35 Burst results for "Times Times Times"

Mississippi grand jury declines to indict woman in Emmett Till killing

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 hrs ago

Mississippi grand jury declines to indict woman in Emmett Till killing

"A grand jury in Mississippi declined to indict the white woman whose accusations set off the lynching of black teenager Emmett Till in 1955 The grand jury determined there was insufficient evidence to indict Carolyn Bryant donham for kidnapping and manslaughter Relatives told the AP till had whistled at the white woman Historian Timothy Tyson read the now 87 year old donham unpublished memoir Her husband brought Emmett Till to her at two 30 in the morning and wanted to her to identify him that she said it wasn't him three times And then she said Emmett Till flashed me a strange smile and

Carolyn Bryant Donham Emmett Till Timothy Tyson Mississippi Donham AP Emmett
The Real Housewives Brain Conundrum

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:17 min | 7 hrs ago

The Real Housewives Brain Conundrum

"Watched one episode of Real Housewives. Oh, you did. Oh, I try everything. I even did, what is it called? Naked and alone, making. Oh, I don't know that one. Naked and afraid. Dennis, which at which franchise, which I know. I think it was Orange County. Oh my gosh. It's what popped up. The only time I watch TV and it's very rare then is in a hotel room. I find television. I've always said that. I don't really watch TV. The exception. I'm not condemning people who do. I think it's great to have some silly time consumer. We need that. But the problem for me, at least naked and scared, is that right, Sean, make it make it in the freight. Make it an afraid is interesting. How do people put up with being unclothed in the Guatemalan jungle? I mean, it's at least interesting. But the dialog on Real Housewives. I think I rather, I know, no, I don't think. I'd rather just be in a silent room and let my brain entertain me. Right.

Dennis Orange County Sean
Eric Trump: When Will Enough Be Enough?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:47 min | 8 hrs ago

Eric Trump: When Will Enough Be Enough?

"For example, last night on Sean Hannity's show on Fox News channel, president Trump's son Eric was with the 45th president in New York City. In fact, it was Eric who got the call that there's an FBI guy with a machine gun at the gate of Mar-a-Lago. There are 30 FBI agents. They've just cracked into a safe that it turns out was allegedly empty and they're carting away boxes and boxes of documents. And I wanted to pay close attention to what Eric Trump had to say to Sean last night on Fox News channel. What could they possibly think existed? Inside of Mar-a-Lago in a box that was taken from The White House that was so damaging that the FBI director and the attorney general of the United States would have to raid a former president's residence and grab everything out of there because that doesn't make sense. What could what secret document could possibly rise to that level? I don't know, they'll probably find a note for me telling him how proud I am of him and what a great job he was doing as president. They might find some pictures of my kids, maybe some nice headlines, maybe a nice note from you Sean. It's insane. How many times can you cry wolf? I mean, the FBI dragged this whole country through hell for three years based on lies and deceit and dirty dossiers and fisa warrants and everything else, right? And everything proved to be incorrect, fraudulent, made up and absolute sham, they dragged this country through hell, and here they are again, rating the guy's house. I mean, when do you give up? When do you say enough's enough?

FBI Fox News Channel President Trump Eric Trump Eric Sean Hannity Sean Lago New York City White House United States
The Gospel According to 40

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:57 sec | 8 hrs ago

The Gospel According to 40

"Folks, this month is the 40th 40th anniversary of my radio broadcasting. By the way, you know 40s big in the Bible. 40 days of the flood is the flood. Oh right. 40 nights, Moses is on Sinai getting the ten commandments. 40 years, the Jews wander in the wilderness till they get into the promised land, 40 is a very important number, and as I explained in my Bible commentary, the rational Bible, 40 doesn't mean the number between 39 and 41. Numbers in the Bible certainly in the Torah the first 5 books are meant to convey notions 40 means a divinely significant period of time.

Sinai Moses
Kurt Schlichter: Don't Get Enraged, Be Determined

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:28 min | 8 hrs ago

Kurt Schlichter: Don't Get Enraged, Be Determined

"Bottom line is this. And what we'll get into all of that, we're going to get into the weeds about what happens if he's indicted. Can he run? That seems to be a bit of an open question. I'm going to get your reaction to this shocking, unprecedented raid of Joe Biden's political opponent. No other way to say that. There's no other way to word this. We have President Biden's Justice Department weaponized to the extent that his main political rivals home was raided. I'm going to say this. First of all, cooler heads must prevail, Kurt schlichter had a good, he's a red meat guy. He had a good tweet last night. Don't get enraged, be determined, be awake, have your eyes open to what they're capable of doing, but understand something else. And I'm going to be the voice I think of reason during what seems to be a very unreasonable time. A federal judge did have to sign off on this. I know that doesn't mean anything if it came out of D.C.. This whole bunch are politicized and weaponized. Nonetheless, the judge had to know this was dropping a 100 megaton bomb in the political landscape 90 days before the midterm election. There's no way you do this in a vacuum.

President Biden Kurt Schlichter Joe Biden Justice Department D.C.
President Trump's Statement Announcing FBI Raid at Mar-a-Lago

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:29 min | 8 hrs ago

President Trump's Statement Announcing FBI Raid at Mar-a-Lago

"45th president of the United States and his statement that was released on the truth social platform since he has been banned from Twitter, revealing that FBI agents had raided his home at Mar-a-Lago. He wrote, these are dark times for our nation as my beautiful home Mar-a-Lago and Palm Beach, Florida is currently under siege, raided and occupied by a large group of FBI agents. Nothing like this has ever happened to a president of the United States before. Began after I was working in cooperating with the relevant government agencies, this unannounced raid on my home was not necessary or appropriate. It is prosecutorial misconduct. The weaponization of the justice system and an attack by radical left Democrats who desperately don't want me to run for president in 2024, especially based on recent polls and who will likewise do anything to stop Republicans and conservatives in the upcoming midterm elections, such an assault could only take place in broken third world countries. Sadly, America has now become one of those countries corrupt at a level not seen before. They even broke into my safe. What is the difference between this and Watergate were operatives broke into the Democrat National Committee here in reverse, Democrats broke into the home of the 45th president of the United States.

FBI United States Lago Palm Beach Twitter Florida Democrat National Committee
FBI searches Trump's Florida estate for classified records

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 9 hrs ago

FBI searches Trump's Florida estate for classified records

"Presidential historians say nothing like this has ever happened in FBI raid on a former chief executive Southern methodist university's Jeffrey engel says it's one of the Trump presidencies fascinating parts We've had to reconsider how often we use the word unprecedented This fits the bill I'm having a hard time finding anything that reaches the scale and the importance angle says the Trump administration's history keeps getting rewritten I remember saying when Trump was impeached that this is the first line of his biography for the rest of his life Now I don't think that's even in the first paragraph Sagar Meghani Washington

Jeffrey Engel Southern Methodist University Trump Administration FBI Donald Trump Sagar Meghani Washington
What We Know so Far About the Trump Raid

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:38 min | 9 hrs ago

What We Know so Far About the Trump Raid

"Your reaction to what we've learned thus far about the raid on Mar-a-Lago. Well, I don't think we know enough for me to have a real competent reaction. I mean, there are the political implications, but even the political implications so far are in reaction to something that we don't know enough about. And so on the one hand, we could in theory find out this was completely justified and makes a lot of sense despite how unusual it is. Or we could find out it doesn't. But I would predict that no matter what we find out, everybody's going to revert to their corner and conclude that they either like what they hear or don't believe what they hear. And I would say, as a matter of the midterm election, again with the going to win the House majority, because it's very least the Democrats are defending a 5 seat majority that's so thin, it's impossible to defend and even though the Senate races have looked tougher for Republicans in the summer insane recently, we've seen this movie before, at least in the 21st century with wave elections where it starts out okay for the party in The White House. Then it looks really, really bad for a long time. Then it looks like weight, maybe it's not so bad. And then it all goes the way it looked like it was going to go, especially when you look at the states where Republicans are on offense or even where they're playing defense. So we need to know more before I can tell you, okay, this is the potential different impact, but I don't think we know enough.

Senate House White House
'I didn't really learn anything': COVID grads face college

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 9 hrs ago

'I didn't really learn anything': COVID grads face college

"High school graduates are headed to college and still dealing with the learning disruptions of a pandemic They were sophomores in high school when the pandemic hit now young adults worry that upheaval and long stretches of remote learning have left them unprepared for college level work Angel hope is taking the summer bridge program at the university of Wisconsin at Madison I was more of going to online school to pass not really to learn He graduated near the top of his high school class and yet I think if I didn't take this program and I went straight into the fall I would be moderately unprepared Alison Wagner with the scholarship program all in Milwaukee It says many students are going on to college academically malnourished She saw startling numbers of applicants who spent half their school hours working part time jobs or couldn't study higher level math or science because of teacher shortages experts fear Many will struggle unless America's schools can find a way to close those learning gaps I'm Jennifer King

Alison Wagner University Of Wisconsin Madison Milwaukee America Jennifer King
Kenya in close presidential election amid prayers for peace

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 15 hrs ago

Kenya in close presidential election amid prayers for peace

"Kenyans are voting in a rather unusual presidential election A long time opposition leader backed by the outgoing president faces the deputy president who styled himself as the outsider East Africa's main economic hub could see a presidential runoff for the first time economic issues could be more important than the ethnic tensions that have marked pass votes with some time deadly results The top candidates are regular Odinga whose vibe for the presidency for a quarter century and deputy president William Ruto who stresses his journey from a humble childhood to appeal to millions of struggling Kenyans long accustomed to political dynasties I'm Charles De Ledesma

East Africa William Ruto Odinga Charles De Ledesma
The latest in sports news

AP News Radio

01:58 min | 18 hrs ago

The latest in sports news

"8 piece sports time David Schuster a light schedule in Major League Baseball action on Monday but the first place mets in the national league east they were in action and our Mike man Q fills us in The mets continued their winning ways with a 5 to one victory over the reds with 13 wins in their last 15 games the 71 and 39 mets lead the braves by 7 games in the national league east Chris Bassett tossed 8 innings for his 9th win Starling Marte a two run first inning Homer for the mets against Cincinnati's Justin Dunn who took the loss Over in Baltimore the red hot Orioles made it 6 wins in 7 games with a 7 four victory over Toronto four home runs for the Orioles including one by Austin Hayes We're going out expecting to win every game so I think we've been in this mindset now for the last couple months and we're just continuing to play good baseball Meanwhile out in Seattle the Yankees got back in the win column they snapped their 5 game losing skid They defeated the mirror nurse 9 to four and Philip gon fills us in on San Diego and San Francisco Alex would allow just three hits over 6 and a third innings as the San Francisco Giants as the San Diego Padres one to nothing The giant starter would out dual padre started Blake snow who allowed a run on 6 hits in 5 and two thirds innings The Padres have now lost 5 straight games and saw their lead over Milwaukee for the final playoff spot cut to just one game Pro basketball news Kevin Durant reiterated to Brooklyn Nets ownership that he wants to be traded and let's changes are made in the organization College football news Alabama Ohio State and Georgia They are the top three teams in the preseason coaches poll Meanwhile at Oklahoma assistant coach kale Gundy resigned after he was found to use repeated racially charged language and antennas Serena Williams still coming back from injury she won her first match in over a year at a tournament in Toronto I'm David Shuster AP sports

Mets Chris Bassett Starling Marte Justin Dunn David Shuster Red Hot Orioles Austin Hayes National League East Baseball Philip Gon National League Braves San Diego Padres Reds Homer Orioles Cincinnati Mike Baltimore Brooklyn Nets
'Big Trouble Ahead' Author Allen Jackson and Eric Discuss the Madness

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:57 min | 20 hrs ago

'Big Trouble Ahead' Author Allen Jackson and Eric Discuss the Madness

"Talking to my friend pastor Allen Jackson of world outreach church in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, where I've had the privilege to be many times. I know I'll be there in mid September. He has a new book out brand new called big trouble ahead, a real plan for flourishing in a time of fear and deception. I think the madness that we're experiencing. And there's no other word for it. I mean, it's absolute madness in every direction, it is a spiritual battle, it is a satanic war on truth and we're seeing it in every way. But the good news is the lord is allowing it to wake up a holy remnant. And to not just wake up a holy remnant, but to find people who didn't have faith who now see things are so crazy, there has to be an answer. Is there a God? Where do I turn? And they're seeing Christians like you, call things as they are. And they're saying, that's right. I wouldn't have I wouldn't have said so before, but I see it now. The craziness makes me want to know, is there a standard of truth? And ultimately, that's the answer and in your book, big trouble ahead, you talk about that. Well, it seems to me that evil will always overplay its hand. You can observe that in nature a disease process will destroy its host. An evil will destroy what it touches. And we're watching that. It's come to the point of the absurd. And in that, there's an opportunity to stand up and then to begin to align ourselves with the truth. How did we arrive at a place where we're unwilling and public to define what a woman is, when we're electing people to some of the most are selecting people for some of the most powerful offices in the land. We didn't get there in a week or a month. I think we got there by winking at immorality long ago. We said fornication really wasn't a problem. And we took all sorts of we took down the sexual boundaries that God gave us.

Pastor Allen Jackson World Outreach Church Murfreesboro Tennessee
Allen Jackson Describes His New Book 'Big Trouble Ahead'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:46 min | 20 hrs ago

Allen Jackson Describes His New Book 'Big Trouble Ahead'

"Pastor Allen Jackson. Welcome. Well, thank you, Eric. It's good to be with you. I'll pretend we're just acquaintances because I want this to be a hard hitting journalistic interview. I'm going to ask you the tough questions. This book is titled big trouble ahead, a real plan for flourishing in a time of fear and deception. One of the reasons that I like you and I like the book is because you tell it like it is. We are in a situation in this country, unlike anything we've seen in our lifetimes without any question, and that's what you talk about. So tell my audience effectively, essentially, what do you say in the book big trouble ahead? Well, big trouble ahead is really a play off the word tribulation, which is our biblical world. And tribulation just means big trouble. And I think there's a temptation amongst evangelicals, especially to leap ahead to think, is this the end of the world, because we're walking through this turmoil. And rather than answer that question, I try to acknowledge that we're in this season of tremendous confusion and disruption in realignment. And what do we do to flourish in the midst of that? I think it started with the pandemic in 2020. And we were told if we'd go home for two weeks, we could flatten the curve and return to normal. They lied. And so now we're more than two years later. And the turmoil is escalating. It's not diminishing. We've survived the virus. Such as it was. But we have violence in our streets and lawlessness on our borders and more deception and propaganda and censorship. I mean, you know the list. And we can't just click our heels together and want to go back to 2019. We have to decide what we do in this environment to make a difference for the kingdom of God. And that's what the book's about. How do we flourish in this season?

Allen Jackson Eric Confusion
Who Will This 'New and Improved' IRS Target?

The Trish Regan Show

05:11 min | 21 hrs ago

Who Will This 'New and Improved' IRS Target?

"In the meantime, back to this IRS thing. I mean, I'm just kind of offended. I sound like I'm like, you know, one of the woke ones right now, 'cause I'm offended, everything. But I'm offended when they think that the answer is to somehow just go after every Tom dick and Harry and Jane and Susan and Sally. And this is who will be affected. It will be your middle class. As much as they're going to try and tell you, oh, it's the 1%, no, no, no. Just in terms of, if you have that many IRS agents, who are they going to go after, and they can't, as I keep saying, they can't go after. The people that they should go after were just the billionaires, they get away with the great deal on the tax front because we've got lawmakers that are so concerned about making sure they have enough money for their next campaign. I told you yesterday about all the money. I mean, Kirsten sinema is one example. She's got donations individual donations from the private equity industry totaling over 500,000 for her last campaign. I mean, that is a lot of money, right? And I'm just looking at the numbers 54,900 from executives over at KKR, 35,000 at Carlisle, 27,300 over at Apollo. The private equity industry is a very big lobbying organization. In fact, they probably spend more money than any other industry right now. They're on K street and one of the reasons they're doing this is to give themselves the beneficial treatment when it comes to taxes. Do you know the Chuck Schumer? Collected 1.28 million from the private equity industry, including Blackstone and KKR, so you really think that he's that interested in raising taxes on this particular group of people. Go back and listen to Monday's podcast. If you want to explain or they're on why this is income and why it should be treated as income and why this is just highway robbery, frankly, of the American people and of our government, but these people in Washington I'll tell you the whole system is so darn corrupt. When you see what just went down. And when you see that they're going to effectively inflate, again, the U.S. economy artificially by spending all this money while simultaneously adding another 80 billion to go after everyday folks from the IRS all all while saying we're going to give a pass to those private equity investors. I mean, give me a break. It's not investment. It's income and they need to be taxed as such. Anyway, it's really pretty disgusting. But the whole thing is just disgusting. I mean, the idea that they want to pass this off, the name itself as somehow an inflation reduction act. Guys, you're just spending more money. All right, before I get to that, I do have one more thing I want to mention to you. You know, it's summer and we're all looking for movies and I don't know about you, but it's kind of hard sometimes. Kind of hard to find a good movie that you can enjoy watching that is representative of your values. I think that our values have gotten kind of lost and pop culture these days. And it's one of the reasons why I think it's important for all of us to think about what we're watching and who we're supporting when we watch it, right? Are you really into Disney right now with all their bogus? Or do you want to try and seek out some alternative sources of entertainment? This is where this movie in particular comes in. When I was a kid, I used to watch Cameron on that, what was that show? Oh, you know what? I got to look it up right now as I'm talking to you. This is how you know I'm recording in real time. He had that sitcom, when I was a kid, what was it? So anyone who can answer that in the questions below, extra super duper points, go to you. I'm going to come back to that in a second because it's going to drive me crazy. I remember that sitcom really, really well. Anyway, he's got a new movie out a new movie that he's backing. He's a very big Christian. He's an growing pains. Growing pains. That was the sitcom. I remember that now. Anyway, he's got a new movie that is just out. It's pretty neat. It's got a good message, and I think it's worth taking a look at as you're looking for things to watch and be entertained by. So this is called life Mark. And in this movie life Mark, it tells the story of David who has this very comfortable world that gets totally turned upside down when his birth mother, unexpectedly reaches out to him, and she's looking to meet him. He's 18 years old at that point. She only had the chance to hold him once, and she went looking for him and he finds this out. So it's really, it's an interesting storyline and probably one that happens a lot. He gets encouragement from his adopted parents, and so he embarks on this life altering journey, which really is a process of discovery and it leads to a pretty staggering truth from his past, inspired by a true story life mark is a powerful reminder that one decision, one choice can impact so much more than one life. It's a pro family pro love pro forgiveness pro reconciliation and pro new beginnings kind of movie.

IRS Tom Dick KKR Kirsten Sinema Chuck Schumer Sally Carlisle Blackstone Susan Jane Harry Washington U.S. Disney Cameron Mark David
Unleashing the Beast: A New IRS

The Trish Regan Show

01:15 min | 21 hrs ago

Unleashing the Beast: A New IRS

"Appalled here because somehow the answer to not having enough tax revenue is to just, oh, hire more IRS agents and then you'll be all set. Look, again, I'm not advocating that people not pay their taxes. Let me be very clear on that because it's actually critical that people pay what they owe, otherwise will turn into a country like Greece, which if you recall during the European debt crisis, it came to light that nobody was actually really paying what they owed. There was this huge underground economy and I think one example they showed us was swimming pools, right? Because you had to pay a certain tax, you had a swimming pool and so nobody had a swimming pool allegedly and then it turned out when you went and did these aerial photos from high above in a plane. It turned out they're all these swimming pools. What do you know, right? So people were trying to avert the taxes that they would otherwise face. And this is what happens if you live in an economy where the government is so onerous as to tax, in fact, too much, which we can save that debate for another time. I would just argue in this particular instance that it's going to have the opposite of the intended effect. In other words,

Swimming IRS Greece
Ric Grenell Discusses Brittney Griner and Prison Transfers

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:28 min | 1 d ago

Ric Grenell Discusses Brittney Griner and Prison Transfers

"Rick walk us through how prisoner transfers usually usually work. Brittany griner goes to Russia with drugs, shouldn't have done that. She's a fellow American despite the fact she hates America. She kneels during the national anthem. Under a normal administration, I believe Britney would already be home. We saw that with the ball brother with Lamar, I get them all confused. When Trump got these prisoners home, but now it seems as if we're doing this elaborate prisoner swap with the merchant of death, how do prisoner swaps usually work and why is this so outrageous what we're entertaining right now? Well, I think the first thing to say is that the State Department has a whole bureau that deals with this detained Americans. And you know, it's a very, very slow process. If you commit a crime in another country, we usually let the other country kind of go through the machinations of its illegal process. We demand access, there's consular affairs individuals, Americans working overseas in the embassies who will go see the Americans detained. It's a very slow process and we try not to jump forward on legal processes. But there are times when detaining detained American is so outrageous that the political types and usually the NSC or The White House jump in and say this is unacceptable. We're not waiting. We're going to get you home

Brittany Griner Rick Lamar Britney Russia Donald Trump America State Department NSC White House
Major test of first possible Lyme vaccine in 20 years begins

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 1 d ago

Major test of first possible Lyme vaccine in 20 years begins

"Researchers are looking for thousands of volunteers in the U.S. and Europe to test the first potential vaccine against Lyme disease in 20 years Lyme disease is a growing tick-borne threat Pfizer's anneliese Anderson tells the AP they're working on a vaccine to protect both adults and kids as young as 5 We call it beer a 15 Robert to willer is an avid hunter in hiker He was the first in line when the study opened in central Pennsylvania And if I find a tick on me I don't know okay I'm good I don't have to worry about anything Doctor Allen Kevin's at the Altoona arthritis and osteoporosis center in Pennsylvania is looking for volunteers who spend lots of time in tick infested areas Not a single day goes by that someone either has a concern about Lyme disease could possibly have Lyme disease We live in an area where Lyme disease is endemic The Pfizer study will cover two tick seasons I'm Ed Donahue

Lyme Disease Anneliese Anderson Willer Allen Kevin Pfizer Altoona Arthritis And Osteopor Pennsylvania Europe U.S. Robert Ed Donahue
The Price Controls We're Not Talking About

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:26 min | 1 d ago

The Price Controls We're Not Talking About

"From The Wall Street Journal, the so called inflation reduction act will be one of the greatest misallocations of federal resources in American history. The bill has many moving parts, but here's a simple way to sum up its macroeconomic impact. It would transfer about a quarter of a $1 trillion. Are you with me, my Friends? A quarter of a $1 trillion. Was that there was a time not long ago when a $1 billion was a lot. It takes a thousand $1 billion to make a trillion. The left is ruining the United States of America. The Democratic Party, the party of the left, the media, the media of the left. The universities, colleges, high schools, and elementary schools, the educational arm of the left. It would transfer about a quarter of a $1 trillion from America's pharmaceutical industry, which saves an extends lives and by the way a no fan of them either. The corruption involved in the vaccine alone. And the dishonesty there was enough, but it doesn't matter. He's right.

The Wall Street Journal America Democratic Party
"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

02:06 min | 2 months ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Day for me. His memories were still fresh. There were dead people everywhere. And as a bodies, on top of cards on the ground on top of walls. More reports of gunshot victims started coming in and Lisa Allah went to investigate those two. I think after those 25 that I saw, they were more out 40..

"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

02:33 min | 3 months ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Hey, what's up? It's Gustav Ariana and it's Tuesday, may 17th, 2022. And today, on the times, daily news from the LA times, we've got border city, chapter 5. In this episode of the podcast from the San Diego union tribune, longtime border reporter Sandra dibble takes us back to the moment when the ariano Felix cartel and no, I'm not related to them by the way. When that cartel took a big hit when its leaders were killed. Rivals from Sinaloa then started jockeying for power and there was corruption at every level of law enforcement in Tijuana. Sandra says no one knew who to trust at the time. But as a cartel fueled violence continued, Sandra and the rest of the city lived their lives. Senator treated her visiting mom to handmade corn tortillas, cafe de Lea and eggs drench in mole. In Tijuana's upscale neighborhood, she took her brother to the famous Mercado Miguel hidalgo, which I've gone to my entire life 'cause it's amazing and they would go by tamales there. And senator even got on stage to play a noblewoman in a Tijuana performance of Romeo and Juliet. Then and now, Sandra says reporting on Tijuana can feel a lot like reporting on two totally different cities. And hey, if you've been liking these border stories, then make sure to find and follow border city on Spotify, Apple, or wherever you listen. Enjoy. Today, the FBI is placing Ramon Eduardo ariano Felix on our ten most wanted fugitive list. As the gangs enforcer, Ramon decided who got whacked as one U.S. official put it, officials say he once tested a new gun by killing a pedestrian, he happened to pass in his car. Something that from one used to constantly say, we're already damned. We're going to hell anyways. So there's no sense having a conscience about it. And a sunny Sunday afternoon in February 2002, Ramon adeno Felix, the number two men in the arena Felix drug cartel was shot dead. Photographs show his corpse sprawled outside of pharmacy in the Pacific Coast city of mazatlan, a semi-automatic pistol lies a few feet away with a number two painted in red on the handle. Nearby is the body of the cop who shot him. Ramon death and the shocking events that followed that year would eventually lead to the collapse of one of the world's most feared drug cartels, but that kingpin theory, the idea that drug trafficking and violence.

Tijuana Gustav Ariana San Diego union tribune Sandra dibble Felix cartel Sandra Mercado Miguel hidalgo Sinaloa LA times Ramon Eduardo ariano Felix Senator Juliet Romeo Spotify Ramon Ramon adeno Felix FBI Apple U.S. mazatlan
"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:48 min | 4 months ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"I'm Gustav Ariana. You're listening to the times. Daily news from the LA times. It's Monday, April 11th, 2022. Today, what we breathe when we're on a plane. An LA times investigation found that jet engine oil can leak into the air supply of passenger planes creating a toxic cocktail that can lead to health problems. It happens with an alarming frequency across all airlines. And that's despite the airline industry and its regulators saying otherwise. It's an investigation.

Gustav Ariana LA times
"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

06:38 min | 7 months ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Hey, what's up? It's me Gustav ariano. As you know, the times podcast is dedicated to bringing you fascinating stories from entertainment news to climate change developments to the random tales we should care about. With your support, you make shows like the times possible and help independent journalism keep you informed. If you haven't already, consider subscribing at just $1 for 6 months. So go to LA times dot com slash exclusive to subscribe today. Gracias. The 1619 Project began as a work of journalism. Still is. It's still in us, but did you have grander plans from the beginning that you see what it could become? Hell no. No. The original project was a grand plan. Never in the history of the times has a single issue of the magazine, a special section and a podcast series been dedicated to one thing. So even just pitching that was extremely ambitious and it also then came with a great risk. I talk a lot about how in the week before publication I was like sick. I couldn't sleep. I was worried because I had commanded all of these resources from the times as a black woman on a project about slavery. And if no one read it, if no one cared, you know this. That is a long time. It closes the door. So we bear responsibility. If a white journalist teaches something ambitious and it doesn't work out, that reflects on that journalist. But if a black journalist teaches something ambitious and it doesn't work out, it reflects on all of us. The day we laid printed out the entire magazine and put it up on the wall in the room so that we could see it in its entirety in a Wesley Morris and I who wrote the music essay, he was at work that day, and I called him in. And we just embrace each other and started sobbing. I think it's a really powerful message that you don't have to be in some exalted position to start something. And I think that's an example, bleeding from where you are, but still the scope, the resources, all of what went into it, how did you make that happen inside a place like The New York Times? Ancestral intervention? I say that kind of jokingly and kind of not, because I'm agnostic, I'm not. I'm not a religious person, but it's been so strange on this project because I have just felt something like some act of intervention in so many times because there's no reason this project should exist as it does. Knowing everything that we know about the industry to have really unprecedented amount of resources to put into a project about slavery that, by the way, it was like, you know, what made the project powerful was we were unflinching. We were not telling a story that we were worried about. How does the typical New York Times reader respond to this? Will the typical New York Times reader feel comfortable? Which is so often news decisions get driven by who are the consumers of news. And we just didn't do that. It was in response to that question we've all gotten, which is, for everyone's a long time ago, why don't you get over it? Black people are constantly having to answer that question in a country that can't get over slavery. And we were trying to force an acknowledgment of this thing we've treated as an asterisk that has never been asterix, right? Like people are like, oh, everybody knows slavery happened. Yeah, but we act like slavery was like two paragraphs in the story. Over there somewhere. And that the constitution is so divine that we can't even mess with it. It's shapes so much of our policy, our law, you know, you have originalists who think it was like the tablets, the stone tablets. And yet somehow slavery were told has nothing to do with our society today. And that just doesn't, it's not logical. So this project was trying to do that. But I also had to be in a certain place in my career to brightness forth. So you have to work as hard as you can to make yourself undeniable. They might still deny you in the end, but you have to put yourself in a position to be undeniable. And by the time I picked the 1619 Project, I had a track record of showing you could do these long form investigative pieces about racial inequality that infuse a lot of history and people would actually care and read them. So we take the project to book form. 7 new essays, more than a thousand in notes. A list long list, very impressive list of peer reviewers. Yes. What was revised? What was in hand and how did you go about constructing the book? So the beauty of the book is having faith, two years of scrutiny, two years of critique, some of it, much of a bad faith, but some of it good critique, legitimate critique. We were able to use that to really strengthen perfect the project and show our work. So every essay, if you read the original project, every single essay has been expanded significantly. And then we have new essays that go into different areas that we weren't able to talk about in the original project. So for instance, we didn't deal with settler colonialism or India removal in the original project, which I always knew was a gaping hole. You can't talk about slavery without talking about the first people who were enslaved by the colonists, which were indigenous people. And then the fact that you can't expand slavery unless you steal the land. So that was necessary. We have an amazing piece, which I actually think of all the pieces in the book will probably be most surprising to kind of your more casual reader. Because it also talks about the 5 so called civilized tribes who engage in chattel slavery, which we also don't learn about. That there were black folks on the trail of tears, but they were enslaved. We don't talk about that. So there's an essay about that. We have an essay that talks about the patient revolution. And how it impacts the United States as well. The first project, I was very intentional that we weren't dealing with the Diaspora. I always feel like black Americans are asked to hold the weight of the entire black Diaspora and we can never just have our own story. And this was a story about us. But having done that, now in the book form, we were able to expand it out. One thing about me is I do care deeply about the work, the research, my credibility as a journalist. So when all of these people were trying to attack the project and especially that couple paragraphs about the American Revolution, I was like, okay, you don't know me because I would just read more and study more and sharpen and now that section which was a couple paragraphs is.

Gustav ariano Wesley Morris New York Times LA times India United States
"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:04 min | 7 months ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Social.

"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

06:05 min | 7 months ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"And I know it's important to a lot of families. And it's an idea that we have taken and we're going to do something with. It's just one representation of getting closer to community. And I think there are lots of ideas that people have of how we can bridge the gap between us as journalists and those who we want to consume our journalism. Sometimes before you get people to subscribe to you. You have to have them understand you and you understand them. And them to see you. And to know you. And so I think a lot of it even before you get to subscriptions sometimes it's like you have to do that groundwork. You have to lay the groundwork for the subscriptions. Yeah, if we're going to do portraits, let's make sure not to go through Kmart because those portraits get yellow like 20 years later. We have some of the best photographers in the country. So I think we'll be all right. You know it? So what kind of journalism do you want people to come to the LA times four? We're in a time where people seem to want more bias and news, not less. And younger reporters are questioning the very idea of objectivity and journalism. Historically, columns and opinion pieces were about feelings and the rest of the paper was about facts, but some want those walls completely torn down. You know, I think the newspaper, it's really a smorgasbord, a storytelling. You have the opportunity to hit people with a lot of different a range of storytelling. You know, for some people, it's utility. If they want to have the world explain to them, they want to also know where the best hikes are, the best burritos are. They want to know where the wildfires are. They want to know when and how to spot earthquakes. There's a lot you do there. And others, they want really strong local accountability journalism. When you get to opinion, I'm a big fan, I'm a big proponent of extending opinion. More first person essays more commentary in different forms and video and audio, opinion is a catalyst for understanding and to stir debate. And so I think if anything I want the journalists to be even more ambitious, I want us to be more ambitious on the biggest topics that people are paying attention to. And so you have to build a big edifice where you have ambitious journalism and you have a lot of other ways for people to come at storytelling. We could have the most ambition and the best stories around, but it doesn't matter if we're not making money and thank God we have a benevolent billionaire owner, but how are we doing financially right now? We certainly was a tough year, a lot of people have had tough years. $50 million lost in 2020 before you came on. In COVID, a lot of businesses have struggle. That's the reality of it. You have to figure out how to make money and sometimes in the challenging industry. And we have both a mission, you know, we're a civic institution. It's also a business, right? It's not a nonprofit. So we balance that with our civic responsibilities, the sense that we should be there for people to be a place where you can get really good informative information to hold institutions accountable and all of the other things that newspapers traditionally have been. And yet we have to continue to try to build revenue. Last year, The New Yorker did a profile in our owner, doctor Patrick soon, and in it, you said that you and doctor soon still hadn't found a quote cadence, have the two of you at least found a common melody so far? The question I was simply asked was just do I have a regularly scheduled meeting? I see him. I talk to him or text him, communicate with him, as often as I like and him with me. He's a very accessible owner. In my experience, you know, never had one who owned a company and has as many business interests more accessible to him. You know, and I worked with Jeff Bezos, too. So I'm not worried about that. Okay, so what are we going to do in 2022? What are the things that you could tell our listeners to watch out for the times that we're going to do this year to just dominate? We're going to continue to build our podcast slate. We're going to do more to use the term with our IP. We're going to do a lot of ambitious journalism. One of the most undercover topics that we have that cuts across a lot of lines is mental health. You know, I think there'll be a lot more attention to that topic. In terms of ambition, you'll see some new exciting storytelling and some other surprises that I don't want to spoil. Are we sacrificing our journalism, though in this quest to make ourselves more relevant? Not all. I haven't seen any sacrificing of journalism. I think the journalist has really been strong. You know, we have a lot of award winning journalism that we've done, right? I mean, California medical board reporting about that. You know, our coverage of the rust shooting involving Alec Baldwin on set. We've been dominant there. We essentially are reporting pretty much change the whole architecture and how the Golden Globes would perceive. So I see no sacrifice in the journalism and no let down in the journalism. Yeah, I think the reason I ask because I think I see the news of us hiring 15 people for a meme team and expanding events and outsiders will think, well, that's not really journalism. That's just like, you know, trying to boost up our Cred for the youngsters or something. Well, I don't see it that way. I think one of the things that you have to have in today's world. Everybody has a strong social presence. Social media is the way that so many people consume what we do and how our work gets amplified. And you have to create social content. You have to take your journalism and sometimes create work to bring people to it in the platforms where they are. And so it's a big driver. It's a very competitive space. How people come to you is really important. And so investing in.

Kmart LA times The New Yorker Jeff Bezos Patrick Alec Baldwin Golden Globes California
"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

12:22 min | 7 months ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Welcome to 2022. COVID still worldwide thing, midterm elections in the U.S. will be huge and climate change don't stop. That's why now, more than ever, you need a great news outlet to make sense of it all. You need the Los Angeles Times. So what are we gonna do this year to tackle all of this madre? Beats me. But I know someone to ask. I'm Gustavo. You're listening to the times, daily news from the LA times. It's Monday, January 3rd, 2022, happy new year to y'all..

"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

02:03 min | 8 months ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Thank you <SpeakerChange> all. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you. Thank you. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> And that's it <Speech_Music_Male> for this episode of the times. <Speech_Music_Male> Daily news <Speech_Music_Male> from the LA times. <Speech_Music_Male> Tomorrow, <Speech_Music_Male> the hundred year history <Speech_Music_Male> of see's candies, <Speech_Music_Male> and yep, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm doing a whole <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> taste test for it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our show is produced by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Shannon Lynn, Denis <Speech_Music_Male> kerra, kasia <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> basale and Melissa Kaplan. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our engineers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Mario Diaz are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> editors Lauren rap, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our executive producers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are Shawnee Hilton <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and has been agile <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and our theme music <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is by Andrew epe. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Like what <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you're listening to, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> then make sure to follow the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> times on whatever platform <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you use. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Don't make us to Gucci a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Gustavo <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Rihanna. We'll <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be back tomorrow

"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

09:37 min | 8 months ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Shut all disasters be forgot and never brought to mind. That would be a wonderful life, but ain't this one. 2021 was a bad year for disasters, drought, oil spills, bomb cycles, wildfire omicron, yet if you're listening, you survive. Angular, you're listening to the times, daily news from the LA times. It's Tuesday, December.

"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

20:32 min | 10 months ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Community in Santana has learned a lot about Alexander in the last ten years. And I think it's because of that persistent unapologetic push for justice that continues against the odds against what seems politically possible. What does a U.S. government officially say about the assassination of Alex O'Day? Well, the U.S. government doesn't say a whole lot. The FBI has been the lead agency in the murder investigation since 1985. And basically what they do year after year every October 11th is reassuring the Arab American community that the investigation is a priority that it is ongoing, and what they don't say is who they believe to be the authors of the crime. They have never publicly named the suspects that there are any that they have. And investigative journalism suggests that they do. I mean, they have a $1 million reward that has been promoted since about 1996 for information leading to a conviction of the crime. But it's just a very peculiar purgatory for the case, and it doesn't seem to break with any new developments over the course of the past few decades. So there is understandably a lot of cynicism within the Arab American community. But some of my most recent journalism suggests that it looks like the FBI has been, at least in the early onset of the investigation, pretty active in terms of trying to prosecute, but there's stymied. And according to my interview with retired lieutenant humi, it wasn't the FBI in 1996 that basically wasn't proactive. It was the State Department official in his recollection that said we need to look at the bigger picture of the U.S. Israeli relations in this case is going nowhere. There's a lot of speculation about oday's killer, but this is speculation that also comes from government statements and actions that sometimes contradict each other in 2016, for instance said, Department of Justice said that the oday family was actually victims of Robert Manning. Who's he? Robert Manning was one of three Jewish defense league members that had been discussed privately according to my reporting and others in connection with the Audi bombing. Never has he been officially named as a suspect we can't even say that. He was extradited in 93 from Israel to the United States in he stood trial for a male contract bombing. He was a hitman in a sense and sent him mail bomb at the behest of the person who paid for the crime, and unfortunately, Patricia wilkerson, a secretary in Manhattan beach, opened up the package and the bomb detonated and it exploded and killed her. So he is serving a life sentence for that crime. A retired FBI agent wanted to question him in the aude case and essentially he denied having been a member of the JD L, which was an extremist Jewish group founded by the late rabbi honey. And essentially, he says, I know nothing I did nothing, so he still in Phoenix Arizona is serving out his prison sentence. So why then does the United States government and Department of Justice say that the uday family is a victim of Robert Manning if they're not saying anything officially that Manning has anything to do with the killing of Alex O'Day? It's just this really peculiar legal predicament. It makes no sense, right? The American Arab anti discrimination committee, which is the group that Alex Audrey belonged to and was the West Coast regional director for, they are also deemed by the DOJ as they told me as victims of Manning's. And how can that be? It clears the way that classification internal classification clears the way for Helena ode to speak at the parole hearing as she did in 2018 in person in Phoenix, and then also in 2020 remotely. And the ADC president is also able to address the parole hearing in those years too as well as a victim of Manning's. But he's never been indicted. He's never been charged. He's never been convicted of that 1985 office bombing. In saint Anna that killed Alex Saudis. So it's a contradiction. It's a paradox. It just doesn't make any sense. What other hints have come out over the years about how much the U.S. government knows about the identity of a day's killers? It's been pretty well reported for the course of 30 plus years. Again, what I was able to do was corroborate a unnamed anonymous source, recounting of the scene in 85 in Santa Ana, where the FBI and LAPD joint terrorism task force members descended on the scene via helicopter and probably pretty dramatically in a little unusual for an Orange County city like that. They got off and they told lieutenant at the time it was the acting captain that day. And at the command center, one of the persons in the group of four basically said these are the people that we've been training, flying from New York to LA. They were lost at LAX. And the three names have been spoken of privately and then publicly and journalism and Andy green, who now goes by bruk Ben Joseph, Keith, Israel fuchs, and then Manning. So it's been an open secret who the investigation has looked at. And again, the FBI, according to the lawsuit documents that I referenced earlier, wanted to question and according to their field director that I interviewed a few years back, did question Manning about the audit crime. So at the bare minimum, you can call Manning a person of interest, and then with the parole hearings, the victimizer of the organization and the family, but in terms of the criminal conviction, something's getting in between. Some things in the middle, the ADC has long wanted to see the extradition agreement between the U.S. and Israel and with regards to Manning to see if there's answers there as to why that gap exists. Robert Friedman was a Village Voice journalist, and wrote a op-ed in the Los Angeles Times in 1990, where he was in Israel. And basically saw green and Manning at that time, and said they're here. They're living freely in these Israeli settlements. One was at that time it was also a particular settlement that followers of kahani would live in and basically they couldn't be arrested if they were in the settlements they had to be in Israel proper. But, you know, Friedman said you can find them there too. So it's not a secret who has been discussed in connection with the case, and it's not a secret and it hasn't been a secret where they are, and with regards to Manning his where belts are well known. He's incarcerated in Phoenix Arizona. We'll have more after this break. Facebook's safety teams protect billions of people each month. They lead the industry and stopping bad actors online. That's because they've invested more than $13 billion in the last 5 years. Quadrupling their safety and security teams to 40,000 people. And investing in industry leading AI technology to enhance safety on their platforms. It's working. In just the last few months, they've taken action on 1.7 billion fake accounts, 30 million violent and graphic posts, 32.8 million explicit adult posts. 7.1 million terrorism related posts, 3.8 billion drugs and firearms sales posts. But working to reduce harmful and illicit content on their platforms is never done. Keeping your feet safe will continue to be everyone's priority at Facebook. Learn more about how they're helping people connect and share safely at about dot FB dot com slash safety. It seems like more and more, getting what you need online is a tradeoff between convenience and your privacy. Want to connect to Wi-Fi might not be secure, want 25% off a tropical vacation, give up a lot of your personal information, like your email, birthdate phone number and your significant other's birth date. Unfortunately, it's easy to be unsafe online, but now it's easy to help protect yourself. Norton 360 with life lock gives you powerful device security, a VPN to keep your Wi-Fi activity private. An identity theft protection to help monitor your info and alert you to potential identity threats, all in one. No one can prevent all identity theft or monitor all transactions at all businesses, but you can opt in to cyber safety. Save 25% or more off your first year of Norton 360 with LifeLock, at Norton dot com slash LA times. That's 25% off at Norton dot com slash LA times. Gabriel you mentioned a lieutenant humi. He was one of the first people there on the scene at the site of oday's assassination. What are you telling you about that day? One of the challenges with reporting a cold case that is 36 years old is that people that have the institutional knowledge and firsthand experience of the case and the investigation are disappearing. They're passing away, and that's true of a lot of people from the Orange County side of things. You had Charlie stumpf, who was the commander or lead of the bomb squad for the Orange County sheriff's department. He had his team comb this scene of The Office on 17th street in Santa Ana, and they reconstructed the bomb like a big jigsaw puzzle. He passed away. The lead investigator on the case where Santa Anna PD was concerned was feral buckles. And he was the one that had firsthand knowledge up until his retirement in 1996. What was unique about humani is that he was the area commander of that part of the city. And deputy chief dispatched him to take control of the scene. So he was there within 20 minutes. And he witnessed the FBI's arrival within the hour. These guys come out and they come walking over to us and there's a couple of FBI agents and a couple of LAPD joint terrorist task force members. And they came up and they told us that they'd been tracking a couple of guys from New York up in LA and they lost to man LAX and they were probably responsible for the bombing and Ted time. I think you gave us the names of green and Manning. And really he has a firsthand experience of that scene. It was a big case in Santa. And I'm very high profile. And of course, it's a crime of international implications, but he went up into the office. He remembers seeing the destruction and devastation. He remembers the scene very vividly and what he did. And so that's, you know, for historical posterity, it's necessary to get someone like humani on the record. And that's the other challenge in this case is that because it's an open case of cold case and there's still at least on the surface and active investigation, people with knowledge are hesitant or do not have the clearance to speak openly about it. So humani is very valuable in that regard. And he definitely offers new details into that day and the investigation that followed. Lieutenant moon has been retired for nearly 20 years now, but the old days case is always wait on him. The reason we have laws is to punish people who prevent them from doing that again, or is it kind of a warning to others, look, we have lost about this. So when people avoid prosecution, it's annoying. I can't. I'm not going to sleep over it. I'm not going to cry about it. It happens sometimes, but she's we had at 1.57 warrants for guys that were and fled to Mexico. So we knew they were down in Mexico, a lot of when we knew their addresses, but this is big government and they don't care about the little people. It's significant. But matter in the big picture. From your experience, firsthand knowledge of the conversations that happened on the scene and in 1994, you know who did it, you know how they did it. And, you know, you knew where they were. Yeah. Or they came from where they went. All that was no. Everything is no. It was a very solid case. You know, easy to process. You shared with me that when he would walk from the Orange County superior court in saint Anna to the Orange County district attorney's office in the rhythm of his workdays, he would pass by the outer statue. And that kind of served as a reminder to him of this unsolved murder mystery, if you will. And he's always felt that it was. Higher up government institutions that got in the way of a very easily prosecuted case. So it always kind of had a thorn in the side element to it. And it wasn't just a statue. What is interesting is when that statue was first dedicated in 1994 on what would have been Alex 50th birthday, Mooney worked at. So you had Mooney, he said it was a light security day, but it was acrimonious because her Reuben who was as bellicose leader of the JBL was across the street in Santana and crossed the street from the statute dedication and was basically berating the family in the people in attendance of the dedication. And the FBI was there too as well just to keep tabs on everything. So, you know, the case had a way of coming up. So it definitely weighed on him on that day in 1994. In April, when he worked security for the statute dedication, and then in 1996, he goes with Ferrell buckles to the FBI field office in LA, where he got a front row seat in how the investigation was stymied in his recollection by the State Department. And so he has those memories in mind and he's open to speaking about his experience with the case and what he has seen. And as he mentioned to me, he expressed his remorse for the family because they have not been delivered justice for 36 years. Alex how they had three daughters at the time of his death his murder. And they were very young, and he never got to see them grow and get married and lived their lives. And that gnaws at a lawman who likes to feel dissatisfaction of justice being delivered and a case being closed, and surprisingly, it was really unprompted that he deemed out a man of peace. It was definitely the mere opposite of her Reuben. He was not Delacroix. He was not boisterous. He was very soft spoken and very eloquent in his media appearances, but he was a man of peace in that regard. If he found things that were disagreeable about his politics and stances on Palestine and Israel, it was very hard to hate Alex all day, unless, of course, you were embroiled in the JD L extremist mindset. So, you know, he expressed very forthrightly that he believed him to be a man of peace above all, no matter what disagreements there may be politically and it's just another case of justice denied and justice delayed. Audi's case is something that local politicians have never forgotten though. Former Congress member Sanchez press the House of Representatives repeatedly to investigate his assassination and then recently, Congress member Luca ra has continued that work. Absolutely. I spoke to congressman Correa about his resolution, House resolution. And what it seeks to do is basically enter Alexander's memory as a matter of congressional record. And recognize him as a victim of domestic terrorism. And as the congressman mentioned, it also acts to carry on with Sanchez's work before she left the office. And it also seeks to renew attention into the investigation. So it would be very interesting to see how the case develops and going forward, how all of this is going to coalesce because you have the ADC pressing the attorney general Merrick Garland to name suspects to provide details about the case while at the same time in Congress, you know, Rashida Talib has also cosponsored that House resolution. And so there's motion on this case after 36 years, where it all leads to, remains to be seen, but it's easy to be cynical because there has been concerted efforts to renew interest and not let the case grow cold in memory in action, but what really changes at the end of the day is getting closer, but we'll have to wait and see. What's important is that the three folks I mean, many people have passed on who've been involved in the case, but the three people who have been of interest internally in the investigations are still alive, so justice remains a possibility. Finally, what is it about the Audi case that has stayed with activists decades after his killing? It's always been important to the Arab American community, but when I wrote about his case 30 years later, the younger generation of Arab American activists in Orange County and elsewhere throughout the United States almost forgot about them, they had to relearn about him. He was just getting started. He was 41. It's hard to find audio clips of his appearances in the media or video clips because he was really just getting started. He joined the organization only for a few years. And before that was basically also a poet and a lecturer at orange coast college and graduated with a master's degree in political science from Cal state Fullerton. So he was a family man who just started a family and an activist who was really starting to shine and come into his own before his life was taken. So the new generation has had to kind of relearn his legacy over in the West Bank and he's never been forgotten. He's a hero in jifna Palestine, a martyr. And he's basically seen in that role, but also as a native son. Someone that if you traveled to that area, you're going to hear stories about how he was as a person. So his memory is spread between Southern California and the West Bank. Over here, and there's a bit of a renaissance, if you will, because the new generation of Arab American activists are basically taking the baton from their predecessors. And it will be up to them to continue to press for justice in the case. So really what we're seeing is a generational, like I said, passing of the baton. And we're going to see that level of advocacy continue. And in my work, I always try to not just have a focus on the case and the investigation and the persons of interest, if you will in the suspects, but it's always important, not just to ask who killed Alex all day, but it's always important to remember who was Alexander. Gabrielle, thank you so much for this interview..

FBI Robert Manning Manning oday United States government Department of Justice Israel saint Anna Alex O' LA times Patricia wilkerson ADC rabbi honey Phoenix American Arab anti discriminat Alex Audrey Helena ode Alex Saudis
"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"I don't believe that this date ship tell a parent whether or not a child should be vaccinated. I think that's an intrusion of state power. Thomas jefferson warned about a trading freedom for public safety. And i think he was white. That's california gubernatorial candidate. Larry elder speaking with the editorial board of the l. a. times last month the way california's gubernatorial recall election works. Voters will have two questions to answer by september fourteenth the first one is straightforward should gavin newsom be recalled if it majority of california voters. Choose no then. The second question becomes moot but it's that second question that's getting people simultaneously excited and frightened that one ask voters that if newsome is recalled who should replace them. Forty forty-six people are on that ballot including elder and he has led his rivals by a huge margin ever since he announced his candidacy in july. Those same polls have seen support for newsom shrink over the past year and the idea of elder as governor has a democratic party pleading with its base to reject the recall. Erica d smith. Is my fellow metro columnist at the la times. She like most of us. La times columnist right now is covering the california recall. Erica welcome back to the times. Thanks for having me. So elder says that his upbringing in south central los angeles is what led him to embrace conservativism. even though black conservatives are rare. what's the story. yeah. I mean he's a guy who grew up in south central. La you know as a teenager right after the watts rebellion and so he tells the story of how he was brought up by his parents. His dad was a republican is mom was a democrat. And so he's tell stories in his books about himself about how his household was pretty abusive. He did not get along with his dad at all. His mom was more of the heart of the family but he got busted one point two white school to kind of pursue some studies and came back and was very disappointed. This is according to his book that he wasn't going to get the same opportunities a lot of the white kids and his mom basically responded that you need to find a way around that you know he did succeed he to ivy league school. He ended up in cleveland. Ohio started to show their after being an attorney and starting a firm ended up back in southern california. And is kind of been here ever since antagonizing folks. There was one story that he told l. a. times editorial board that it's been getting a lot of attention about how as a teenager. He got stopped by police. According to him between seventy five and one hundred times just in one year but elder didn't tribu all of that to racism. No he said it was because he looked young. I looked young. That's what the officers said over and over and over again. I look young. And i did look. They were polite once. I showed them the license issue was over. I wasn't beaten wasn't taste. I wasn't thrown against the wall. I was treated politely. Because i responded like and that's one of the problems. I think some of these so-called civil rights leaders so called people who were activists should tell people be polite comply. Jacob land could have been avoided. Had he complied. Eric garner could have been afforded had complied. Michael brown could have been avoided. Had he comply most of these high profile shootings in deaths could have been avoided if the person stop simply head complied. What does that anecdote show about. Elders worldview i think chance does it. It goes out of his way to kind of downplay. The role that race plays in society even at the point of when racism is just so obvious. He pretends that he doesn't see it. And i think that goes back to what he was saying about his parents in about this idea that if hard work and determination can help you get you anywhere. And that racism while it may exist doesn't really preclude you from doing anything that you want in life and i think that this incident where he's literally being pulled over clearly for racist purposes. He just pretends that that's not had nothing to do with it. It's like he created a narrative for himself and no matter what the evidence may show. He's gonna stick to that narrative and in his narrative. Racism is not the big deal. Almost everyone else makes it out to be. No i mean. I think he's a person that doesn't believe systemic. Racism exists at all just by that statement alone. He's basically saying that. Racism has no big role in society that keeps people from getting where they want to be for doing what they wanna do. That's non an obstacle. And i think that that is something that no matter. What the facts show no matter what reality shows. He continues to say that in believed that an exercise at all of his policy decisions that he talks about on the radio and that perspective gave him that career and talk radio. It's lasted what this point over thirty years. And he was a part of wave of southern california talk show host at influence american conservatism. In a big way. We're talking about people like hugh hewitt dennis prager. Who gave larry his first Chance in radio ben shapiro. Larry elder even ended up proclaiming himself the sage from south central but he also was never the biggest star. No he wasn't the biggest star. But i think that he's always aspired to be the biggest star and i think we've seen that particularly in recent years where he's become a regular commentator on fox news he's got his live streaming service in his show that he goes out. He's got a massive Twitter following facebook following on social media. I think he's really ridden. This wave of this link between conservatism and trumpism and you know online social media and honing that audience. And he's done that probably better than most people that are out there right now and i.

california la times Erica d smith Larry elder ivy league school gavin newsom newsome Thomas jefferson Jacob land newsom Eric garner democratic party Erica elder Michael brown los angeles southern california cleveland La Ohio
"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Let's back up back before the protests before silva's stood on those steps. Gus screamed at to beginning silva's beginning. When he was a baby he was found by lapd. Officers near sixth and san pedro streets in skid row less than a mile from that spot where the young protesters screamed in his face last year. My mom was a crack addict and a prostitute so she was working I was found on top of a dumpster in a car seat Officers had observed me. They contacted a the social services. I was taken immediately What not sure if my mother was arrested but You know further moving. I was put in to a foster home. Because of his biological mother's addiction silva battled with developmental delays from the exposure. I in foster care later. He was adopted in raising a blended family. His mom's white his dad's latino. He grew up in baldwin park and west covina in the nineties and early two thousands and have a lot of latino neighbors and friends but few black ones and as a teenager he says he was racially profiled on multiple occasions by police. I remember certain occasions when i will be walking. And officers would see me and they probably see a black male and they they slow down they look and i kind of like get that uncomfortable feeling like oh crap. I already knew what was going on. I'm being profiled and i kind of my heartbeat would go mar. It's get sweaty just the whole Shebang and i kind of look over. And i kind of wave and what i get back was just a dirty look. And you're kinda like okay. What's going on. And then they pulled over on the street and then you continue walking and then they slowly follow you. That was not on a day to day basis but the happened frequently after high school. Civil was not thinking about becoming a police officer. I you worked at a pizza place. Then at best buy then. He started working as a case manager with homeless clients trying to find them housing that last job he really liked. It seemed important him and it was on the job when silva met. Lapd officer who also worked with people experiencing homelessness that officer told silva he'd make a great cop at first civil wasn't so sure he knew some people and his family would be very skeptical but the more he thought about it the more. It seemed like something he'd like so he took the lead he joined the police department and graduated from the police academy in twenty thousand nineteen and after a probationary period and rampart division. He requested a permanent placement. In the central division the central division is home to some of la's poorest neighborhoods and poorest residents it's also home to skid row where officer silva was found as a baby. He wanted to be there to give back. So let's fast forward now back to the night where that viral video was captured silva normally worked patrol downtown. But that night had been given protests duty. A grand jury in louisville kentucky had declined to charge police officers there in the fatal shooting of a black woman named brianna taylor and some big crowds had gathered downtown. La civil was stationed outside of lapd headquarters. I remember Gearing up Going right there in front of a police headquarters standing on the steps holding my post. I remember all the protesters kind of Walking by the first time and they weren't as rowdy they walked through. They went all the way down spring street and at once they started working their way back. That's when we heard over the radio that hey things are kind of getting out of hand. They were starting to kind of vandalize businesses as the crowd grew in front of headquarters silva moved up and stood near the line of gates. A few young protesters in horror masks came up and they started taunting him tossing out racial slurs and flashing the middle finger and his face. By that time. I've been. I was well trained and i was kind of used to it. But i'm not gonna lie in the beginning i was. Shell shocked because that's something that black individuals don't really use towards each other and especially the way that they said. It was with medicine their voice. So we'll said he watched. The protesters is enhanced for threats but didn't see any from his perspective. They were just venting frustration and anger in an immature way. It was one of a lot of encounters in the past year. And a half in which silva's dual identity as a black man and a police officer has left him straddling one of the nation's most volatile cultural faultlines and feeling criticized for not landing solidly on either side so said he's also had difficult encounters with fellow police officers last year. He was involved in a situation. Where a black man being questioned on the street by an aggressive white officer asked to speak with silva instead and the white officer hit so vaughan arm and referred to the color of his skin. Smacks me on the arm. Here's a black skin officer. Civil said he felt that other officers had said black skinned with disgust. And he said he's had other officers. Tell him to never show any solidarity or compassion or understanding for black lives matter protesters or other activists in the street. He said a lot of activists and a lot of his fellow officers seem to have drawn battle. Lines separating the two groups but he doesn't really see it that way silva doesn't think the lapd should be refunded because he thinks police play an important role in public safety in that l. a. Needs good cops but he also thinks that social service providers people doing work with the homeless he used to do are also incredibly important. Should be funded as well. He doesn't like the way protests turned violent and spurred property damage across the city but he also doesn't dismiss the black lives matter movement wholesale. The message that i get from them when things aren't burning and when it's not as hectic as hey our lives matter to retired we want the same amount equal rights. We want the same amount equal pay. What the same amount of equal opportunities whether it be within school or workplace and our everyday regular lives we want equal and we want it now silva told me that he truly believes that the way to achieve better police community relationships is for police officers and community members to start getting to know each other better to start seeing each other as human beings not just badges or crime statistics. He knows it won't be easy but he remains optimistic about being a police officer. Do we have a long way ahead of us. Yes we do Especially with the protests that we go through day to day on a day to day basis But like. I said it's all about sitting down with black lives matter and kind of reaching a resolution. We can do it old school. Where we hey. Nobody leaves until each side is heard out But at the end of the day were police officers. Who do our job. And we got to serve the community. And we've got to do what's best for everyone Do wanna go home safely and see our family. Yes but We'll we put our life on the line to serve our community. Yes we will. That's what we signed up for the lapd like other agencies. I've covered doesn't always allow individual officers to speak with the media and that can make it hard for journalists like me to capture the perspective of those officers in our coverage. It's also difficult for officers to talk about problems lake racism within their own department because their colleagues don't always have the best reaction at a time. When everyone is trying to figure out a better path forward in american policing i think officers perspectives are worth hearing covering the lapd can be an intense job. People have really strong opinions on issues. I write about and they let me know it. Readers have accused me of blindly loving and defending the police. They've accused me of hating the police and tearing them down unfairly..

silva brianna taylor baldwin park west covina san pedro Gus louisville kentucky la vaughan Civil
"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"We'll have more after this break. Frank carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher gothard writer and host of the l. a. times podcasts. Dirty john and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law. In california's central valley new episodes of the trials of frank carson are available to find them search for the trials of frank carson. Wherever you get your podcasts. Thank you trey who took a smallest role in blood in blood out an experienced that allowed him to return to san quentin for the first time since he was an inmate. There this time as an actor during filming he was able to roam almost freely inside a facility that for him was the site of so many horrors early passages in the book describe mortal dangers lurking around every corner at san quentin and in a state of full circle. He even got to shoot a few scenes inside c. five five zero his actual former cell in the prisons south block. I consider my life a complete gift from god. cut remember nineteen sixty eight. I made a deal. I said you know what if you let me die with dignity. I'll say your name every day. And i'll do whatever i can for my fellow inmate. I said inmate. Because i never thought i was getting out of jail a year later. He left prison for good. And despite many bumps along the road tranquil transformed into a dedicated recovery counselor and sponsor recovery ultimately is the driving force of the memoir. Trae who has more than four hundred credits to his name. Now a remarkable achievement for someone who could hardly have imagined a film career as he prayed at soledad prison and nineteen sixty eight today he recognizes how far hollywood has to go to expand opportunities and roles beyond tough prisoner number one on the topic of latino representation the subject of a recent series of stories in the times trae who says he welcomes the growing advocacy. But what's needed to move the needle. He argued is more direct investment from high powered producers of latin american descent specifically. Everybody we were were not represented were not represented not represent you know. I have to say the reason. We're not represented. Is that people on top not caucasian. Latin american people do not want to produce phil but your point about the the representations issue that we just don't have enough latino financiers of films producers is what you're saying exactly you know and it's stop clients.

frank carson christopher gothard Dirty john san quentin trey soledad prison california Trae trae hollywood phil
"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Get it for hugs. Get it for date nights for live. Music home games and haircuts. Get it for eating at your favorite restaurant for grandma's birthday for graduations. Get it for your loved. Ones and the essential workers. Get it for all of us when it's available to you. Blue shield of california encourages you to get the cove in nineteen vaccination. Get it for california. The world is built on relationships from building wealth to building a business. It takes a dedicated team working together. And the only difference between success and failure is who you have in your corner when the going gets tough at city national bank. We aim to be the people you rely on when it really counts. That's why your relationship manager will take the time to get to know you after all it's only by knowing your goals that we can help you achieve them see what personal can do for you at c. n. b. dot com city national bank member. Fdic staying up to date on. The latest news can work up an appetite. Well grubs got you covered. grub hub. Works hard to serve restaurants so they can work hard to serve you today. Grab hubs doing a little extra to serve pinera. Get a free delivery perk on your first order from pinera of fifteen dollars. Or more order through the grub hub app or online grub hub. We serve restaurants. Excuse me is this seat open. There are no assigned seats on a southwest airlines flight. And that means your net seat mate could be chest about anyone. Hi i'm quentin jenkins. I league community outreach. At southwest airlines and welcome to is this seat open on this podcast. We'll hear twenty stories from south west history from people like chief marketing officer ryan green. Leave it to southwest airlines to save the company by offered a bunch of free booze. Managing director of culture and engagement whitney ike inger. All of it coming together was probably the greatest piece of humor. I've ever seen at southwest and retired vice president of cargo and charter matt. Luckily i look back on it. I get goosebumps. So sit back. Relax and enjoy stories of south west fifty years of flying. Because you never know who. You'll meet the next time you hear. Is this seat open trae. Who grew up in the bario culture of the san fernando valley in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixty s from an early age. He understood the true distance between the glitter of nearby hollywood and his world of drug dealing and bare knuckle. Violence grabbed you by the throat and threaten threatening to break every bone in. Your body was abused. I didn't know giving marijuana when you were eight. Was sharing it stuff like this. Trae hall writes that eventually got him hauled into a police station for the first time at the age of ten from that point on. He spent years engaging in criminal mayhem in the san fernando valley and up and down the state cycling through juvenile and state prisons and never expecting to come out alive but over the course of trails life. His experience with criminality would collide with hollywood one. Crystallizing episode came when trump. Who was wayne offers to appear in two films in the early nineteen ninety s one was american me to be directed by edward james olmos. The other was blood in out by taylor. Halford both sought to tell the story of the founding of the mexican mafia trae ho with his chest of tattoos and years of time served would have been a great fit in eater film. There was a problem though. The mexican mafia or ma is highly secretive and torius for its ruthless. Executions word was already getting around the penitentiary system. That the american meese script took some offensive narrative liberties related to prison rate into the ms fraternal codes. In order that we're upsetting real world. Gang leaders the proposed film would also explicitly use the term. Na which is another big no-no you ever. Jeans is great actors. Unbelievable actor but you gotta. We walked into into jerry's deli in encino okay. He walks in worrying county jail shirt but to the opening and do look like like an easterly. Chiloe and so. I'm trying to figure out dow's doing this to be my friend or i didn't. I didn't understand that kind of getting into character. The first question we asked was. Hey did you get permission from joe to do. The job organ was the leader of the mexican mafia and the mexican mafia l- was was not like the john gotti who wanted to be in the papers. Okay just before a second meeting with almost tranquil. Got a message. Joe morgan the guy trae who warned about wanted to talk to him the infamous joe quote unquote. Peg-leg morgan incarcerated at the time at county jail was then the living dawn of the according to traco. Joe morgan doesn't call people unless he saying you're dead. Who took the call the home phone of his friend eddie. Bunker an old industry insider who he met in prison. Joe morgan got right down to business on. Never forget it. He had to be the age old. What's up and he goes down. You know what medicine serious owns understand. Europe for that movie of american me and yeah. I'm up for both of them up for a month for blood in blood out do. He's which are you gonna do. I says you gonna do blood in blood out on. Never forget joe morgan's oh yeah oh. That's a cute one this movie about about mexican killers and said quinton. That's the cute one so we talked needs to even to daddy you. Don't you could do the other one. you could do. American me of you want nothing would happen. But i know i wouldn't israel. I wouldn't disrespect the people that i know almost not respond to a request for comment about the passage in the book or about trucco statements for this story in the book trek. Oh emphasizes again. His admiration for almost and his advocacy for latinos and people of color in hollywood almost made american me as a morality. Play to warn you about the dangers of prison life. Yet the stories ripple effects in the real world were unmistakable to consultants. Who worked on the film were killed including a beloved gang intervention worker named anna lisa. I think four people got killed out here directly because that movie and about eight or nine killed in prison directly behind that move..

pinera national bank quentin jenkins ryan green whitney ike inger san fernando valley south west Trae hall trae california Joe morgan hollywood grandma southwest airlines Fdic jerry's deli Chiloe edward james olmos Halford
"times  " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"times " Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"One of the most fascinating and honestly bad ass figures in hollywood today. Danny trae ho. What i had was this look of a criminal. I had the look of a bad guy. You know guys that bad guys. Tell me well. You really look like a pack. We spoke over. Zoom treacle wore a cap and he and of seventy seven. He's one of the most beloved genre actors around even over the pandemic distance trae who's fierceness onscreen as the perpetual prisoner or inmate is evident in conversation. He spoke with emotion and sometimes snorted a rubbed his face with both hands. It was as if he was bracing himself against the pain of experience in the state penitentiary system. That took up half his life. I was doing a film. With mickey rourke and we were doing in new mexico and i played this insane killer and and it was strange. The direct route say okay. Let's do that we do it. And he's a danny hon. You do it. It's like you go to this maniac and then all of us. I watch you and you go what i say. Cut you immediately. Go over and play with your kids. And he says most accurate they get into that zone and they want to stay there. When i'm playing that insane crazy person. It's like i been there. I've seen that. I've lived that you know i don't i don't want to be there. There's times that. I've been acting. And then i stop and i'm gonna throw up because that place that you can go to is is very very real. It's like i love working with like all the wanna be tough guys and convy killer in hollywood because you look at a menu. No as tough as you are you would be paying protection to some little five foot six mexican. That's how tall danny trae. Ho really is by the way. But it's his face that captures people's attention. It's famously mangled. By the years. He spent in prison offering an ideal expressive palette for the actor he became he can convey rage and humor like few other villains on screen. Some of these stories have been told. The many have informed his wildly prolific word and the most important are collected in his new memoir. Trae ho my life of crime. Redemption and hollywood he co authored with his longtime friend and fellow. Actor donal lobe. You know if there was a group of us standing on a corner. When i was young the cops into lovey with a you compare always just i just had the phaser the body that stuck out but as far as hollywood. I don't think i ever been discriminated against. I work all the time. And i was a inmate number one bad guy and i didn't know that i was being stereotype. I just do. I was working in fact the young lady probably fresh out an interview school. You know she asked me a danny. Don't you think you're being typecast. And i didn't know what that was about. What what do you mean. Well you're always playing the mean. Chicano dude with tattoos and thought about as i am the means chicano due to adapt dues trae who got his break in the business after visiting a film shoot in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. He was there to help someone onset. Who's battling through addiction addiction recovery. Then his career took off at first quietly with a string of tiny rolls as prisoner inmate or tuck inmate run but by nineteen ninety-five pray ho shared a riveting death scene with robert deniro in michael mann's movie heat one of my all time favorites and one of many displaying trae skill at portraying someone on the brink of death he says even deniro wasn't crises death of the century so funny when i was doing that to get a compliment from robert deniro and he helped me up off the ground. There's a lot of talk in the hollywood community about the constant use of the gangster. Trowell kind of bob ewell stories but at the same time some actors will say well. That's giving us work. We're training in our craft were reflecting the streets. Where do you lie on that argument. And how do you some of these films. You know that you were under leader career in today's mindset days as long as the bad guy dies or goes to prison. I don't care okay. You know what i mean. It's like i won't do a movie or the best guy lives in. I got ninety six deaths. Now i think and i got the record for death in film you know just. I worked a lot for me. Is i like yeah. Let's tell those stories. Yeah let's let's get them right you. Let's get right. it's you know what. Why do you. Why or why are prisons full of african american and mexican. Because you know jobs aren't available. There's a lot of things going on that. They're putting us in prison right now. I honestly believed that. Probably fifteen percent of the people that are in prison belong in prison. You know what i mean. We could do other things with with with the other. Fifteen percent you said percentage fifteen hundred eighty five percent of people in prison. Don't don't need to be there. Yeah i honestly believe that we could do something else. Non-violent drug addicts do not belong in prison most of the dealers they got in prison. Were dealing to support their habits. You don't mean it was like you got a i got a quarter. I'm going to cut it up. And i'm going to sell this. I'm going to use this. You know don you know it's like i. I know some of the big dealers that were in prison. Why do you think people still want to see these kinds of films and love. Even american people still watch it. People watch blending dow On your in withdraw. Their people want identify with violence. First of all secondly they wanna see heroic characters and like. I said as long as the bad guy loses. I'll do it in one thousand nine hundred five legendary filmmaker robert rodriguez gave trae a ho a signature role in desperado. He played a colombian assassin. Contract to kill antonio banderas is character and in two thousand one. Rodriguez specifically created four trae. Ho the role of marceca in spy kids a role that eventually became a franchise on its own that established perhaps the only character in film history to straddle the genres of children's adventure and grind house horror trickles role as much as iconic but his tough guy movie roles seemed to be just a fraction.

trae hollywood Danny trae robert deniro danny trae donal lobe mickey rourke Trae Trowell bob ewell new mexico Ho michael mann deniro don robert rodriguez
"times  " Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"times " Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"times  " Discussed on My Funeral Home Stories

My Funeral Home Stories

08:17 min | 3 years ago

"times " Discussed on My Funeral Home Stories

"The circle of cars and trucks surrounding are seeing the crowd of officers. That were near the body disperse. Until it's just Lindsey myself and the officer that brought us back to the body. Everyone just vanished. It's eerily quiet now. I've been a little too busy slipping on my heavy duty blue surgical gloves to take a look at the body. Well that's not entirely true. I haven't taken a look at the body because I'm terrified of what I was about to see. I'm thirteen. I don't have any experience with genital mutilation so I'm not sure how I'll respond seeing it up close. It doesn't really sound like my cup of tea. I hope I don't faint when I get up. Close I've fallen blood once my gloves. Her on the stretcher has been lowered. Lindsey grabs disaster pouch and we walked closer to the body. She throws me a small water. Plastic out of pocket and says put these on their shoe coverings. Lindsey watches me. Slip THEM OVER MY LEATHER SOLED Steve Madden Lace Up. Cap Does and tells me you don't want to get anything on your shoes and take it home with you. Your dog will lick the blood off the souls. What Yak given the amount of blood leaking out of this man's body on the pavement? I'm glad she brought these. I don't want my dog lapping up. This guy's blood off my shoes. Carter's a good way. He wouldn't mess with them. I think seeing all the blood around the body I think to myself. How are they going to clean this up? Surely they can't just leave it here once we take the body right. I'm standing over the body with Lindsey. Now our feet covered in plastic or both in his blood. There's a faint chemical smell coming off the blood or the body. Although it's barely cutting through the smell of the cheeseburgers which smells less appetizing. The closer I get to the body. This is my first look at our foreign exchange student friend and the site just about knocked me out. I exhale sharply. Lindsey looks at me concerned I take in my surroundings about six feet away from me as a medium sized black man with designer wool pants pulled around his ankles. Laying near a storm sewer on the side of Lake Street. Shoes are still on. That's creepy do you suppose. He was dead when his pants were slid off. There's so much blood on his body and on the ground it's difficult to tell what happened. Clearly there giant stab wounds and slices all over his body. The man's navy polo shirt had so many holes in it. It's impressive stayed on while his body was being pushed out of the car. I look at the man's right hand and see stab wounds on his palms and slices on his fingers. Did he try and grab the knife? When do you suppose he gave up? Fighting was it before or after his pants were off inevitably. My eyes are drawn to the man's paint us or what I think it's being penis again. There is so much blood. It's hard to make out details. But his pianist definitely had deep slices an and was barely recognizable as a human penis. Lindsey must have seen me staring in horror trying not to imagine what it would be like to have. My penis repeatedly sliced by a random stranger. She tells me to grab the man's feet. This was nice of her. Normally veteran funeral directors. Make the new guy do the heavy lifting but Lindsay Catella was having difficulty processing the situation. So she did me a solid and took the heavier bloodier end. Lindsey opens the Disaster Pouch and places in next to the body she grabs the shoulders starts moving the body and finally get a look at the man's face for the first time my mouth must have hit the ground. I've never seen anything like this before. Sure at someone's face but aside from a Barau line nose and mouth. This man's face had more in common with the deflated basketball covered in broken teeth and ground. Meat this man had the thickest black is coagulated blood coming out of his eyes mouth and however many stab wounds were in his face and head. You heard me right. This guy must have had a dozen stab wounds to his head. It's weird you don't ever see that in movies. Everyone gets stabbed in the body but in the real world I can assure you there are apparently no MPA guidelines for knife-wielding killers had stabbings. Are Real thing the overpowering smell of hot and fresh cheeseburgers mixed with the site of this man's brutalized face? Made me wish I was at the beach with a Mandawa right now in made me wish I was anywhere or maybe I'm just hungry for a cheeseburger. Edano no one Lindsay says all right. Let's move him. I grabbed the man's ankles. His lower legs and feet are in perfect non stabbed condition. The Sky could be shorts model if you to do well if he wasn't dead. It's kind of weird that his lower legs weren't touched at all right. The person who did this was pretty thorough. So I'm surprised. He didn't shoot for full body coverage maybe he did. And I just can't tell we put the body in the bag and ZIP it up as we're moving the body to the stretcher. I see a firefighter in full uniform. Connecting a fire hose to a hydrant Lindsey points at them and says they can write a hose. This place down. Oh so that's what they do with all that blood we load our body into the back of the van. Get in and buckle ourselves up for our trip back to the funeral home. Wow it's only nine thirty Lindsay. Says she points across the street and says hot and fresh meals pretty good. You WanNa take our buddy to get a burger. She laughs secretly. I'm disappointed that she wasn't serious. I could really go for a burger. We found out later that weekend that our foreign exchange student was actually stabbed seventy seven times. The entire left side of his face was crushed by a weapon or instrument of some sort and to top it off. The tip of his penis was cut off. And his scrotum was crudely ripped open by a serrated blade and it was all done by a complete stranger as far as. I know they never found the person who did it. They're probably still driving around in that ninety six. Lancer. It's Labor Day night. I'm getting ready for bed. I'm brushing my teeth and thinking about my presentation tomorrow. I can't talk about this murder. I want to. But it's not really. Pg I'd get enough for sure or Mrs Jones. May actually snap and staff may seventy eight times for telling my classmates about my weird encounter with a dead foreign exchange student right by the hot and fresh this weekend. I don't know what to do. It's Tuesday morning. I was awake six minutes before my mom came in and woke me Of being completely unsure of what I was going to present my class in eight period had me tightly wound from the jump so when my mom came in and open my blinds I was a little less than pleasant my stomach was in Nazi? Entire ride to school. What can I talk about movies? I saw or music. I listened to over the summer that fun trip. I took to the amusement park. How about genital mutilation just kidding? That wouldn't go over. Mrs Jones already hates me because of my awfulness last year so I need to think fast. Otherwise I'm going to be completely fucked for the next one hundred and eighty days until high school since I can't tell the story from this weekend. Maybe I'll just talk about what it's like working at the funeral home. Yeah like day to day. That's interesting right now. It's boring. I walked into the cafeteria just after six period feeling completely sick walking up to the lunch line I always usually pretty excited for launch because like I mentioned before we always carry out since we're a small Catholic middle school. There isn't really enough funding for anything. Not to mention whatever money it would take to properly staff maintain a cafeteria kitchen so essentially we get baths food. Every day as I get closer to the front of the line where the parent volunteers handing out lunch. I get a waft of whatever it is. They're passing out. It's of familiar delicious. Smell I feel my saliva. Glands activate tangle and then the foreign exchange students crushed Izhak at pops into my head for a moment at breath classmates standing in front of me turns us. We're both inching our way forward in line and ask. What are you giving your presentation on before I can even open my mouth? She says my family and I went to the billboard mansion over the summer you know the place where they filmed richie rich sliding forward barely listening. I think to myself I'm fucked. I don't know I sternly say to my classmate abruptly ending her blabbering stupid fucking rich mansion. I get.

Lindsey Lindsay Catella Mrs Jones officer Steve Madden basketball Izhak Catholic middle school Carter richie rich murder