35 Burst results for "Time Warner"

'Shang-Chi' Tops Box Office Again With $35.8 Million

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | Last month

'Shang-Chi' Tops Box Office Again With $35.8 Million

"The latest Marvel movie continues a winning streak at the box office that brings our family after what was a surprisingly strong Labor Day opening for movies during the pandemic Shanxi in the legend of the ten rings the first Marvel movie to star in Asian superhero stayed on top in its second weekend in theaters collecting another thirty five point eight million dollars in ticket sales it's the second best weekend gross of any film during the pandemic edging out Black Widow on Friday Disney announced that all its remaining twenty twenty one releases including the internals will open exclusively in theaters and not on Disney plus at the same time Warner brothers horror thriller malignant with the stock debut of five point six million was also released on H. B. O. Max for subscribers disease Ryan Reynolds action comedy free guy also did well during its fifth week of release it's made two hundred and seventy six million dollars worldwide I'm Jennifer king

Shanxi Disney Black Widow H. B. O. Max Warner Ryan Reynolds Jennifer King
The Internet, From Space

Reset

02:06 min | 7 months ago

The Internet, From Space

"The internet. It's how we work. How go to school how we see friends and family but not everyone has a good connection. And that's where a few companies come in with a sort of modest proposal. What have we got our internet from outer space. Adam clark estes deputy editor at recode wrote about this and is here to talk about it. Hey adam so surprising thing in your story that a lot of people probably don't already is that a lot of listeners. Already get through internet via satellite. That's how we get wi fi on planes for instance. So why hasn't this taken off more. Broadly satellite internet has historically been just a little bit subpar. When you compare it to terrestrial wi fi you're down on planet earth. We have fiber optic cables which basically have limited bandwidth and to do satellite internet. You're basically beaming connection from the address. Drill network up to a satellite and back down and technology just hasn't been good enough To to get bandwidth to enough people so that it compares to terrestrial broadband internet you get from verizon or time warner but that's starting to change with a new satellite technology and what are called constellations of satellites and has the pandemic at all sort of raised the stakes for this work and made it more. Urgent less-urgent tell me about that. Dependent is absolutely accelerated development and especially investment in this technology just after the pandemic starting to became incredibly clear. That a lot of people don't have internet access and they're being left behind young students who are able to get online for classes people who aren't able to to to work remotely so once. It became so clear that solving this problem of internet access was urgent a lot. More investment went into xilai broadband initiatives The number of launches went up quite a bit. And i think we're gonna see that. Investment continue and more these networks go online in the near future.

Adam Clark Estes Adam Time Warner Verizon
FTC Challenges Illumina’s Proposed Acquisition of Cancer Detection Test Maker Grail

WSJ What's News

00:44 sec | 7 months ago

FTC Challenges Illumina’s Proposed Acquisition of Cancer Detection Test Maker Grail

"Federal trade commission has filed a lawsuit seeking to block gene sequencing company alumina from acquiring grail the developer of a blood test that promises to detect cancer early. The ftc says the plan seven point one billion dollar deal would diminish innovation because test developers have no choice but to use aluminum instruments the commission alleges that the company could raise the prices at charges to growls competitors and impede their research and development efforts. The case sets up a major test for us antitrust enforcement because the proposed deal is a vertical merger of companies. That don't compete head to head. The only other litigated challenge to a vertical merger in the past forty years was the justice. Department's twenty seventeen case against at and t.'s. Acquisition of time warner which the government

FTC Alumina Cancer United States Time Warner
Start Something Stupid with Richie Norton

The Chalene Show

05:46 min | 10 months ago

Start Something Stupid with Richie Norton

"Do you do the economy's changed. Jobs are not as prevalent as they. Once were in many people report. Their businesses are down as much as seventy five percent. Is this the right time to start something new or is that just a stupid idea. Well let's hope it's a stupid idea because today that's what we're talking about how powerful it is to start something stupid with the author of the book the power of starting something stupid. My friend marketing impact academy alumni. Richie norton well richie. Thank you so much for joining me today. I'm really excited to do this. You just the finest person in the world. Oh man you're the best an honor. I've been waiting my whole life for this very moment right now. I know for real though. I love you so much. I know you're asking me questions yet. But i've done mia. i've been there. I've followed you've taught me everything i know. Everything i say is straight from you just coming through my mouth. I dunno honestly so grateful for you. And what what you do for the world. Oh my gosh check is in the mail amazing because like literally this week. I have a hard copy of your book but for some reason. I bought a kindle this week and i'm just like oh my gosh this is so inspirational. There's so much of that. I need the world to hear right now because now more than ever i think people are really starting to realize nothing is certain d- i have to be in control of my own destiny and there's so little that i can count on that. Maybe now is the time that i considered like doing my own thing. It's sort of and you're just really motivate people to do that. Yeah you always had that kind of spirit you know. I don't know even as a kid my mom would encourage me and but also encourage my own willingness to try and help other people like the kid that no one else likes. You know i'd go and hang with that guy you know what i mean. I guess that's in my nature but as far as it into things that serve people enter. Entrepreneurial i mean i grew up with that by dow is entrepreneur. My grandpa was an entrepreneur. So he kind of taught me to think in different ways you know and so. I don't know if it's innate or learned but i've definitely been doing it for a while let's are the people who struggle with it right because we both work with those types of individuals now and i mean in the intro. People got to hear about how vast your experiences like. You're one of those guys who knows something about freaking every word making it up as a but there's i find that there's two different types of people those people who are like the really down to experiment to fail and it's like it's just not a big deal. They don't even think twice about it. They just leave. They jump to go for it. The hardest people for me. I feel like to reach in the ones that. Keep me up late at night. I suspect this is probably true for you to are those people who are so paralyzed by perfection. The ones who worry endlessly about is the right thing. Is this the right time warner people are gonna think what if i'm doing this wrong and i just i don't have that gene and i know you don't either but tell me about those people who you've worked with that maybe when you first working with them like how did you help them to break through that mentality. 'cause i know there's people listening right now that's that's me my hands are up to. How do you break through that. Okay this is my head spinning always examples but let me back up real quick lake. There's the voices that are outside that we hear there's the voice in her head that we hear and we tend to actually the had a lot. We also start to filter the voices of others almost in a way to say what we want them to hear. Even if it's negative someone might say like you're saying goes out of business and they here. Yeah but that's not for me. No no that's not what she leans set that it is for you. I remember i was sixteen years old. I wanted to make some money. I told my dad. I wanna make some money in the summer. We'll get like a minimum wage job. Picking up trash at like the local carnival. Or whatever i was going to do. He said worst add ever. He says you don't want to. Who says that he said no. I'm from san diego. He's he's a go to el centro and ask the watermelon farmers if you can either irregular sized watermelons from them that they couldn't sell to the stores because they're oddly shaped and i'm like okay. He gave me a little bit of seed money so to speak and filled up our family. The antic out the seats with these water mounts me and my brother. I was sixteen. Fourteen came back. Call up all my friends. parents said. Hey guys watermelons. It's almost the fourth of july. Do you want to buy them. They said yes. Probably its climate kid and whatever. I'll tell you what i learned from this process. I made more money in one day on the fourth of july. Then i would made the entire summer. Working minimum wage is what entrepreneurship learnable skill. It's just that sometimes we're not getting the right voices. We're not listening to the right people or filtering those voices in a way. That doesn't serve us about that. Filtering process like so. Do people know that they're filtering. How do you change the filter right. So we're filtering. It's like cognitive bias. Like we all. Let's yeah yeah. no it's true. Let's play with that for a second like you mentioned people who procrastinate and a lot of people associate the whole chapter my book on procrastination i've studied a procrastinator myself and people associate procrastination laziness when in reality the trait most associated. You can google stuff. People don't believe me the trait most associated with procrastination is immediacy. And you have to always do something right now.

Richie Norton Richie Jobs DOW Warner El Centro San Diego Google
"time warner" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:43 min | 11 months ago

"time warner" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Um, anyway Well, if you want to send us questions, you have any comment? You like to make Um, about what? We talked about her like this, and it's a story. We always have stories. And like hearing from people, you can send my get a good one. You could send them to actually business we worship dot com or you can go to our website business. Beware show that come and see some Oh, a bunch of stuff. I'm not even going to list. Not even at least love up. Yeah, we love to fluff up Exactly. Well, you know, Speaking of love ups Let's not be one s O. This is a former Marine that was fired from a job for lowering the flag on Memorial Day. So basically, he went to put the American flying half staff morale today. A memorial day Alan born well, 29 was thinking about his best friend, a former Marine who had said he killed himself two years ago when he returned from the U. S. And so Basically he put the flag down. I believe he worked for Time Warner Cable something so right? Yes. Yeah, and so much that they Ended up firing him. Over that. It's just I really don't even know that I really have words for that. I mean, honestly, like I read this and I think. Oh, my gosh, This is crazy. Well, then you're telling me that this is the first time it's happened? I'm going. Why? Why is this? Fine? Why does this keep happening? You know You know, and You don't get me started on this. You know, we live in a country where you could burn the flag. As expression. Of foreign expression. You burn this like this is a man and I.

Time Warner Cable Alan
"time warner" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:43 min | 11 months ago

"time warner" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"To the business anywhere, So I finished one with the song. Keep running because this is kind of how we feel tonight. So, Yeah, um, anyway, Well, if you want to send us questions, you have any comment You like to make Um, about what we talk about her like this, And it's a story. We always of stories and like hearing people, you can send my get a good one. You could send them to actually business people show dot com Or you can go to our website business. Beware show dot com and see some Oh, a bunch of stuff. I'm not even going to list. Not even staying at least love up. Yeah, exactly. Well, you know, Speaking of love ups This might be one s O. This is a former Marine that was fired from a job for lowering the flag on Memorial Day. So basically he went to put the American flying half staff Moral today a memorial day, Alan Cornwell 29 was thinking about his best friend, a former Marine who had said he killed himself two years ago when he returned from the U. S. And so Basically he put the flag down. I believe he worked for Time Warner Cable something so right? Yes. Yeah, And so am I. But they Ended up firing him. Over that. It's just I'm really don't even know that I really have words for that. I mean, honestly, like I read this and I think. Oh, my gosh, This is crazy. Well, then you're telling me that this is the first time it's happened? I'm going. Why? Why is this fine lot of keep happening, You know. You know, and You don't get me started on this. You know, we live in a country where.

Time Warner Cable Alan Cornwell
Google antitrust case is opening salvo in war with Big Tech

The Tech Guy

05:12 min | 1 year ago

Google antitrust case is opening salvo in war with Big Tech

"What is the latest? You might ask what is the newest Mr Mr Tech Guy if that's what your name is, what is the latest news? about the IPHONE, right? We don't have to talk about that Ad Nauseam. You either get under you're not if you're getting you're getting excited and if you're not then you don't care. You're happy with whatever you have. there is some question of course about whether the iphones camera. Will. Best the? The camera of the. I guess the current leader, which is the Pixel Five. I don't include Samsung in that bunch. I know a lot of you do mike beat our chases my my Samsung as twenty as a best camera ever. But I think most camera nuts photography nuts will have to ask Chris, martyr foget. But most of most of the camera shots I know, say they too much processing in the Samsung both Google and? I phone to a more. Natural Look. And yet, both are using the state of the art and computational photography get more detail to get better low light performance. Number of people. Including Marquez Brownlee, the Youtube Star. Are Now weighing in saying you know. Even the old pixel. Even, the Pixel four four, a has a better camera than the new iphone. Isn't that's shocking. I think they're both I have to say I, think they're both so good at this point. That it's really now even the Samsung it's really now matter of personal taste. The opinion. Not, so much. The actual quality of the images which you like better. All of them do some significant processing it's just whether you like more or less than. How well they do in low light I'm looking for we haven't seen the iphone Pro Max, which is going to be the best of the new iphone twelve. Bunch because it's got the biggest sensors got It's actually kind of a cool technology. Optical image stabilization and it does it by when you jiggle the phone you know because you're his hand held, it jiggles the sensor, the chip. To, match your jiggles to to to smooth it out. And that's something really I don't think we've ever seen a phone before we've seen in high end cameras but have a phone. That's pretty good. Pretty good and the iphone you know is when just out of the box I think gives you a great images so we'll see. We'll. See What else? What else is going on? facebook and twitter CEOS are going back to court tested dot court Congress to testify a little bit more. This was the week that the Department of Justice decided to go after Google for. Being a monopoly for. Antitrust. Interesting. It's going to be interesting. We've been waiting for this. For a while everyone knew that the justice, department is going to file this suit and there's some merit I have to say there's some merit in the suit. because Google is Jain. ORMUZ and it does use its advantage in search. About eighty percent market share and search to help it I think in other areas it's for instance in advertising at both makes the market. Sells the advertising and places the advertising. Functions that could all three of them be separate? But Google does it all and that kind of might tilt the plainfield a little bit in their favor? But Google is quick to say well, but there's other places you can go to buy ads come on we're not the only one. So it'll be interesting to see the. Of course you remember the last big. Antitrust lawsuit against. which was who almost a little more than thirty years ago with the Department of Justice going after Microsoft, they don't go after many. Tech companies after many companies at all, there's only been one big antitrust action in the last twenty some years. And that went that went out with a fizzle that was the time Warner. CNN. Merger. with what was it at and T. Half I can't even remember anymore. That was really kind of a little bit politically motivated. I have to say and it went by the wayside pretty quick. Could say there are those who do this is politically motivated as well. If that's the case while I wonder. what will happen I don't know. We'll see. but I as I said I, think there's some merit in The case I don't think anybody would end the e probably gonNA pursue their own action. In this regard I don't think anybody would disagree with that and yet what do you do you? You can't break Google up. To. Make Google Sell Youtube in the shopping and just stick to search maybe sell advertising. I don't know if that's a good solution.

Google Samsung Department Of Justice Youtube Marquez Brownlee Chris Mike CNN Congress Microsoft
The Internet, From Space

Reset

05:42 min | 1 year ago

The Internet, From Space

"The Internet, it's how we work how go to school, how we see friends and family. But not everyone has a good connection and that's where a few tech companies come in with a sort of modest proposal. What have we got our Internet from Outerspace Adam Clark estes deputy editor at recode wrote about this, and is here to talk about Adam. Surprising thing in your story that a lot of people probably don't already know is that a lot of listeners already get through Internet via satellite. That's how we get wi fi on planes for instance. So why hasn't this taken off more broadly satellite Internet has historically been and? Just. A little bit sub par When you compare it to terrestrial Wifi, you're down on planet earth. We have fiber optic cables which basically have limited bandwidth and to do satellite Internet. You're basically beaming connection from address Joe Network up to satellite and back down and technology just hasn't been good enough to to get with to enough people so that it compares to terrestrial broadband. Internet. You might get from a variety inner time Warner A, but that's starting to change with new satellite technology and would call constellations of satellites and has pandemic at all sort of raise the stakes for this work and made it. More, urgent less-urgent. Tell me about that depend epic is. Really accelerated development, and especially investment in the technology. Just after the pandemic started, it became incredibly clear that a lot of people don't have Internet access and they're being left behind young students who aren't able to get online for classes, people who aren't able to to to work remotely. So once it became so clear that solving this problem of Internet access was urgent a lot more investment went into Xilai. Broadband initiatives the number of launches went up quite a bit and I. Think, we're GONNA see that investment continue and more these networks go online in the near future Gotcha. So who exactly is trying to do this? What are the different companies that see a future in? Internet for space, the two companies being talked about both right now our space x and Amazon both of them are launching what are called low earth orbit constellations into space this year, and in addition to them, there are companies that have had satellites These are the companies that. You. Probably. Use to get a connection on a plane or a train and via sat and Hughes two big players in that space and part of the idea is tabby satellites be sort of a low orbit, right? So there are two main types of satellite broadband setups. One is geosynchronous satellites geosynchronous satellite. Okay. So A geosynchronous satellites as above one place on earth and spins with the earth so that it can be connected down to to anywhere on the surface at any given time. The second kind and this is sort of the the newer more exciting type according to some. This is what spacex, Amazon or doing. These are called low earth orbit satellites. Geosynchronous satellites are thousands of miles above the earth surface low orbit satellites. However, as the name implies are much closer, they might be as little as three hundred miles above earth surface. I think it SPACEX, they're going to be about three, hundred and. Forty miles above the surface, and that means that the distance that the signal has to travel is much less, which means you get lower latency that means you won't get a lag on a connection and because there are a lot of different satellites, Elon Musk, and spacex say that you'll have a bandwidth that will be able to compete with terrestrial broadband and even fiber optic networks, Gotcha and SPACEX and Amazon are doing this. I assume just because there's money to be made right I. Mean I got think. There's a bounty at the end Elon. Musk has said that he just wants to get into the business and he wants to disrupt the telecom business and he believes that he can make enough money doing. So to help fund his mission to colonize Mars. Amazon hasn't said that much about why they're doing it It might also be just to get into the telecom business in compete in an industry that is is fairly monopolized. Others have hypothesized at Amazon wants to get into the satellite broadband business because then they could be their own first customer, Amazon web services, of course, offers a lot of cloud computing technology and the ability. To be connected to the Internet anywhere on Earth, could do a number of different great things, aws. Got It. So the answer is a mix of just straight up capitalism money to be made if we don't make it someone else will, and then another incentive is that this could be pretty synergistic with the main business and I'd add a third thing and and everybody mentions this. Bridging the digital divide is not only good for business. It's sort of good for mankind connecting more people to the Internet stands to have great unforeseen benefits space experts didn't says. The connecting people that previously could not get Internet access in parts of the rural United States and southern Canada. Like the Pacific Northwest Region is where they've had Beta, testers and I think that a lot of different companies have really pursued the dream of satellite broadband because it can reach people in areas that no one else can these are areas that aren't served by big telecom companies where there aren't fiber optic cables and in fact, would be expensive to build that infrastructure that no one has ever going to do it.

Amazon Spacex Elon Musk Adam Clark Deputy Editor Warner A Joe Network Pacific Northwest Region Xilai Hughes Canada United States
"time warner" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"time warner" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Notice I don't name names yeah guys it's just all these done is been a virologist epidemiologist for his whole life for a bunch of different presidents left or right all of a sudden these work in French I like George Soros is the anti Christ now as a left winger I've seen worse anyway I'm just let you know the virus how much in a much more closely right now but I do not think the pull back in the virus related stuff has anything to do with that I think it was just all technicals with the cruise lines in the airlines and all that other crap pulling back right now Oct ten down five six down three up eight down for that can change the bad I haven't seen it yet and in fact again today as I speak in the one o'clock hour they get a little bit the founded here did I mention to you also did you see the top cops off the air the show they get rid of gone with the wind well I think Time Warner just taking it off the air for now they say because it's bad but taking cops off the air you know it's a show about cops doing their job they're taking it off the air police officers just to win their trust you know earlier this morning I drove out and is this international parkway near I live and I was crossing it with two cops on motorcycles they are next fall and I told them how much I appreciated them keep up the great work and don't take any crap from anybody and they thank me do you know this three hundred and seventy five million contacts between police and people a year three hundred and seventy five million contacts between police and people each year but her feet that three hundred and seventy five million contact.

George Soros Time Warner
Small America Vs. Big Internet

Planet Money

03:40 min | 1 year ago

Small America Vs. Big Internet

"When we met grant goings a few months ago he was holding a copy of the local newspaper and he was so proud of the story on the front page. It was about this new kind of municipal uber system in his town. So for like a Buck Fifty. You can call come pick you up. Take you to where you're going. We're super excited. Grandpa is a total wonderful civics nerd and for the past fifteen years. He's been the city manager of Wilson North Carolina. The city of Wilson has a population of about fifty thousand people. It's downtown is full of these giant old brick warehouses that used to be filled with tobacco. But now there's a microbrewery barbecue restaurants. This city has managed to transform itself into a manufacturing town they attracted bridgestone tyres and Merck pharmaceuticals but they were starting to worry about keeping those businesses because by the time grant got to Wilson in the mid two thousands. The city had a problem. It's Internet. They're hearing from businesses that the Internet not so great and maybe worse they were also hearing from the little league parents facilities would go down frequently and so someone will be halfway through registry the kid there would be some type of breaking service. They'd have to start. All over again. Crashed Little League registration in two thousand and five. I mean come on in other parts of the country. People were discovering nickelback online. Wire with no problem. The Internet could be so much better so grand goings called a meeting with the local Internet provider. Time Warner Cable and the local telephone company and then we sat down and we basically had a few Ask so number one was. We asked them to heavily. Invest in upgrading. The system we. We'd sort of felt like we knew that answer no interest. Yeah the answer was no time Warner cable. Now Charter didn't agree to an interview for this story but you can understand their answer. They're like. Why would the existing company invest a ton of money? Just to wind up with the same customers. They already have. It's a questionable business decision at best. But that's okay no problem. Gran had prepared option number to partner with us. What if Wilson pays to build the top of the line Internet infrastructure fiber optic cables? Then Time Warner could offer their service over these super fast lines town had built. The answer to that question was where the second largest cable provider in the country. Why would we partner with you? Which only left option number three? The city would do it alone. Grant told Time Warner fine. We'RE GOING TO BUILD. And run our own fiber optic network and that's when the laughing started and they very quickly exited after that they literally laughed at you in your office absolutely. Yes and have admitted that did that like light. A fire for you did for me. That's the day that you said it's on it's hello and welcome to planet money. Kenny Malone and I'm Wilson Fair no relation to the city of Wilson and not only would time Warner cable laugh in the city of Wilson's face. They would actively fight to stop the city from building. Faster Internet it is a fight that has now spread to dozens of other states. We started reporting the story before the pandemic. But it's more relevant than ever because this is a big part of the reason that it's very hard to move to little towns around the country and make a living working remotely

Warner Cable Time Warner Wilson Wilson North Carolina Grant Little League Partner Kenny Malone Nickelback Bridgestone Gran Merck Pharmaceuticals
AT&T CEO John Stankey on the launch of the HBO Max streaming service

Squawk Pod

07:51 min | 1 year ago

AT&T CEO John Stankey on the launch of the HBO Max streaming service

"Joe Kernan. Kicking things off with John. Thank you this morning on Squawk box. John Thanks for coming on today. It's great great to have you with us you me on. I know you have high hopes for. Hbo We all know HBO. Obviously it's synonymous with some of the greatest things ever on video. Obviously game of Thrones Sopranos etc. You WanNa take on Netflix. And I understand. I think that's interesting because I don't know whether it's true or not. But supposedly someone said maybe we should have some kind of alliance with Netflix's someone suggested that you and you said we want to crush Netflix's Adams John you want to replace net flicks or at least be a very potent competitor refrains US Navy. Some on what I would call not accurate reporting on the New York Times Are hellacious is going to multiple streaming services knowing forward in pretty consistent. I think if you look back over the last year of domain around my conversation that our goal frankly is not to be. Netflix's our goal is to be something different and there are other senior services are starting to show up on the market that clearly different ease for the customer. Hbo Mass is going to have a unique focus in a unique position with the customer in play our game. Our goal is at crush flights. Our goal is to make sure that we meet customer needs engaged every day household. Find something worthwhile in time with us. And that's what we're GONNA see foes I guess they didn't so that was in the New York Times but that was that was not accurate according to so that. That's not a quote from you that that's interesting Anyway but I I guess the reason I led with that John is that I think about net flicks and everything. That's there and from documentaries to movies to programming that they generate themselves. That is a big universe of things that they have how will HBO? Max and I just said you're not going to strive to be everything to all people but you probably do need to add some things to the offering to make it so attractive that people have it in addition to the other streaming services absolutely a clearly customer Nanna. What's current as from kind of traditional media through the pay TV bundle and general entertainment content coming into the streaming world has credible number of choices of what to do with their time and then he going all dynamics in the digital environment about France capabilities to good use generating content? Like there's no question. There's more choice after today than there ever has been in paradise choices. Feel Max Niece resolve needs on the customers. Says you know I'm looking for something? That is this particular need of where I stand right now at my mood or my family situation that it's the first thing you think about that. I can go and no one wanted to find something. That's curious down. Who in meaningful selection of high-quality is Gonna? Hit the mark for me in the consistency. That happening time and time again clearly. The a hallmark more for the bran and for the service. And that's what we believe where you will focus on a more carried. Orderly got such a talented team. It warned me be do dat curate in that fashion just doing it for the demo outstanding the entire family. And you point out that that it's it's not much difference in price from what people are paying for now with with. Hbo So you have done some surveys. And what you saw one out of five people might decide not not to go with with Max. But it's not not much of a difference between just converting what they have now into HBO. Max Oh you don't you. Don't see any churn in that respect a difference were selling at that price day with just the HBO product which is a product that has half as much content is what HBO. Max New Offering Margaret. So you twice content same price and I think if we're seeing all of us everybody who's in the streaming business utility matter fact increasing during these unfortunate moments going through right now at this pandemic that's increasing dramatically so the performance of house value arrive actually increasing as a result. So you know our job is to make sure. The customer finds the equation to be done that for over thirty million customers with a long period of time in our goal is to extend that out beyond the family. I think we've got a really strong probability Andrew John. It's great to see you this morning. And congratulations and good luck on the on. This launched the question. I have two questions. The biggest I think is a distribution question. Which is and. Maybe you can explain what's happened with the likes of comcast parent company of this network. Amazon and Roku which a stoically with been strong distribution partners for the HBO product but are not on board at least from what I understand at the moment with HBO. Max and what that does to your reach a Bra List and distributors who are working with us the traditional and the market is the pay TV. Marcus actually signed on going to carry four. They're going to be successful years with. Hp Amax just like they were HBO along the providers doing that. Frankly you mentioned your parent company I'm optimistic still opportunity for something to be on there. I suspect that there's an opportunity that need other pay. Tv providers are given the vast majority. The ECO system is a likely become interview just useful. Come her moving forward. I think the interesting dynamic you're alluding to is Roma who Amazon at this point elected mocked distributors. I got and I didn't expect first of all have distribution across the entire race. I think must be doing something rightist. Somebody believes now to be more in conflict with your business so I don't necessarily take a bad sign but I do find it a bit ironic when I think banning litigation heard prior to the Time Warner eighteen transaction closing the concern was about withholding content from traditional distributors. And what we have now. We actually have dynamic where we have. New Technology viewers individual H. Who are likely not student and I think that dynamic is an important one understanding shows fast. The market's moving how we got to respond to those changes. I just to follow up with one other question which relates to this which is speak to the marketing challenge which. I think there may be one in terms of getting people to download the APP because some of these cable operators aren't going to necessarily be carrying it as an on demand on the box if you will so so what has to happen given that you do have these multiple brands and getting people to understand that they need to actually go get this. Get this particular product. It's a good question this

HBO Andrew John Netflix MAX New York Times Amazon Joe Kernan Time Warner General Entertainment United States Comcast France HP Marcus
"time warner" Discussed on Krypton Report: The Supergirl Podcast

Krypton Report: The Supergirl Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"time warner" Discussed on Krypton Report: The Supergirl Podcast

"Here. My daughter came in she. Yeah Anyway Yeah. My had it to bed soon. You know how it is. That's why we do this. We can hit my kid. My kid is. He's just laying at my feet fe. I Fed him a lot of cheap burgers today so he's pretty good day. Pass out one to four. We hit go here. We go ready everybody at home listening. We're at ten seconds. It says Warner Premiere one to a Time Warner Company logo is being formed. I like this logo only appeared in what two movies. I think like theatrical this kind of the logo they did for Superman returns. I don't know if it was in the theatrical green lantern. Okay here we get to go back. They went through three different. Dc Logos in the last ten years. Fifteen years maybe. Now Yeah I didn't like the D. That looks like a page that look stupid but I like this logo. Did either of you.

Warner Premiere Time Warner Company
Melanoma Medicine

2 Docs Talk

08:15 min | 1 year ago

Melanoma Medicine

"Just to be clear there are lots of different kinds of skin cancer knowing them as just one of many chewed chewed happens to be the kind of cancer that comes from land sites which are the cells in our skin that make pigment and it's the third most common type of skin cancer right right behind squamous cell and Basal the Cell Carcinoma. And I would say it's also the scariest meaning people rarely die from squamous or Basal cell cancers but definitely can with melanomas right but let's not feed people out the five year survival for all. MELANOMAS is greater than ninety percent so that's good true. The thing to know is that survival rates are dependent on the size of the melanoma. Ah really the depth of the melanoma so if the melanoma just involves the top layer of skin. That's good treatment is almost always curious. Yeah but if the melanoma extends down into deeper layers of the skin or even metastases to different parts of the body then the five year. Survival rates dropped precipitously so for stage four disease which is the worst. The five year survival rate is pretty crappy. I think around twenty five percent. Yes so for obvious reasons. There has been a big emphasis on prevention and early detection. The idea being if you can find these things before they grew too big or too deep in prognosis will be better right so the first thing with respect to prevention is who is at risk because the risk of developing a melanoma is not the same for everyone. Yeah so people who are fair complected have blonde hair especially red hair and blue or green. Eyes are at an increased risk from Elena's. Yeah I think it's like twenty times more common in white people than black people. Yeah all white people I guess. Yeah Yeah and also if you spend a lot of time in the sun or -taining booth that's not good. Yeah we're talking to you. Donald trump does he couldn't attaining booth. I thought that was just a Tan from the spray on. It might be anyway if if you've got sunburn when you were a kid or teenager that's also not good. You know every time I right now. I'm just like checking every box I just cringe. I mean growing growing up. We spent so much time at the local pool. My mom would just drop us off at ten. For Time. Warner cod same. The lifeguard lifeguard was our babysitter but anyway that wasn't good. It was fun but not good. Yeah also win. The lifeguard wasn't there we douse ourselves with ketchup. And then fall at the diving boards like we'd been shot. I still feel really guilty about that. But it was also not good in a little disturbing. No good for the soul. But we digress. There are also some heritable disorders orders and genetic mutations that ran families that's put some people at risk and Radiation therapy in childhood also. So that's not good and people who just have a lot moles that increases the risk of developing melanoma. Okay so that brings up a question. If you're somebody that has a lot of moles. How can we tell them? Melanoma from Benign Neva or a normal old mole. What is melanoma look like? Well there are some characteristics that can help us tell good from bad but before we get into those we should probably say see. That doctors aren't really very good at predicting good from bad. I mean we're better than a crap. Shoot you mean better than fifty fifty right but even dermatologists the folks that look at these things all the time. I'm only get it right about seventy percent of the time so means that means if you're a good dermatologists you're still be removing normals. Pretty often right so anyway. There are a couple of tricks they teach you in Moscow to help you get it right one being the ABCD rule. Okay let's see if we can remember that far back as stands for a symmetry if the mole is asymmetric metric. That's not a good time right and be is borders. The borders are irregular. Also not good for color so lots of different colors red white blue also black and gray not good a mole should be just one homogeneous color right not a variety just read is okay just blues okay but not various colors then. D is diameter if the mole is six millimetres wide greater gus worrisome and finally which stands for evolve if you've had them all for years and then suddenly it starts to changing color shape size. Whatever north boy no moles should not evolve? Yeah they should remain uninvolved evolved. Yes also let's not forget. The Ugly Duckling will or one of these things is not like the other rule exactly so if someone has a lot of moles and they all look alike except for one. Maybe that one isn't just a mole and the ones that do look like just them all could also pretend that the potential is there that they could be something. It's very rare but you know we're not saying we're not diagnosing every normal here if it doesn't meet these criteria are not hard and fast. Yes that's true okay. So now everybody out there. Listening has stripped down birthday suit in his examining themselves with magnifying glass. Thanks for the mental energy me my pleasure but the thing is dermatologists are really working to improve public awareness of skin cancers I including melanomas true for good reason over the past twenty to thirty years a number of cases of melanoma has just skyrocketed in fact the number of invasive melanoma Mama cases has doubled from nineteen eighty to two thousand eleven which is scary because these are later stage melanomas the ones with a bad prognosis. Yeah but here's the deal. Most people think this is due to increased diagnosis from screening not a true increase in the number of cases. Well then we have a problem. I mean if the number of cases week diagnosed has doubled old because we're doing a better job screaming than we should see a corresponding decrease in mortality. Exactly but that's not what's happening. Mortality has decreased only a very little bit certainly not close. Goes to what you would expect with such a huge jump in diagnoses. And here's the other thing. The United States Preventative Services Task Force the USPS T.F. The the folks at review the body of research on a topic to see what the scientists telling us. These folks don't recommend screening. Let me repeat that they don't recommend screening. There's just not enough evidence evidence to say it really works so we're diagnosing more and more melanomas but it's not really affecting mortality. People are dying almost as much as before right and this is something. We're starting to see fairly early regularly and medicine. These days across many specialties We want to believe it. Screening the general population for cancers works. But this may not always be the case. Yes yes so the risks of not screening. We get you'll miss a cancer if it's early enough to do something about it but the risks of screening or not as well known or appreciated right and we've talked about this on previous podcast screen and can lead to false positives unnecessary procedures increased cost to patients inside in general anxiety pain suffering. All those things get so maybe we need to not necessarily screen more people but screen the right people right screen people who have a higher risk of the disease than the general population. Okay but it's not all doom and gloom in fact there's some really good news out there about MELANOMAS. There is for one. The number of melanomas diagnosed in young people is going down. We're seeing it less and less and young folks not exactly sure why this is happening. Maybe it's due to increased emphasis on prevention. I mean I was out there with baby oil on my kids. Were not out there with baby. Yeah so there's there's a big difference right there yeah. Meeting more people stayed out of the sun or covered up. More people wearing sunscreen. That kind of thing. Yeah I slathered sunscreen on my kids way more than my parents ever did for me. I was religious about a real then still there were a few cents sunburns in their same. Because we're so pale but well. I'm wondering if you've been getting questions from friends and family lately about the safety of Sunscreen because of that study the FDA publish this yeah right so this is a study that showed chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed systemically Klay levels at the FDA would normally require choir phase one through three testing before approving exactly. So here's the thing we have no idea what these chemicals are up to. And our body wants to gibbs or maybe they're up to nothing they're totally harmless more. Maybe not we just don't know but we do know that using sunscreen prevents skin cancer sir. That's not in doubt so we need more studies. That what I hear you saying. We need more studies to figure out what's going on. But until then dermatologists are recommending. Continued it to use sunscreen because the benefits are so great. Yeah and the risks are basically unknown. If you're really freaked out about it you can use zinc oxide based or titanium oxide Bay sunscreens trains. Those aren't absorbed. They just sit on the top of the skin right there barriers. But don't stop protecting yourself from the Sun. We knew the benefits to some protection. So keep up the good work mom and

Cancer Mortality FDA Cell Carcinoma Donald Trump Sunburn Diving Elena Moscow Radiation United States Preventative Ser Gibbs Usps
Predict the Future with these Megatrends from Rohit Bhargava

The Small Business Radio Show

08:15 min | 1 year ago

Predict the Future with these Megatrends from Rohit Bhargava

"This is the time of year that I make my predictions for small a business having a good run for about five years in a row. I've been way off these last few years. My next guest. The person that's always knows what the next trend is reheat. bhargava is the founder of the Non Obvious Company and as an entertaining original and non boring keynoter on Innovation Trust. He previously spend and fifteen years in leadership roles at two renowned AD agencies. Lebron Ogilvy Rohe's Wall Street Journal bestselling author of six books and book by deliver rickie notes in thirty two countries around the world. He's a popular adjunct professor of storytelling at Georgetown University. His new book out this year is called. Non Obvious Mega trends real heat. Welcome back to the show thank you. It's always awesome to talk to you. It's been three and a half years. I looked it up. I know I can't believe leave it. I miss a lot of trends so every year you publish a book with the last nine years you published book on non obvious trends but this year you say this is not MBA mega trends and visited last one. Why are you stopping after it selling so much? Well I think one reason is because I wanted to WHO Head out on top style like one of the big reasons so It was it was kind of time. You know it's been a decade. I've been working on this project for After ten years and every year I do neutra and predictions and it felt like twenty twenty was kind of a significant moment in all of our lives right. If we're doing things differently we're thinking about the world differently. Were kind of projecting forward. It was sort of a perfect time for me to think about how to write this a little bit differently. I'd say twenty twenty and last thing I turned around it was like the year. Two thousand is just crazy the on line that said Twenty twenty was twenty years ago but nineteen eighty was twenty years ago. Exactly exactly so I want to call it a couple of your mega trends. The one you talk about his `gendering you say that traditional gender divisions are replaced with more fluid understanding of gender identity forcing a reevaluation. How we see one another I think for those who are of my generation which is really you know the boomers? We have a hard time with this thing called engendering. Why isn't important in business? Gender used to be this pretty simple Sort of answer to a question right. It was either this or that. It was the second question or the question we asked on a form And and it straightforward and now it's become kind of a statement for a lot of people This is how I wanted to be seen in the world and so you know we we get hung up a lot on this idea of gender and I don't understand understand it and it seems kinda strange and thinking about it but if if we put it in terms of identity as in we all just want to be understood and addressed in the way that we see ourselves you know that makes sense wants to people like I get that you know and so I think for small business owners and for any of us one of the things that we need to think about is are we unintentionally driving people away by just assuming that they fit into the boxers that we put them in so is it another F- for small businesses. We think of as a another way to define persona a buyer's persona and now gender becomes a flower our or a non gender and becomes a factor. Yeah I mean that is that is one piece of it you know. It's the customer personas but the other is just these kind of Unintentional things we might do drive someone away right. I mean. How important is it really for you to ask that sort of question for example In an interaction right. I mean depending on what you're selling you may not necessarily need to know that like if somebody's interested in what you have to sell and you have a great product or you have a great service and you're trying to get in front of somebody buddy like don't lose their attention because you're unintentionally offending them. I thought it was really interesting when I think this with your lift or Uber where you go on and you can set your preferred pronouns so again that is more personalized service and the driver doesn't insult someone unintentionally. Yeah this basic sailed right. I mean anybody who's he's gone through. Sales trading is like oh address customer by name like asking their name and and use their name because everyone loves hearing their name and I think this is a reflection of that too like people want to be addressed with correct Pronoun and yeah. I've been getting emails from people who in their email signature says my preferred pronoun is and they tell you right and I know a lot of a lot of people say yeah well I just don't get it. I'm thinking to myself. It's not for you to get. It's the way they want to be identified and And I think that that that is a great is a great point right. I mean I I think we do kind of get hung up on this. I don't get it I don't understand it You don't have to necessarily understand if someone says my name is so and so you. You don't always know how to pronounce it right. So you ask you do your best and you move on right absolutely well. megatrend number three talk about instant knowledge as as we consume bite-size is knowledge on demand we benefit Hillary more quickly but risk for getting the value of mastery and wisdom. This scenario that I'm really concerned about that. People want instant knowledge but no one's is willing to go deep. has that really affect us. I think there's a couple of ways I mean it's A. It's a great example of a mega trend that it isn't inherently positive or negative. I mean look if I can go onto youtube and I can learn how to fix a leak in my toilet myself like that's awesome. I mean that's great. That's good for everybody What's bad is if all we have is that type type of knowledge and no one ever believes that? It's worth spending that extra time to become a master to become an expert. So how does it affect us in business as we're trying to attract customs that's one of the biggest things one of the biggest tenants of content marketing. You know which I know you talk about. Is We want to educate our customers. Because we're the ones providing the Education Gatien. We're building trust and building credibility and I think this fits perfectly into that because when people want instant knowledge like who do they get it from right. And if you've got for example a financial advisory refer and you're trying to educate your client what they should do with retirement and they're going online to watching videos from someone else. Educating them you know what are they gonNA think right. They're gonNA start thinking well. Why isn't the financial advisor? Educating me why do I feel dumb when I walk into that meeting with my adviser and I don't feel dumb after these videos. Maybe I should make a change. Do you think there's still a place to help people with mastering wisdom because there are some people in Emily that always want to go deeper. Of course yeah I mean I think that that the nice thing about instant knowledge. It's it can be a gateway to mastery and wisdom. Look I can go online and I can watch An acting class with Henry Winkler you know or I can learn how to play the Banjo. Which Steve Martin and those was a great man I'm GonNa but am? I going to be a professional banjo player. Maybe not but that's okay because I can start with that and if I do find something that I love something that I'm passionate about then I'll spend the time because because the thing with mastery and wisdom is for a lot of people we become masters and experts in the things we love it and that's not going to change because that's a human desire in centers in me. Because when I I used to own one thousand nine hundred ninety three Ford Falcon. It didn't have any seat belts in it because they weren't required at the Time Warner and drive it. I need to have seat belt so I go online. I'm thinking how am I going to solve these seatbelts. I wonder if anybody's nobody's ever done it. And of course there was probably six places where you could watch videos of install belt nine hundred sixty three or four falcon. It's like who would've known Yup because the thing about Expertise is and when we learn about things from people like that. They've become an expert because they're passionate about it and one of the things they WANNA do. They WANNA share that expertise Jason. That's really cool that we have instant access to that. I love your megatrend number four. You call revivalism overwhelmed by technology. Complexity people seek out a simpler experienced. I often established and remember more trustworthy. Time that's kind of like a complex statement. I think some people are looking for a place that is simpler but wasn't really more trustworthy the time or just only a couple of sources who were trusted. I think maybe a little of both And I think maybe we remember the past a little more romantically than and we should. But I think that revival isn't was a really interesting one because what it meant to me. And the implication for any small business was sometimes this thing that we consider to be bad this word that we consider it to be bad which has downgraded actually might be good because a lot of times what we think about when we think about downgrade is that it's less optimal but a downgraded experience for example is something that maybe is more humid. I mean there was a great story that I wrote about a grocery brand in the UK the created. Are

Twenty Twenty Non Obvious Company Lebron Ogilvy Rohe Wall Street Journal Georgetown University Adjunct Professor Founder Time Warner Innovation Trust Rickie Youtube Henry Winkler Steve Martin UK Falcon Hillary Advisor Emily Jason
U.S. companies force workers to train foreign replacements

The Personal Computer Radio Show

02:00 min | 1 year ago

U.S. companies force workers to train foreign replacements

"At and T.. Sticks it to American tech workers forcing them to train foreign replacements since at and T.'s reportedly laying thousands of American workers after forcing them to train the foreign replacements who have been imported through the H.. One Visa Program. At and T.. In Richardson Self on public spectrum and yet the Goal Nafta American workers by forcing them to train the H.. One be replacement this is unacceptable. The H. One B. Program is completely broken and must be changed disbanded as it is not addressing shing shortages in the job market. It is supplanting qualified Americans. It is particularly ironic that. At and T.. is engaging this blatant abuse of American workers while they are dependent on publicly on spectrum in order to build a five gene network if any company should be a good corporate citizen it it is a t and t the SEC. Should investigate whether at and T. is meeting their responsibilities under the recent at and T. Time Warner merger and should should be blocked from additional spectrum purchases based on the egregious abuse of immigration laws every year more than one hundred thousand farm workers of brought brought to the United States on the H. One B. Visa there are about six hundred and fifty thousand H. One B. Visa Foreign Workers in the United States at any given moment when Americans are often laid off in the process and forced to train the foreign replacements more than eighty five thousand Americans annually potentially lose their jobs offs of Foreign Labor through the H. One B. Visa Program despite claims by the big business lobby American workers who have been replaced by H. One B. Follow workers say there is no shortage of talented and qualified citizens for high paying white collar jobs current and former. At and T.. Employee said that they they are being laid off after being forced to train the H. One B. Foreign replacements.

Visa Foreign Workers United States T. T. Time Warner SEC T..
HBO Max launches in May 2020 for $14.99 a month

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

HBO Max launches in May 2020 for $14.99 a month

"Another streaming service scheduled to debut next year eighteen to you says its war course streaming service H. B. O. Max will launch in may it'll cost fifteen dollars a month the same prices HBO now the company officials predict many users will switch to H. B. O. Max because there's more to watch like friends and Sesame Street the service plans to launch fifty original series in the first year part of a two billion dollar initial investment AT and T. which spent eighty one billion dollars to acquire Time Warner thinks HBO Max will be profitable in twenty twenty three Brian Clark ABC news

H. B. O. Max HBO Time Warner AT Brian Clark Eighty One Billion Dollars Two Billion Dollar Fifteen Dollars
Red Sox president: Keeping Mookie, J.D. 'difficult'

Ron St. Pierre

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Red Sox president: Keeping Mookie, J.D. 'difficult'

"The red Sox say they're not ruling out keeping on fielder's Mookie Betts and JD Martinez team president Sam Kennedy says it's going to be difficult but there is a way for them to retain both stars and remain under the competitive balance tax threshold Boston have the highest payroll in the Major League Baseball the last couple of years and of course the owners John Henry and Time Warner last week said they want to get under that two hundred and eight million dollar cap good luck with

Red Sox Fielder Mookie Betts Jd Martinez President Trump Sam Kennedy John Henry Major League Time Warner Eight Million Dollar

How I Built This

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"So what are the guiding principles of creativity is that some of you very best ideas. Come out of sheer frustration products like honest tea or cliff bar olders dyson these all came about because their founders couldn't find the beverages or energy bars or shoes or or vacuum cleaners that they wanted so they invented them but in the case of Tristan Walker. I think it's safe to say that he didn't just start from a place of mild frustration. He actually started from a place of being fed up even angry because for most of his life he had felt completely league ignored totally overlooked whenever he walked into the shaving. I'll drugstore virtually all the big shaving brands were making products that worked well on men with relatively straight hair but tristen couldn't find a high quality razor that worked on his curly facial hair without leaving razor bumps olivarez neck Kajol line and he knew that like him many African American men were dealing with the exact same problem so he decided to design bevill a shaving system with a simple single blade razor that was easy on his face and he wanted everything about the product to look and feel great not like the dusty boxes of shaving products for African American men that we seem to be on the bottom shelves at the drugstore and his ambition to build a black owned and led consumer Marand as big as Johnson Johnson or proctor and gamble but of course when I tried to raise money from all those VC firms on sand hill road in Silicon Valley and he got a lot of knows but eventually he was able to launch his company with a razor some shaving cream but of oil and brush and over the past five years his brand has grown to include more than thirty specialized hair and beauty products for men and women which are now sold and lots of big retailers lers across the country a few weeks ago. Tristan sat down to tell me how he did it in front of a live audience at the Lincoln Theater in Washington. DC tristen Walker Central. I'll take it so let's start. Let's start at the beginning. Tell me about about out your childhood knew you grew up in Queens where I like to describe. It is a bit of the Rosa grew from concrete story. I grew up in Queens New York projects. It's Welfare Bouts of homelessness that sort of stuff right and I realized very early at one goal in life and as as wealthy as possible as quickly as possible Salaam. I realized three ways to do it. I was to be an actor athlete that didn't work second second was to work on Wall Street that didn't work in the last entrepreneurship and then thank goodness. I came to that realization. We were a little boy. A A your dad died. He was killed killed and you grew up with an older brother and your mom. What did your mom do yet for work so oh my mom worked three jobs mainly New York City Housing Authority Administrative Assistant? She spent some time working for Time Warner Cable and she did some retail all at the same time within seven days. I don't know how she did it. She did it. Thank goodness for her. It was not easy but she persevered and as a result of I think her perseverance good fortune beam I graduate college in my family and she she really in what what do you remember about like your neighborhood growing up as a kid I mean would did you do. Did you add in do much because I couldn't do much like my father was killed. When I was three years old? I don't remember too much about him other than the fact that he was killed when I was three years old which is a little bit telling to Kinda type of environment that I did grow up in so you know I lived probably the first six seven years of my life live in Jamaica Queens New York forty projects in the time I turned around seven years old. We moved to flushing Queens. Another project can development and it was much of the same right. My mother was like you're going to be the one you're not gonNa go through this stuff very disciplined. Stay home. Get Your studies and you're not going outside. When I snuck snuck outside? She caught me. I got in a lot of trouble but that was really kind of my life right. Get to school get home. Do you work repeat and you know that discipline actually Kinda got me to wearing them. Now school easy for you has a kid yeah. I was a good student because the discipline that was inspired me I always excelled right. I tended to be at least up until high school anyway at or near the top of my class you know and I kinda slow down when I say that stuff because by the time I got to high school. I realized I didn't even know what a verb was right. I wouldn't do this entire time. All the way up until my high school years doing really really well at the top of my class not even knowing what verb now and that sort of thing was as a teenager you ended up going to this really elite private boarding school hotchkiss in Connecticut the way I like to describe posh kisses is the first time I got to see how the other half lived. I went to school literally rockefellers Ford's right and I learned a couple of things first name mattered to being wealthy wasn't same as being rich and the last and probably the most important was I can compete with each and every one of them while while while I didn't know Oh what a verb was I learned and by the end of my four years they're you know on a roll like that. Sort of thing you know is then absolutely just wonderful experience for me but transformative in a little bit different from how I grew up was it was the transition for you when you got there because you were like fourteen years old. I've been living away from home since I was thirteen fourteen years old and were the first few months at hard for you. academically we get to the school and I realize I don't even have a computer and you know all of my other classmates had computers that sort of thing and I went to leave as the English professor who is my adviser at the time and I remember he took me to this basement. We're all used textbooks are and then he was old compaq like Presidio L. Computer that we had the like hall out and take it to my room so academically. It was very tough because I wasn't equipped with the tools to compete but over the years accelerating so you fish you go to Stony Brook University New York to study economics. Most most students don't necessarily know what they're gonNa do but did you have a sense of what you want to pursue their and what you thought you would do after I mean I was always thinking about the after I wanted to get wealthy yeah I was pretty singular in that help very singular in that hope and overtime that's kind of morphed and changed and the things that are important Ed Morrison changed but I knew I was very very very focused on how to get there and Wall Street was the next greatest option. All this silicon valley stuff at new idea about my world was New England so you're thinking do this degree and I'll go into finance plows e- economics is the closest degree we had at Stony Brook again to Wall Street Okay and in between my first and second year of university I got an internship and Lehman Brothers back office halfway through I I said I want to try some of this front office stuff so I left that enjoined trading desk at the time just observing so when you graduate so you you went actually went to work for Leman and then as a traitor and then everything and eventually JP Morgan in that time at that time time period. Did you still think this is what I should be doing. This is my sort of path to the worst years of my life. This is two thousand and five when I joined the company and as a traitor. Your job is to make money

Tristan Walker Queens Time Warner Cable Queens New York Jamaica Queens New York Stony Brook University New Yor Facial Hair Lincoln Theater New York Johnson Johnson Washington Silicon Valley New England Walker Central Ed Morrison Ford Lehman Brothers Jp Morgan
Trump says it's 'great news' activist investor involved with AT&T because CNN is 'bad for the USA'

Chris Plante

00:59 min | 2 years ago

Trump says it's 'great news' activist investor involved with AT&T because CNN is 'bad for the USA'

"President trump has been very critical of CNN now he's praising news this morning trump is that there may be a buyout of C. N. N.'s parent company AT and T. there's an activist investor Elliott management's thinking about taking over AT and T. trump tweeted great news that an activist investor is now involved with A. T. and T. as the owner of very low rating CNN perhaps they will now put a stop to all of the fake news emanating from its non credible anchors of course CNN has been very critical of trump in their coverage Christine Romans with more on this. Ellie had management proposal for AT and T. and a letter to the board Eliot call Time Warner quote spectacular company then questioned eighteen tease a strategy here's a language eighteen T. has yet to articulate a clear strategic rationale for why eighteen T. needs own Time Warner well it's too soon to tell whether a TT can create value a Time Warner we remain cautious on the benefits of this

T. Trump Time Warner CNN AT Elliott Management Christine Romans President Trump A. T. Ellie Eliot C. N. N.
Will HBO Max work and will consumers pay?

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

05:10 min | 2 years ago

Will HBO Max work and will consumers pay?

"I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as bounty of the Hollywood reporter and Matt. We've known that this industry is disrupted and Warner brothers and Warner media. Its parent are sort of the ultimate case study. You're right now of what is going on. Warner Brothers was the premier studio in this industry for so many years and being the chairman of Warner Brothers was the biggest deal imaginable and they have now announced that an Sarnoff who who comes from the B._B._C. America America and has really good experience and is very well regarded but is completely almost completely unknown in Hollywood is going to be the chairman of Warner brothers and at the same time the Warner media is announcing in the launch of this H._B._O.. Oh Max which is the streaming service that they have been building toward and they are pulling programming from all over the place to service this thing. This is a huge priority. So first of all your people were going to have to look at that they do. I need this will this H._B._O.. Max Idea Work and at the same time within the industry. There's a question of well gee. What does this mean for Warner Brothers? I mean is Warner. Brothers now going to be subservient to the streaming service and does being chairman of Warner Brothers really have any kind of clout and prestige or are you just going to be taking orders effectively from Bob Greene Blah who runs the streaming service as well as these other cable channels and H._B._O.. He reports to <hes> John Stanky the. Head of Warner media as does and Sarnoff but it's not so clear what it all means in terms of who has power this really does represent a sign of the Times entertainment because when A._T.. And T. bought the Time Warner assets it was very clear that the crown on jewel was not warner brothers. It was H._B._O.. Because they could leverage H._B._O.. To create a global streaming service that will hopefully in their words compete with net flix and that's what every conglomerate is trying to do right now. They're trying to leverage with their assets are create new stuff and go head to head with Netflix so you're seeing warner media pullback a lot of the content that was out there most notably friends which has been streaming on Netflix is now going. Going to switch over to this new H._B._O.. Max they're gonNA start doing with a bunch of other shows on the C._W.. On Turner on the Turner Networks Like T._N._T.. And T._B._S. Some C._N._N.. Content this is all going to be funneled into this H._B._O.. Bill mack streaming service will be pitched as an add on to H._B._O.. Or as its own thing a little bit more expensive than the traditional H._B._O.. Costs currently and that's where we're at right now because comcast is doing the same thing with the N._B._C.. Universal shows like the office just pulling it away from net flicks doing their own thing. Disney is launching their own thing. We're going to get into a very stratified ecosystem where the streaming services are tops and the contents suppliers are going to be the studios that they own and. Hopefully others they think I mean has made a Fortune Selling T._v.. Shows the T._v.. Division has been lead you know Big Bang theory two and a half men all of these shows in different networks very profitably and enjoying all of the reaping all of the rewards that followed followed and they just sold a huge project to Netflix Sandman so they're still looking to get that cash coming in the door obviously the I don't even know how you sort it out and I think more importantly people in the industry. I don't know how you sort it out if I'm making a T._v.. Show and Warner Brothers is making that show at what goes to H._B._O.. Max what goes somewhere else. What do I sell to C._B._S.? A._B._C. or or Hulu or whatever so I think it's it's almost like this dizzying situation within the industry of figuring. Bring out who is going to emerge victorious and how these things are going to be sorted and that's that's a potential big change for Warner Brothers which as you mentioned has been this people say there are the arms dealer of Hollywood in the sense that they have sold everybody but if you look at what Disney is doing Disney is very purposefully holding back a lot of their stuff and they are trying to create an ecosystem around this new Disney plus streaming service that will be the one stop shop for Disney. Now Disney has a very strong consumer rebrand and people know Disney and they want Disney oriented content. It's not quite the same for Warner Brothers. They don't have that brand name they just you wouldn't the average person on the street wouldn't even know that one brothers produced two and a half men yet. It's probably the biggest revenue generator that the company has so I just I think it'd be very interesting to see how warner's approaches this ecosystem and who they sell to and who they don't and from the consumer standpoint of course the question is how much does this cost they said it will.

Warner Brothers Warner Media Time Warner Warner Disney Hollywood Chairman Netflix Sarnoff Kim Masters Comcast John Stanky Reporter Hulu Matt Turner Bill Mack America Bob Greene
"time warner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on KCRW

"Long dot or you're listening to KCRW this is morning edition I'm Kim masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Matt Bellamy of The Hollywood Reporter and Matt we've known that you know this industry is disrupted or Warner brothers and Warner media it's parent are sort of the ultimate case study right now of who he is calling on Warner brothers was the premier studio in this industry for so many years and being the chairman of Warner brothers was the biggest deal imaginable and they have now announced that M. Sarnoff who who comes from the BBC America and has really good experiences very well regarded but is completely almost completely unknown in Hollywood is going to be the chairman of Warner brothers and at the same time Warner media is announcing the launch of this HBO Max which is the streaming service that they have been building toward and if they are pulling programming from all over the place it to service this thing this is a huge priority so first of all your people are gonna have to look at that and say do I need this demo and will this H. B. O. Max idea work and at the same time within the industry there's a question of what she what does this mean for Warner brothers I mean if Warner brothers now going to be subservient to the streaming service and does being chairman of Warner brothers really have any kind of clout and prestige or or are you just going to be taking orders effectively from Bob Greenblatt who runs the streaming service as well as these other cable channels and HBO he reports to John Stanky the head of Warner media as does Ansari off but it's not so clear what it all means in terms of who has power this really does represent a sign of the times and entertainment because when eighteen he bought the Time Warner assets it was very clear that the crown jewel was not Warner brothers it was HBO because they could leverage HBO to create a global streaming service that will hopefully in their words complete with Netflix and that's what every conglomerate is try and to do right now they're trying to leverage with their assets are create new stuff and go head to head with Netflix so you're seeing Warner media pull back a lot of the content that was out there most notably friends which is been streaming on Netflix is now going to switch over to this new HBO Max they're gonna start doing with a bunch of other shows on the CW on Turner on the Turner networks like TNT and TBS some CNN contact this is all going to be funneled into this H. B. O. Max streaming service which will be patched as an add on to H. B. O. or as its own thing a little bit more expensive than the traditional HBO cost currently and that's where we're at right now because Comcast is doing the same thing with the NBC universal shows like the office pulling it away from Netflix doing their own thing Disney is launching their own thing we're going to get into a very stratified ecosystem where the streaming services are tops and the contents suppliers are going to be the studios that they own and hopefully others they think I mean worse is made a fortune selling TV shows the with TV division is been a lead you know Big Bang theory two and a half men all of the shows and different networks very profitably and enjoying all of that reaping all of the rewards that followed and they just sold a huge project to Netflix Sandman so they're still looking to get that cash coming in the door obviously I don't I don't even know how you sorted out and I think more importantly people in the industry don't how you sort it out if I'm making a TV show and Warner brothers making that show what goes to the HBO MAX what goes somewhere else what do I sell to CBS or ABC or or Hulu or whatever so I think it's it's almost like this dizzying situation within the industry of figuring out who is going to emerge victorious and how these things are going to be sort yeah that's a that's a potential big change for Warner brothers which as you mentioned it has been this you know people say they're the arms dealer Hollywood in the sense that they have sold everybody but if you look at what Disney is doing this he is very purposefully holding back a lot of their stuff and they are trying to create an ecosystem around this new Disney plus streaming service that will be the one stop shop for Disney now Disney has a very strong consumer brand and people know Disney and they want Disney oriented content it's not quite the same for Warner brothers they don't have that brand name they just you you wouldn't the average person on the street wouldn't even know that one brothers produced two and a half men yeah it's probably the biggest revenue generator that the company has so I I just I think that it was very interesting to see how Warner's approaches this ecosystem and who they sell to and who they don't think from the consumer standpoint of course the question is how much does this cost they said it will be more than just a H. B. O. subscription streaming subscription of fifteen a month fifteen dollars a month you know the streaming services are gonna add up if you if you want this that or the other if you want the office if you want friends if you want the stranger things those are three different subscriptions thank you Matt thank you that's Matt Bellamy editorial director of the Hollywood reporter he joins me this Monday at one thirty on the business I'm Kim masters and this is the Hollywood break down and you are listening to morning edition here on KCRW guess.

KCRW Kim masters Matt Bellamy The Hollywood Reporter Hollywood fifteen dollars
FCC, AT And DOJ discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

01:55 min | 2 years ago

FCC, AT And DOJ discussed on This Week In Google

"Back to team mobile and sprint, you got the chairman of the FCC all hot and bothered. He's excited, you got the DOJ ready to sue. At basically people are saying it's a push fifty fifty we don't know what's going to happen. I'd like to see a merger us t mobile. I think sprint is pretty much useless in our area. Be nice. Nice to see a merge. Especially if they live up to that pledge to get ninety seven percent five G coverage in three years. That would be awesome. You don't think they'll do it? Well, even if they did do it, you know, there's no guarantee on pricing. There's no guarantee on the quality of the network. There's, there's a lot of things. It's one thing to say building something out. It's another thing to say building something else. It's good in coverage doesn't mean quality speeds coverage, just means you can get a bar possibly there. You remember AT and T and Time Warner the merger, and they told everybody that wants that merger happens. We are going to hire thousands of new employees. What happened? They fired fired was twenty seven thousand five hundred jobs. So it just shows you could promise regulators, whatever you want, and you can actually lie to the kids. See you cannot lie to the SEC. So I always find it interesting to look at what companies say, in their, you know, their ten ks their stock events with the FCC sorry SEC, because the FCC, they can just do whatever they want AT, and T promised seven thousand new jobs. Actually that wasn't the merger that was to get a tax break, I apologize. They cut twenty th that was for the big federal tax break. We did get. And you remember they, they gave the one thousand or three thousand dollar bonuses to people as part of the town.

FCC AT DOJ Chairman SEC Time Warner Three Thousand Dollar Ninety Seven Percent Three Years Five G
"time warner" Discussed on X96

X96

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on X96

"Remember these supplies somewhat can go back in Time Warner. And we also get a look at cerebral in this one. So this is the first time they've gone in full X men pretty much Aubrey clauses in still. Yes, she is all good. And she looks terrific. So that's June twenty four th for the final season of legion. All right, Disney because they own everything they had to kinda reschedule release dates so juggling. Yeah. So the good news is we found out when the new Star Wars movies are coming not what they're called or anything like that. We just have release dates. So that's the good news in all g the bad news is they pushed back that avatar sequel about a year now. Get ready for that clamoring for I guess, I just never got the whole avatar people upset that it's pushed back. The argument is the argument for avatar is it's the number one money making movie of all time. Yeah. But do people love it. Like, I can't believe gotta wait a whole other year for the people. People are tired of me saying this. But the best thing about avatar is that ride down in Florida was awesome. It was one of the best attractions. I've ever been say was unbearably stupid. We got more casting for Marvel's the attorneys movie on the way, we got the guy from game of thrones. Let's see who did he play Robb stark on game of thrones. Richard Madden is in talks to star along with engine. Lena Jolie and Kumal Johnny in the new marvel movie the turtles, Ed, Ed brash. You're going to have to learn to play video games because there's a John wick video game in the works. I know you'll want to avenge the puppy events the puppy in the video game. And then there's this final item Roland Emmerick is going to direct a new Sifi disaster move. That's too bad called moon fall in which the moon is not from its orbit and sent on a collision course towards earth naturally. A rag tag team launches a last ditch mission to the moon hoping to solve the mystery and save the earth from arm annihilation is just so orgin his Bruce Willis vailable. He seems perfect. I me personally. I don't wanna miss a thing. Are. I had. Kind of my head while avenue Ogden close between twenty first and twenty fifth streets for the hundred fiftieth anniversary celebration of the golden spike. Find alternate routes through downtown Ogden brogue repair at the intersection of v west fourth north in bountiful. This is from a water main break last night. Whether you're talking fist fish pelicans escaping to a tropical rainforest or encountering birds summer camp. You'll inspire your curiosity everyday at Tracy aviary located inside.

Roland Emmerick Time Warner Ed brash avenue Ogden Aubrey Disney Richard Madden Ogden John wick Bruce Willis Marvel Robb stark Tracy aviary Florida Lena Jolie Sifi Kumal Johnny twenty fifth
What To Expect From Alphabet's Earnings

WSJ What's News

03:29 min | 2 years ago

What To Expect From Alphabet's Earnings

"Our main story this morning alphabets are names, Google's parent company is set to release numbers after the bell today and for investors. There will be a whole host of questions from what the company is doing to police the spread of misinformation on YouTube to how it's planning on combat in competition from Amazon Charlie Turner has been speaking to our alphabet reporter, rob Copeland about what we can expect. Rob investors will be watching the performance of Google's YouTube division, but financially that's a tough chore. Isn't it exactly you know, YouTube is really a blackbox inside Google? The company wraps its earnings inside the legacy search business and the search businesses one of the most spectacular profitable businesses in the history of the earth. So it's very tough to see how YouTube is doing well how much liability does you to face because of events like streaming the New Zealand massacres that putting a damper is that turning people off of YouTube. Definitely the last thing. Google wants is headline risk. And that's exactly what YouTube gives it right now. They have really tough bargain to strike when there is a big news event like the shooting at the mosque in New Zealand. They could shut down New Zealand, for instance on YouTube, but they would lose a tremendous amount of money in advertising. And frankly, they might not even stop the proliferation of the video. I'm curious how much competition does YouTube face from other streaming services, or is it still the dominant? One overall, it is the dominant one in certain categories and for certain types of videos, but Bernstein's faces incredible competition from twitch for people making videos on themselves playing video games, it has a new product YouTube TV product, which would like to compete with Time Warner and apple TV. And quite frankly, hasn't caught fire at all. And you write that Google doesn't break out you tubes finances. So that metric is tough to figure out anyway, exactly and analysts and investors have begged for more information and the company has shown no. No indication that it wants to get into that. What about Amazon and the competition from there? Rob the ladder is impacting Google's dominance advertising. And search isn't exactly they face a truly existential threat from Amazon that we really couldn't even imagined a year or two ago consumers are starting to go directly to Amazon to search for things if they want a Hanes t shirts that used to put it in Google and Google could sell you ads on it. If you don't go to Google, and you go to Amazon, I it is just a death for alphabet. So investors will basically be king on those two things. Can we expect any surprises? This is a company that very rarely surprises. They rarely give out really any interesting guidance as well. The thing is search is so big that it can mask larger larger problems one thing that investors have been looking at is the margin, which which fell last quarter a little more than many analysts were expecting. And it's right now at twenty one percent, which is a spectacular business over time. Time that should fall. But if that falls again this quarter and just another quarter. That would be definitely surprise. I don't know if you know the answer to this. But I'll ask it. Anyway, you know, it's one of the FANG stocks. How's it doing in relation to the others? It's doing okay this year. It's about in line with the market. It wasn't doing. Well last year. I think it actually fell last year. So there is a lot of opportunity here. But the question is is this a growth company anymore, or is this the beginning of a winter for an old, man? Wall Street Journal reporter, rob Copeland.

Youtube Google Amazon Rob Copeland New Zealand Reporter Wall Street Journal Charlie Turner Fang Time Warner Bernstein Apple Hanes T Twenty One Percent
"time warner" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"And then, you know, she left spectrum of Time Warner the time whatever it was. And that could be the kind of thing that could all of this is very believable. I also believe I never heard that kind of story about Lucas an athlete is a person whatever it feels very out of character. But I don't know what happened. And so we're all in a position. Now, I think rightly where we have learned and been taught to. Believe stories to not say, well, she didn't report it right away. Must not have happened that there are thousands of reasons why women don't ever say anything about any of these things. But in individual cases, it can become tricky and heart. I am again don't want to don't want to do a disservice either party. So I hope the truth comes out because some it, obviously if this really happened and she's traumatized by it. It's awful. It is the worst. If it didn't happen and Luke's being accused of something you didn't do that's equally bad. So hopefully, the truth out if we'll go conversation of what happens if they're both sort of they're both two versions of the same both. They're telling the truth. And and and so only time will tell but that is the latest on that investigation. The lakers. Meanwhile, are interviewing coaches and reports have it that they're interviewing Tyron Lou for a second time today. And then there's money Williams who may have his choice of at least two and possibly three jobs will lay all that out for you next Brian Kinski in for Mace. I'm john. Ireland ESPN LA..

Time Warner Brian Kinski Tyron Lou Lucas lakers Ireland Luke Williams LA
"time warner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"There. Getting through the machine to stop it. Don't do it. Carol don't do it game. Stop shares doubt about seven and a half percent here in the after hours stocks been under pressure this year overall, let's get into the quarter because the company just came out with earnings and also talked about guidance or lack thereof Matthew Kaneman, entertainment and vertical. Specific software analyst at Bloomberg intelligence. He's our go to guy with all things gaming Matenaer. Bloomberg. Basically say he's our video. That's a long title, Mr. Samat takas, walk us through the quarter. How should we as investors? Look at it. The numbers are messy, and that's what's creating confusion because they sold the business. They were trying to diversify away from game. So they bought a mobile phone reseller because why not? Well, yeah. Well, it didn't help that the mobile market got really saturated really fast in the US you've seen. What's happened to the iphone sales? They were the largest authorize AT and T reseller not owned by AT and T so AT and T subscriber trends weekend direct TV got week eighteen focused on buying Time Warner right phone sales. Got sluggish all that made the business not good to be in. So they sold. It actually got a good price. So they got like seven hundred fifty million dollars cash. So let's get because the balance sheets cleaned up. They have net cash position now on the balance sheet. They got a couple of Bama charities coming. So for the problem is those numbers that business comes out of revenue out of profit. So the numbers aren't really like for like with what people were expecting because he got like, wait. Okay. No. It's below this line. So it doesn't hit revenue anymore. So the numbers don't match up. And so people were kind of confused as to what he said. And so we need to hear them walk through it. And also, even though they didn't give explicit guidance for for for the next year for fiscal twenty nineteen we really need to get an understanding of what they're expecting in terms of drivers for next year. You did see though. Just let me just throw a number out. There is they did see fiscal year come sales down five to ten percent that doesn't feel good. No. But that's in line with that. You know, it's expected. I mean, the problem is we don't have good visibility to the software release late this year. But we do know that last year was really really really strong for video game software. Plus, there's not expected to be new hardware. There's rumors of new switches, but they're not going to embed that in their guidance until Nintendo confirms it, and so there's a lot of moving pieces that go into that. And so how much of this Matt is just the simple story of this is not where gamers by games anymore. They buy it online. And we've got an east sports movement that they've also been a step behind on. Is it just that simple that these guys just haven't kept up? It's not I don't know if it's so much. They haven't kept up at the market has moved away from the right? And so people were downloading games at an increasing rate. It's roughly going to be forty five percent of full game. Sales for eighth ten councils. It'll be digital downloads. This here verse forty percent last year and even up until last year game makers were still selling download codes and retail stores. So you could buy a code and then go scan it at home. But at least you would buy it in games dot Sony, just pulled all their cold's out of retail. So you're even seeing that go you're still saying to me that we're the fifty percent is still done at retail. Yeah. But that's that's a spring pie. It's declining. And it's in a keep declining. And actually, it probably will accelerate as it gets more and more saturated as people buy new consoles with more storage because the first version of the Xbox One and PS four had very little storage. So what's their business forward? I mean, you make the case to me that this is a company that in a few years apps, or maybe sooner makes no sense. We're going to have a new console cycle next year. Probably that will help them because they do very well in the console cycle. They're still the leader in market share. And they. Actually, historically. And even with the Swiss recently, they tend to have very high software attach rates to their hardware shells, which is very good. They have the pre owned business, which is very high margin. So they resell us games. They also resell hardware all of that will do well. But beyond the next console cycle. It's very hard to have visibility as to what this business looks like one thing they could do is. I've thought about this is turn the retail footprint into many sports arenas alluding to you know, just to get people in the store have a reason for them to come. But if they're trying to sell collectibles, you see my I got my blink on my badge here at Bloomberg. I got all my different bunny. Would you go? Would you go to see like a match is that what is that what you're talking about? Yeah. I would I went to a conference last week. And there was an e sports tournament there. And I watched people play Tekken, right? So what do you play in these days? So I am playing a game. And it's on my badge upper ranch and it actually ties into game. Stop because it's a game. It's available on XBox game pass, which is subscription service to games. And so I don't have to buy it. I can just play it as part of the subscription bundle. And it's all digital. Download the game. So it's not streaming still download it. But I don't have to go out and buy a game. I can just click a button, and it's like Netflix. I want wanna play this. So listen, we've got forty five fifty seconds left here. So I want to just throw in the apple component of them getting involved that something different. So what apple is doing is on the mobile side. And what I don't I'm not a big believer in Apple's value proposition. Here we need to see what kind of exclusive content. They bring to the table right now. They're pitches. Basically to summarize it here's a whole bunch of premium games that apple thinks is great. But you don't wanna pay for up front ninety nine or whatever here's a bundle of them that you weren't gonna pay for. But maybe now you'll pay subscription to play them. I don't know. I don't I don't I don't see it. Now, we need the talked about exclusive content. People developing games without looks like to see if there's value in that. And it was interesting. How little the ultimately the game stocks reacted? You would think that apple getting into the business sort of like Amazon would just freak everybody out. And ultimately, it didn't really it needs the cloud five G. There you go. Partially. But don't forget that Apple's the fifth third biggest gaming companies by revenue just by clipping commissions on the app store. I just I'm just amazed at how much is going on in the big players. Matt cantor man, we love talking to you of our Bloomberg intelligence team game. Stop shares doubt about eight percent. Let's get back to the national news.

apple Bloomberg Matt cantor Bloomberg intelligence AT Mr. Samat takas Matthew Kaneman analyst US Carol Nintendo Sony Time Warner Bama Netflix
"time warner" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on KGO 810

"Their television. Instead of the traditional television services from say cable companies though, keep in mind, most of them are still getting their internet from those same cable companies, even if they're not getting their TV services from there. So the cable companies have an incentive to keep bumping up the prices for internet services. Make up make a difference there. The other thing that's happening. Is that people are trying to decide what streaming services to get? Because there are so many so many of them some of our very narrow niches, for example, if you want live channels, there's there's there's swings. There's YouTube TV, there's direct TV. Now, there's others that are in the pipeline. If you want premium services, and you don't really care about movies because that's really been going into their own productions you have net flicks. Which is the biggie. There were services like film struck that we're wonderful with bringing a classic movies now criteria that film. Struck was terminated with AT and T merged with Time Warner criterion is watching their own channel next month. And I'm very excited about but the point is. There are so many of these there were science streaming channels. They're a British programming TV channels. They're all different. They're all separate. They all have different apps to run them. They all have different user interfaces. And of course, you're looking at all those separate monthly fees. So the question is how many nine ninety five a month. How many eleven ninety ninety five a month? How many of these are you going to be able to handle and because they come and go and her mutating in so many different ways, we have gone from that that kind of one cable TV setup that we'd love to hate to this accord acopia of streaming choices. That's just a giant miss mishmash. That's very unstable. So where this is going to end up is hard to say, I suspect there's going to be significant consolidation in. This is good news for the consumer Lorne. It could be. With a bigger could there's no I wouldn't bet the farm on this on this one yet how this is gonna come out because when you have these mergers, and you have these consolidations what can frequently happen is that only the most popular services survive..

AT Time Warner
"time warner" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on WTVN

"Their television. Instead of the traditional television services from say cable companies though, keep in mind, most of them are still getting their internet from those same cable companies, even if they're not getting their TV services from there. So the cable companies have an incentive to keep pumping up the prices for internet services to make up make a difference there. The other thing that's happening. Is that people are trying to decide what streaming services to get because there are so many so many of them. And some of our very narrow niches, for example, if you want live channels, there's there's there's swings. There's YouTube TV, there's direct TV. Now, there's others that are in the pipeline. If you want premium services, and you don't really care about movies because net flicks is really been going into their own productions you have net flicks. Which is the biggie. There were services like film struck that we're wonderful at bringing a classic movies now criteria that that film. Struck was terminated with AT and T hers with Time Warner criterion is watching their own channel next month. And I'm very excited about, but the point is there are so many of these there were science streaming channels. They're a British programming TV channels. They're all different. They're all separate. They all have different apps to run them. They all have different user interfaces. And of course, you're looking at all those separate monthly fees. So the question is how many nine ninety five a month. How many eleven ninety nine? Ninety five a month. How many these are you going to be able to handle and because they come and go and her mutating in so many different ways, we have gone from that that kind of one cable TV setup that we'd love to hate to this accord acopia of streaming choices. That's just a giant miss mishmash. That's very unstable. So where this is going to end up is hard to say, I suspect there's going to be significant consolidation in the is good news for the consumer learn it could be. With a big could there's no I wouldn't bet the farm on this on this one yet how this is gonna come out because when you have these mergers, and you have these consolidations what can frequently happen is that only the most popular services survive. And if you were.

AT Time Warner
"time warner" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Their television. Instead of the traditional television services from say cable companies though, keep in mind, most of them are still getting their internet from those same cable companies, even if they're not getting their TV services from there. So the cable companies have an incentive to keep pumping up the prices for internet services to. Make up make a difference there. The other thing that's happening. Is that people are trying to decide what streaming services to get? Because there are so many so many of them at some very narrow niches, for example, if you want live channels, there's there's there's swing there's YouTube TV, there's direct TV. Now, there's others that are in the pipeline. If you want premium services, and you don't really care about movies because net flicks has really been going into their own productions you have net flicks. Which is the biggie. There were services like film struck that we're wonderful bringing classic movies now criteria that that film. Struck was terminated with AT and T merged with Time Warner criterion is watching their own channel next month. And I'm very excited about, but the point is there are so many of these there were science streaming channels. They're a British programming TV channels. They're all different. They're all separate. They all have different apps. To run them. They all have different user interfaces. And of course, you're looking at all those separate monthly fees. So the question is how many nine ninety five a month. How many eleven nine hundred ninety five a month? How many of these are you going to be able to handle and because they come and go with her mutating, and so many different ways we have gone from that that kind of one cable TV setup that we'd love to hate to this court acopia of streaming choices. That's that's just a giant miss mishmash. That's very unstable. So where this is going to end up. It's hard to say I suspect there's going to be significant consolidation in this. This is good news for the consumer Lorne. It could be. With a big could there's no I wouldn't bet the farm on this on this one yet how this is gonna come out because when you have these mergers, and you have these consolidations what can frequently happen is that only the most popular services survive. And if.

AT Time Warner
"time warner" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Chairman Jerome Powell took the Fed's new message to Capitol Hill testifying before the Senate banking committee. The fed January decided to shift its policy to hold rates where they are until further notice he told lawmakers Tuesday that while the outlook for the US economy is favourable he sees the Nuff dark clouds on the horizon to art a wait and see approach before making another move over the past few months. We have seen some cross-currents and conflicting signals financial markets. Have become more volatile toward year end and financial conditions are now listed port of of growth than they were earlier last year, a US appeals court on Tuesday unanimously approved AT and T is deal to buy Time Warner that's a major blow for the US Justice department, which in two thousand seventeen sued to stop the eighty five point four billion dollar merger. Arguing it would mean higher prices for consumers. Ars based in Britain standard charters is focused on his Asian markets. And big changes are expected that the Bank announced to cut seven hundred million dollars in costs and says it will restart your operations in four underperforming. Markets South Korea, Indonesia and India up for sale to it appeared to hint be it's forty five percent, eight hundred and thirty five million dollars sake in Indonesia's bunk Panetta which is quite they longer. Call..

Jerome Powell US US Justice department Fed Indonesia Senate banking committee Chairman Time Warner AT South Korea Britain Panetta India seven hundred million dollars thirty five million dollars four billion dollar forty five percent
"time warner" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"I think it's a dollar ninety nine out of sure exactly what the pricing. I think. That's right. But think about that that is the ultimate serving the interests of the fan, and that's just a great business model. I think we're looking at this for European football and so forth as well. But that that is all a cart at the extreme. Right. That's a hard decision to make. And you got to be thinking about the fan. I go down those paths. How long do you think that the leagues themselves become direct distributors of their sports and cut you guys out or work together with you? But also offer an option where you can buy a package or a game directly through the leagues. They do it today. Right. I mean, you're you're seeing this happened today. Several leagues are going directly to the consumer. And I it's not just sports. I mean, look if you're in the the media business if you have premium content. You better be trying to figure out how you go directly to the consumer. That's where the business model is going. That's this is why Time Warner acquisition was so important to us because this idea that if you own premium content, and you think you're just going to generate returns by going wholesale do cable companies satellite countries, so forth. That's not going to do it in the in today's day and age you're going to have to figure out how to get directly to the consumer. That's why Warner media now what we call Time Warner. We're standing up a direct to consumer platform that is called an S spot video on demand service to go directly to the consumer. You're going to have to talk about that world. So you guys said we're coming out with this late this year. But I think actually it's really gonna launch next year the full service going up against apple Amazon. Netflix little company Netflix. Yeah. Disney FOX, they're either all in the market there are spending billions and billions and billions of dollars on content. And how much capacity do you have to sort of compete with them dollar for dollar? You've already taken on a ton of debt just to do. This Warner media deal how much flexibility you have to sort of keep up with them for if they're going after a deal that you want at the same time the debt situation. We'll have the lion share that debt paid off by interview this year. So I know sitting here thinking the debt somehow is a inhibitor to what we need to do Warner media think about Warner Brothers studios. I don't think people appreciate just how deep in broad their IP, libraries, intellectual property library. I mean, just try to conceive of what sits within Warner Brothers. In fact, I think the best example of this that people don't think about is net. Flicks licenses a lot of Warner Brothers content as so last year the contract for friends the rerun friends right came up for renewal of Warner Brothers. We own that intellectual property, and when it appeared that net flicks might lose friends their customers. There was an outcry. It was that was surprising outcry from their customers net. Flicks wanted to rely since just France, well, friends is just one little piece of content city within Warner Brothers. They have a library of this kind of stuff plus movies. Plus continue regeneration of new stuff now at HBO. There is a library of content here that I. Leave. We'll rival just about anybody. And it's not going to require a ton of new investment, some require some new investment. We've already said we're gonna plow a lot of money additional money in to HBO to beef up that library. And so what is the objective of this? I'm convinced that as you go three four years out. Every household will have at least one two three video on demand. Subscriptions, and Netflix, Hulu, a Disney. Do we think our library and our services so compelling that we will be one of those in virtually every household. We actually do we're convinced that we will be one of those those video on demand. Subscriptions that will be in the household. I also believe that tach d- to video on demand. If you have the opportunity and the potential to offer live TV as well. Can you.

Warner Brothers Warner media Time Warner Flicks Netflix HBO football Disney FOX apple Disney Hulu France three four years
"time warner" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"This is Recode media Peter Kosta that is me. I'm part of the vox media podcast network. I'm not speaking today from vox media headquarters in New York City. Instead, I'm dialing it in from Minnesota where it was negative for this morning. Don't worry. I'm more today. I'm gonna play an interview I just did with Randal Stevenson, as you know, he's the CEO of AT and T as you know, he'd now owns the company formerly known as Time Warner. We talked about how that merger is going future of five G eighteen views on sports betting and a bunch of other stuff. It's a good fun fast. Interview. We taped it last week at the NBA all star tech summit in Charlotte, North Carolina, and you can listen to it right now for free. Enjoy. Randall nice to see you gotta say it was very exciting to get introduced by Mavra. Let's go back in time until my eight year old Vikings fan self that was going to happen. One day in the future. When we start there. We just saw cool five G demo and every time you or anyone else from the telco business comes on a stage. Like, this you talk about the importance of five G as far as I can tell five G means faster data. What does that mean for consumer because our phones and our internet connections are pretty fast right now. What's going to be better for us when five G shows up? It's just more than fast. I mean it fast as a key element to it. I tell people like connecting a fiber optic cable to your phone, but that it goes beyond that, the technology of five G puts you in a world of no latency, and what that means is just instantaneous, and it's a real time network and. Think about the applications that require instantaneous connectivity. And the first one we all go to autonomous cars. Right. You do not want to be in a car that's relying on network connectivity. If there's any latency, you don't wanna buffering when you're trying to figure out if you're going to pass that truck or not exactly or something child comes out in front of a car. You don't want buffering if a child runs out in front of a car, and so this no latency zero latency thing is really really big deal. It's the game changer, and as you saw in Adams video some of that look terribly futuristic, but it's really not because when you get to a world of high-speed, no latency, then all of the stuff that's in that smartphone that you're holding right there. The storage no longer needs to be their their stores can be back in the network, the compute capacity no longer needs to be there could be back in the network. A why is that important when you start taking all of that and the power requirements out of that? Now, you get to a place where you don't need this big form factor, and you can actually begin to conceive of a world without screens. And that's what happens you you. You lose the screen, and because suddenly you have a form factor that may look more like this. You don't have to have power. You don't have to have compute. You'll have to have storage in here is back in the network. And now you can begin to use really thin form factor capability and moved to a world with no screens. So how does the NBA conceive and think about a world, no screens, you saw some examples of it over their virtual, and augmented reality become I mean, truly possible in this kind of work is this a world where you and varieties in and your remaining competitors only to build out individual five G networks, and as a consumer I need to decide which network I'm going to be in. And or does this require some sort of public infrastructure commitment from the US or someone else to say, look, we're going to need to build we're gonna need to act capacity. That's going to require government intervention or suppose, it's headed down a path where it will be competitive environment. I. Obviously being a capitalist mindset think that's the right way. That's what will drive the fastest deployment of this a competitive race who gets there. First who gets there with the best quality who gets there with the best services on top of.

vox media Randal Stevenson NBA Peter Kosta Time Warner New York City Minnesota Vikings US AT Randall Charlotte North Carolina Adams five G eight year One day
"time warner" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Absolutely. I feel like I can go into any room and take any role and know that my base knowledge, I will succeed in my in my base, my base knowledge and anything and it's just about now. How do I learn every everything around me, but I can answer a question about the long range plan, or where should we invest our money? And and I feel good about that. I bring that to the table every single time. Okay. So you're at g you did this program for a while at the company for a while good company to work for especially at that point in time. I would imagine. Terrific like leadership development, and it was great to rotate through all the businesses and it out what I really liked to do which was I really loved media. So when you make the decision that first job deciding to leave a first job is always tricky, right because you feel in some ways and a best case scenario, you feel like you owe them something you feel like they've helped you in developed your career for but at the same time. You're oftentimes looking for something bigger is that the case for you? I think I so I decided early on that I wasn't gonna really move my family while my children were in their school years. And so what that meant was that I did a number of jobs within the area. But then I started feel like I was maxing out. And that it was time for me to try something else. How did you know that because I think it's it's always tough to really know when you've maxed out inside of a job. Yeah. I think it's for me. It was people say two things are you still having fun? And are you still learning and? There's a part of me that felt like it wasn't becoming as much fun anymore because I wasn't learning. It's much. And so those are the two factors that I do I love coming to work every day and still learning, and I wasn't feeling that anymore. And that was the sign for me that it was time to move on. And how did you go about looking for the next opportunity? Well, I'd met Howard April. Who was the CFO of Time Warner when I was at NBC, and we always stayed in touch. And I think that that networking is incredibly important. And so I reached out to him and said, I'm really interesting getting back in the media. We worked together at NBC you. I was CFO of one division. He was the CFO of another. And he had me come in an interview for the head of investor relations role at Time Warner. And and so I think it was I reached out to a number of people within my network and. And he and I had always stayed in touch. And so he he he brought me in and I'm incredibly grateful for that on a practical level people often talk about staying in touch. What's the right way to do it? Yeah, males. When you see a new story about the person or checking in from time to time holidays. Yeah. I think it's I actually tried to three times a week to reach out to someone and that can be Email that can be for coffee that can be for a lunch. You know? I actually Richard Butler's amazing at this. And I learned a lot from him about about how to do this. But for me, it's always been force yourself to do it a few times a week, maybe that ends up being four maybe that ends up being too. But you're out there meeting with people. And and for me that has really helped continue to keep my network alive. Men is mice versa. I. As much as I want to help people get new roles too. And so I I firmly believe that you know, we talked about the CFO of g lighting who helped me we talked about Howard, April who helped me I firmly believe that this pay it forward mentality. And so I'm meeting with people who I think maybe looking for jobs, and how can I help you find the right next move. And so I think it's purposely scheduling three to four times a week with people. That's really smart. I do that too. I and again, it doesn't for me. I don't make it specifically about getting a new job a lot of anelle who's in my universe. Who am I interested in getting to know?.

Howard April Time Warner NBC Richard Butler
"time warner" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on TechStuff

"But one designed by a leader in the space for some people halo meant the internet. That was what they thought of it some people called AOL internet for dummies. But a lot of people just thought AOL, that's how you get on the internet. So on the surface, all of the seemed incredibly attractive other companies were worried that this merger was going to mean, there is going to be a new giant media company and soon it was going to become a monopoly, and it would either run you out of business or it was going to gobble. Oh, you up and acquire you. That's something that love folks are saying right now about Disney not to mention some other pretty big companies like AT and T, but this all came from a high level conceptual mindset when it came to actually bringing the two major companies together things fell apart pretty quickly. The corporate cultures were drastically different. Time Warner executives saw AOL executives as being impetuous, brash and arrogant, AOL executives viewed their Time Warner counterparts as being stuffy and conservative and risk averse to the point of complacency and this mismatch in perspectives meant there were very few instances of people actually working together across company lines. They were frequently feeling like they were at cross purposes working against each other making things even worse was the general economy now as I said the deal. Happened before the dot com, bubble burst. But then that bubble did burst. And I've talked about the dot com. Bubble so many times, and I'm sure some of you probably could pause the podcast right now and give an overview in my voice about the dot.

AOL Time Warner Disney AT
"time warner" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"time warner" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"These two teams have played three times. The first half scoring has been about half of what the second half scoring has been the last three years. So the two teams I have been slow. They score about twenty points combined in the second half. They've scored almost forty points. Now, we see this phenomenon in the Super Bowl is. Well, teams are tight. They're careful. They don't wanna lose the game in the first quarter. I almost always spent the Super Bowl first-quarter under first half under. But if I liked the over I bet the second half then to go over. So if you liked the under in this game, I'd say bet the first quarter under bet the game to go under bet they'll be no scoring in the first five minutes. But if you like the Overby patient, I would wait until halftime. And then what have we seen when these defenses get gassed only, see these coaches? I'm watching the is gassed all of a sudden here comes the onside kicks. Here comes the trickery to halfback option passes. If you like over play the second half of great stuff from Steve fezzet, again, one of the sharpest handicappers in the country. All football doesn't matter. I know he specializes the NFL to Time Warner the super contests says right now. It's split up. Pretty good here in Vegas five and a half's Alabama. There are several four and a half years a few fives, including here at the golden nugget. Do you take five and a half? Now. Again, you're you're late to the dance getting Clemson. But again, if you're still gonna play Clemson, do you take five and a half, and would you? I know it's it's crazy. But would you buy it up to six is it worth it? Or you say, you know, what this is probably the best number. I'm going to get right now. Let me take the five and a half, even though I think five and that's the best number. You're going to get on. Clemson. I would still advise you to wait. I would not buy a half points not worth it, mathematically. And here's why because I'm not certain that is going to keep going dropping. Although I think it's more likely than not. But who cares if it drops down to four and a half to four you can always still grab a four. Now five is such a dead number that much rather hold out the chance to get a plus six and risk losing the plus five as long as you get plus four plus four plus five not exactly the same. But very.

Clemson Steve fezzet NFL Time Warner Vegas football Alabama five minutes three years