4 Burst results for "Timothy Wiley"

"timothy wiley" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

08:39 min | 2 weeks ago

"timothy wiley" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"Going to undo any progress. But you know if you only talk about johns hopkins university and academic research with psychedelics. You're neglecting to acknowledge the reality of psychedelic drug use for many people. So that's that's the way i try to handle. It is to show that you know to just to show honestly how these things exist in society and let people draw their own conclusions. So if you see somebody. Who's you know strange artists living alone in the desert who has a lot of outlandish beliefs about angels in. Ufo's in dolphins who uses a lot of ketamine. Anything loved that. And you think that's terrible will then there you go then you then you have but if you think that's fantastic then there you go as well. That's that's kind of my my take on it and alan love with that guy. What was his name timothy wiley. Wow what a saint that guy was he had to me. And maybe it was just the lighting. He really seemed to have this ethereal glow about him like he really seemed like some kind of i don't know awaken being or something. Oh well you know. He was like a spiritual leader You know the process church. Yeah he was a big part of the process church. He was behind the scenes in a lot of different things. You know genesis pure edge yes. Her transformation was because of timothy wiley. Yeah giving her kademi and helping her like transform so he was. He was part of a lot of different things and he was a really you know he was a true artist. True weirdo a true Independent strange thinker. And i love that you know. I think that. I don't wanna reality that. So sterile that people only talk about these things as psychiatric medications for treatment of disease. I think that they're useful for expanding thought in directions that are strange and artistic and poetic and weird. Why not you know. It's the ashes all beautiful and good and in the finale of my show last night I profiled this woman amanda fielding. Who reminds me of timothy wiley and a lot of ways. You know she's brilliant. She's a truly heterodox thinker who has spent her life in this quixotic quest to demonstrate the trepidation is a medically valid procedure. And and while. I don't think trepidation is likely to be medically validated. Although i'd be happy to be wrong I think that part of it comes from a certain insecurity that many people have. They need medical validation. When i see this is sort of artistic decision that she made A sort of body modification that valid whether or not it has any impact on her consciousness. Is something symbolic is truly opening her head opening her mind you know. I think that there's something amazing about that. Regardless of what physiological effect it may or may not have listen if you if anybody who has watched a documentary on trepidation and hasn't had at least a fleeting thought of like shit. Maybe i should try that. That sounds awesome. I think you're not looking into it. Deeply trepidation is one of those things. The problem with it is like how do you go back. you know. what if you're wrong. But anytime i've seen these documentaries i would never be is it. You'd say trump. And i would never be trepp trained but come on. Aren't you curious about like what the effect is. This was just like this. Is something body modification. People who are doing this was a like a cultural movement at one time right. This was something that was being practiced for centuries right like we're still finding skulls with that have been trapping. Oh yes. it's one of the oldest known surgical procedures it. Yeah it's some form of what like neurological bloodletting or something like well. What is the idea. It relieves pressure on the brain or it enhances mystical states. I have yet to see the finale. So sorry if i'm making your something. No no in. The finale actually doesn't even go into the science of it because i don't want to take public stance on trepidation for the record. I do not imagine that it has. I don't predict that. It has major therapeutic effects you know. People routinely have holes drilled in their skulls for surgical procedures. Rainy autumns. So it's it's not as if it's not done in the twenty first century and it doesn't seem to have a major effect but historically in these you know various artifacts that have been uncovered in these ancient skulls that have been trapped and it makes a lot of intuitive sense. If you have a headache will the pain. It's in your head right. So where are you going to direct your medical intervention to the head. You gotta get out that demon. That's in your head you're insane. There's something in your head there's a problem in your head. You gotta get it out so it makes sense in this. You know intuitive understanding of the way the body works especially from a spiritual framework where you're attributing disease to malevolent spirits right. yes yes. let me also emphasize. Don't don't trip in it yourself or your friends or anybody. It's just a curious thing that has happened in the past. Also you know what was the anesthetic. They were using our part of the experience in the past was the lack of any kind of anaesthetic as we. At least the ones we have access to now. Maybe there is some initiate tori pain high. That people were getting from it. But do you. You know this to me. When i know you get it now. I'm hearing that you get it. Which is like the people who are very protective of what they see as some kind of flowering psychedelic. What do they call it. The third there's a name for the thing. And and i've forgotten what it is and there are people are rightfully protective of it. And i agree with you. It does seem to me to be im- right now maybe necessarily imbalanced towards the medical universe that it can get to the place where it can you know happily be used as a cultural amplifier stimulator and inspiring kind of something that like shape movies and art and things like that but the message i've gotten from people is more along the lines of we don't need any more tim gurus. We don't need any more psychedelic. Jesus's out there you know what do you think is the weird connection between psychedelics. And the messianic thing that seems to happen to people you know like we inevitably someone emerges you get a person who's taken enough acid that they really believe they're the christ or the betrayal or whatever alien representative and weirdly. They end up with a group of people following them around because there is some kind of actual gravity. These people have. What are your thoughts on that do you. Do you have any thoughts on like the many psychedelic size. We've had in the past and certainly will have in the coming years. It depends on how you define messiah. Because if you're including timothy leary. There i think timothy leary is very widely misunderstood. You know the more. I think about timothy leary. The more i think of him as a comedian. I really i think more than a psychologist more than guru more than almost anything timothy leary was a comedian. And he was someone who believed in psychedelics. At a time when they were being attacked from every imaginable direction medically legally socially and he defended them and the psychedelic community does not appreciate what he did the sacrifices that he made he's routinely criticized people Blame him for the end of psychedelic research. I think a lot of what we have today is not something that exists in spite of timothy leary but because of timothy leary and I don't really think he did anything wrong at all. I think that he was a victim of.

timothy wiley Jesus timothy leary twenty first century last night today christ trump tim third one university one time fielding one of those things messiah johns hopkins kademi
"timothy wiley" Discussed on Cults

Cults

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"timothy wiley" Discussed on Cults

"And recruits, but immigration, restrictions and finances proved to be a challenge in Italy to likely for these reasons the Rome chapter closed in the spring of nineteen. Sixty nine most of the process went back to London where they may have been unpopular, but were at least allowed to live and work. Around this time, the process shifted into a matriarchal society. Male members couldn't argue with their female counterparts who were able to pull rank Marianne designated female, deputies to quiz members on Roberts logics, a set of speeches and tracts that expounded upon process. The algae members had to know the logics verbatim and were subjected to excessive tests they had to pass with perfect scores. Every time at this stage, the hierarchy mirrored Marianne torrential attitude, according to Timothy Wiley, quote, her autocratic management style, frequently reflected among the lower ranks in the poor way. Many of them were treated and intern were treating others the stressful part about life as a junior process member was the unpredictability members were transferred between chapters often with little advance notice. They were no position to protest a member described the situation thusly. I don't decide what I'm going to do. That's decided for me. And it's a relief. Those who flocked to the process had done so amid turbulent times in their lives. So handing control over to the degrom stations felt like a load off their shoulders. According to Diana, all stead, and Joel Kramer, authors of the guru papers masks of authoritarian powers quote off in a large component of spiritual seeking is the desire for a place of no conflict, where a benign all powerful intelligence is taking care of things that the Grinstead, however were hands off outside of telling the process where to move next and imposing odd rules. They were much more interested in growing their cult and supporting their lifestyle, but the future of the group would be called into question in the summer of nineteen sixty-nine their old, Los Angeles. Neighbor, Charles Manson would make international headlines for the Tate labianca murders. As rumors about the Manson family, spread many noted his close proximity to the process church when it had been in Los Angeles and wondered whether Manson was actually elapsed process member both the Manson family and the process borrowed from the book of revelation, and preached of an Armageddon that would spare only a chosen few both groups also referred to themselves as family the similarities made many potential members run from the process church, despite the fact that Marianne had no interest in murder. Members of the process had little experience dealing with the press and routinely put their feet in their malls. While defending the process church in one thousand nine hundred seventy one the Boston chapter director unwisely said, quote, if we had the opportunity to speak to Manson we could have avoided that series of very brutal killings the rumors were further inflamed when the process published their magazines death is. Issue featuring Manson on the cover, and including an article penned by Manson from jail, they saw this as a way of taking control of their narrative, but the public was widely offended. It was a public relations disaster that left the process open for attack to counteract the bad press. The degrom since instituted a wardrobe change gone was their signature black their new uniforms were now light grey with the family friendly appearance. The degrom sins reason that casual observers couldn't confuse them with Charles Manson, but the uniforms did little to squelch the outlandish hearsay. The process was accused of ritual animal sacrifices with reports of slaughtered stray dogs and cattle remains found across the United States other rumors concerned child sacrifices and new recruits being forced into orgies Cranford the process was secretive about certain practices. So it's hard to. Definitively. Dispel these rumors, but Marianne was an avid dog lover. It's unlikely she would advocate for animal sacrifices female ex member wants mused, the dogs were fed much better than we were the only rumor that did have some truth to it was that of the orgies granted only senior members engaged in orgies and only under Marianne direction. She partnered them up. This was supposed to free their sexual innovations, but proved traumatic for participants these.

Charles Manson Marianne Los Angeles Rome London Italy Joel Kramer intern Timothy Wiley United States Diana Roberts Tate labianca Armageddon Boston murder director
"timothy wiley" Discussed on Cults

Cults

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"timothy wiley" Discussed on Cults

"Last week, we focused on the lives of Maryanne and Robert de Grimsson from their contrasting childhoods to their fateful meeting in the church of Scientology their psychotherapy group. Their disastrous search for paradise and they're return to London in nineteen sixty six. Finally, we covered their migration to the United States in nineteen sixty seven in this episode. We will turn our spotlight to the members of the process church of the final judgement. We will examine who they were. And what became of the church after the grim skins marriage fell apart? The process church had been squatting in an abandoned salt factory in stool, Mexico until November nineteen sixty six when the factory was destroyed by hurricane as all. But five members fled back to London even more devoted to the church than they had been when they left a female process. Member said, quote, I remember coming back to England with a sense of invulnerability and power that so help me I had never experienced in my life. I was convinced that it came from God it was a bit feeling like superwoman many of her fellow members. Agreed when they were starving and stool, God had washed up a fish when they needed shelter. God had directed them to the salt factory in the eyes of the church members. God had taken care of them completely. According to author and sociologist William SIMS Bainbridge who researched the process after having been a member for several years, quote, the hypothesis that God existed. Intervened in the process seemed confirmed by a number of experiences the cult had at this period Vanessa's going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the rest of the episode. Just remind her she's not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist, but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks, greg. The members of the process church had given everything to the degrom Stein's money. Time belongings the sunken cost made it extremely hard for members to recognize the fact that their leaders were just guessing that perhaps there was no divine plan. Instead, the members interpreted all trials and triumphs as messages from God in a case of pollyanna syndrome, gone wild, for instance, surviving hurricane I Knez prove that God wanted them to tough it out in Mexico. Instead, they took it as proof that God wanted them back in civilization where they could share their knowledge with others, all but five members less. Mexico. The five who stayed were determined to hold down the fort until the degrom stations returned secretly Marianne had no plan to do. So but their devotion gave her status which she was never wanted to turn away. So she obliged them by nineteen sixty seven the process were back at the mansion at two Belfer a place in London they needed money. So they opened a coffee shop in the basement, according to Timothy Wiley, one of the first process members, it became quite the place to meet unusual characters who appeared to feel secure enough to let down their masks, those unusual characters included a meditation master named chug him Trunka Rimba shea one of the.

London Mexico hurricane Marianne William SIMS Bainbridge Vanessa Scientology United States Maryanne degrom Stein Timothy Wiley Trunka Rimba England Robert de Grimsson greg Belfer
"timothy wiley" Discussed on Cults

Cults

14:51 min | 2 years ago

"timothy wiley" Discussed on Cults

"Cults. You have the suspect's fingerprints at the crime scene. You have witnesses testifying that they saw the suspect commit the crime. The suspect has a motive. It's an open shut case. Or is it each week my new show not guilty examines? Controversial criminal cases and tries to determine why solid evidence doesn't always lead to a conviction. La- police considered compelling evidence against Casey Anthony in the disappearance of her daughter Kayleigh defense attorneys classified as fantasy forensics, and she was acquitted of Keighley's murder. Amanda Knox served four years in an Italian prison for murder before later being acquitted was the media portrayal of knocks the profile of a killer or televised character assassination and sometimes jurors are responsible for wrongful convictions. As was the case when the central park five were convicted despite DNA. Evidence showing none of the suspects were involved search for and subscribe to not guilty on Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Again, search not guilty or visit podcast dot com slash not guilty to listen now. Now back to the story in nineteen sixty two twenty seven year old Robert Moore dropped out of architecture school, suddenly and without warning. He had found renewed purpose within the church of Scientology much to the surprise of Moore's former classmates shortly after joining he met a woman who would soon capture his imagination thirty one year old Marianne McClain who was a year into her membership and had already risen to the rank of auditor her job was to monitor psychotherapy sessions with the use of an electro Cy commader or e meter an auditor like McLean would administer a stress test to each individual using series of questions. She then use the meter to gauge their reaction. But when Moore was first introduced to MacLean, it wasn't exactly love it for site. Moore wrote quote mcclain's brash exterior and her general air of supreme confidence had offended me and probably threatened. My masculinity and quote, yet his initially rotation with her subsided as they found that they both shared an interest in psychology, specifically, more and McLean admired the work of Austrian psychologist. Alfred Adler Adler believed that every human being was in pursuit of a goal. And once actions were driven by unconscious motivations more grew to see the human mind as a labyrinth of complexities that went around in a circle and endless cycle of misery or superiority, but despite his voracious reading on the subject more struggle to grasp psychology beyond the abstract McLean. However was more analytical in her approach has a former sex worker her survival had wants dependent upon her ability to read clients to determine their needs. She was a master of scrutiny facial expressions tire turn of phrase. Everything was a small window into someone's personality. This ability to read. Others likely aided her as an auditor convincing people to return to Scientology time and time again, according to author James r Lewis the objective of the initial service is to create for the novice away win, which may spark interest in additional services, the church of Scientology staff held McLean in high esteem as an auditor that reportedly offered her much higher positions within the church, but she repeatedly refused them. She evidently liked being an auditor probably because it allowed her to have complete control. She enjoyed the control so much that eventually she began refusing to follow Scientology script and conducted her own evaluations. She liked knowing more about people than they knew about themselves. But that didn't mean McLean refused. More training in nineteen sixty three thirty two year old McLean underwent rigorous training for six weeks until she was clear. It was a difficult process. But was made. Slightly easier by the presence of her new friend Robert Moore who was also in the class the church of Scientology referred to the state of clear as when an individual becomes free of compulsions traumatic events and involuntary feelings when Moore and MacLean were officially declared clear, it meant they could officially help others become clear towards the end of their training McLean provided therapy to more these intimate sessions were spent facing each other across a small table. More talked while McLean, mainly listened more wrote, quote, I'd found real contact perhaps for the first time in my life. And I was in love and quote for her part MacLean welcomed Moore's and patchy Shen and the two became romantically involved. However, it didn't come without a price. Mclane provided comfort and security, but in exchange, she demanded absolute control this put her at odds with the church of Scientology. And they started listening in on her sessions when she discovered his sessions have been bugged acclaimed grew enraged and left Scientology, an infatuated more willingly followed, but the couple didn't go empty handed. They stole an eater. From the auditing office's equipped with the eater and Adler theories on self actualization, the couple resolve to help others connect with their inner selves more had an idea about who they could help. I he has some school friends. He hadn't spoken to in a year. Perhaps it was time for a class reunion in nineteen sixty three twenty three year old Timothy Wiley was a fellow architecture student at Regent Street polytechnic and had been a close friend more during his university stint their friendship was somewhat inevitable as they took the same bus route home in those days. So when more phone wildly out of the blue after a year of radio silence. Wiley was happy to hear from his friend more. Told wyle that he had founded a new psychotherapy method with Marianne McLean. The needed a Guinea pig to tested on as they turned out the kinks. Wiley was already paying his way through school as a practice patient for a student psychologists. So he figured why not try this out too. But from the first moment, Wiley met McLean. He distrusted her having known Moore's first wife and children while he saw McLean as a home, wrecker McLean, of course, knew how to win Wiley over she sent more to fetch coffee and asked why questions about himself while he admits he enjoyed the attention from clain, even as she became increasingly invasive Wiley said, quote, I was flattered of course, who wouldn't be. We all like to think we are special in our own secret hearts, and quote, these sessions, however were different from the ones McLean audited as a scientologist McLean felt the official auditing process converted people into puppets for Scientology. Founder L Ron Hubbard. She and more favored a more existential approach, they asked questions, and they're stolen eater measured the electrical resistance on the skin of Wylie's hands. The results were displayed on a meter and interpreted as his unconscious emotional response. The line of questioning what eventually turn to how one might be unwittingly sabotaging their purpose in life. Mclean would ask him philosophical things. Like what the consequences would be should one fail to find their purpose. Why Lee said quote McLean was a master at tickling out answers, and quote, these sessions with McLean attracted the interest of Wiley and Moore's other friends from Regent Street polytechnic who notice the positive change in wireless demeanor soon. Wylie's neighbors were having sessions with McLean and more but claim supposedly taught them how to channel their past lives and tap into who they were in decades past the excitedly shared their cell. Discoveries. Amongst each other. The group grew to about twelve members by the end of nineteen sixty three all of whom were told that their current issues where the results of actions taken in a past life over time, they became so close to one another that they felt they had shared encounters with each other in past lives. Wylie said, quote, all this gave us the feeling we were onto something big and inevitable, and quote yet while the group believed they were making headway together McLean in more put up a wall between themselves and their patients, the gradually withdrew from the casual meet ups held by other members and conducted private sessions with each other this distance helped them in shroud themselves in mystery and seem more authoritative to their followers. According to American authors, and spirituality experts Diana all stead, and Joel Kramer, quote authority may be vested in some perceived capacity within an individual and quote in other words, Robert and. Marianne were the only ones who knew how to read the eater and as such were lionized by their patients. Meanwhile, McLean continued to exercise control over every aspect of Moore's life more in his first wife had long been separated, but he was still legally married. A fact that McLean wouldn't let him forget McLean. Utilized every possible opportunity to shame him about his previous marriage. She reportedly claimed Moore had deceived. Her yet more was adamant, he loved McLean had no intention of going back to his first wife. Eventually McLean believed him agreed to move into gather. Although in truth, she was probably never all that concerned by Moore's first wife, only using the marriage as a tactic to keep more under her control and groveling in nineteen sixty four the twenty nine year old Moore and thirty three year old McLean. Rented an apartment together on Wigmore street in London. It was likely. No accident that their practice. Near where several licensed doctors performed consultations. This helped the couple to purposefully misrepresent their psychotherapeutic practice as legitimate McLean and more officially dubbed their practice. Compulsions analysis to fit their new image McLean. Groomed. More into dressing, the part more war expensive suits to offset. Mcclain's loose-fitting dresses to see more refined. More also had his blonde hair cut to draw. Attention to his blue is the strategy worked soon membership grew to around twenty people McLean and more held by weekly meetings that they called communication courses together. They taught a crowd of eager young people who hung on their every word as the courses expanded. It was clear McLean and more had stolen more than just the e meter from the church of Scientology the couple had stolen some of the exercises as well. They split up the group into pairs and had them look each other in the eye. I for five minutes without distraction, another exercise involved one patient verbally abusing or harshly criticizing another while the other Baird the insults without betraying emotion. This exercise volved into one patient sitting in the center of a group of about thirty to forty patients. The selected patient would sit quietly as the others shouted the worst insults. They could think of the supposed goal was to break there in additions and through this rediscover themselves by the mid nineteen sixties compulsions analysis was doing so well, but it was able to move out of the Wigmore street apartment and into a mansion on Belfour place in the Mayfair district. The bow four place mansion was leased by patient of McLean and Moores who had recently come into money as with the Wigmore street apartment McLean and more had intentions for the mansion it was to serve as their base to bring together believers and spread their word. However. Several other sources allege that the bell four-place mansion was the first step in McLean. Moore's plan to live like royalty at the expense of their devoted patients as their patients began to see them as status symbols. It was that much easier to entice new followers who had gladly give the money hand over fist, the political activism and freedom of the swinging sixties attracted a lot of young adults to freethinking movements like compulsions analysis popularity came at a price British American journalist and television personality ouster cook had a stepdaughter named Holly who became involved with compulsions analysis in the summer of nineteen sixty five Holly was depressed at the time at initially felt relaxed after therapy sessions. However, these sessions were expensive and all consuming Holly and several other patients were compelled by McLean and more to make a full commitment to compulsions analysis. This not only meant paying. Large fees to McLane and more. It also meant cutting themselves off from friends and family to dedicate themselves full time to the organization while Hawley wasn't trenched in compulsions analysis for sisters Susie visited her in London. Suzy was sixteen years old at the time and naturally curious about compulsions analysis, Holly introduced Susie to McLane and more and soon Susie was part of the group her visit was supposed to be a brief stopover on her way to Paris. But she ended up spending all her travel money on compulsions analysis and began cleaning the mansion from clean and more to make ends meet concerned, Holly and Suzy's mother Jane attended a compulsions analysis session to see what her daughters had been up to the Sacramento incantations and group shaming confirmed her worst fears when Jane told Alistair Cooke about the session, cook reached out to friends in high places to help us stepdaughters one such friend was in America. And ambassador in London named David Bruce, Bruce told McLean and more that because Suzy was a minor her parents had the legal right to remove her from compulsions analysis. But her sister would not get out so quickly by the end of nineteen sixty five Holly had had a total of three hundred therapy sessions with McLean and more. It was only then that she realized what she had gotten yourself into the Clinton more were moving away from psychology with an increasing focus on spirituality. The organization was focusing far less on discovery of the self and far more on the end of days. They

Marianne McLean Robert Moore Scientology McLean Timothy Wiley Alfred Adler Adler auditor Regent Street polytechnic Spotify Marianne McClain Amanda Knox Mclane Wylie London MacLean La murder Holly Kayleigh