i think they probably gave him a six figure..

bellows maine saul bellow Tina brown
Viola Davis, One of the Greatest Actors of Our Time

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:22 min | 10 months ago

Viola Davis, One of the Greatest Actors of Our Time

"Welcome alex i. It's great to have you here to talk about viola. I'm so excited to hear your picks but first a little bit of background viola. When she won her first oscar for best supporting actress for fences and twenty seventeen. She became the first black person to win the so so-called triple crown of acting a competitive advantage emmy and tony award because of this in how omnipresent she's been over the last decade including her turn in the blockbuster period piece the help and as the shady complicated lawyer least keating in the long running series how to get away with murder. It might be easy to forget that. She has more than paid her dues to get where she's at. Now she graduated from juilliard in nineteen ninety-three and bounce between theater and screen throughout the rest of that decade by the early offs. She'd become a reliable supporting actor. Popping up in steven soderbergh movies like solaris and playing rations on the mom rule or the urban professional. She spoken candidly about how being dark skinned. Black woman has impacted her career like in this interview. She did with tina brown in twenty eighteen. I have a career that's probably comparable to meryl streep julianne moore. Let's sigourney weaver. They all came out of jail. They came out of juilliard. They came on nyu. They had the same path as me and yet i am nowhere near them. Not as far as money not as far as job opportunities. Nowhere close to

Emmy And Tony Award Viola Oscar Alex Steven Soderbergh Meryl Streep Julianne Moore Tina Brown Weaver NYU
"tina brown" Discussed on Bank-Fintech Fusion

Bank-Fintech Fusion

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"tina brown" Discussed on Bank-Fintech Fusion

"Hello welcome to link fintechs. Fusions third episode of the vein operational alignment series. I'm tina brown. Principal at ccd catalysts. And with me. i have john peckham also a principal. Cd's i don the Absolutely i'm really excited about this conversation. In episodes one into through identifying how your business units performance supports reaching the overall his ational goals and had a full visibility of the overall health. Your business unit in today's episode we're going to discuss. How operational limet calls for current process review risk assessments an implementing key performance indicators sadat. Let's start with discussing how important it is for a financial services organization to complete an internal operational assessment..

john peckham tina brown
"tina brown" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"tina brown" Discussed on 600 WREC

"That's Hunter Biden, you can burn cities. That's Portland and Seattle. And you do all that without consequence. But if you're conservative, you can't even smile at a native American. That would be Nick Sandman. Is that not a great tweet? Fabulous, Fabulous tweet, by the way, Speaking of tube in the left, is trying to save his gig. They got what's her face? What's her face? Tina Brown out there trying to say Hey, you know what? He didn't mean to do it? He didn't He didn't mean to masturbate. Well, No, he didn't mean to do it in front of people. All it was an accident. The camera was on pointed at the pubic area. Yeah, essentially wasn't actually didn't know he was doing it. He's there's no reason why public masturbation should destroy a 30 year career at a great liberal publication like The New Yorker. They're trying to get the guy reinstated. Okay. Back to the phones. My adopted hometown, Sacramento, California. This is Robbie. Welcome, sir. Great to have you here. Hello. Hi, Rush Limbaugh. Yesterday you had a caller who was asking who the next leader of the Republican Party should be as if Donald Trump has faded into oblivion and, um There was talk about winning more Republican seats in the future. What We're going to play some gigantic game of house. If we step past what has just happened in this presidential election, as if nothing happened. If we do not deal with it, we have stepped from what was America. Into tyranny. What will be left other than one gigantic pretend game of politics. I don't disagree with that. I'm I'm trying to think back. I asked who would be the Republican leader in the future? I asked that question. I asked of who Well, A caller yesterday was asking it was posing that question. There was some discussion on it and you know, and there's been some talk about 2022 2024. But what's the point of what's the point of discussing any future election if we don't feel what has with what's just happened? Oh, I look, um you're preaching to the choir on that my point about this from the very beginning has been the integrity the Constitution. The integrity of our electoral system of the Democrats are the ones that have blown it up. Um, And if if this is not resolved, and it doesn't look like it's gonna be Then how can we assume any election down? The road is legit and fair. I were on the same page here. But that still doesn't mean that it doesn't matter who is going to be the leader of a political movement. You're still gonna have to have that. I know. I guess I'm just wondering what's the point? It looks to me like if we don't deal with what has just happened. We're just going to be playing one gigantic game of pretend Attending our votes means something pretending that we can influence what's going to happen. So what should happen? I mean, there have been serious efforts. Ah, lot of people have worked very hard to try to expose this. And to fix it, and they've bombed out. What? What? What? What do you think should be the next step The next phase. Well, I think Marc Stein, your guest host was saying on Monday. This is the hill to die on. Um and I think we have to stand up against tyranny or we're going to be living with it. We're living with it. Right now, until this is dealt with, and we will be living with it continually until this is dealt with. So I don't I don't have the answers other than just encourage all of the listeners. We have got to stand up against tyranny. This is our generation. This is our moment. I don't disagree with that. And I think you have 74 million people that did. They voted for Trump. They were cheated. They were defrauded. There's no question that That something really out of whack happened in this election. And you know, asking them to, um, uh, to do more than that. It's a hill to die on. I understand that. I understand the sentiment, but where's the hill and let's define dying? Well, maybe maybe more colors can can weigh in on this point. I do want to take issue with the 74 million figure. I keep hearing this 70 million figure than 74 million figure. I think we need to add a plus on the end because I just have great doubts that that is accurate. And that that is high enough. I've heard some people think that Trump maybe even said 80. I'm not. I'm not sure. Ah! I've heard that number bandied about. Um, Yeah. Look, I totally understand the sentiment that you have I I understand the Frustration that you have and to say that this is a hill to die on that if we accept this meaning if we accept Biden's president, Then. We've cooked our own goose and that we're just living in a pretend world to use your term where our votes supposedly matter, but they actually Don't Because we will have been Hoodwinked. And cheated and so forth, and so on short of something that Prevents Biden being elected going.

Donald Trump Hunter Biden Republican Party Nick Sandman Rush Limbaugh Tina Brown Portland Sacramento Marc Stein Seattle California Robbie America The New Yorker president
"tina brown" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"tina brown" Discussed on KOMO

"On five in Seattle around I 90 North five. Also struggling just a bit. Rate around the two Komodo Mar. Next report is that 1 54 I'm Kevin Smith. Couple traffic. Your co Moh forecast pretty typical afternoon around western Washington in December. We have the grace guys out there showers or tapering off upper forties and lower fifties today keep a gray overnight police Cloudy out there you won't see the great awfully dark and then on through Monday and Tuesday It will be cloudy on Monday, mostly dry for most of the day before showers show up late in the come with senator turns on companies stay connected. Stay informed The Northwest's on Lee 24 hour News station Co. Moh news 1000 FM 97 7 Approval of a covert 19 vaccine is close, say experts, while others are pending. A B C's Uni Han has more the FDA is meeting this Thursday could mean a green light for fighters. Vaccine, according to Doctor Is she Shaw, Tina Brown University's public School of Health. But John also telling Good Morning America, There are some concerns about vaccinating his Children right away. I expect my kids to get vaccinated the issue simply Is that we haven't tested Is there not enough Visor has started testing a vaccine on kids, 12 years and older and Madonna says it will follow suit. The goal to have a vaccine ready before school starts and fall of 2021 U. De Haan, ABC News Some big developments on the coronavirus front this week. Infections airway up, But a vaccine we're told, is on its way. However, it's not here yet. ABC is Sherry Preston reports. We are in a humanitarian crisis with this pandemic after John Brown Steen, an epidemiologist and ABC News Medical contributor, as cases continue to surge across the country, so two hospitalizations And death in a 24 hour period.

ABC John Brown Steen ABC News Medical Komodo Mar U. De Haan Seattle Good Morning America Uni Han Shaw News station Co Kevin Smith senator Tina Brown University Washington Madonna FDA public School of Health
"tina brown" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"tina brown" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"To him, and he wrote a book that was her way of getting out of the marriage. And then she claimed to not have given the interviews. But she actually did. She started leaking information to Andrew Morton because Andrew Morton wrote of Wonderful Unauthorized Accounts of her and really find upon her, So she's like she picked a journalist who she knew liked her. And then she started leaking those that information to him. So it is in her own words. But yes. Oh, that's he takes that. And then another book from Tina Brown and then a couple of others about Prince Charles and puts it all all together and then I love the host. Sarah Marshall because she really is hearing. She's like us. She plays the role of not knowing the information heat is just telling her the information. She digests it and It's very late back and very conversational to it. Z, you know, you think journalists but you know they throw f bombs in there and they're they're really fun. She likes to point out a lot of ways where you know it's like here we are again expecting a woman to do this, You know, just because she's a woman, so she brings that perspective to it. And so it's called. You are wrong about And I'm interested to even listen to the other ones that aren't about Diana. And like I said, you'll have to sift through on your podcast app to find the five parts about Diana. But I wish I remembered which listener suggested this didn't me but thank you See? Just put a link up on our show Page two to the first episode, so hopefully that will easily Yeah, it's super easy to find once you expand and you know, just I don't know what chap you use, you know, podcast one or whatever. But you just You might just expanded to all so you can see all of them. It's so That's why I love these shows these by history based shows because that's what it does to me. It's spur it. It motivates me to seek out more actual information. You know what I mean to fill in the gaps of the dramatic narrative, So yeah. Find it wherever podcasts are sold. And the Diana in her own words that don't offer also referenced on Netflix is well with the crown 8 17. The dirt alert is coming up next. My talk 171. Are.

Sarah Marshall Andrew Morton Diana Tina Brown Netflix Prince Charles
The Crown season 4

The Watch

08:47 min | 1 year ago

The Crown season 4

"I am now joined by. Amanda dobbins our resident expert. Amanda thanks for joining me again. My pleasure your pleasure to watch these middle. Three episodes of the crown season four absolutely crushing. It this stuff. Is this really good. We're talking today about favorites fagin and taryn knowle's ands basically. It's the episode with all the kids. The episode with the guy breaks into the palace and the episode. Where charles and diana go to australia. And i have to say that i think four. I've seen a few people dating for here and there for some reason. Maybe because it's too too well kind of put too much of a bow on it. I think it's fucking extraordinary. Like if i i thought that favorites was a really like startling achievement in dramatic writing and just in terms of the amount of stuff that they burn through in the way that they bring all these characters. What did you. What did you think of that episode. I agree with you. And i have not seen any criticisms because i don't really consume social media anymore but anyone who thinks it's too neat or they put a bow on it. I guess find another show This is peter. Marin is a playwright. There is a lot of construction and intentional cinematic and exposition all dialogue and set pieces built into this. It's not. it's not that it's obvious but all of it is very crafted. So i agree with you that i thought episode four was tremendous in terms of the amount of like and setup that they managed to convey to you in a very effective way. Because we don't really know anything about two of the four children barely met any of them and has been kind of a side character and so there are four children who get their own scenes and moments and so you have to develop those characters. You have to develop the queen's relationship to all of them. You also have the margaret thatcher thematic connection of the of the children. And you're drying out a little bit about margaret thatcher's relationship to women as well which is an important larger thematic episode. And also you've got the falklands war. I mean it's and they do it definitely and i thought about something you say a lot. Which is the crown doesn't like doesn't waste a moment. They just pick the scenes they pick the lines. And you know everything you need to know. That is so hard and they nail it. I mean they do a lot of stuff that i think other shows would probably shy away from because it would feel too like they were showing you too many of their cards so i kept thinking about the scene between elizabeth and an you know they go riding out. This is the thing that they sort of both share this love of horses even though and is obviously phillips favorite. And that's like in the way that that gets conveyed in the beginning and their conversations heartbreaking you know like their conversation is legitimately breaking and i think you could look at what an says. She's like. I used to enjoy being the difficult on and scaring people and now i don't feel like have any control over that anymore and you could be like well like you might go your entire life and never have that level of self awareness. You know you may have to go through thirty years of therapy to find that out about yourself and this young woman just like sort of pops out off when confronted by her mother on iran day. But it's beautiful writing. It's just it's just like amazing writing. And i thought the performances specifically in that scene mostly because the three sons come off as absolute troll lords in this episode mean. Yeah but the scene in particular was was quite lovely thought. Listen i think that there are levels of emotional breakthrough and clarity in this. Show that it's never happened in real life and certainly have never happened in the uk and to anyone who is absolutely senior no country just a lot of time talking about salads in england too early because they get a lot of salad industry and how to their salads or just blue cheese and bacon their emotional relationships are blue cheese and bacon. Do they are not. They're not doing the the smart greens. Now i mean it's it's a tv show and we are projecting emotions and trying to figure out how these people felt about the facts that we know are true. That's what we think is so interesting about episode for which made me reflect a little bit of on the queen character in this season and an interesting thing is happening. We talked a little bit about this on the last episode. Where libya coleman is kind of popping out a little bit and coleman is one of the great actresses of time and also i find her personally hilarious so i think that that's great but i see moments where it nothing is on the page and it's just olivia colman giving it that sense of humor giving it that timing Or maybe even the character is being a little bit written to her strengths and that is also a little bit because the queen is not. i mean. she's not a side character but the way they're telling the story is about all of the other people and events who are kind of crowding into that character's life and how she's bouncing all of it but episode four is just it's about the queen and all of their writing it's character development that is in line with the past three seasons that we've seen and it's pretty extraordinary and i think libya coleman also does like a great job with the actual written script and the character and the reacting to like the horror show of her children. I mean they all are. Do you have a favorite of the four. Who is your favorite on the shore in real life. No on the show. I don't really i. It's shifted i think blassie's and it would have been charles and yeah and this season it's probably end. Although let me get to the end of it. I mean it's obviously not editor andrew. So yeah. I wanted to just quickly before we get into edward andrew charles. A little bit ask you you start this episode up. Did you expect the wedding. No if only because number one. I read some spoilers about how they don't show the wedding but i do also think in their when charles and diana yes yes. The most watched royal wedding. I think of all time. I i don't. I should have gotten this statistics. It was close to a billion people. Watch it. I mean that was everywhere and people taped it and watched it over and over again rate including me who. Dvr it when bbc america riera it before the wedding harry and meghan and it was part of their like twelve hour block of programming. I watched all of it i. It's pretty boring. They didn't really have their production values in one thousand nine hundred one that we expect from royal wedding now anyway but no. There was sort of finality to episode three and there was something intentional about the way they showed their rehearsal and kind of the real behind the scenes emotions where i was like. Okay this is an interesting choice and like this is what we're going to get and also i've seen it before was do because like they wouldn't be a lot of opportunity for people to be talking during that so unless there would be some fagin like wrinkle history that they wanted to explore not really sure what they would do their right. I mean it happened at such a scale that even it would defy the crown's siegi budget. I will say. I was surprised that diana disappeared for new episodes. We'll get episode five. But she is very briefly shown and she is heavily pregnant when she shown episode four. And she just won't come out of the room and in one way. That's really all you need to know. About how their marriage is going and how everything is you know how everything is is shaken out but on the other hand i was like uh this is a choice. Diana pretty popular. Yeah yeah no. I thought that the dow is interesting. Also the suggestion. That charles is starting to become under the influence of these gurus and like self help nutritionist. Which i didn't. I didn't know that about him. Oh yeah the the lawrence vander past reference. I only know about this from the tina brown book. But apparently he brought those books on their honeymoon and then tried to get diana who was twenty at the time of their wedding to read the books and discuss them over for dinner on their honeymoon. So that's how that went

Amanda Dobbins Taryn Knowle Margaret Thatcher Fagin Diana Coleman Charles Olivia Colman Marin Amanda Blassie Edward Andrew Charles Australia Phillips Peter Elizabeth America Riera England
"tina brown" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"tina brown" Discussed on WJR 760

"Call from a gentleman who wass up in arms about a video that he had seen on social media or about absentee ballots being marked on the envelope with an R or a D. Yeah, And I'm here to to explain that. It's been be bunk in the mainstream media long ago, and I'm surprised Well, actually, I'm not surprised that it's still kicking around. But here's the explanation. And then I think there are three really important takeaways from what is otherwise. A very trivial story. So the explanation is that? Yes, indeed, the ballots that were in that Facebook video posted by some lady from Florida. Name Tina Brown is that it was a primary election in Florida. Florida has closed primaries, roll voters register by party and then they get a partisan ballot. Sure if we just went to the polls, you you had to fill out whether you were voting on the Democratsside a Republican side to make your choices in the primary here in Michigan to that's that's very common, isn't it? No. In Michigan, you get one ballot and you fill out the Republican side or the democratic side. Your primary you are you all right? But But you could only vote on one side. You can't mix up your votes is what I'm saying. Yes, But Florida has closed primaries where you register with one party or another, and you only get that ballot. So that is the very simple explanation. Why, in a primary election in Palm Beach, Florida, U would have Ah return sleeve That's marked our or deed. So that explains the whole video. There's not one explained to him about it. And there's nothing. It has no impact on anyone in Michigan. There are five states that have closed primaries and it only happens in primaries. Those things Won't be on Florida ballots in the general election. The whole store is Caribbean and much to do about that. Now, here is what is important about the story. First of all, it's been debunked in the mainstream media and people people like mainstream media, but the main Did a good job of blowing the story up. The only reason that survived was because the race through All right, well, we lost you there, but I get the point and I agree with you. All of us have to be very, very careful with what we report that includes talk shows that includes news people. You know, everybody takes prided. And I mean this, even if if you have the most partisan person in the media, they take pride in trying to get accurate information out to the public. Each and everyone So I hear what you're saying. I understand your concerns, and that makes all the sense in the world to be of why that would be marked R and Andy on the on the ballots, And I'm glad you called and explained all of that for us. Thank you so very, very much. Let's continue on the phones here will go to Detroit. Next, Paul, you're on the Frank Pickman show. Good morning..

Florida Michigan Tina Brown Facebook Frank Pickman Palm Beach Detroit Andy Paul
"tina brown" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"tina brown" Discussed on 710 WOR

"To bow and try to do things to help change you know the lack of diversity across gender race ethnicity sexuality disability and age and so this is just be one Paul old when I feel very strongly about so what I'd like to like to drive change in advertising is very interesting area because the target demographics right for many of these companies and many of these products has forever been eighteen to thirty four right at least in my business and television or eighteen to fifty four if you really want to stretch it but after fifty four they don't really care and I'm curious is that an outdated antiquated modeling your view so bloody into day and it's all for a much bigger problem which national has quite rightly highlighted which is the patriarchy suit at the top of my industry as at the top of your screen and runs through the closed loop of white guys talking to want guys Bob white guys what that means an appetizing is that the primary of everything on the primary influence apart from everything is female that's not so majority ordered subsidizing eighty percent of consumer goods are not by one but the advertising industry is dominated by men so we are close to being sold to ourselves from the male gaze and equally my industry is extraordinarily ages Tina brown and I were talking recently and we were saying why is this obsession still so prominent because we were saying that women when their children get older and they're out of the house they have more disposable income they have more freedom to travel to spend it to do things and yet they're still kind of invisible the thing about that is everything we're talking about the solution is enormously simple if you want to sell a ton of products to older people in a way to make all the people go my gold let me get my one account and give you all my money older people make yeah and it should have older people create the ads approve the ads produce the ads and direct the ads if you had told the people in the industry operating at every point along the way we would see much better advertising and from normally especial pictures well cells because the enormous irony is all right bang on about the young water campaign which for many US has run the tagline live young and the skills that's what we want to do I trace the hash tag little because we are the ones living the aspirational lifestyle we have our own sense of values we have our own personal taste we dress the way we won't we live the way we want if we're looking at we have money that means we can travel we have more freedom these are all things that young people are too but we.

Paul US Bob white Tina brown eighty percent
"tina brown" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"tina brown" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Talked about and try to do things to help change you know the lack of diversity across gender race ethnicity sexuality disability and age and so this is just being one Paul old when I feel very strongly about so what I'd like to like to drive change in advertising is very interesting area because the target demographics right for many of these companies and many of these products has forever been eighteen to thirty four right at least in my business and television or eighteen to fifty four if you really want to stretch it but after fifty four they don't really care and I'm curious is that an outdated antiquated modeling your view up so bloody new play and it's all for a much bigger problem which national has quite rightly highlighted which is the patriarchy suit at the top of my industry as it was top of your listing ever on streets a clean sweep of white guys talking to want guys Bob white guys what that means an appetizing is that the primary everything on the primary influence with pictures of everything is female that's not so majority organs appetizing eighty percent of consumer goods are not by one but the advertising industry is dominated by men so we all Kansi being sold one cells from the male gaze and equally my industry is extraordinarily ages Tina brown and I were talking recently and we were saying why is this obsession still so prominent because we were saying that women when their children get older and they're out of the house they have more disposable income they have more freedom to travel to spend it to do things and yet they're still kind of invisible the thing about that is ever sing with talking about the solution is enormously simple if you want to sell a ton of products to older people in a way to make all the people go my gold let me get my wallet out and give you all my money older people make the ads and it should have older people create the ads approve the ads produce the ads and direct the ads if you had older P. from industry operating at every point along the way we would see much better advertising and so normally a special pictures ourselves because the enormous irony is all right bang on about the young water campaign which for many US has run the tagline live young and the skills that's what we want to do I push the hash tag little because we are the ones living the aspirational lifestyle we have our own sense of values we have our own personal taste we dress the way we want to live the way we want if we're looking at we have money that means we can travel we have more freedom these are all things that younger people spot too but we.

Paul US Bob white Tina brown eighty percent
"tina brown" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"tina brown" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Male dominated fused obsessed industry if there ever was one who is tool to bow and try to do things to help change you know the lack of diversity across gender race ethnicity sexuality disability and age and so this is just be one Paul old when I feel very strongly about so what I would like to like to drive change in advertising is very interesting area because the target demographics right for many of these companies and many of these products has forever been eighteen to thirty four right at least in my business and television or eighteen to fifty four if you really want to stretch it but after fifty four they don't really care and I'm curious is that outdated antiquated modeling your view apps a bloody nose Hey and it's all for a much bigger problem which national has quite rightly highlighted which is the patriarchy suit at the top my industry as it was top of your listing ever on streets a clean sweep of white guys told want guys Bob white guys what that means an appetizing is that the primary everything on the primary influence the pixel everything is female that's not so majority organs appetizing eighty percent of consumer goods are not by one but the advertising industry is dominated by men so we all consuming still twelve cells from the male gaze and equally my industry is extraordinarily ages Tina brown and I were talking recently and we were saying why is this obsession still so prominent because we were saying that women when their children get older and they're out of the house they have more disposable income they have more freedom to travel to spend it to do things and yet they're still kind of invisible the thing about that is everything we're talking about the solution is enormously simple if you want to sell a ton of products to older people in a way to make all the people go my gold let me get my wallet out and give you all my money older people make yeah and it should have older people create the ads approve the ads produce the ads and direct the ads if you had older people industry operating at every point along the way we would see much better advertising and some normally a special pictures well cells because the enormous irony is I bang on about the water campaign which for many US has run the tagline live young and the skills that's what we want to do I press the hash tag little because we are the ones living the aspirational lifestyle we have our own sense of values we have our own personal tastes we dress the way we won't we live the way we want if we're looking at we have money that means we can travel we have more freedom these are all things that younger people spot too but we.

Paul US Bob white Tina brown eighty percent
"tina brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"tina brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"New documentary for some a captures the day to day lives and determination of those who fought for their freedom the film framed as a letter to their daughter won the award for best documentary at the Cannes Film Festival and premieres in New York on Sunday afternoon at the I FC as part of fifty one fast fifty one fifth of the Film Festival for films about and by women its founder Tina brown will join us next hour but now here speak with us are wild Hines and Edward thank you so much for being here thank you for having us so why did you frame this as a love letter to your daughter how tall is something we I was always wanted to do for like everything I've tried to do was for hair and indirect way or indirect Tory so the firm laws with the help with Edward we were discussing with the best way to speak about the fan and how with the frame would be about the friend and we had that idea bought to telling that to Selma which has like a duty was a domestically bike the footage can tell you is that I want to be for some I want to speak with some added just because my life was as old mother and as a journalist at same time and everything I captures lost makes between they still lifes the mother and journalist and was the only way to be very honest and very sensitive about what I was what I went through and what man comes a thick discussions about hums a you you both were struggling in the film with whether to stay we are actually struggle you're pretty clear you're pretty clear that you're staying but you do bring up and you do address the feelings of would be safer for our daughter elsewhere what kind of conversations did you have off camera about them parents yeah it's the it was very easy is it like first like Vitti ad hard to take that it was immediately we took that decision but the conversation about that about thinking like what's best for our daughter because we had the option not tool bring her back with a start up had the option to leave her with my parents in Turkey but we thought that the siege yeah we had an a a aloha for example was seized for five years so we thought like are you really going to be away from our daughter for five years what a life to be or what are we going to we might be killed and is is it better for her to grow up as an orphan with her grandfather and grandmother but that that family over then we took the decision we would we one family or no different than any other family that are in east LA ball we live together or die together and that's it when you went back and looked at the film what do you after watching the whole film how do you view your decision it's still very complicated until now anti count really how vast the Lexington think about what we went through the man thinks about this that's what we've went to so is that happening now so you can't really separate yourself about okay this is a story and it's and and now I should have that's feedback about what's going on it's more about we should just try to use this for now as a and evidence on trying to tell the world what's what was going on and what's going on right now as we speaking and another place called and left the last very out of a subdivision so it's not about you know like I'm just training it's the didn't finish it's it's still we are at the same busy and difficult moment about take this shins even if it's not me at times and all but there's thousands and like like I don't know how many from is with a lot of families who have the same discussion now and they have literally no place to go where or there is no they don't have that's of opportunity to to have a discussion and we're tell me how you can involve the process so any met these two after they left the left by I'm because which wasn't that long ago right now it's not like three years three years from now yeah and and we met actually very quickly off to the left and no one realized that what it got that this incredible archive of old ideas in the city it was only after they left and she literally brought these back to war Scott hard drives with that to our colleagues in London and they realize she had this incredible all kinds to know and expand the conflict and everything that happened that it'll save their family store in the story of summer and sighed I think because it was so you brought to her still at that time and because people need to I was very passionate about Syria and I always wanted to tell a story about people like what in the hands of the middle class people eat them fighting for their freedom inside I think we will match made basically we have put together to work on it together there was a lot of footage there was a lot a lot of fish three hundred to five hundred hours yeah I have a five hundred I think I you know you're right as Stephanie I have a five hundred I mean she was filming all sorts of things I have a five years from the sublime to the horrific and site yet just the beginning of the process was just trying to Wade through and get a handle on this Voss archive which in itself took months and because she done such an amazing job what what was something in the footage that you mean you had to be in this goes in out of all those hours this has to be in this film there's also things which I thought that's been than we did and what you had more the decision about taking some things out was very very difficult to me it's more about you know I feel just these stories are very important every detail and every story and everyone not just like the other family Arafat Saddam and the kids on the just my from you but there's thousands of stories which I I think not just me with a manual and went on a everyone who works in the team of from or excuse reducers anyone who was involved in some part they have a preferred to footage they wanted to be but yeah at the end we couldn't make everything gets ninety five minutes so far and we can put anything more but I think we can make was there something Edward you had to be in there was a quite a few things I think I mean one of the things that always struck me was with old Hara based in the trauma that these guys have been through the thing that would bring the emotion most of the surface was the moment when they were forced to leave which was quite a surprise to me and I think to a westerner in general you think well you know at least you're getting out of this nightmare but it was such a visceral for both of them that that really hit me and and just explore not try to understand why that was the sort of point of maximum pain I guess yeah that's was one thing but there were many other examples we're talking about the documentary for sama the filmmakers wiped a tear and her husband actor home Hamza achieved and Edward watch so I would play a little clip because part of the film also is about your work yeah I'm sorry about your work as a doctor in about the last I can't even remember the news report about the last and in hospital and Aleppo let's take up a little bit of a listen to a clip from the film and we'll talk about it on the other side.

New York Cannes five years three years ninety five minutes five hundred hours fifty one fifth
"tina brown" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"tina brown" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Blast. The basic says one thing I'm Courtney love you've never heard or seen anything like so buckle up because it's about to get exciting. So one thing or doesn't matter literally the first thing here. The record is Courtney's Vogel over distorted mid tempo. Tune river the lyric when I was teenage heart. My mother asked me baby were four I give you plenty. Why do you want baby? Why? The singer Courtney answers her imagine mom, I said, I feel so alone. I wish I could die a see things you put me through. And I wish I could. The sting of Courtney's childhood was front and center wasn't going anywhere. And neither she Courtney. Love was possible to ignore. At least that's what Kirk Cobain within thirty seconds of meeting her a dank, Portland club. He was tussling on the beer soaked floor with her wrestling playfully or some comment Courtney made while Kurt was loading. His gear him before Naronha gig. Something about how he looked like Dave Perner from soul asylum to Kurt them's was fighting words, so things got physical turn Kurt on left an impression one the current was eager to explore the next time. There has crossed on the road in the UK Courtney on the road with hall Kurt with their honor. And then again, stateside Chicago where they eventually get around to giving into that building sexual tension. They both fell hard and fast. It was Tober nineteen Ninety-one right in the midst of Nirvana's ascent via the release of never mind, the two married in February nineteen Ninety-two, voila, rock and roll royalty. In the early nineteen nineties, you couldn't get more mainstream than Vanity Fair magazine. Comprised of alias contributors like Dominic Dunn star making photographers like her Brits in any liebowitz. And how by genius editors Tina Brown and Graydon Carter the high gloss MAG both projected and reflected American culture, but what set it apart from other means stream outlets. In addition to the quality of its content was its willingness to brazenly Wade into the waters of high society and celebrity scandal in nineteen Ninety-two. Vanity Fair was covered monthly by the images of mega celebrities like Kevin Costner, Jack Nicholson and Princess Diana boasting articles such as Norman Mailer on Oliver Stone's JFK friend liebowitz on money, Nick Toshio on Ed Sullivan. Not to mention the steady stream of aristocratic scandal covered by Dominic Dunn. The cover of the issue featured Gina Davis riding high on the sales of ninety two star turn alongside Tom Hanks, Madonna and a league of their own the cover also promised perspective readers insight into Gorby. Dow Camille Paglia Courtney love. The article on the recently, wed grunge Queen to a reluctant voice generation husband was to court anyway, supposed to be like all the other articles a blow up celebrating her outrageous sense of now her arrival on the scene in the jenex takeover of tired mainstream culture with Courtney love leading the charge, of course. Because when he got right down to it who is more able or deserving. Corning was fearless unafraid to say or do anything and her band hall was incredible. We'll be right back after this word were you define your future. You have choices. You can choose to be the author of your own life story. We all know the stock market is like a casino, you put your money down. And you hope you win..

Dow Camille Paglia Courtney Kurt Dominic Dunn Vanity Fair magazine Kirk Cobain Vogel Vanity Fair Tom Hanks UK Tina Brown Gina Davis Portland Nirvana Graydon Carter Wade Chicago Kevin Costner Norman Mailer Corning
"tina brown" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"tina brown" Discussed on KTOK

"Cobain within thirty seconds of meeting. Her in a dank Portland club used tussling on the beer soaked floor with her wrestling playfully over some comment Courtney made while Kurt was loading. His gear him before nirvana gig. Something about how he looked like Dave Perner from soul asylum to Kurt them's was fighting words. So things got physical turn Kurt on left an impression one the current was eager to explore the next time. Their paths crossed the road in the UK Courtney on the road with whole Kurt with they're gonna and then again stateside in Chicago where they eventually got around to giving into that building sexual tension. They both fell hard and fast. It was October of nineteen Ninety-one right in the midst of Nirvana's ascent via the release of never mind. The two were married in February nineteen Ninety-two, voila, rock and roll royalty. In the early nineteen nineties, you couldn't get more mainstream than Vanity Fair magazine. Comprised of contributors like Dominic Dunn star making photographers like her Brits in any liebowitz. And how by genius editors Tina Brown and Graydon Carter the high gloss MAG both projected and reflected American culture, but what set it apart from other mainstream outlets. In addition to the quality of its content was its willingness to brazenly Wade into the waters of high society and celebrity scandal in nineteen ninety two Vanity Fair was covered monthly by the images of mega celebrities like Kevin Costner, Jack Nicholson and Princess Diana boasting articles such as Norman Mailer on Oliver Stone's JFK friend liebowitz on money, Nick Toshiba's on Ed Sullivan. Not to mention the steady stream of aristocratic scandal covered by Dominic Dunn. The cover of the September issue featured Gina Davis riding high on the sales of her ninety two star turn alongside Tom Hanks and Madonna and a league of their own the cover also promised perspective readers insight into Gorby. Dial Camille Paglia and Courtney love. The article on the recently, wed, grunt clean to a reluctant voice of a generation husband was to court anyway, supposed to be like all the other articles, a blow celebrating her outrageous sense of now her arrival on the scene in the genetics takeover of a tired mainstream culture with Courtney love leading the charge, of course. Because when you get right down to it who is more deserving, according. Fearless unafraid to say or do anything and her band hall was incredible. We'll be right back after.

Kurt Courtney Vanity Fair magazine Cobain Dominic Dunn Nirvana Portland Camille Paglia Tina Brown Gina Davis UK Graydon Carter Dave Perner Ed Sullivan Kevin Costner Norman Mailer Nick Toshiba Tom Hanks Wade Gorby
"tina brown" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"tina brown" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Thirty seconds of meeting. Her dank, Portland. Club was tussling on the beer soaked floor with her wrestling playfully or some comment Courtney made while Kurt was loading his gear and before nirvana gig something about how he looked like Dave Perner from soul asylum to Kurt them's was fighting words, so things got physical turn Kurt on left an impression one the current was eager to explore the next time. Their paths crossed on the road in the UK Courtney on the road with whole Kurt with their vodka. And then again, stateside Chicago where they eventually got around to giving into that building sexual tension. They both have hard and fast. It was October of nineteen Ninety-one right in the midst of Nirvana's ascent via the release of never mind. The two were married in February nineteen Ninety-two when voila rock and roll royalty. In the early nineteen nineties, you couldn't get more mainstream than Vanity Fair magazine. Comprised of alias contributors like Dominic Dunn star making photographers like her Brits in any liebowitz and hound by genius editors Tina Brown and Graydon Carter the high gloss MAG both projected and reflected American culture, but what set it apart from other mainstream outlets. In addition to the quality of its content was its willingness to brazenly Wade into the waters of high society and celebrity scandal in nineteen Ninety-two. Vanity Fair was covered monthly by the images of mega celebrities like Kevin Costner, Jack Nicholson and Princess Diana boasting articles such as Norman Mailer on Oliver Stone's JFK friend liebowitz on money, Nick Toshiba's on Ed Sullivan. Not to mention the steady stream of aristocratic scandal covered by Dominic Dunn. The cover of the September issue featured Gina Davis riding high on the sales of ninety two star turn alongside Tom Hanks, Madonna and a league of their own the cover also promised perspective readers insight into Gorby. Dial Camille Paglia Courtney love. The article on the recently wed, grunt Queen to a reluctant voice of a generation husband was to court anyway, supposed to be like all the other articles a blow up celebrating her outrageous sense of now her rival on the scene in the jenex takeover of tired mainstream culture with Courtney love leading the charge, of course. Because when you get right down to it who is more able or deserving. Courtney was fearless unafraid to say or do anything and her band hall was incredible. We'll be right back after this word were islanders in the Caribbean. Just say that if you don't like the weather, wait, ten minutes. Hi, I'm RIC Edelman, and that's great advice for the stock market to it's easy to get upset when the market falls. But what we have to remember is that this too shall pass. Let's easier to say, but sometimes it can feel hard to do..

Camille Paglia Courtney Kurt Dominic Dunn Nirvana Vanity Fair magazine RIC Edelman Vanity Fair Portland UK Gina Davis Dave Perner Caribbean grunt Queen Graydon Carter Tina Brown Ed Sullivan Wade Chicago Kevin Costner
"tina brown" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:18 min | 3 years ago

"tina brown" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Eight pm on C span one Matt gaetz who is an ally. President Trump Republican from Florida with the following tweet. Hey, Michael, Cohen, dear. Wife and father-in-law know about your girlfriend's. Maybe tonight would be a good time for that chat. I wonder if she'll remain faithful when you're in prison, she's about to learn a lot Matt gaetz who is a close friend of the president. We should point out that Michael Cohen originally postponed part of his testimony because of threats against his family former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton says it's time for congress to connect the dots in the Russia investigation. During an interview with Tina Brown on her podcast, the two thousand sixteen democrat candidate won the popular vote losing the electoral college to President Trump says it's up to congress to educate the American people on what really happened. There is so much information out there that maybe we'll be all connected up in a final set of indictments and or a report, but there is enough grounds in what has already been made public for the government for congress in particular. To be doing more with it. And I'm pleased that under speaker Pelosi. The Democrats are beginning to hold hearings and try to connect some of these dots. You might know Tina that many years ago, I was on the impeachment inquiry staff for the house of representatives investigating Nixon and the public hearings that were held by the Watergate special committee were essential in helping to educate the public about what all this legal stuff meant. What is obstruction of Justice mean, for example? And we haven't had that opportunity. Many of the hearings and witnesses have been behind closed doors in the. Investigations so far. There hasn't really been the kind of solemn somber laying a facts and information before the public and the press that should happen in our democracy. Hillary Clinton onto podcast TVD with Tina Brown. And you're listening to Washington today on C span radio. The new bestselling book is titled the threat how the FBI protects America in the age of terror and Trump author Andrew McCabe is here in our studios. Thanks very much for stopping by. I want to begin with one of the headlines that came from your sixty minutes interview in which you talked about the deputy rod Rosenstein, wearing a wire discussing the possibility of invoking the twenty fifth amendment. Can you recall that ever happening under any other circumstances? No, certainly not Steve it's struck me at the time is just a remarkable thing to say, that's why I remembered it, that's why memorialize it. But neither neither mentioned where things that we. Acted upon. So neither are actually even included in the book. I decided that I thought that including them would be kind of inflammatory distract people from the bigger story. We were trying to tell but for those who studied the constitution and our democracy. What's the lesson? What's the takeaway? You know, I don't know that there's much of a lesson in in mister Rosenstein, mention of thinking about the twenty fifth of twenty fifth amendment, which is really the way that it came up. I think it's more of an indicator of the unbelievable stress and the somewhat kind of. Chaotic times that we were operating in these were the highest levels of the Justice department, and the FBI trying to navigate a totally novel and challenging situation under very very stressful circumstances, so I think it's more than indication of that and less a sign of certainly not a sign of anything that actually took place. You are in the middle of the book tour. We'll talk about the C span. Two book TV interview in just a moment. But what's it been like for you? It's been it's been amazing. I've gotten to meet so many people it's been a bit exhausting. I'll confess that. But it's just I'm just glad to finally be out and be able to tell tell my story to be able to talk about the FBI talk about the great work that the men and women of the FBI do every single day. Certainly there's a lot of it far beyond the scope of the Russia investigation, which is what many people like to hear about. But I've tried to tell the story of not only the work we do. But how we do it how we work how we make decisions that we do and the principals and kind of legal authority that those decisions are made upon rather than the kind of politics and personal preference. Things that people think and obviously you don't get a do over in life. But in hindsight, do you think in the summer of two thousand sixteen the fall of two thousand sixteen the director of the FBI James Komi should have done anything differently with regard to Hillary Clinton, the emails and the Anthony Weiner information. Well, Steve I spent a lot of time thinking about that. And I try to address those issues very honestly in the book, our decision in July to announce the results of the Clinton Email case is one that I think we probably should have thought differently about I certainly have the benefit of hindsight looking back on those things. And I think we underestimated the incredibly fraught political nature of the environment that we were releasing that conclusion into I think we overestimated Jim's ability to convince people as for the decision in the end of October to notify congress about the emails on Anthony Weiner is computer that was something that I did not agree with at the time that was Jim's decision, and he made it when you came across those emails in Anthony weiner's laptop. What was the reaction inside the department? It wasn't nearly as. It wasn't nearly as impactful as you would think I mean, the fact is that we had come across batches of emails on different machines and different servers all through the course of the investigation, and in the vast majority of those circumstances when we've come across what we thought might be a bundle of new information when we'd run it through our systems and compare it to the information we already had we would discover that. No. In fact, it was duplicates or copy copies of emails and things that we already had. That's of course, what ultimately happened with the material on the Weiner laptop. And I think many of us suspected that. That would be the case yearbook is now number one on Amazon. Did you expect this quickly? I did not I did not this is my first time doing this. It's my first book the whole experience have been kind of head-spinning, but it's been a busy but satisfying week. What did you learn about yourself in writing this book a great question? You know, the the entire. Process of writing the book really enabled me to step back. Kind of step out of the the the sort of immediate insult of having been fired and look at the expanse of my career in a more holistic way and try to derive some some themes and importance from the work that I've done from the day. I started in one thousand nine hundred eighty six until the day, I left so it was it was a very almost kind of cathartic thing to do in tumultuous time. Let me get your reaction to something that the president said recently about you, whether Andrew McCabe has made a fool out of himself over the last couple of days, and he really looks to me like sort of a poor man's J. Edgar Hoover as a I think is a disaster. And what he was trying to do is terrible. And he was caught. I'm very proud to say we call him. So we'll see what happens. But he he is a disgraced man he was terminated. Not by me. He was terminated by others. The report was a disaster disaster from his standpoint, anybody reading the report would say how could a man like this. Be involved with the FBI the FBI has some of the greatest people some of the finest people you'll ever meet. But this man is a complete disaster. Thank you very much. Thank you. Andrew mccabe. You've heard that before. But your reaction. Sure. So. You know, my reaction at this point, Steve is is one of just kind of pity. It's it's ridiculous. That the president continues to lie about me something he started in October of twenty sixteen. He continues to this date. And I understand it. You know, the president calls anyone who stands up, and and tells the truth about him about things they've they've seen and heard and decisions they've made. He he he runs right to discrediting. Everyone's credibility and calling everyone liar. So I'm not surprised by it. Steve. I don't know what he means by that reference today or your Hoover bit of it's not always clear what the president's saying. And I think this is one of those cases, I will tell you. I don't feel. I don't have any misgivings about standing up and telling the truth and sharing a story with the American people that I think is important to their understanding of events that clearly are very meaningful to a lot of folks. No matter what side of the political spectrum you happen to be on. I don't know that there's been an opportunity to really hear from anyone who was involved in those decisions. So having unique perspective to offer. And that's what I've done with the book as chronicled in the threatened, by the way, your interview on C span two's afterwards program airs this Saturday eleven AM eastern time again, ten PM eastern time on C span two's book TV after the tours over what's next for Andrew McCabe. Well, let's see I've I've enjoyed participating in this kind of national conversation about how we feel about the FBI and about the investigative work. They do I think that people would really benefit from knowing more about the agency that that occupies such an incredible position in American life. And in the American consciousness, but one that I would argue most people don't really understand how we work on a day-to-day basis. I think if I can continue kind of getting that word out, I think people would be less likely to fall for the baseless lies that here. In the media every day about FBI corruption and plotting coups and the rest of that nonsense the threat how the FBI protects America in the age of terror and Trump author Andrew McCabe. Thank you for being with us. Thanks, dave..

FBI president Andrew McCabe Hillary Clinton President Trump congress Anthony Weiner Steve it Tina Brown mister Rosenstein Russia Matt gaetz Michael Cohen Steve America Washington Pelosi Florida Amazon
"tina brown" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:56 min | 3 years ago

"tina brown" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Barbara game for Madeline brand. I'd like to throw some heels I take a trip up toward. There rapping about the scene at world on wheels. World on wheels is a roller skating rank on Venice boulevard in mid city. It was closed for years like a lot of rings in the US. And that also meant the end to local African American skate culture on certain nights called adult nights. Black skaters created a vibrant scene at these roller. Rinks? They developed elaborate dance moves on skates and in the eighties. Rappers like Queen Latifah, and Dr Drey would perform the story of black roller skating culture is told in a new HBO documentary called United skates. Madeline sat down recently with Deanna Winkler who co directed the film and Felicia right a longtime roller skater and one of the subjects of the movie. Thanks for coming in you too and dealing with begin with you. How did you come across this? Yeah. Tina Brown, and I basically made this entire film. Just the two of us we shot. It did all the sound directed at Purdue state two women shell and neither of us are African American and neither of us scape. So. So actually the project found us. We're quite adamant that people tell stories from within their own communities, and we didn't actually feel this was our story to tell. Although we were introduced to the scene. We said occupies amazing. We love what you're doing and good luck. And we laughed but the skaters themselves they pulled us back in. They kept saying no, we want it to be you. We bought you to make this film so Tina, and I finally said, okay, if we do this. We're going to do it with you buy you for you. And so every where we went in every city that we shot an and Lee shot in cities all over this country to capture all the different skate styles in music scene. Coming out of each city. We were picked up by a skater. We were housed by skater. We slept on their floors their couches and escape took his into their rank on their night. So we never went in as outsiders. And I think you feel that in the film, and how did you actually film the skating sequences because someone was on skates? Right. Yes. Many people were on skates is so hard to. Shoot roller skating. Well, especially when you're in Arinc that's low limit when they're moving fast. And when there have darker skin tones, it's three challenges all in one Felicia showing. And and so we had a lot of trial and error. We had a lot of bad footage before we got the good footage. But ultimately, we've been put Felicia pushed us from behind while we shot on. But we also handed off our cameras often to the skaters themselves to get the footage for us because it's dangerous out there. Do you know how to skate now? So when did you learn how to skate Felicia, I was born into this culture? My mom was on. The taps gay deejays was born. My father was a flag art sell Apas born into this culture. And so from says, I remember every Christmas and birthday, I got skates. And it's just. And what was your rank at the time back in those days of the old Hollywood scaling back in the day. Of course, that's gone. And then later on it was run on Lewis come nineteen Eighty-one describe world on wheels. Because that was quite a scene in the eighty s. Ron Wilson's everything. And as I was down with every day. Oh my God. I need to take stock and Ronaldo's that's much. Money's we used to give you. Because it was just a place to be. It was always crowded. There was not every time. It wasn't. It was just an an awesome place to be you know, the deeper that we got into this world the more. We realized that rinks have played a major role in so many parts of American culture that we didn't realize first of all we found out that one of the first citizens in the country was escape in in a roller rink in Chicago to get access to skate and later on we found out that all of these hip hop artists got their starting their rank. And we wanted to know why? And what we discovered is that in the early days of hip hop and rap they weren't actually allowed to perform in large venues because their music wasn't taken seriously. And so the only places that they could go were roller rinks on an adult night. And so what they started to do was started to have tours in roller rinks they would perform in one rink one night. And then go to another city perform. I'm in their rank go to the next performing their rank. And so that was how a lot of these early artists got their starts Queen latifah's. First performance was in a roller rink. Dr dre started as a DJ was his first job in a roller rink and then NWEA had their first performance in the rink. I mean, the list goes on and it wasn't just in LA. It was in New York. And then in Atlanta as well. There's a huge scene in Atlanta. What is the origins? What is the history of this? Well, how did this culture flower in roller rinks, so it came out of segregation? And these ranks that at the beginning didn't allow African Americans escape at all they fought to be allowed to skate, but then had to stay separate one night. They gave us one night. Yes. And those nights where then called code words like soul night Aren being night. Martin Luther King. We found a sign of rank in Philadelphia. I believe it was called CPS night. I mean Harvey. Yes. We have the poster. And so you know, what they were doing was subliminally letting people know which nights they were welcome in which nights, they were not. And if the black skaters would go on a top forties night or family night. They would be told they didn't have their size skates. They would actually hire thugs to beat them up and not let them on the floor. And if they pushed back and said, you know, we have a right to be here to they'd say see when there's black people here there's violence, and so they just ended up sticking to their nights. But on those nights, they created this beautiful world that we tried to capture in the film. And felicia. So you side also is a great way to keep your kids out of trouble all to keep your kids. Bonded to you to create a strong family life because you would take your five kids all the time to go roller skate like every week. Yeah. And this still is that place. If you want a good babysitter taken skating, you fat mouth and afternoons state ads. It's an election night, and they're safe. But they're also creating a great social does have great social life. It teaches you that as a child the girl the skating with me in the beginning. And now people we practice that leaving that's practice anything and we've been getting together nine years. You're not just just for the audience. You're not just skating around in a circle. Just no getting and then crossing are getting because you're doing all of these tricks and dance. It's.

Felicia Queen Latifah Tina Brown Madeline US HBO Atlanta Deanna Winkler Ronaldo Dr dre Martin Luther King Chicago Dr Drey LA Lee New York Ron Wilson Hollywood
"tina brown" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"tina brown" Discussed on Channel 33

"And the first stories about New York magazine potentially being for sale where or early August. So, you know, if that had been, you know, a germ of, you know, in in his in his head that he might be ready to move on to something else that must have been a huge contributing factors this decision. I think so I mean without knowing I just it seems like this is the time was not you if not you would stick around specifically because of that I mean, you would say, well, I'm gonna see us through or you know, what there's there's and without addressing it at all directly. I think that to me like, I said tells you what you need to know basin things about Adama's Demi or in interesting things to me one is a lot of these other guys you mentioned Graydon Carter and a winter Tina Brown their most larger than life, right, personality wise, or a was he his aura was almost smaller than life. It was like, you know, he was not a off. Wall personality, you cannot imagine him hosting a talk show on HBO if he'd been born at if appeared in his life. It was like keep poured all of his personality into the book itself instead of carrying on as this Rangan tour interview with him for a job one time. And I remember somebody warned me that it's going to be like one of those Socratic seminars like you do in a college philosophy class. Right. And indeed, it was I drawn up this list of story ideas. And he said, you know, and I mentioned what he said that's interesting now now who would write that story. And I offered some names. And why would you pick that person? Right. That story. And I and I mentioned why pick that person he said now, what would the discovery be in that story? And why would that be interesting? And it was this is pulling out of, you know, he did not tell tales about you know, editing. So, you know, Michael Lewis of the New York Times magazine, he wasn't sloughing off stories. He wasn't trying to impress me at all. He was just Neang king. The idea bodily. Outta me. There's a whole like a horror movie. But in a good way, you know, it was just he was pulling it out. And you know, I think that was you know, people who worked for him talked about that a lot. I think he could drive editors and writers nuts by insisting on lots of late in the game changes and edits and and striving for perfection. Yeah. But that was him. And that to me is like, it's it's amazing. And he's talked about in this in this New York Times piece like he he he can he his hobby was the magazine like that was his law. That was every you know, he woke up thinking about it. He went to bed thinking about it. That's what he liked to do. But it's funny. He was just very very very different personality type than a lot of the people. We talk about in that role the other thing, I drove up, you know, we've been hearing a lot about coaching trees like in the NFL the Andy Reid coaching tree in the Bill Belichick coaching tree. Would you like coaching tree? Yes. Please. I sent a few emails. Here's the list. These are people who worked for moss, and then went on to edit something or edit part of something you ready. David Haskell, new editor of New York magazine. Obviously Hugo Lindgren times magazine, Lauren Kern over at apple news. Megan lieberman. Formerly of Yahoo news. Gilbert, crews are pal vulture alumni arts editor New York Times. Dan course over at slate. David Marchesi, a New York Times magazine interviewer John holman's aerial camera. Amanda Dobbins our very own some of the deepest cuts. I got James Ledbetter who worked with moss at seven days. And then went onto ran run. Reuters dot com, by the way,.

the New York Times magazine New York Times Tina Brown moss editor HBO Michael Lewis Graydon Carter Adama Reuters Amanda Dobbins James Ledbetter David Marchesi Bill Belichick David Haskell NFL Hugo Lindgren Andy Reid Megan lieberman Dan
"tina brown" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:17 min | 3 years ago

"tina brown" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Smoker slash nonsmoker. Was that I didn't enjoy lying to her as soon as I could succeed in quitting again permanently. The wave function would collapse, and I would be one hundred percent the nonsmoker always represented myself to be but only if I didn't I come out in print as a smoker. Henry had been a twentysomething Gunderson when Tina Brown hired him at the New Yorker, he had a distinctive type chested manner of speaking a kind of hyper articulate mumble like pros acutely. Well, edited barely legible. I was off by his intelligence in his area dish in and it quickly come in to live in fear of disappointing him his passionate emphasis in therefore, you must write about them. He was the only speaker I knew who could get away with the stressed initial therefore in the imperative must allowed me to hope that I'd registered in his consciousness in some small way. And so I went to work on the essay, everyday combusting half a dozen low tar cigarettes in front of a box fan in my living room window and handed in the only thing I ever wrote for Henry that didn't need his editing. I don't remember how my mother got her hands on the essay or how she conveyed to me, her deep sense of betrayal. Whether by letter or in a phone call. But I do remember that she then didn't communicate with me for six weeks by a wide margin. The longest you ever went silent on me. It was exactly as I had feared. But when she got over it and began sending me letters again, I felt seen by her scene for what I was in a way. I'd never felt before it wasn't just that my real self had been concealed from her. It was as if there hadn't really been a self to see again, that's what essays four. So. Things in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight seven nineteen ninety seven the last thing in the world. I wanted to think about cigarettes. That was pretty quickly replaced by climate change as the last thing in the world. I want to think about and I bet that goes for a lot of you to pretty much the whole world. It's the last thing they want to think about nevertheless. A certain point. I got really angry about it. I got angry about one particular aspect of it. Which I'm gonna talk about actually several aspects. So three years ago, I was in a state of rage about climate change. The Republican party was continuing continuing to lie about the absence of the scientific consensus on climate. But I wasn't much less angry at the left. I'd read a new book by Naomi Klein, this changes everything in which she assured the reader that. Although time is tight we still have ten years to radically remake the global economy and prevent global temperatures from rising by more than two degrees celsius by the end of the century. Kline's optimism was touching. But it too was a kind of denial ISM even before the election of Donald Trump. There was no evidence to suggest that humanity is capable of slashing carbon emissions quickly and deeply enough to change everything. Even the European which had taken the early lead on climate and was fond of lecturing other regions on their irresponsibility needed. Only a recession in two thousand nine to shift its focus to economic growth. Really disliked the European Union when it comes to the environment. I will just say that it's like basically sterilized western Europe with the common agricultural policy. And also had this enormous mandate for biodiesel vehicles, which resulted directly contributed to the. Rampant deforestation of Indonesia. Little problem. More cutting down huge trees in order to grow palm oil. It was actually a great piece in the times magazine coming on at this weekend. And and they're so sanctimonious, why can't America be more responsible? We'll America's still has insects barring a world end of little rat barring a worldwide revolt against free market capitalism. In the next ten years. The scenario that Klein contended could still save us the most likely rise in temperature this century is on the order of six degrees celsius. We'll be lucky to avoid a two degree rise before the year twenty thirty. Here's a paragraph that I'm gonna read slowly because I think it's important and myself when I read this kind of thing, my my mind bounces off it. But I'm going to try to get this across. In a polity evermore starkly divided as ours is the truth about global warming was even less convenient to the left than to the right?.

Henry Gunderson Naomi Klein Donald Trump Indonesia European Union times magazine Tina Brown Republican party America Europe Kline