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22 Burst results for "Times studios"

Airtable And Virtual Interns

Topgold Audio Clips

04:15 min | 5 d ago

Airtable And Virtual Interns

"Hey is Sabrina Goldbach Guy am a virtual intern advisor. Trait? A making a topcoat audio clip episode five to nine, sharing this into the audio collective. It's a group of voices, probably thirty different voices during the month of June twenty twenty for the last ten years. Different voices have come together and shared experiences so I've picked up experiences about workflow and how to pitch for projects, and what kind of to read from different people who take time out of their day to offer suggestions. And bought some of his books and I've improved. Some of my workflow is going down going down some rabbit holes of better nutrition and Diet thank you for the audio commentary today I wanNa share something that has pivoted on the back of suggestions about workflow that people like Phil Sorrow and K Truitt. To Brits on. The autumn audio collective shared how they've done work so I've gone down. A pathway of a virtual spreadsheet caught air table with two interns, doing virtual internships with another person who's on the audio collective Joshua. Farrell Hurley and the bunch of us are taking content Josh made podcast, and we're using air table as a framework scaffolding to kind of track the section of old audio that Joshua's made into short audio Graham suitable for. And twitter. So the NOB- of what I'm saying, is this. Collaboration is essential, but to make sure. Don't get confused as of what you're doing to make. Sure all pulling in the same direction. It's really important to be on the same project tracking. Or to have updates at sometimes can occur eight synchronous league, which is what an online spreadsheet or online project manager will do for you. Now are flavor of the month. Is Air table because? Well. It's got the legs to do the stuff in templates that. Make sure you don't make mistakes that previous creatives might have made. Her table provides templates, templates, videographers cinema- cinematography cinematographers. We're just modifying it I simple simple audio production, and the result well probably show up if Corey and ORLA the. Two students involved do a good job that will probably show up in their Lincoln status updates when they kind of say, here's how I'm doing this with this particular piece of software, and maybe they'll get a thumbs up or a recommendation from the company spur line that they're making the content for, or maybe they'll just learn how to do it better, and over the course of the summer, a become better and more efficient than in the production of creative media products. I work on the climate digital campus. We train students to do this quite frankly. The workum asking them to do during the virtual internship is not as complex as what they'd have to do in a time studio environment when there slicing and dicing in correcting video content or approving the audio. Content for work. Could they've done in the field? But it is time pressurized and the emphasis on being able to adapt the workflow. To future projects they would have on academics. Academic programs are. In mixers they go pitch for an actual jobs. Air! Table is these define on many social networks. It was daylight gambler. For some insider information and I'm top goal over lots of different places to follow how this thing unfold them sure within a week or so. If you listen to quote audio clips, I'll give you an update otherwise inside viewed. I E is a website that I maintain irregularly. Put something about air table over there because I like the software by pay to use it and I hope to have students learn. How to do things better. With good tracking and good attention to detail,

Joshua Sabrina Goldbach Twitter Farrell Hurley Intern Phil Sorrow Project Manager Corey Advisor K Truitt Josh Graham
Airtable And Virtual Interns

Topgold Audio Clips

04:15 min | 5 d ago

Airtable And Virtual Interns

"Hey is Sabrina Goldbach Guy am a virtual intern advisor. Trait? A making a topcoat audio clip episode five to nine, sharing this into the audio collective. It's a group of voices, probably thirty different voices during the month of June twenty twenty for the last ten years. Different voices have come together and shared experiences so I've picked up experiences about workflow and how to pitch for projects, and what kind of to read from different people who take time out of their day to offer suggestions. And bought some of his books and I've improved. Some of my workflow is going down going down some rabbit holes of better nutrition and Diet thank you for the audio commentary today I wanNa share something that has pivoted on the back of suggestions about workflow that people like Phil Sorrow and K Truitt. To Brits on. The autumn audio collective shared how they've done work so I've gone down. A pathway of a virtual spreadsheet caught air table with two interns, doing virtual internships with another person who's on the audio collective Joshua. Farrell Hurley and the bunch of us are taking content Josh made podcast, and we're using air table as a framework scaffolding to kind of track the section of old audio that Joshua's made into short audio Graham suitable for. And twitter. So the NOB- of what I'm saying, is this. Collaboration is essential, but to make sure. Don't get confused as of what you're doing to make. Sure all pulling in the same direction. It's really important to be on the same project tracking. Or to have updates at sometimes can occur eight synchronous league, which is what an online spreadsheet or online project manager will do for you. Now are flavor of the month. Is Air table because? Well. It's got the legs to do the stuff in templates that. Make sure you don't make mistakes that previous creatives might have made. Her table provides templates, templates, videographers cinema- cinematography cinematographers. We're just modifying it I simple simple audio production, and the result well probably show up if Corey and ORLA the. Two students involved do a good job that will probably show up in their Lincoln status updates when they kind of say, here's how I'm doing this with this particular piece of software, and maybe they'll get a thumbs up or a recommendation from the company spur line that they're making the content for, or maybe they'll just learn how to do it better, and over the course of the summer, a become better and more efficient than in the production of creative media products. I work on the climate digital campus. We train students to do this quite frankly. The workum asking them to do during the virtual internship is not as complex as what they'd have to do in a time studio environment when there slicing and dicing in correcting video content or approving the audio. Content for work. Could they've done in the field? But it is time pressurized and the emphasis on being able to adapt the workflow. To future projects they would have on academics. Academic programs are. In mixers they go pitch for an actual jobs. Air! Table is these define on many social networks. It was daylight gambler. For some insider information and I'm top goal over lots of different places to follow how this thing unfold them sure within a week or so. If you listen to quote audio clips, I'll give you an update otherwise inside viewed. I E is a website that I maintain irregularly. Put something about air table over there because I like the software by pay to use it and I hope to have students learn. How to do things better. With good tracking and good attention to detail,

Joshua Sabrina Goldbach Twitter Farrell Hurley Intern Phil Sorrow Project Manager Corey Advisor K Truitt Josh Graham
"times studios" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:27 min | 3 weeks ago

"times studios" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Your mind from Minneapolis looking here in Europe morning consul for him out indicating that fifteen percent of the cold three Americans believe that the use of military force the judge the parties putting down a fifteen percent approval take a look at the form I wonder if general manager of bothered to look at it if you don't know the difference between peacefully protest thing and and I in families then you tested positive for still to play nice everyone SKG triple eight seven one seven two four three the second time studio a store owner in New York not happy that looters destroyed her star resort black labs this why don't you you do too much the bad we you wanted to the money that was a woman who is a part time owner of the store in New York that was looted here's another black man who was wondering why is it that there's this outrage when George Floyd gets killed but when people get killed in our own neighborhoods well there's a different attitude yeah a lot of black people hate me for this video but I got to speak because Israel so check it out yeah I mean to tell me yeah I'm more mad about and also the can is somebody that you didn't know just because they are the same race follow.

Minneapolis general manager New York George Floyd Israel Europe
"times studios" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:39 min | Last month

"times studios" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Happening on Saturday because it's going to be cold but for now partly cloudy fifty eight tonight partly cloudy thirty four mostly sunny forty nine tomorrow and then Friday night mostly clear thirty three right now fifty eight and fair at the my talk studios it's fair not fair at the my time studios this is a call the number at least on my talk on a seven one streaming live at my talk one of seven one dot com everything entertainment Colleen Lindstrom Bradley trainer thanks for asking we've got some dumb people doing dumb things to tell you about but before we tell you about them what is is that do you have a feeling to Bradley said a little something to give away what are we giving away how lay the last two codes for coffee with cobra tomorrow at ten thirty in the morning my experience it's going to be family friendly so to speak we were in a diaper over family friendly six five one six four one one oh seven one you will be able to get the last two codes to coffee with cobra this week so common now call me no no and now we'll tell you about those crazy stupid yes yes yep well then I guess one could say that's a crazy stupid idiots C. as it stands for okay done people doing dumb things.

Colleen Lindstrom Bradley
Hollywood in Crisis: Producers, Theater Workers, Crew Members Brace for Coronavirus Fallout

The Frame

06:15 min | 3 months ago

Hollywood in Crisis: Producers, Theater Workers, Crew Members Brace for Coronavirus Fallout

"Around the globe. Hollywood is shutting down the production of scores of movies and TV series and that means a huge number of crew members are suddenly unemployed. Many of those who lost their jobs are assistance and writer's room studios in agencies who might not qualify for pay or health benefits during a shutdown. Liz Alpers TV writer and a former assistant. She's the creator of pay up. Hollywood and I asked her how her organization started half. Hollywood is an organization that started in response to a lot of these system abuses and low wages that were going on in the entertainment industry and our goal is to shine a light on some of the abuses and outdated practices that have been going on and do whatever we can to fix it and bring assistance and other support staff up to a living wage while also radically aiding the abuses they're still going on in the workplace. So let's talk about what's going on in the workplace right now. More than seventy TV and film shoots so far. Shut down but when you add it all together probably looking at thousands of people below the line who are suddenly out of work. Do you think that's about right? I think that number's rising every day. So some of those people might be full-time studio employees. They might be casting directors or maybe somebody who works in post production. But I'M GONNA have to assume the majority are freelancers. They go from show to show kind of the backbone of Hollywood's GIG economy how might that latter group B. added disadvantage if they're laid off especially for the freelancers who are not part of any of the unions. These are people who don't have any sort of Cushion to fall back on often. They're living hand to mouth often. They're being paid lower than anyone else on the crew and they are paying for their own health insurance. It's not provided through union. They're the ones who went stuff like this happens. They don't really have anywhere else to turn. There are also ten ninety nine employees Who Don't get to pay into unemployment insurance and so they don't receive unemployment benefits when you major shutdowns like this happened even though it's never really happened before in the event that movie is cancelled or TV. Show ends what they have in their bank account is all they have to survive on until their next GIG. I have read that some of the things that have been considered our pain. People compensation for a couple of weeks but based on a forty hour work week. But there's almost no such thing as a forty hour work week during production. A lot of the compensation is tied to overtime when people are working sixty eighty hour weeks so that extra pay which can be huge if that goes away even if you're getting a paycheck for a couple of weeks it would be a fraction of what you might typically take home correct. Yeah that's connected honestly. Most people who work in production are given sixty hour. Workweek guarantees so by saying that we will pay you for a forty hour workweek. You're taking away. Twenty guaranteed hours if you're making say minimum wage of fifteen dollars an hour. That's about an additional three hundred dollars a week that you're losing and that's a huge difference. That's the difference between being able to pay your rent. Pay Your bills. Maybe you know by your kids food. If that money goes away you have nowhere else to turn and especially in a situation like what we're facing now where everything's uncertain. No one knows when production's going to be coming back you're essentially digging a financial hole and you don't know when you can stop we're talking with Liz Alpert from pay up Hollywood about unemployment in Hollywood. Your organization has helped start a crowd funding campaign. What kind of people do you think are most in need of help? You know honestly I think across the board. There are just people in need of health. It's it's the workers if the production folk we're focusing on the support staff because that's who our organization is fighting for but beyond the support staff. There are there crew members. There are studio assistants. Are Office Workers? Who have been laid off without pay. So it's really everybody. And even though we started this go fund me we're still urging the studios in the employees in the entertainment industry to continue compensating all their employees. Because right now the employees are the ones that needs to be taken care of and the businesses profit because of the hard work of their people so right now they need to be stepping up and offering financial protection and support throughout this time of uncertainty. It also feels like this is a moment where income disparity in Hollywood and probably around the world could be brought into much sharper focus so we have studio heads and CEO's who make tens of millions of dollars. Disney's Bob Iger may nearly fifteen hundred times. What the average is the employee makes and whole foods which is owned by Amazon. The richest man in the world. Jeff bezos worth. A hundred billion dollars has been asking it staff to donate their time offer others who might be sick. And I'm wondering if we're to step back might be a conversation that could follow after this is all over. You know. This is a conversation that's been had for years so it's not that these conversations haven't happened. It's that the world hasn't taken notice yet. And so what I think needs to happen is for the public at large to understand that we are facing a severe income disparity where the people at the bottom ten to pay the most in situations like this and who are at the most at risk and get their situations never change. They're they're never give an ounce of relief instead. They're told that they simply have to work harder to dig themselves out of these financial debts that they've accrued.

Hollywood Liz Alpers Writer Jeff Bezos Liz Alpert Bob Iger Amazon Disney CEO
"times studios" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

11:53 min | 3 months ago

"times studios" Discussed on Asian Enough

"From the La Times studios this Asian every week on this podcast. We talk to one Asian American celebrity about the joys complications and everything else that comes along with being Asian American. I'm frank show and I'm Jenny. Moderate we know that the world feels crazy right now and that. There's a lot on everyone's mind. We recorded most of this podcast before our current National Public Health crisis exploded so we hope that this show gives you a brief break from the anxieties. That were all feeling right now. And we'll have a bonus episode for you later this week. A special quarantine that takes a look at how the corona viruses affecting our communities this week on episode two of our show we have our conversations with the thoughtful the fund the fierce the powerful. Luwan sheet erected last year's filmed the farewell. I knew that I didn't want to tell a story that was biased. And that was just that exists only to prove my point of view. That's interesting so just to set it up. Luang filmed farewell is the semi-autobiographical story of an American woman named Billy was played by Tina who travels to China where her family is gathering under false pretenses to saved. Because they're keeping a very big secret from Billy's beloved grandmother. She called nine. The farewell won the Spirit Award for best film. It went off a fina a historic Golden Globe and it is one of the defining movies about the Asian American immigrant kids experience. Yeah this movie wrecks me and it kind of wrecked. My Dad saw watched it with him and I saw this tier will dad tears. We will talk to Lula about the movie of course but also about what it was like to be in the middle of thunder and bidding war like she was the farewell and the problem with diversity programs in Hollywood and she has a funny story about what was going on right before she walked onstage to accept her indie spirit award. She gave this really amazing and true speech that went viral. And I've really been looking forward to this conversation so let's get started so you and I met just over a year ago at the Sundance Film Festival where the Farewell World premiered and left me cry like we being seriously like weeping in my seat In the theater lights came up. All these ushers. We're trying to get me to leave and I had a ride so hard like I had snaffled into my jacket sleeve. It was like it was a bad scene for me So it's very special. That's where we met and then we spoke for the first time. I heard your story and I heard more about in. I have been so happy to see how the rest of the year unfolded for you. But what does it feel like for you to be on the side of it I think I'm still processing all of it because it's been such a roller coaster of emotions and I was telling the rest of the team this weekend. That in some ways sundance was the most meaningful moment. 'cause it's the introduction of your baby to the world and just having no idea how it's GonNa land and we were all together. You know that was what was so beautiful. Is that we. We are all in that same room and we all experienced it. We all brought our fears and excitement. And you feel like you're not sure and of course everyone's like looking at reviews right after but I think everyone felt the energy from the first moment that the room laughed. Everybody just broke into laughter and it was very unexpected to. It wasn't a place that anyone thought was like a hilarious joke moment. And then you know from there you can hear people cry you. Can you just feel this energy? This communal thing which is what's so beautiful about The theatrical experience and then the sale the late night like you know bidding war that you've heard about as a filmmaker that's like the dream and then you're actually they're being driven. I'm like in my PJ's with a giant co being driven into like this mansion. You're just like what is going on as what happens like late at night you know like they literally were like get out of bed right now. The car is going to be in front of your house. Get in the car like we're taking meetings you know it's like you're not sleeping. You're like celebrating. But you're anxious and we're all together and then the weird thing about this whole year. Is that for the rest of the year. You're kind of separated. You know it's like oftentimes at events it's like me Aquafina sometimes just me. Sometimes there's Jau sometimes you know maybe Danny's there but It just we just everywhere and you're not sure how many tickets we get to this thing or that thing in who can come and what's happening and a we lost. You know you're you're like. Oh we didn't get nominated but you're like trying to still like hold on to the feeling from that. You made a movie that mattered. And like we're all trying to like remind each other of that and but it's complicated and so by the end of the season it was like how do I bring everybody together. And so I rented a house and just said everyone come over. Watch the awards and let's just really like be in a small space together and my brother cooked and other show I'm brother WHO's a chef. Yes and he had come to China and men everyone and So I think when you were filming when we were filming yeah he actually came to China and hadn't seen anyone since then but that was really important to me because at the end of the day. It's like you know we know what we went through to get this film made. And you know we were on the ground and Battling and And and so I think it's just important not to forget those things and it becomes about like this other thing you're part of this bigger conversation and everyone so angry but for us. It's so like everyone does get angry. I'm like we made a film that's like eighty percent subtitles in Chinese. And no one wanted to make. And then it ended up making like twenty million dollars domestically in theaters. Like we've one guys like me but also yes. We should be angry. You know about the bigger picture about what we're but at the same time it was important for us to just feel feel the weight of The change and and and what everyone contributed to okay so in this scene? Billy's visiting her parents when she senses. Something's not right and this is before they go to visit nine. Nine China and Billy's prodding her mother and she gets some surprising news. Billy's mom played by Diana. Lynn Speaks I. I always going to leave like this. Parbat sexy I hope so. Why not try to save them? You should change expensive lifestyle. Give me shit every time I come home. I'm not coming home anymore voice. Xp Beats Evening at six PM. What's wrong with them? Nothing tired see okay. He's fine. We just busy busy with white. It's going on getting married so we'll have to go to China since when girl you. You don't need to go no expecting you to go. I mean it only cousin days. They should be there okay. Knocked her up. How as you want five. That's not enough. Make a dozen cans. Good I love this movie. And there's also such a great international cast here from time up playing Billy's dad to Zhao Shuzhen. Who Plays Nine I. And they're filling in these great really specific nuances across generations in his family. When I heard you talk about what you were asked to do to the film what financiers wanted and when ironically heard that the farewell was classified as a foreign film. I cringed really hard in this very specific way. It kind of felt like what the film was going through. His what Asian Americans go through and part of that is probably because this is a story inspired by your own actual life but you talk about how you like push back against all of this stuff You know why did you push back? And and and do you think people understood what you were trying to say or whether you're just trying to change it I think that when I was first pitching eat people. Don't ask questions enough in this town. I think I think that's a something to look at because you know as journalists. That's the first thing that you do. Is You interrogate. You ask questions you try to understand and I think that so often in Hollywood. The first thing that is done is such a cynicism that immediately you pitch a story and it's immediately like how do we make it like that other successful movie and when you're film doesn't have a lot of calms Which is like the industry term comparisons And you can't like name like a calm. That didn't do well like that's not gonNA work. You have to name a calm that similar in tone similar plot and then also successful in the box office. And you'RE GONNA like you're like this foam is going to be like that and it's going to do just as well but when you're trying to do something original that you can't have that so. I think that was the pushback from the People. Initially pitched it to where they were like. We have to change it to be more like one of these other films already exists and I was trying to say actually. I'm trying to do something that hasn't been done But it's based on my own experience and that's why I wanna make it because I haven't seen this before so that was really challenging this interesting. It's almost like a structural response against new stories. If you can't related to old stories it's harder to understand Lulu also did this American Life Story version of the farewell That came out. How many years ago was it? The two thousand sixteen thousand sixteen so that was kind of like the first. Go at the story. Yeah exactly and then of course when I did this American Life. The experience was so different because it was like that's fascinating. Why did your family do this? And how did you feel about it? But then how did they feel? And the what did you say? And then what did your mom saying? What did your dad? San was all of these questions that some of which I had the answers to some of which I didn't have the answers to and I said well let's explore that. Let's go talk to them. Let me call my great aunt because you know what I actually never asked her that question and so through that process. I got to understand my own story. Better it's engine. You bring up ca kind of having to call your great aunt. Both Gin and I have had to tell stories about our own families on occasion is very awkward sometimes chosen to really yeah. Yeah but then. There's this like really complicated responsibility that you take on. How do I tell my family story? How much of my family's story do I want to reveal? How much of my own family's experience have I processed myself and understand and you're so scared to get.

Billy China Hollywood La Times sundance Golden Globe Lula American Life Story Danny American Life San Parbat Tina Lynn Lulu Diana
"times studios" Discussed on Chasing Cosby

Chasing Cosby

03:40 min | 5 months ago

"times studios" Discussed on Chasing Cosby

"After she wraps up a role lily tells cosby she's going to report port him to the police. He said he's GonNa ruin my career. I did tell people whom I trust it until my agent. My agent tried so hard to convince me to go to the police in the end. Lily couldn't couldn't bring herself to go to the cops. She was too afraid of what cosby might do. But that threat was still undermined. Twenty three years later when Lilly was struggling with whether or not ought to go public with her story. We should say here that we sent an email to cosby spokesman asking for a response to the details on lily story but he declined to comment it. I was afraid of the retaliation that would endure from bill cosby and the disbelief. And then there's a whole level of being a black woman right more than a third of us. Bill cosby survivors are black women. We have an extra burden in speaking out against him because the black public attacks us for having brought the the black man down mm-hmm and so one of my celebrity friends came to my house and said you're GONNA be okay. A lot of the industry knows lily. Bernard finally does decide to take her story to the police and to the public in May two thousand fifteen lily. Final question to you sixty seconds. How would you respond to the defenders? Bill cosby speed. If and when I'm called to testify under oath I will present all the details along with evidence. Finally the allegations begin to catch up with bill cosby mark. Whitaker the author of a new bill cosby. biography is apologizing for not pursuing allegations that the comedian had brought in sexually assaulted numerous women NBC ditches. It's planned and bring bill cosby back to prime time. This after Netflix postponed the cosby special indefinitely to have caused these appearances on talk. Shows have been canceled. TV Land stopped airing reruns of the cosby show Coming up in the next episode of chasing a new firestorm surrounds bill cosby. This time is because of his own words original not the accusations about when that deposition came out I was shocked. He said what he did. He admitted what he did. He specifically we mentioned my name. I couldn't believe the way he made light of. It felt like dirty. I gotta say all of the Information Mashed. That's out there kinda points to Gilles. Jason Cosby reported hosted by me Nikki. Weisensee being in the Los Angeles Times podcast and a production of La Times studios and hers Aachen Company. Our producer is Alexandra. Zaslov our audio engineers are Angus spottiswoode pizza arto Brett whitlow by Kathleen and Eric. Montgomery production help from page Heinsohn Erin Sands Hands and Robert Glenn Smith the original music you heard in this podcast was composed by allison. Leyton Brown are sound designed by snap. Sound thanks to everyone who granted us access to their archives. You can find the list at La Times dot com slash chasing cosby. Jason Cosby is executive produced by fight Abby Venture Swanson for the Los Angeles Times Mark Herzog and ending Beckerman for Hers Organ Company and Me Nikki. Weisensee Egan if you're the victim of sexual the assault or know someone who is you can get helped by calling the national sexual assault hotline at one eight hundred six five six four six seven three.

bill cosby cosby Jason Cosby Lily Los Angeles Times bill cosby. assault Weisensee Egan Leyton Brown Lilly Netflix NBC La Times Bernard Abby Venture Swanson Hers Organ Company Angus spottiswoode Whitaker Robert Glenn Smith Montgomery
"times studios" Discussed on Chasing Cosby

Chasing Cosby

01:33 min | 6 months ago

"times studios" Discussed on Chasing Cosby

"Coming up in the next episode of Chasing Cosby. I was probably fiddling with my phone and I heard him say bill cosby and immediately hit record and started filming. And you think Oh. Here's here's a way to get this cosby story back into the public eye. That statement by a virtually unknown comic in a small club was posted online igniting a firestorm over charges that had been dormant since the two thousand five lawsuit. Jason Cosby is reported in hosted by me. Nikki Weisensee it's a Los Angeles Times podcast and a production none of La Times Studios and Hers Company. Our producer is Alexandra. Vassallo our audio engineers are Angus spottiswoode Pete Cro Brett whitlow. Mike Heflin and Eric Montgomery production help from page Heinsohn. Aaron Sands and Robert Glenn Smith the original Music Zip you heard in this. podcast was composed by allison. Leyton Brown are sound design is by snap sound. Thanks to everyone. Who granted US access to their archives? You can find the list at L. A. Times dot com slash chasing Kospi. Jason Cosby is executive produced by Abby Swanson for the Los Angeles Times Markers Occurs Beckerman for her Song Company and me. Nikki Weisensee ICAN. If you're the victim of sexual assault or know someone who is you can get help helped by calling the national sexual assault hotline at one eight hundred six five six four six seven three..

Chasing Cosby Jason Cosby cosby Nikki Weisensee Pete Cro Brett whitlow Los Angeles Times assault Los Angeles La Times Studios Beckerman US Abby Swanson Mike Heflin Leyton Brown producer Robert Glenn Smith Aaron Sands Hers Company Song Company Eric Montgomery
"times studios" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:44 min | 8 months ago

"times studios" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Father's staff sergeant Randolph elder says hard work wins you get out of life put into it and now here's Larry elder you know in your heart no you have value do you go back and forth and not he says it with somebody else you know I was a Democrat the hi you with at so we're looking at is I know you look at it to the rectal blower but there's a lot of people back there now what good for him are more rain your record get over it or you know China should do it though he admitted it we got so many people who are not never Chomper everything there but we keep got from my soul it was the second third and fourth which if convicted of the plate nine seven one eight nine seven one seven two four three very elderly secular time studio well as a mention three of the four witnesses testified today a whirl on that phone call so they are first hand witnesses and two of them thought that the demand as he put it was inappropriate but said he didn't think it was a bribe Nancy Pelosi's calling it a bride that's the problem the other problem is this I think Republicans will be a lot more amenable to taking the Democrats accusation that this was a quid pro quo.

China Nancy Pelosi Randolph elder Larry elder
Netflix and Theater Owners Go To The Mattresses Over Scorsese's Irishman

The Frame

07:39 min | 8 months ago

Netflix and Theater Owners Go To The Mattresses Over Scorsese's Irishman

"Welcome to the frame and Stephen cliff us filling in for John horn Martin Scorsese's highly awaited mob boss drama the Irishman hits theaters today well you know what is the situation going on now for big business and the government they're trying to pull us down you might be demonstrating the failure to show appreciation seems the the Netflix film stars Robert deniro Al Pacino and Joe Pesci but seeing the three and a half hour long at beginning theater will take some effort Scorsese had hoped for a wide release but after negotiations stalled between Netflix and movie theater owners the film will only be seen in eight theaters in New York and Los Angeles before heading to the streaming service on November twenty seventh Nicole Sperling is media reporter for The New York Times covering Hollywood and streaming and she has the backstory on how things fell apart hi Nicole hi how are you Steve good good Nicole good you first please explain what theater owners were hoping for in terms of the Irishman's release I mean I think with what theater owners were hoping for was that Netflix was going to get in line and follow the rules that the traditional studios have with the theater chains and you know that is asking a lot for a company that doesn't necessarily believe in a theatrical window that is a subscriber first company that wants to make their subscribers happy by bringing them their content as soon as possible so what they wanted them to do was agreed to a seventy two day release which means that not necessarily the movie would play in theaters for seventy two days but that there would be an exclusivity period for that long before they would put it on their streaming service and that's really asking a lot for a company like Netflix I mean what ideally what Netflix like to see I mean no theatrical release at all no I mean I think Netflix is coming around to the idea of some limited theatrical release some of their consumers want to go see their movies on the big screen in a Martin scorcese gangster movie seems to fall into that category but they don't spend a lot on marketing so what happens in the traditional studio model is you have to put your movie into theaters you have to spend you know thirty five million dollars at least on a wide release to get people attention so they will know it's in theaters to go see it and then if you have to wait these seventy two to ninety days that are required by the theater chains when it does hit the next window whether that's a streaming platform or pay TV or whatever it is often times studios have to pay again to market the movie so it's really a lot of money but it also there is a requirement for Oscars is you have to have a movie in a theater for a week to be eligible that is part of the rules well after the Irishman start streaming on Netflix on November twenty seventh will there be the option for theater chains to give it a more wider release and and show it in theaters then for for those of us who may want to have that cinematic experience Netflix will keep it in theaters once it opens on their service as long as the chains want to keep it in it's just a limited number of theater chains that will play the movie the big giants AMC regal Cinemark those are the guys who are refusing to play by Netflix's rules which are much more truncated release windows and they're accustomed to Nicole Sperling is media reporter for The New York Times covering Hollywood and streaming with Irishman showing now at the Belasco in New York and the Egyptian here in Los Angeles before expanding to a handful of others what can you tell us about why those specific theaters were selected as far as the Belasco that's a Broadway theater that shows Broadway plays this is actually one of the first times that a movie is going to be debuting in that theater and it's kind of terrific in a sense that like it's a big palace in there it has a thousand seats in it it makes you feel like you're in this you know old timey kind of environment there's not a lot of single screens left in New York City so they're kind of recreating the old time Hollywood feel on that screen as for the Egyptian in Los Angeles that theater is currently owned by American Cinematheque it's a his work location but Netflix is actually in the process of trying to buy that theater it's an independent movie house they want to own it so that on week nights they can put their movies in and have a vents and do whatever they want and then on the weekends American Cinematheque would still program their films as they see fit and they're kind of retrospectives and the repertory theatre that they are well fear owners were trying to make the case to Netflix that you know if you truncate the theatrical release you're gonna lose out how much money are are are we talking about potentially well they use the departed as their example which was Scorsese's two thousand six movie and that made three hundred million dollars worldwide now the studio doesn't get all three hundred million dollars they split that evenly with the theaters and then when you add in marketing costs it goes lower than that as well but there's still a you know a significant profit that could be made it's a could be because it's also a three and a half hour movie so how many people are going to be rushing to the theater to see it I mean the film has received rapturous reviews critics are loving it so that interest to see I think is high but there's also the risk factor that's involved too and I think Netflix has been less interested in getting involved in that business because it is so risky and it's much safer to put it on your service and then a month from now tell everybody how many people and watched it right there were similar release negotiations last year over the theatrical run of another major Netflix project and that's all fine so quite owns Roma can you remind us how that agreement check out and how it may or may not have influenced how this deal over the Irishman was hammered out it was the same kind of situation where the big chains refused to play at the smaller ones the landmarks the Alamo they played the movie and for some of those theater chains the movie did really well for them and it stayed in theaters for a long time well as streaming giants become more powerful in the big budget feature film industry will movie theaters become secondary venues you know for special films well it depends on who you're talking to I mean at this moment in time Disney who is you know launching their service in two weeks is a huge proponent of the theatrical window probably most of the movies that you went and saw most of Americans when Sonya last year were Disney movies whether they came from Pixar or Lucasfilm or Marvel those are the movies that make a ton of money at the box office and they stay in theaters for a very long time so Disney is a big fan of the of the theatrical window now how that changes we'll see there also putting a lot of money behind their Disney plus service so that needs to work out really well for them as well and who knows if product will be shifting to the service and hopes to you know bolster their subscriber numbers a lot of the streamers are backed by a traditional studios so they're gonna have to figure that out as it may go forward Nicole Sperling is media reporter for The New York Times covering Hollywood hand streaming the call thanks is a is a pleasure thank you for your time I appreciate

Martin Scorsese Stephen Cliff John Horn Three Hundred Million Dollars Thirty Five Million Dollars Seventy Two Days Seventy Two Day Ninety Days Two Weeks
Robert Evans, ‘Chinatown’ Producer and Paramount Chief, Dies at 89

Terry Meiners and Company

00:40 sec | 8 months ago

Robert Evans, ‘Chinatown’ Producer and Paramount Chief, Dies at 89

"One of Hollywood's one time studio chiefs and producer Robert Evans has died at age eighty nine as head of Paramount Pictures starting in nineteen sixty seven Robert Evans over Saul string of acclaimed films Rosemary's baby love story the godfather and Chinatown S. once about making the godfather and then they give you a PTS Miller's spaghetti Evans stepped down from paramount in nineteen seventy four becoming a producer turning out more successful movies marathon man black Sunday pop by and urban call boy in two thousand two Robert Evans autobiography was made into a documentary the kid stays in the picture building you'll ABC

Hollywood Robert Evans Paramount Pictures Rosemary Producer ABC Saul Pts Miller
"times studios" Discussed on Room 20

Room 20

02:20 min | 11 months ago

"times studios" Discussed on Room 20

"What if no one knew who you were and you had lost the ability to tell them in coronado nursing home employees have cared for a man for years but they have no idea who he is late changed in an instant stint for one man. It happened in the california desert nearly two decades ago on a clear morning in june. He's been kept alive on life support ever since i remember hearing the the cars crashing because you could hear for my bedroom. My name is joanne varian. I'm an investigative reporter and i spent nearly two years trying to figure out how a teenager ended up unconscious an unidentified for so long and how we came to be known only by the name sixty six garage to think that there's a family out there that just has no idea what happened to their son their brother their uncle <hes> <hes> he couldn't even have children that he just disappeared off the face of the earth for certain they had no idea piecing together sixty six garages story will make me question region what i thought i knew about consciousness. Make me question what i thought i knew about my own family so only went to pick her up at the airport. I remember brielle. Get jumped up on this one but i remember the first thing. She said she's two. Oh it's a story about connection and what makes us human ban. It's about resilience and finding hope in the most unexpected places. This is room twenty a new podcast from the l._a. Times studios understands so talk <music> <music> <music>.

joanne varian investigative reporter coronado brielle Times studios california two decades two years
"times studios" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"times studios" Discussed on American Scandal

"Tough part will be figuring out why he was left lying in that bed unidentified for so long and whether the person inside garage still exists. My name is Joanne Farren and I'm an investigative reporter. This is room twenty a new podcast us from the L. A. Times Studios I. I heard about sixty six garage back in twenty 2014 while I was working on a story about people kept alive on life support sometimes for decades we had nothing in common garage deny he was born in a place so foreign to the Canadian prairie where I grew up his life was unfamiliar in every way.

Joanne Farren investigative reporter L. A. Times
"times studios" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"times studios" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"They recorded in Los Angeles. This time ROY Halley had made LA his new home in Paul's backing band of choice. The famed wrecking crew was also based there aren't knew all too. Well that Paul took his time studio he took out a three month lease on a big funky house in laurel canyon real Hollywood hills musicians. Pat, late one night after work Paul already in a bunch of musicians were hanging out there smoking and drinking telling stories and cracking jokes Paul's brother, Eddie started banging away rhythmically, piano bench soon. Others joined in clapping along clicking silverware pounding away on boxes or whatever else was handy. Paul loved what he was hearing. So he clicked on his tape machine and let it run. He took the tape to ROY Halley in ROY turned it into a three minute drum loop that busy propulsed rhythm bed became the basis for Cecilia one of four hit singles off the upcoming album. Now days recording artists, very commonly build songs, just like this. And Cecilia is one of the earliest adoptions of that technique. In later years. Paul Simon songwriting, very famously taking Latin American and African influences and flavors El Condor pasta was where he stopped dippy tone, those influences and really dove in and in his own wistful lovely words to a Peruvian Fulton. Melody? In another foreshadowing of later events, he had merica musicians play the basic tracks. But the field just wasn't there. So he teen the rights to the original recording in had ROY Halley, simply dub in these Simon and Garfunkel, vocals and one more piece of foreshadowing Paul Simon sings the verse and art Garfunkel sings the chorus they are both on the track. But never at the same time. Some of it was put there intentionally some of it just happened the bridge over troubled water album, crawls with clues about what was coming next for Simon. And garfunkel. Way to wrap our heads around the mad maelstrom of events, only changes in music and culture in technology that took place all around the world. I'm late nineteen sixties we decided to kind of break things down by region. So we talked about London the mod scene and then Jimi Hendrix gets off the plane. They're Memphis soul. Chicago blues Nashville country five summers in Los Angeles. And a brief in hopeful summer club in San Francisco and New York City where we try to take in the view from both park bench and Park Avenue. Everything that is in America is in New York health just about everything that is in the world is in New York, and what's more. It's all crammed into one place skinny little Manhattan island, and an all seemed ready to burst the seams the decade lunged towards its conclusion. Slam. Nineteen sixty nine was the turning point for everything before that it looked like the sixties was going to change the world that everything was going to go this way. But instead everything went that way, they might have been righteous, and they turned out to be right, especially when it came to Vietnam. But the angry analysis of the new left revolutionaries couldn't be sustained for a second. There. It looked like it might catch on. But it didn't and never made it out of the sixties has a mass movement. Who knows maybe it would have given the chance, but that wasn't gonna happen. The backlash from the establishment was ferocious new left leaders were routinely harassed often imprisoned and sometimes hunted down and killed in his wing Kramer points out correctly, in our view, the lefty spend entirely too much time in fighting and going after each other of that sure as hell didn't help. What we do know is the shit just kept piling on all through nineteen sixty nine violent unsettling events. Just kept rushing at us. And the backlash began in a big way as we said back in fifteen in nineteen sixty nine a powerful riptide started pulling everything back out to sea in January, the Nixon administration took power and politically America lurched sharply to the right? The savage in Vietnam continued unabated and escalated into neighboring countries at home, a war on drugs was declared cops and DA's federal state and local even more leeway to crack down more power to ruin people's lives in. That's exactly what they started doing Black Panthers in weathermen and others started fighting back and the police response, especially since the Panthers was swift and deadly all the fear. Air and anger was seeping into the culture. Nowhere more. So than in rock music. Sixties historian Todd gatlin, but this way and his book years of hope days of rage, the rhetoric of showdown and recklessness prevailed the end always lay near the site guy screamed until it was horse most Americans alive, then had never experienced such a troubled time had never seen their countries so divided in weary as they finished up the album in late nineteen sixty nine pollen, Artie or feeling divided in weary to here's period. Carlin from his two thousand seventeen biography of Paul Simon. They were both tired Paul was tired of having already in Haley, insist on making his songs so pretty although string sections and the layers of echo putting shimmer on tunes. He thought would sound better with a little mud on. In their shoes already was sick of working within the boundaries of Paul's desires and needs. So there they were finally at absolute loggerheads unable to sing together. They settled for silence. One

Paul Simon ROY Halley Los Angeles Cecilia Vietnam art Garfunkel recording artists laurel canyon New York Pat Memphis Jimi Hendrix London Nixon administration Panthers San Francisco Carlin America New York City
"times studios" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"times studios" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Show. I'm your host, Joshua, David. Having a great time studio with these senior education, counselor, Mr. L Connex, and he was actually just shedding some light on on how you can generate income for today and your cash accounts or maybe that's later for your retirement accounts. He talked about having a strategy for any market condition as we know the market goes up down. It also goes sideways one of the key things. He talked about it. I want our listeners understand is about risk management. And that is the key. If you don't manage your risk, you have nothing to manage. If you happen to miss us before the break for the three hour investing class to passes. Call nine five two eight one four forty four ten now. What would you do if you had another source of income? I should say what would you like what would your life? Look like, would you be able to do some of the things that you've always wanted to wanted to maybe take more vacations not have to worry about? And I know alley we hear this a lot about you know, if I'm not at work. I'm not making money if you're able to make money while you're on vacation. What would that look like? All those fun things that we like to do on the beach. You know, what the family is also that, you know, as we talk about a whole bunch times L is is that financial freedom. Now, a lot of our listeners. Our listeners are new to the market and want to get started. There's also a group that we've been seeing that have been have been investing. But they just haven't been getting to their goals. There's another group alter that will has been investing. They're doing good. But they're just hoping to do a little bit better at what are some of the things you're keen on how to generate supplemental income using the financial markets, and how can you do that? Even if you have a full-time job. Well, the first thing to understand is the markets offer one of the best opportunities available for generating income or creating wealth. And knew the great thing is it's available to everyone doesn't make any difference..

Mr. L Connex Joshua David three hour
"times studios" Discussed on Arrive Early, Leave Late

Arrive Early, Leave Late

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"times studios" Discussed on Arrive Early, Leave Late

"I can't stand. The look on your face. I can't stand the air you breathe because it's my air that you're breathing. That's how they feel about each other and doing that game. You saw chatter you saw them each other. That one time Chris scored three point play. He fetches must look at Rondo. He was not happy about that. You can see this moving the hair moving. Something was being said, I'm sure it's not the stuff you want kids. But you know, what that's what everybody says in the eighties. Everybody used to do that McHale. Close lining is all that's the is kind of that way. No, not that entails. Not that into. I mean, they talk trash because everybody's friend. Not gonna have a kale close lining was again, by the way. I love it to up the create Rams to make it really really mad. If you don't be nice to me. Call Kevin McHale. We wanna. Upset. Time with the it's a different era, of course. But the beauty of sports and why we love it. Because of the memories passed along to new generation of fans, we'll tell you. I saw magic I saw Colfax that who's who the hall of famers. And that's why sports but brings up debate. It takes you back to a place as he just feels right now doing for the first addition of storytime that was fine Pasadena Kate and BT Parsa kid like me live there, reporter drinks. Now. Let us know what you think about this concept. Do it more less. We're all ears. Tweeden. Let us know the arrive early late podcast produced by Daewoo engineer by my Kathleen Angel Rodriguez is a sports editor I'm your host the grand arrive early leave late the LA times studios production..

Kevin McHale Rams Chris Colfax Daewoo Kathleen Angel Rodriguez LA engineer editor Pasadena Kate reporter
"times studios" Discussed on Arrive Early, Leave Late

Arrive Early, Leave Late

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"times studios" Discussed on Arrive Early, Leave Late

"I mean, the back when I started they were talking about putting a hundred fifty million dollars the newest stadium now that doesn't build the concession stands. Bill the bathrooms. Stan Kroenke stadium's gonna cost north of three billion dollars and the first in Inglewood and the first phase of that stadium, which we can see looking at the window here at the times is is five billion in total. When you talk about NFL network and the sixty five hundred seat performance venue. That's going to be attached to the stadium. So five billion dollars for a stadium. Staggering. Okay. You cover the NFL sound farmer. I am the post game host for the chargers on an five seven radio. I go down to practice. I see that. I know they're not getting much attention. But that's a good squad. Also worked for the Rams the first year they're here and to see where they're at to where there are now that. Excellent squad. Ideally, could it possibly happen in a crazy world where you have to LA teams in the Super Bowl. It could absolutely happen. I mean, you look those teams you look at the chargers right now their role in. They have Philip rivers. Obviously injuries have been something. That's forever. You know this. This has been a snake bit franchise. But if they can keep guys healthy now, they get Joey Bosa back to think how good that defense could be when they get Bosa back Philip rivers great player. They've got you know, they got very good receivers as you know, and the FCC kind of wide open. I mean, yes, you have the patriots there lurking. But there aren't a lot of other AFC powerhouse teams. We've seen the chiefs get off to great starts and then fade. And so and they've got a young quarterback is essentially a rookie Patrick Mahomes. And then the Rams it's it's unbelievable. They seem they're almost running away with the NFC right now they have a game and a half lead on the NFC. Some key games coming up. They play the chiefs in Mexico City. The NFL could not be happier that they got that game for Mexico City often in Mexico City could be the the game of the year in the NFL right now little number crunching. Yesterday at the game. The Rams are there differential is plus one oh seven right now and the rest of the NFC west is minus one hundred twenty six so you think about that spectrum and the way they're scoring. They've only had one game out of the thirties. Then even look that great on offense. They had some issues. They missed miss him opportunities, and they scored thirty nine points their highest point total of the year. So defense they've come around offense. They're always going to be there and special teams. Now, they got Zir linebacker. So that's a that is a team that is definitely playing as they say complementary football. So I think it's entirely possible that if they approached the playoffs because they're they're almost certainly going to get a by right now just to get where they were last year at eleven and five they have to go four and five who thinks the Rams are gonna go four and five they play the Niners. Again, they play the they play the cardinals again. It's just not gonna happen barring injury. So I think there's a there's a very good chance. I wouldn't say it's a I would necessarily make right now, but I don't see entirely within the universe of possibilities. Sam farmer LA times. Farmers where you don't wanna follow him on Twitter. Does a great job every weekend all kinds of stories and definitely going to be a big guest on arrive early. Leave late podcast. The second episode is done. I can't believe the time flew or by great stories from farm. Fred Turner, and McCulloch we're gonna keep on Trinity's out, please fried share review of a nineteen. We're going to read all the comments we're gonna go when just every single episode of things that have different play player because we want to make sure that we're giving audience and the listening and the readers what they desire when it comes to arrive late, and the beauty of this is that we can evolve. Together. Meet the writer the listeners going on doing that arrive early leave late produced by Dave wine engineered by Mike Heflin, associate producer today. Marc Potts for Angel Rodriguez and the entire LA times. Sports on listening to arrive early leave late and Ellie times studios. Production..

Rams chargers NFL NFC chiefs cardinals Philip rivers LA Stan Kroenke Mexico City Ellie times Joey Bosa Inglewood AFC LA times FCC Twitter football Patrick Mahomes
"times studios" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"times studios" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"And there's also the shadow of Apollo thirteen. Right? And and the right stuff and all. Yeah. Make the same type of movie. We've seen when people go into space and there's the wide shot of everybody in the doctoral center celebrating and ready seen that movie. Exactly. So so I think but but a lot of times studios to just see the movie they've already seen, and I had a lucky situation with with the folks universal that they were actually very much on board with doing something different. And and you know that said, you know, it's still a process of, you know where you have to just then, you know, once you're all on the same page intellectually, then you gotta figure out logistically how you do it, you know, and and and this, this one was tough. You know, because because of the way we wanted to do it, this wasn't going to be a, you know, giant giant budgeted movie for what it was and and we weren't gonna have a ton of days to shoot it, you know? So. So we had to shoot it in less than sixty days. And we had to find a way to to kind of Mary the these quotidian life, the home life of the movie with with the space sequences. Find a way to do this spacing winces practically, I wanted to do those in camera, which is its own kind of can be its own sort of, you know, a knee breaking kind of ordeal, but, but again, I think you get a lot out of it as a result. So we wanted to shoot a lot of movie on sixteen, but you've got to be careful, especially, we knew we were doing an IMAX blow up going from sixteen millimeter Dimac is is it's not generally done because sixteen very tiny gauge and you know, tiny foreman, and I'm exits very huge. But we liked that idea of sending kind of a wizard of Oz moment on the moon where you could go from the smallest film format. There is to the biggest well, we could've done super eight if we were really if we were really ballsy. We've done super anytime experts. Instead, we did super sixteen NYMEX, but anyway, you know, trying to kind of wet ourselves to certain things like that that we knew would be either difficult to execute or difficult to sell. But, but at least with the sort of overall support of everyone, the studio, the crew myself, everyone being in agreement that, okay, you know, even if we fall on our face, at least we gotta try to do something different here because as you say, otherwise, there's no point, what would you say was the hardest part? Was there a moment on you're like, oh, shit. Why did I do it this way like this off the the first day we tried to do kind of our space sequences in the first scene of the movie. This x fifteen flight was our first day of kind of of of set pieces like we had. We had done all the on the ground, you know, quote, unquote, normal stuff. We broke for a hiatus during the during the the winter break, came back started working on sound stages in that first day, and we we had kind of spent a lot of time in prep figuring out how we're gonna do this. And you know, we had, we had a full scale replica of the airplane built on a sound stage and it was on a gamble. So it could move back and forth. Front of there was a big LED screen which was projecting all the all the stuff that basically Neil in the audience sees out the window. So it was all set up. We looked at what the LED imagery was going to be. We'd looked at the craft, we'd figured out our angles at had all been story boarded. And I show up after, you know, we just done a month or so of shooting where we were banning out multiple scene today..

NYMEX foreman Neil Mary sixty days
"times studios" Discussed on One Giant Leap For Geeks

One Giant Leap For Geeks

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"times studios" Discussed on One Giant Leap For Geeks

"Look at you think it on the fly today anyway i think that the reason at brooklyn nine nine got picked up so quickly was because that show was me by universal television okay and universal television is a sister company of nbc so it's kind of all in how shits or you're like hey man you know you're with our same umbrella companies like we might as well because a lot of times studios will make a show in have a different network distribute it so it's like it's a universal show but fox is who puts it out okay how just like gotham is a warner brothers show fox out yes so see i don't know that much about brooklyn nine nine i'm it's just like a comedy it's like a comedy cop show right i've seen a couple it's like previews for it and it looks okay not only going to rush out and watch right away but not i wouldn't never watch it it just i have so many shows that i watch we have an embarrassment of riches there are too many options of so yeah so yeah i know somebody's probably like in south africa listening to this life fuck off you say oh your life is so hard all these tv shows and all these superhero movies that you've got to watch like how can you ever say i'm trying to keep focus from cut my goddamn head off with a machete right now and y'all bitches one you're talking about batman hey you know we recognize the struggles to real definitely not in titled no by no means entrusting we are low budget shit.

brooklyn nbc fox gotham universal television south africa
"times studios" Discussed on Bodega Boys

Bodega Boys

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"times studios" Discussed on Bodega Boys

"Is that your this is all the shows or go to your local pharmacy got the sudafed in a fucking lock box i think it's taken it out drop at the time leo longregarded your bike that last year look at not soon under the regionals where is this going to be undo donald donald trump will rainy has to do donald trump is a bag kid as is like at this point the parents give it up a you look at like yo you've got this where the parents that's us how he is rose i visual and they gave flew one show and it was like wow this is crazy what like why are you doing this and that just kept given up show or those watching the all where we can watch it so drumbeat dole now those won't be these at schiphol shuttle in a room full of light nobody attractive no i was no no no data are higher us to sit in a room we just running a you wireless we will you why would consultants while it does have a good time studio oh no oh my god ms own what did he say that elizabeth homecoming no justice breyer costa of the move x is martin the new separatism for this generous so if you look at it like you'll see this man how they have a phone in a house what's the fertile fuck google shit you know why any elevated some might even have a computer no.

donald donald trump schiphol shuttle breyer costa martin google
"times studios" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"times studios" Discussed on WLAC

"It's painter human development the difficulties newsradio of dealing safety with the situation donny will ac correct boards is somebody in the from room the with box her at all four times studios in los angeles absolutely she is a twenty four seven here's steve uh is sick or person three college caregivers football ballgames because the last of which is indoors she in phoenix is end a of the first quarter and kansas very state has just infant taken a seven like our three todd lead over like ucla in her mind on a in sixty she eight doesn't yards have touchdown run the sense bruins of star quarterback harm josh rosen and out if tonight there's something not yet left medically out cleared because we're after are a we concussion are baby utah proved outdoors at all in dallas times they because list the she attendance has put at twenty things in thousand her mouth in the cotton that bowl are extremely utah dangerous won it's ballgame game against west virginia thirty two fourteen indoors oh in detroit duke a thirty six fourteen winner over northern so it's a illinois it's a permanent which had fourteen uh drives life and only thirteen of toddler first downs heard tomorrow greely night fox tv um will have arizona so it's against really purdue hard the patriots to sign linebacker to james deal harrison with that the rams is to say get they going will probably on rest we're starters i'm this this sunday is the year in the season i turn fifty finale against my san husband's francisco gonna turn forty eight nine nba games and right now we milwaukee the bucks have all star yana satanic kubo back in the lineup from his sore knee he averages thirty points per game he has 2004 so far late thirdquarter 83 81 bucks over the bulls the michael berries show where political correctness dies in ugly ugly death newsradio fifteen ten wale see the ludi lin upon down long vis the value begana that rigby leila lawal at this navy seal her i realise pre lee win i knew i assume that the love of on the problem hold on all would leave at me in billy later lying in bed sooner any wa they in mind me the new now siding they're gonna man i came in donald the new okay the.

kansas donald billy milwaukee nba francisco purdue illinois detroit west virginia dallas utah todd donny wa leila lawal bulls rams harrison james arizona josh rosen ucla phoenix los angeles
"times studios" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"times studios" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"You have no idea when you're really gator being judged no doubt that it's it's a you don't know what translates with snl even if you maybe there's something we're maybe you don't get it like why is it on the show take note that worked at some point or it wouldn't have been on the show as the misery that's why we are linking worship rehearsal but not on the major routes different people the moon i don't know it's like comedy so that's why when people talk about it being so hard it's because you can't figure it out you can't tell me something that everyone will think is funny that's why comedies to me should be specific and you find out we are audiences and you write it with them in mind because i think the problem is a lot of times studios will take a comedy ceo cape this has to apply to everyone and you end up watering it down or changing the ingredients where it's like that's not going to taste good like itit's really good to like this group of people just trust me how to just be that because humor so specific and a dozen a script you can't say that all comedy scripts have to be hundred ten pages they they're just not going to be some will be funny here at one forty they just will be funnier and now i'm getting a time cotti on sorry us i did me do you you have no it happens even with us now you'll read something at the table that gets applause and then it dies on camera and the same thing and you know that going into movie when you're shooting scene or an entire.

snl ceo itit