37 Burst results for "Time Magazine"

Buying Science, Healthwashing Labels, & Sparking Real Change - With Guest Vani Hari

The Model Health Show

06:43 min | 3 d ago

Buying Science, Healthwashing Labels, & Sparking Real Change - With Guest Vani Hari

"Our guest today is New York Times. bestselling author Vanni Hari and body was named by Time magazine. One of the most influential people on the Internet. And she's been such a powerful force of change and influencing how major food giants like Kraft General Mills Subway Chick-fil-a in starbucks create their products in her advocacy has steered them towards making more helpful policies. She's been profiled in the New York, times the Atlantic the Financial Times Wall Street Journal USA Today the Dr Oz show the doctor show CNN the list goes on and on she is such a powerful and important voice that we all need right now she's demonstrated how powerful we are. She is just one person who stepped up and setting noth- is enough I'm not going to allow these things to be in our food system into injure unsuspecting consumers to injure children all over the country all over the world we can change this and she stepped up and made it happen. All right. So Vanni is one of the big reasons that there's been so much change in fast food and in processed foods and she is she is just one person but she is powerful. She is remarkable as you are. She said, yes she just said, yes. Stepping into her mission and being an advocate for change and again I'm saying because I want to remind you of how powerful you are. We all are powerful beyond anything we can imagine. And, it's wonderful to have these conversations and talk with Bonnie to see how she did it to see what he's up to to hear what she's thinking about right now in the context of what's happening in our world today, you know in her leaning into this discomfort with all of us and seeing what is, what is she going through? What is she thinking about and also she's got a new little surprise that she's. Developing right now herself you know a new addition to her family. She's got a corona bonus. You know at this time there's also Within the terminal, those also these things of beauty. There are moments of opportunity and beauty, and it just depends on what we are able to see the questions we ask and the actions that we take, and if anybody knows about action, an advocacy is our guest today Vanni Hurry. So it's jumping to his conversation. With the amazing New York, Times bestselling author food advocate the Food Babe Herself Vanni Hari Viney Welcome back to the model show how are you doing today? So Good Sean is so good to see your face. Let me just tell you that I wish person. I wish it was in person. So I give you a big giant. Fat. Wet Hug. And there's a reason behind the fat portion. Beautifully plump is you have you're having a baby your daughter's about to be a big sister. That's right. She's GonNa be a big sister to a little boy. And Yeah, I'm getting ready him. It's it's coming up soon I gotta get gametime on. I. Got Up early, this morning and worked out was pumping iron and shared on my instagram. I was like, Hey, guys give birth is a real athletic sport. You need stamina you need physical endurance especially if you WanNa do it naturally you you really gotta be in shape you can't go into that. Experience being shape. Let me just tell you. That is so true. Same thing mirrored by you know my wife and so many other women just sharing this story is just getting prepared for it. You know and this is something we have evolved doing just being active out gathering, taking care of things but you know this is just a big shift that's taking place and even right now it's probably been a little bit more complicated for a lot of people just to get outdoors and just to be active so I just want to commend you for that. Pumping Island. Getting for the baby you know that's awesome. I'm just so thankful gyms are open back over here. You know for the for the first, half my pregnancy they were closed, and that was really tough mentally because I had to I had to have that motivation to get in that Jim, my own little home gym at home. Every day and in our basement and it got old after a while and not having that external motivation and doing everything on a screen. You know it was just it was very tiresome. So I'm so glad to be able to go back in in the community and workout and have that external motivation in loud music and all that is just it's the. Best. Yeah I feel the same way you know and this is one of those things and I'm I'm so grateful to talk to you and this even in intro that I put for you just you're such a inspiration to me you're such a hero that we all need right now and I'm so grateful to have you on to have these conversations because. For some folks, the Jim has been it's not just about the physical health side is their mental health mental emotional wellness being able to get access to that, and it was just kind of been this big law even here in I'm in Los Angeles, all the gems is still closed. I literally would have moved I would have to move away a lot of people have. Had to be away because you know that's what it is for me. It's like my anti anxiety medication, right? It's my anti depression medication. It's that you know that routine every single day I start my day and I go to the gym and do my workout class when I come back and it's It's it's a game changer. SMA- meditative practice that I have to do and four something to take that away. Was An insult on my body. For the government to take that away and you know I shared actually a interesting me on instagram when when our governor continued to close gyms but would allow. People to for example, Golf Club or tennis clubs, but they wouldn't we go to a gym. There's all of these kind of. These rules that didn't make sense and I said you know, hey, if you got McDonalds open open my freaking. Jim You. Got McDonalds open open my. Goodness sakes

Jim You Vanni Hari Vanni Vanni Hari Viney Vanni Hurry New York New York Times. Time Magazine Noth CNN Kraft General Mills Starbucks Wall Street Journal Usa Pumping Island Golf Club Bonnie Sean
Fresh update on "time magazine" discussed on On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

01:20 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "time magazine" discussed on On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

"Welcome back while we saw the G. Conductors Sussex back. In action this week when they convened with experts for a tech, talk on how the Internet is affecting critical issues such as racial justice, gender, critique, climate change, and mental health. It was a two hour episode with Time One hundred talk series, very popular events. Hosted by Time magazine, it saw the duchess worn of global crisis of misinformation as they continue to push for a safer digital worlds. Now, this oversea ties in very neatly with the work that they do with, there seems to be launched nonprofit organization arch. Well, they'd already held a number of private conversations with leaders and those in the tax base about this exact subject they have also become increasingly invested in holding tech companies accountable for the spread of misinformation platforms such as facebook and twitter, and of course, we remember earlier this year we saw them partner with the. Stop Hate for profit movement where they reached out to. Tech entrepreneurs and leaders of many of these social media organizations themselves. To continue to push message. So it really comes as no surprise when it was announced that they'd curated the special lineup for war Time magazine series, it was streamed across multiple platforms and October Twentieth I. Believe it reached something like four million. Individuals at the time it was livestream but of course. Still available to watch on youtube or indeed time website as well. It both spent a couple of months really working to put together the topics and issues that were discussed in the event and also reached out many of the individuals spoke in the event themselves including friends of the podcast teenager therapy who were on last week's talking about their collaboration with the Duchess of Sussex we heard from them during the special. Great moment for them. Again. As I said you know Harry and Meghan they both had a conversation with. Someone on their team this week, he spoke about how both of them feel that this is taking a huge toll. This issue digital experience that we currently half has taken a huge toll on the world's emotional mental wellbeing as well as the trust in the information society. consumes. As a source said to me. You know that this is something really believe in that they feel that they can can and will. Worked Washer in change and they believe that critical issues. That we're facing as I mentioned earlier, such as racial justice gender accuracy climate change, even our own health and you know this is a belief that they say reflects a core element of arch well, which we'll talk about later in the show. Now, this the event started off with conversation with Edward Felsen thole whose the editor in chief of time and Megan explains a little bit about why it's something that they continue to champion and really what it is that they want to see what changed they want to see in that space moving forward I mean I think for both of us individually and also as a couple. Our commitment to the causes that we have. Really worked towards for a long time well before knowing each other. Our unwavering and it was only in the past couple of years we both started to connect the dots of. All of the work that I was doing on women's empowerment or young girls and their sense of self and self worth. and seeing what the online spaces were doing to that community. and. Equally, obviously, my husband's quite a fitness mental health but also the environment which you can touch on. The mental health aspect is the most obesity. Very, much been a topic of conversation costs along the platforms but also. In the media as well. Let's not forget these places are refuge for some people, but it is a sort of a combination of a a love hate relationship and then it was broken up into a series of conversations we saw. Meghan. Have a one on one conversation with the REDDIT CO founder and close friend of hers because he's the husband Serena Williams. Alexis. Hanin who spoke to Meghan about his decision to step back from his role at read. So his spot could be filled by black candidate something. He said he still receiving Hate Mail A. Decision that was. Influenced by an understanding that the tech space often lacks diversity. I. Think. There'd be many compensations over the years about how loss of these startups were created by sort of similar type of individual from similar type of educational background and upbringing, and of course, much of that has then fed into the infrastructures and the sort of. Algorithms have been setup. Since then. But, of course, also as the father of a mixed race daughter. He really felts that reshaping or sort of changing those roles within the social media companies because of the huge role they have in society with something incredibly important, and in fact, it was something that both of them referred to in the conversation about this awareness of having mixed race children. And of course, the diversity that often lacks in the online space itself. I've been heartened when I have seen other people in similar positions who have stepped down to create opportunities for people of Color I still. Don't have to look too hard to see. There's a lot more work to be done. And You know I'm happy to sign myself up for that because. I owe it to Iot to a lot of people. And I'm ready for the challenge. One. Of the things that you said actually on the heels of a piece that my husband had written for Fast Company, you wrote leaders lead and I think that's what you're doing. Just thank you for saying that about the work that that he's doing something on super both really passionate about that's what you're doing. You are leading by example and I. Think. You know I'm sorry to hear that you're still receiving hate mail I. Know We have. Shared experiences in being interracial marriages and raising small children who are of mixed race and how that plays into that I think what was interesting about? These conversations was I think many expected to feel as if they were being lectured by Harry and Meghan who are whilst very well versed in the things that they talk about relatively new to the conversations. That have long? Existed within. The tax base and many other organizations are also involved in sort of pushing or offering in change for, and it was great to see this sort of almost student teacher role with a couple who. Were there to almost along science the listener the viewer learn along the way it was a chance for us to see what they've learned over the time, but they were really data here. What's the experts what the professionals had to say and that was very much evident when the Sussex together to interview tryst on Harris? WHO's the a Silicon Valley vets he founded or CO founded the center of humane technology and of course, many of you will remember or recently seen one of the most prominent voices in Netflix's Social Dilemma Documentary he was also alongside Saffy Noble he's the author of a fascinating book called Algorithms Repression Safire will actually be coming on a feat rep sight of the upholds do. For that So yeah, as I said, her book Weenie offers an in depth look at how the negative biases against women of Color s deeply embedded in search engine results and algorithms. And that's something that will be very it was so interesting to baton. We very interesting to to speak to Sapphire about later on but we heard during this discussion, Harry and Meghan really sitting back and listening to what the experts have to say Sapphire referred to Meghan Zone experiences of being the talk of online hate and..

Meghan Zone Time Magazine Sussex Harry G. Conductors Sussex War Time Magazine Facebook Youtube Obesity Twitter Partner Reddit Edward Felsen Serena Williams Sapphire Netflix Silicon Valley
Free speech and the struggle against misinformation ahead of 2020 election

Fresh Air

05:34 min | 3 d ago

Free speech and the struggle against misinformation ahead of 2020 election

"Last week, The New York Post published a potentially damaging story about Hunter Biden, son of the Democratic presidential nominee. Based on emails, The Post said, were provided by former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani and originally harvested from a laptop computer left in a Delaware repair shop. There were enough questions about the authenticity of the emails that most mainstream media declined to publish the story, but it's the kind of content that Khun spread like wildfire on Social media. In a remarkable move Twitter on Wednesday Band users from sharing links to the story because it said the emails may have been hacked and contained private information. It reversed course two days later after Republicans accused Twitter of censorship. But the episode illustrates a question our guest, Emily Bazelon, has been thinking about in an age when questionable, Perhaps even fabricated content can sweep through the digital world unchecked. Does our traditional commitment to unfettered free speech still serve democracy. And the cover story for this week's New York Times Magazine, Basil on surveys the impact that lies and conspiracy theories sometimes promoted by foreign actors can have on our political discourse. And she explores how other countries think differently about free speech and its relationship to a healthy democracy. Emily Bazelon is a graduate of the Yale Law School and a journalist. She's a staff writer for the New York Times Magazine and the Truman Capote fellow for Creative Writing at Yale Law School. She's also the author of two books. She joins us from her home in New Haven, Connecticut. Emily Bazelon welcome back to fresh air. Thanks so much for having me you open your piece with a story that began making the rounds some months back, among right wing voices on the Internet that there was a plan by the forces of Joe Biden to stage a coup to take over the government in connection with the November election. First of all, what was the basis of this claim? Great. So this is ahh concocted claim and the sort of colonel at the center of it was a project called the Transition Integrity Project, a group of about 100 academics and journalists and pollsters and former government officials and former campaign the staff staffers. They started meeting over the summer to kind of game out various scenarios for the November election, and so they were basically testing American democracy in the event that President Trump wins in the event that vice President Biden winds To see in various scenario is what could happen. And in the event, there's a contestant result in a long, nasty count. Yes, exactly especially in the event if there's a contestant result in litigation and other possibilities, and so in one of their several scenarios, Biden wins the popular vote but loses the Electoral College. And so in that hypothetical case they imagined the Democrats would get desperate. And they might consider encouraging California and the Pacific Northwest to threaten to secede in exchange for pressuring Republicans to expand the size of the Senate. So Rosa Brooks, who was one of the organizers of this project, She's a law professor at Georgetown. She published an essay where she mentioned this threat to succeed in one sentence in an essay in The Washington Post. On the next day, you see someone named Michael Anton's, a former national security adviser to President Trump. He has an article called The Coming CU Question. Mark and based on Rosa Brooks is characterization of what the transition integrity project was doing. He starts saying that Democrats are laying the groundwork for a revolution and then you see that article take off in extremist online communities. There is AH podcast maker named Dan Bongino, who's a big trump supporter. He makes videos about it. One of them has the tag. They are telling you what they are going to do exclamation point his videos pull in millions of views. Then you see the story. My great toe, a right wing website called Revolver News Revolver. News starts to spin up the idea that Norm Eisen, who participated in the transition Integrity project and is a longtime Democratic lawyer in Washington. That he's at the center of this supposed coup. And from there, Tucker Carlson feature someone talking about this concocted made up story on his show. And then you see it just go viral on social media and get picked up by lots of groups, including, like a county Republican organization in Oregon, So it is Perfect kind of story because it pulls in both traditional media in the form of Fox and also social media. And then you see President Trump get involved. He tweets in praise of Revolver news, and then he tweets quote the November 3rd election result may never be accurately determined, which is what some want. And that's a kind of typical dark, slightly vague, foreboding kind of warning from President Trump that further perpetuates this coup narrative. And then Trump later retreat. Someone talking about a coup with regard to Nancy Pelosi. So you see from this hypothetical project that was really meant to be a kind of academic exercise about the election. This whole sat of conspiracy theories on the right that get a lot of play in the media on social media, and then from the president

President Trump Emily Bazelon Transition Integrity Project Joe Biden Twitter Hunter Biden Rosa Brooks The New York Times Magazine The New York Post Yale Law School New York Donald Trump Revolver News New Haven Delaware Rudy Giuliani Nancy Pelosi
Fresh "Time Magazine" from WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

00:24 sec | 15 hrs ago

Fresh "Time Magazine" from WBZ Midday News

"II meet magazine bestselling author Brett Kitchen, and if you're over 55 with an IRA or for one k. I want to give you a free copy of my new book Wealth Beyond Wall Street because, according to Time magazine, Wall Street's fora One case have failed millions of Americans after losing 35% in my I R A. And the crash Years ago, I said enough, and since then I discovered a way to grow money. Potential double digits, reduce taxes dramatically and also have my money protected when Next stock market crash hits when the next market crash hits you Lose Nothing Call wealth beyond Wall Street now to get your free book and talked to a specialist to discover this little known strategy to get potential double digit growth during good years and never lose in the market crashes. Call 805.

Brett Kitchen Time Magazine
Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:54 min | 3 d ago

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape Marketing Podcast, this is John Jansen, my guest today's Reeves Wiedeman. He is a contributing editor at New York magazine. Also featured in New Yorker New York Times Magazine Rolling Stone Harper's, and we're going to talk about a book that is fairly new called billion dollar loser, the epic rise and spectacular fall of Adam Newman and we work. So reeves welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So. Why don't you give away the ending for for for people that that may be have followed this story Kinda give us the like. Here's you know here's what was going on at the high level. Here's what happened. Yeah. Fair enough while while a lot of people may know it but but the the the short version of the rise of we work in an office leasing company started in New York City that in the course of a decade expanded all over the world The basic business premise was slicing up large office spaces into small glass. Rent out. By Twenty Nineteen they had more than four hundred locations around the world A also had apartments they had started in elementary school. and a variety of businesses that required a lot of money and so eventually in in thousand nineteen, they decided to go public at of gob smacking forty, seven, billion, dollar valuation and in pretty spectacular fashion over over a few weeks in the summer and fall of last year the. Collapsed out of Newman, the company's founder was was ousted and He's spending most of his time surfing. So you know and the future for him and for the company's still remains to be seen, but it was pretty pretty remarkable rise in in a pretty shocking and swift fall. So the at the from the highest evaluation to like when it all shook out, what did it shed about eighty percent ninety percent You're GonNa make me do some math but you're outright it. It got up to forty seven billion at least in this theoretical way, and and this past spring Softbank, which is, is we were primary investor mark it down to just under three billion, two, point, nine, billion so a. Pretty shocking loss value in a very short amount of time. So. What was it? You did a series of interviews with adamant obviously a lot of other people that show up in the book but what what was kind of the timeline for your interviews because it was really pre crash, right? Yeah. I mean, we when I was I work at New York magazine and we had I decided to do this story at the beginning of Twenty nineteen in the. Reason we did it was was because we work with growing so fast, and because it it suddenly was was everywhere. We have an office in in Soho and in New York and suddenly there were half a dozen of them just a few blocks of where our office was and so we saw it as kind of a success story. We knew there was sort of strange things about the company and. It became very clear to me as I as a after interviewing Adam Newman last April April Twenty nineteen shortly before the IPO was announced. And then talking to people who'd worked with him some members of his executive team that everything that was good and bad about we work revolved around Adam Newman. He he was the visionary. He was the sort of branding expert and he was the. That, was driving company, and then as it became clear, he was also kind of embodied a lot of a lot of what what went wrong. So my only instance as I did work out of we work in Dumbo one time. A few years. Was it nice. Yeah. It was nice. It was like all the kind of. HIP places in that part of town. Are. Very minimal decor. So. It's interesting. You brought up that idea of all good things and bad things because in reading through the book you almost. And and maybe other people. Have covered it this way to that it wouldn't have happened with him and it wouldn't have crashed with with him without him. I think that's exactly right and that's when when we wrote my first story and this was when the company was still on the rise we. I didn't come up with this but but the title one of my bosses did was with the I and we and and and you know it's just everything about this company. was. Just, CER- wrapped up in in in Adams great qualities which which company grow and then things kind of centered off off the rails.

Adam Newman New York Magazine New Yorker New York Times Maga New York City Reeves Contributing Editor John Jansen Softbank CER Dumbo Founder Soho Adams Executive
Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

Duct Tape Marketing

04:54 min | 3 d ago

Should Business Follow Data or Gut Feel?

"Hello welcome to another episode of the duct. Tape Marketing Podcast, this is John Jansen, my guest today's Reeves Wiedeman. He is a contributing editor at New York magazine. Also featured in New Yorker New York Times Magazine Rolling Stone Harper's, and we're going to talk about a book that is fairly new called billion dollar loser, the epic rise and spectacular fall of Adam Newman and we work. So reeves welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So. Why don't you give away the ending for for for people that that may be have followed this story Kinda give us the like. Here's you know here's what was going on at the high level. Here's what happened. Yeah. Fair enough while while a lot of people may know it but but the the the short version of the rise of we work in an office leasing company started in New York City that in the course of a decade expanded all over the world The basic business premise was slicing up large office spaces into small glass. Rent out. By Twenty Nineteen they had more than four hundred locations around the world A also had apartments they had started in elementary school. and a variety of businesses that required a lot of money and so eventually in in thousand nineteen, they decided to go public at of gob smacking forty, seven, billion, dollar valuation and in pretty spectacular fashion over over a few weeks in the summer and fall of last year the. Collapsed out of Newman, the company's founder was was ousted and He's spending most of his time surfing. So you know and the future for him and for the company's still remains to be seen, but it was pretty pretty remarkable rise in in a pretty shocking and swift fall. So the at the from the highest evaluation to like when it all shook out, what did it shed about eighty percent ninety percent You're GonNa make me do some math but you're outright it. It got up to forty seven billion at least in this theoretical way, and and this past spring Softbank, which is, is we were primary investor mark it down to just under three billion, two, point, nine, billion so a. Pretty shocking loss value in a very short amount of time. So. What was it? You did a series of interviews with adamant obviously a lot of other people that show up in the book but what what was kind of the timeline for your interviews because it was really pre crash, right? Yeah. I mean, we when I was I work at New York magazine and we had I decided to do this story at the beginning of Twenty nineteen in the. Reason we did it was was because we work with growing so fast, and because it it suddenly was was everywhere. We have an office in in Soho and in New York and suddenly there were half a dozen of them just a few blocks of where our office was and so we saw it as kind of a success story. We knew there was sort of strange things about the company and. It became very clear to me as I as a after interviewing Adam Newman last April April Twenty nineteen shortly before the IPO was announced. And then talking to people who'd worked with him some members of his executive team that everything that was good and bad about we work revolved around Adam Newman. He he was the visionary. He was the sort of branding expert and he was the. That, was driving company, and then as it became clear, he was also kind of embodied a lot of a lot of what what went wrong. So my only instance as I did work out of we work in Dumbo one time. A few years. Was it nice. Yeah. It was nice. It was like all the kind of. HIP places in that part of town. Are. Very minimal decor. So. It's interesting. You brought up that idea of all good things and bad things because in reading through the book you almost. And and maybe other people. Have covered it this way to that it wouldn't have happened with him and it wouldn't have crashed with with him without him. I think that's exactly right and that's when when we wrote my first story and this was when the company was still on the rise we. I didn't come up with this but but the title one of my bosses did was with the I and we and and and you know it's just everything about this company. was. Just, CER- wrapped up in in in Adams great qualities which which company grow and then things kind of centered off off the rails.

Adam Newman New York Magazine New Yorker New York Times Maga New York City Reeves Contributing Editor John Jansen Softbank CER Dumbo Founder Soho Adams Executive
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 2 weeks ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
"time magazine" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:53 min | 3 weeks ago

"time magazine" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Well, Anthony found she is standing there. And his face and he's you know, it's about waste. That's right, right? Yeah. And if you look at the picture that all you see you don't see the letter M. But you just see two little horns on top of Anthony found cheesehead from the tips of the M interesting. And it literally looks like a man with horns on his head like a devil. I only saw a little postage stamp size, but I have to go Look at that. No, I'm going to send it And I'm gonna post it on advice line radio on Facebook because You guys all have to see this. I don't think it's a coincidence. They will show themselves they will send. What would you call this? Not a sign if you know what I'm saying, But there's You know, visually visualizations, I guess is the right thing. And it's right on the cover of Time magazine. I just sent it to you Tell me if you notice it, Phil. I sent it to you, too, But it's scary looking Who at time magazine allowed this to go out this way. And I'll guarantee they may have laughed and said Look at that. He's got little horns on his head, but they are putting subliminal messaging out there. I'm going to put this on our Facebook interest. Isn't that weird? His hair is gray and normally listen to this. Normally, the word time is black. But it's interesting that it's on a white background. Like a not a head shot, but a waste. Upshot of of Anthony Fauci, and the word time is almost colored. It's like a a light. Grey, like the color of Anthony found his hair so that the two little horns that are sticking up are the same color is his hair. It's Scary that time magazine would have done this. Are they subliminally saying he's the devil? He's the one that has brought this upon America. And are they kind of saying that, or is it a sign to the the others that are out there saying he's our man? He's the one. He's. He's been waffling back and forth. You don't need to wear a mask over. You should wear a mask. The mask doesn't do any good. You should wear a mask. Oh, yes, I said, you should wear a mask. Now, by the way, a friend of mine just texted me. That's a fake cover of Time magazine. But if it is that's hilarious, but I don't know. Listen, I don't know. I guess we'll wait and see when the time magazine comes out, Either that or they caught it. They re called it, But that's pretty funny stuff right there. That could be a fake cover. All right man. Monday Monday Monday so much news to cover so little time. The show. It really needs to be six hours long. I think we should just I think, Howard, I think six hours will take over. 24 7.

Time magazine Anthony Fauci Facebook Anthony Phil Howard America
C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

The Book Review

05:41 min | Last month

C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

"Scott Anderson joins us now from the catskills. He is a contributing writer for the New York, Times magazine, and the author of many books. His latest is called the quiet Americans four CIA spies. Of the Cold War tragedy in three acts, Scott Welcome back to the podcast. Thanks much nice to be here. So you are allowed on the podcast to talk about your previous book Lawrence in Arabia which came out in twenty thirteen hand, which of course feels like now centuries ago which makes it clear to our listeners are longtime listeners that this is not your first. Book. Involving spies I'm curious what what's the draw for you but I think Speiser inherently fascinating in not just to an awful lot of people and of thought about what is I think it's the the allure of having a secret life. I think that I think that for an awful lot of people this idea that you have a whole separate identity is really fascinating New People. What I was drawn to in both the Lawrence and with in the quite America's the foresee a officers I follow is that in both cases, this was at a time when individuals out in the field had a tremendous freedom of action. So it wasn't. People sitting behind desks following policy that they're actually out in the field doing crazy stuff. You also have a personal connection to the story right in terms of what your father did for living you talk a little bit about that. Sure. My father was agricultural adviser for the Agency for International Development, which was a branch of the State Department. I grew up in. East. Asia in in Korea and Taiwan as Indonesia. and. So this was the nineteen fifties, nineteen sixties when I came along American government workers abroad often in those sorts of countries often were two hats whatever their official job was my father's job as agriculture adviser but it was also part of this great anti Communist crusade was happening around the world. So the upfront hearts and minds, soft power aspect of my father's work was working on agrarian reform in line with countries like these countries were were the land was was had been controlled infra centuries by all darkies. But the the more hard power in the darker side of what my father was doing was was setting up rural vigilante squads, home guard militias to watch over the local populace and to make sure that they weren't being swayed by the communist in certainly in countries like Taiwan or South Korea. If you were exposed or accused of being a leftist, your life was not going to go. Well, you know I'm now getting a sense of why one of the four characters in your previous book was an agronomist perhaps. That's right. Yeah it's well It's it's an interesting thing because. It just for national development was often used by the CIA as a cover because. Are Out, in the field, they're not, they're not saying, I'm destined to capitol there often out among the local population and probably have a better sense of what's happening. Outside what you one thing I'll say I've noticed over time in different countries. I've been almost invariably the ex Patriot community that knows best what's happening in the country are tend to be the people are out in the field in often the Middle East is the oil guys. They have a sense much more than than people sitting around in the capital. Let's start with frank wizner. The first person you mentioned, and this is not the the first book to be written at least in part about wisner who was he and what made him. So central to the story wizards amazing Turkey was a corporate lawyer who was working at a Wall Street firm when even before World War Two broke out and he quit his law firm to join the navy, he ended up being an operative for the office to teacher services, which is the the wartime intelligence agency of the of the army that they owe asset kind of the precursor to the CIA. That's right. That's right and he ends up being A. Kind of the first American to to to witness. The Soviet takeover of country in Eastern Europe, and this was in Romanian to summer of nineteen forty. Four So full year before the war ended and a wizard was on the ground as a as an oasis operative and just watch the strong arm tactics did really a matter of weeks led the Soviets to take control the country he and he was sending cables back to Washington telling telling them what are so good allies doing he sees the say he has the same experience in eastern Germany at the end of. The war in watching the way the Soviets for taking over, he goes back to his law from for couple of years for the complete unhappy, and then when the CIA starts up in nineteen forty seven, they have this idea that they wanna start a covert operations branch of of the CIA called the Office of Policy Coordination and frank listeners chosen to head that the name was deliberately chosen to be really boring. That's right and in fact, the name itself, the Office of policy coordination was was so top secret that even you can't even say the name out loud for twenty five years. So in that role wizner e created, what what he called the mighty world, which was this vast covert operations umbrella of a operating throughout the world and everything from hard power aspects of it like dropping dropping partisans behind the iron curtain to everything to cultural stuff voice. Of America. Radio Free Europe that was all came out of the Office of Policy Coordination.

CIA Office Of Policy Coordination Lawrence Frank Wizner Office Of Policy America Taiwan Scott Anderson Times Magazine New York Agency For International Devel Writer Middle East Washington Radio Free Europe Asia State Department Germany
Paris Fashion Week will go ahead this September

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:34 min | Last month

Paris Fashion Week will go ahead this September

"And, finally, on today's program off to Paris to get a roundup of a busy few days in the fashion calendar, I'm joined on the line by Dana Thomas Journalist and author of fashion apples the price of fast fashion the future of clothes always good at talking to maybe just bring us up speed quickly on what has what the show is look like I was in Paris a few weeks ago there was much discussion. Where we're going to be world video presentations again, and many brands saying very committed to actually getting models, and of course, journalists and buyers in seats again and having them walk down a catwalk. What happened. Well some of that's happening. There are shows and people are attending. In fact, there's an official French calendar and on the French calendar, it should it tells who is going to be showing like Gabriella Hurston who is going to be digital chanel showing some people are doing digital. Some people are doing both. The same in Milan summer having shows and some are digital and. I don't know who's attending. I saw that Brian boy the the influence Sir is back in Milan and he's thrilled to be back in. Milan. I saw that on his instagram or his twitter feed but I mean, I know that for example, I contribute to the New York Times magazine is a New York Times as a freelancer, and that team is not coming to Paris spending Friedman's reviewing everything from her home in New York. So you know I know that. Americans aren't really aren't allowed to come to Europe anyway. So there's the whole Chinese can't people can't come to. Europe. A lot of people can't travel. So I, think it's mostly people who are in town who are going I was asked to go to some shows in Paris I have no interest going to watch them on digital. Why do you have no interest I'm curious because you're part of this. You know we're all in this together we that we we have to go out and support and a lot of people say the same thing with sporting events as well. Of course, if the if the guidelines are followed, etc you know. These things tend to drift away and become part of the sideline or do you think that the future is digital? We don't need to go to shows anymore even go into shops. I think that know they're pushing it too soon too fast. I. Think you know we don't need to go into shops and or we don't need to go to fashion shows right now. In fact to me, they feel frivolous and not taking what's going on terribly seriously Yes. We need to boast our our morale a bit by sitting next to people who could have the bro The bug and sitting there with a mask on and you can catch union, catch it through your eyes. You know I don't feel like taking that risk I'd rather be safe and I think that's the most important thing right now.

Paris Milan Europe Dana Thomas Gabriella Hurston Twitter New York New York Times The New York Times Magazine Official Brian Friedman
Post Malone Leads 2020 Billboard Music Awards Nominations With 16

Z Morning Zoo

00:47 sec | Last month

Post Malone Leads 2020 Billboard Music Awards Nominations With 16

"Music Awards were announced yesterday and post Malone leading all Artists at 16, including top artist top male artist have rap artist top streaming song artist Lana's ex Fowler's him with 13 nominations than Billy I'll Ishan, Khalid H or 12. But it's going to be a virtual broadcast live from the Dolby Theatre in L. A. Actually, we're 14. Well, like a lot of other awards shows that have slants you know to them, like the American Music Awards is kind of an opinion thing. Billboard goes by chart performance who has been all over the charts in almost every format Post Malone and Actually, they don't know if it's going to be a Spitz. Strictly Rachael. I just read their figuring that out how to handle the whole time magazine

Malone American Music Awards Dolby Theatre Fowler Khalid H Lana Rachael Spitz Billy I
Heidi Klum & Seal's Ugly Legal Battle

Daily Pop

05:21 min | 2 months ago

Heidi Klum & Seal's Ugly Legal Battle

"Walk to the top so much to today. Let's dive right in starting with highly clue and sealed nasty feud the exit ugly legal battle over the kids she's trying to bring their four children to Germany. While to films showed there. Now seal who has joint custody of the kids does not want them to go Heidi filed for an emergency hearing then seal filed for his own response telling the court he believes Heidi has a hidden agenda to move the children to Germany in keep them away from him. Now we all remember how do you feel as a loving couple back in the day they kept doing their mouths all the time but now things seem to be getting so ugly between them. Twenty twenty honey this year is a raging dumpster fire everyone. is so paranoid and scared for every single thing in their lives and if I was I. I understand his paranoia. If you're going to go to Germany, you're GONNA love it. Their schools are going to open your parents are there you get to spend time with them? What makes him think that she won't say Oh my God the kids and loving it here we're going to stay for another six months I understand. But the thing is it's like, okay I understand where he's coming from as well. These are his children. But when I was lied when I was reading the court documents, he literally says or his lawyer says on his behalf well, I understand that we don't have a specific schedule in place to see the kids but I still don't want them to live somewhere else like it doesn't seem like they're necessarily a weekly priority. It's kind of just like whenever he finds time to see them and I'm sure she finds that to be inconvenient inconsistent, disrespectful and hurtful to her children. So if she wants to go to Germany which all the points you made are valid the schools are open her grandparents lived there. She's German she's probably a national treasure. He can fly to Germany and spend time with his children the way he's been doing it in Los. Angeles. Well, that's not saying every week. That's the thing is with custody you use it or you lose it I mean, if you have the right see the people I mean he did say just to be fair in the arguments he did claim that she makes it difficult says that the kids are sick all the time I'm not sure what's true obviously but either way you can enforce to see your children. That's what. Your legal rights is according to their custody agreement. So He needs to make sure that he ensures that that happens I. Don't think that he's to win this one because she has really plans it out. She doesn't really seem to like have a reason to stay in Germany forever she is said, I'm leaving on this time I will be back by this time even though it's my Christmas I will send the kiss. Christmas. So, right Is Making a big. But that's but if you put that in legal documents and sides like even though the children's spent Christmas with sealed last year, I'm willing to let them spend Christmas with him this year it seems like she's really trying to work things out and I know that we've seen this sort of in the past where if she's saying the kids are sick or it's not time, it's probably because she feels like whatever he was just drop in and see his children is disruptive to their schedule. Yes but I mean. Fair either. But that's when you say okay this is not fair to my kids. Let me get this in writing and let's go to court and let's get a supervise in stable schedule. Don't bring it up when you're ready to move to Germany you guys have had uh Obviously. So hadn't seen kids on a regular basis in years go ahead and put that on file. But the problem is if a parent moves the children outside of a state line and the kids go ahead and get a life, they're they're in sports they're in school they're the mom can petition for kids to move the residences to another state. Imagine another country six, thousand miles away I don't know how to fight custody between California New York much less California in Germany standing. There I understand him being scared. But at the time I just don't think he's GonNa win this one because she's being very clear about coming back. I mean she's not really she's filming she's working. She's providing for her family show happened to be moving over there because of Kobe reasons and it is a weird time and I think you just have to be flexible. So I hear seals concern but I don't think he's going to win this one I think he's GonNa get to take gives you know what's also What's interesting is we just saw this with Brad Angelina as well where their custody case and divorce case had been going real smooth for two years and all of sudden in made a left turn because somebody thought somebody was influencing the judge. It's crazy that we haven't really figured out the facts of what this pandemic has on people. I mean when the Great Depression happened and the financial thought fall of two thousand and eight happened two or three years. Later we started thinking I got everyone's depress. We have the this generation of anxiety riddled people what's happening to people in the time of corona is this paranoia is really get into them and we're going to see a lot of stable and settled court in custody cases begin to get rocky because people are paranoid that their kids are going out and seeing people. No, I'm just saying it's crazy you. Healing. Really affect the roller is going to be in Time magazine. That is showed. A words I'm telling you true. Affecting everybody is true.

Germany Time Magazine Heidi Twenty Twenty California Brad Angelina Kobe LOS Corona New York
Heidi Klum & Seal's Ugly Legal Battle

Daily Pop

05:21 min | 2 months ago

Heidi Klum & Seal's Ugly Legal Battle

"Walk to the top so much to today. Let's dive right in starting with highly clue and sealed nasty feud the exit ugly legal battle over the kids she's trying to bring their four children to Germany. While to films showed there. Now seal who has joint custody of the kids does not want them to go Heidi filed for an emergency hearing then seal filed for his own response telling the court he believes Heidi has a hidden agenda to move the children to Germany in keep them away from him. Now we all remember how do you feel as a loving couple back in the day they kept doing their mouths all the time but now things seem to be getting so ugly between them. Twenty twenty honey this year is a raging dumpster fire everyone. is so paranoid and scared for every single thing in their lives and if I was I. I understand his paranoia. If you're going to go to Germany, you're GONNA love it. Their schools are going to open your parents are there you get to spend time with them? What makes him think that she won't say Oh my God the kids and loving it here we're going to stay for another six months I understand. But the thing is it's like, okay I understand where he's coming from as well. These are his children. But when I was lied when I was reading the court documents, he literally says or his lawyer says on his behalf well, I understand that we don't have a specific schedule in place to see the kids but I still don't want them to live somewhere else like it doesn't seem like they're necessarily a weekly priority. It's kind of just like whenever he finds time to see them and I'm sure she finds that to be inconvenient inconsistent, disrespectful and hurtful to her children. So if she wants to go to Germany which all the points you made are valid the schools are open her grandparents lived there. She's German she's probably a national treasure. He can fly to Germany and spend time with his children the way he's been doing it in Los. Angeles. Well, that's not saying every week. That's the thing is with custody you use it or you lose it I mean, if you have the right see the people I mean he did say just to be fair in the arguments he did claim that she makes it difficult says that the kids are sick all the time I'm not sure what's true obviously but either way you can enforce to see your children. That's what. Your legal rights is according to their custody agreement. So He needs to make sure that he ensures that that happens I. Don't think that he's to win this one because she has really plans it out. She doesn't really seem to like have a reason to stay in Germany forever she is said, I'm leaving on this time I will be back by this time even though it's my Christmas I will send the kiss. Christmas. So, right Is Making a big. But that's but if you put that in legal documents and sides like even though the children's spent Christmas with sealed last year, I'm willing to let them spend Christmas with him this year it seems like she's really trying to work things out and I know that we've seen this sort of in the past where if she's saying the kids are sick or it's not time, it's probably because she feels like whatever he was just drop in and see his children is disruptive to their schedule. Yes but I mean. Fair either. But that's when you say okay this is not fair to my kids. Let me get this in writing and let's go to court and let's get a supervise in stable schedule. Don't bring it up when you're ready to move to Germany you guys have had uh Obviously. So hadn't seen kids on a regular basis in years go ahead and put that on file. But the problem is if a parent moves the children outside of a state line and the kids go ahead and get a life, they're they're in sports they're in school they're the mom can petition for kids to move the residences to another state. Imagine another country six, thousand miles away I don't know how to fight custody between California New York much less California in Germany standing. There I understand him being scared. But at the time I just don't think he's GonNa win this one because she's being very clear about coming back. I mean she's not really she's filming she's working. She's providing for her family show happened to be moving over there because of Kobe reasons and it is a weird time and I think you just have to be flexible. So I hear seals concern but I don't think he's going to win this one I think he's GonNa get to take gives you know what's also What's interesting is we just saw this with Brad Angelina as well where their custody case and divorce case had been going real smooth for two years and all of sudden in made a left turn because somebody thought somebody was influencing the judge. It's crazy that we haven't really figured out the facts of what this pandemic has on people. I mean when the Great Depression happened and the financial thought fall of two thousand and eight happened two or three years. Later we started thinking I got everyone's depress. We have the this generation of anxiety riddled people what's happening to people in the time of corona is this paranoia is really get into them and we're going to see a lot of stable and settled court in custody cases begin to get rocky because people are paranoid that their kids are going out and seeing people. No, I'm just saying it's crazy you. Healing. Really affect the roller is going to be in Time magazine. That is showed. A words I'm telling you true. Affecting everybody is true.

Germany Time Magazine Heidi Twenty Twenty California Brad Angelina Kobe LOS Corona New York
Jay-Z and Pharrell Team up for New Song 'Entrepreneur'

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 2 months ago

Jay-Z and Pharrell Team up for New Song 'Entrepreneur'

"Called entrepreneur with a video that showcases the number of black entrepreneurs who overcame obstacles, including Systemic disadvantage. Song was released in conjunction with Time magazine cover story curated by Williams, which includes conversations with Angela Davis, Tyler, the creator, Naomi Osaka, Geoffrey Canada and others about howto array systemic inequalities in this country.

Naomi Osaka Angela Davis Geoffrey Canada Time Magazine Williams Tyler
Unwanted Truths: Inside Trump’s Battles With U.S. Intelligence Agencies

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

04:36 min | 2 months ago

Unwanted Truths: Inside Trump’s Battles With U.S. Intelligence Agencies

"Us now is Robert Draper writer at large for the New York Times magazine. He's the author of several books including most recently to start a war how the Bush administration took America into Iraq Arbor draper has just published this landmark piece of reporting the Times magazine. It's called unwanted truth this inside trump's battles with US intelligence agencies among the scoops embedded here is news that. The. White House pressured the Director of National Intelligence to change and intelligence community conclusion that Russia wanted president trump reelected in two thousand, twenty, the intelligence director at the time Dan Coats said, no, he was then fired his successor signed off on the change, but he was then fired after one of his deputies briefed Congress that in fact, Russia is working to reelect president trump this year. Mr Draper I, thank you for this reporting for joining us here tonight to help us understand it. Thanks very much for your time. I've said a lot of words about the. Words that you have reported here and that you have printed. Let me just ask if I got anything wrong or if you think that I'm looking at anything the wrong way around. To actually think presences I did when issue two clarifications the I rooted in the most important is that I am not aware the Joe McGuire had anything to do with the alteration of the National Intelligence Estimate this all took place during his first couple of weeks on the job when his hands were very much full with Ukraine whistleblower incident as you correctly pointed at and so this really. Anthem it matter win the in I was approved on September the twenty six inch testifying on the hill all day long. So he wasn't able to cheer that meeting. So that's the first second thing is that You know they're a don't want the story to give anyone the impression that the intelligence community as a whole has been bent to the will of Donald Trump. There's still plenty of analysts in case officers who are doing very good work. The problem is that the people above them have been in the line of fire with the trump administration and had begun to water down such that the intelligence products do not have the integrity that they once did not mean saying black is why end up as down but they are saying things in a more equivocating fashion and we saw this most recently just out of this past Friday. On a no deny official release this election security report saying that for the first time did yes it did appear the Russia. Trump essentially the same breath saying that China in Iran. Favored Biden is if it were kind of a jump ball or something in that was working patient, you did not see before the trump presidency. I feel like I. Thank you for for those clarifications and for drilling down on those things in that way I feel like. When I read it, the beginning of your piece that Dan Coats was pressured to change the National Intelligence Estimate around Russia's intentions for the two thousand election and he said, no felt like, wow, that's that's really big news about Dan Coats to find out that that happened just before he was fired. Is itself a scoop. But then to find out that the National Intelligence Estimate. was in fact watered down in the way that the White House wanted under Joe McGuire. It it does seem like the sort of bending to the White House's will equivocating on things that aren't equivocal casting things in a way that doesn't you know is designed not to upset the president or put things in ways that he likes it does feel like it's not just pressure, but it's effective pressure that's actually working on the I say. Over sharing in. A. probably Rachel that the matter of. Russia in election security has been a sore subject since before trump's presidency and everyone knew I in the NFC in the West Wing and certainly in the intelligence community that to bring the very matter of Russia interfering in two thousand sixteen, it's likely interference patterns through the midterms and into twenty twenty an most of all that if they were trump would be to call into question the legitimacy of this presidency. That's how he would receive this and so because it was such an unpleasant thing as report out then chief definite Mulvaney and then national security advisor. John was a considerable lengths to to keep this completely off the agenda would get on the agenda for example, when it was a single in a seat meeting at relating to Russia in Election Security Pearson Nelson than the secretary of. Homeland Security didn't get five minutes into it before trump started interrupting her and asking questions about a wall along the Mexican border. So this has been a distasteful subject to him people around him have known that and they have adjusted themselves unfortunately accordingly.

Donald Trump Russia Dan Coats Joe Mcguire Director Of National Intellige White House Robert Draper Mr Draper President Trump United States The New York Times Magazine Writer Homeland Security Iraq Arbor America Rachel Biden Mulvaney Director
Debate over mail-in voting heats up

Politics and Public Policy Today

05:55 min | 2 months ago

Debate over mail-in voting heats up

"Another issue that is rising to the surface. The debate over mail in voting and the president critical of states like Nevada but very supportive of states like Florida and Arizona, which, by the way have Republican governors versus a Democratic governor. That's right Now, Trump has tried to draw a distinction between male voting and absentee voting, and there actually is a difference, according to election efforts in a state like Nevada, they are actually sending a ballad to every voter. It's different in Ah, in a state like Florida or a lot of other states, Republican and Democrat run election administrations where they're not sending every voter of ballot, But they're sending every registered voter an application for a ballot. So an absentee ballot is considered something that you have to ask. For now. A lot of states are Doing this for the first time sending absentee ballot applications to everyone removing the need for an excuse for an absentee ballot right in my state, Virginia and a lot of others in the past, you've had to. Ah, Ah sign affidavit that says, I have to vote absentee because I won't. I won't be here. I'm disabled or there's some reason that I cannot vote in person. States, including Virginia are removing that requirement. Removing things like, you know, notarization and witnessing requirements. To make it easier for people to vote from home. But still shop stopping short of sending everybody has ballot, which some conservative voting experts say that just leaves all these ballots lying around that people may not have wanted and opens the door sees an opportunity for fraud toe happen, and there have been a couple of isolated cases of that. Nevertheless, in almost every way and certainly when it comes to ballot security, the experts said. There really isn't a difference between vote by mail and absentee voting and the distinction that the president's trying to drive mostly based on where his friends are right which states he thinks he thinks you're likely to vote for him in which are likely. To vote against him and again, in spite of his attempts to turn this into a red blue divide. You really do have states of both political leanings across the country dramatically ramping up people's ability to vote from home ability to vote remotely. Not all. There's still some some outliers, and and so that's what a lot of election officials Experts to worry that that there's a lot of room for bad things to happen on. And like everything else that Corona viruses sort of exposed. This is a system that already had a lot of problems right. If the pandemic hadn't happened, you could imagine that you and I would be sitting here talking about foreign election interference allegations of voter fraud. All of these issues surrounding our election infrastructure there were already very serious and then the pandemic comes along and simultaneously exacerbates those issues. But also forces forces action. So we've seen this wholesale transformation in a lot of places of the ways that people are going to vote in in ways that could potentially because ah lot of confusion and a lot of delays. Once the once election rolls around, and one followed to that point, and you write about it in your time magazine piece is the president essentially trying to sow the seeds of doubt regarding the outcome of this election in November. That is the concern of a lot of experts again of both political persuasions that you and this is a drumbeat that Trump has has been ah, keeping up since since before the 2016 election and Ah when he said, You know, I couldn't guarantee that he would accept the result and then, of course, and now, of course, Republicans accused Democrats being the ones who never accepted the result. The legitimacy of the 2016 An election, although, of course Hillary Clinton did concede the day after. But again we have the president over and over, saying this election is going to be rigged. This election is going to be improper. The very existence of people voting by mail, a system that existed in many faiths long before Donald Trump was a candidate for anything but just saying that the existence of that system automatically guarantees This election will be fraud fraudulent on and part of the reason that that's potentially so serious number one because you know, democracy relies upon a certain measure of trust that people Trust in the system. Trust in institutions believe that it's an accurate representation of the popular will, but number two because there's so many unique challenges to this election because there's going to be such an unusual value of people voting by mail. I probably will take a while to count all those votes and you could imagine a situation where you know the early vote count goes for one candidate. That is more votes come in. It's hard to change. That's been very easy for that candidate Seo will somebody's monkeying with the number. Somebody's doing something improper, creating doubt in the minds of their supporters, potentially making their supporters want to take to the streets because they feel that their votes are being taken away from them, And that's very dangerous when it's not warranted when it's when it's nearly No Jen DUP in one's perceived political interests that really endangers the bedrock of our democracy. And so there's a lot of concern that that that people have accurate information that people understand that the vote will take a while to count very well may not know the winner of the presidential or many other close elections on election night, and that's OK. That's not something going wrong. In fact, that's the system functioning as it is supposed to function. We should all just take a deep breath and pay for those votes to get

President Trump Donald Trump Virginia Fraud Nevada Florida Hillary Clinton Jen Dup Arizona SEO
Revolutionary Photos

The Nod

04:30 min | 2 months ago

Revolutionary Photos

"We're bringing you a quick concentrated hit of all things black this week, we're playing six degrees of black separation in honor of President Obama's birthday. We're celebrating the thirtieth anniversary of Mo better blues with Spike Lee ranked and and I turn to astrologer Dana Lynne knuckles to see. If the stars can explain why our friendship is. So dysfunctional it's packed week Ya and on today's episode, we're talking to hip hop photographer Mel d Cole who's gone from capturing subjects Ciza, most deaf and tyler the Creator to documenting those protesting on the front lines for change he tells us why he feels like the pictures he's taken this year are some of the most important images he'll ever take a really special episode we hope you like it. This year the black lives matter protests and uprisings have garnered unprecedented numbers and attention popular hip hop photographer. Mill Deco has shifted his lens from music to documenting the movement from the front lines. Today joins us to discuss his experiences as a photo journalist and reveals which image he hopes will go down in history keep watching this is the not Mel, D Cole started his journey as a photographer in two thousand two with a disposable camera, and since then his work has been featured in esquire rolling stone and Fader Magazine's known for documenting the hip hop scene. Cole has been the resident photographer for the roots and he's also shot fifty cents beyond say and chance the rapper. He's also published a book of his earlier works titled Great Photographs of Hip Hop in the current climate. Coal is now focusing on photo journalism in the streets documenting this store time of social unrest. Mouth. Thank you so much for joining us today. Really happy to have you. Happy to be here. Pandemic has halted work for a lot of creative people. Affect you as hip hop photographer. Oh, shoot affected me in ways where everything just completely stopped I work a lot with Trey Songz. Like. A few weeks after that roots picnic, every festival everything has just completely I had. No work and it was like now, what am I gonNA? Do to support my family and e s had to pivot and you moved into photo journalism which in this environment you know is a is a choice he talk about that decision to pick up the camera in a different way I've always done street photography. So it of came naturally get back out there and shoot industries and couple months. Later you know the protests started and George Floyd died and I had a call accident within myself after talking with another photographer by the name of dollars and he basically expired was already inside of me called me to excellent. I'll even saying the words the Time magazine cover his first one was. I crave I desire to win. You know either have a photo inside in Time magazine talks about the moment that you decided that you needed to be out there on the frontlines documenting this movement. There is no way for me to do it except for being the friends I feel like I to give. To give it to the world and use platforms to show people what's going on in expect my photos have the impact that they did took the first photo. There we went viral and got close twenty, five, thousand likes and. Comments and it was really unexpected for me and that really. Kept me motivated I mean I know you've probably been out there capturing kind of some of the viruses curb have been subject to it absolutely within the first week. Got Attacked by the COPS. Beat tons of for life maybe twenty seconds or so and they realized that. I wasn't. A threat. Just, protesting counter protests for people that were protecting. Columbus Christopher. Columbus statue in. South. Philly within moments of getting their man punched me in the face. Right over the back. Before he punched me looked me in the I. Get outta here and boy I mean I see the violence I've become a this I never thought becomes a part of it. You know. It's all

George Floyd Mel D Cole Time Magazine Trey Songz D Cole Cops Spike Lee Dana Lynne Knuckles President Obama Columbus Christopher Mill Deco Fader Magazine Ciza Tyler Philly Columbus
Hiroshima survivors worry that world will forget

Marketplace

05:18 min | 2 months ago

Hiroshima survivors worry that world will forget

"Exactly 15 minutes past eight in the morning on August 6th, 1945 Japanese time at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above Hiroshi MMA Miss Yoshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of the East Asia, 10 Works had just sat down at her place in the plant office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk. That rather ordinary sentence is the opening to the extraordinary August 1946 New Yorker article titled Oshima. It was published a year after the United States dropped the first nuclear bomb on that city, a year in which the U. S government had gone to great lengths to conceal the human devastation caused And to depict the bomb as a conventional humane weapon. The writer of the Peace John Hursey, uncovered a very different story reporting on the ground in Japan, author and journalist Leslie Bloome chronicles foresees work and the reaction to it in her new book, Fallout. She joins me now from Los Angeles. Leslie Bloome. Welcome. Thank you. Start with Who? John Hursey Wass and how he came to be the one to tell this story. Oh, John. Her see was a young World War two correspondent who had covered action in different theaters throughout the war for Time magazine. And like many war correspondents, then he was pretty supportive of the U. S military. And he even wrote an almost overly complimentary wartime bio of General Douglas MacArthur and That the U. S military knew him entrusted him would be an important factor in my story and how he eventually got his story about Hiroshi MMA, and I don't want to give away too much. But I will say that how he got in was by being the perfect Trojan horse reporter, The perfect Trojan horse reporter. You've hooked us where we're intrigued when I got there. He didn't report this out as a war correspondent. He focused very much on ordinary people on he picked six of them. Why did he want to tell the story in that way? Well, I mean, the fact of the matter is is that the bombing of Hiroshima was widely reported when it happened, and it was reported as a very big end of days. Story mean there were pictures of the mushroom clouds that were released in pictures, the landscape devastation. But there were no pictures that were released or no stories that were released about the human toll that it happened on the ground there, and the government was really going to enormous lengths to cover up the reality of theater. Tomic aftermath in Hiroshima, Nagasaki They were very concerned with as the former secretary of war, put it, not being seen as having outdone, Hitler and atrocities. So her C and his editors at the New Yorker magazine became determined to tell the story from the point of view of survivors. You know, these are among the on ly humans who have ever experience what it's like to be on the receiving end of nuclear attack. He ultimately picked a widow with young kids, a young female clerk to medics, a priest and a minister with with a young family, and his idea was to create a sense of empathy. In his readers with these individuals, because, after all, not everybody could understand the physics of how the bombs works or visualized. You know, an all out nuclear attack that anyone could relate to being a mother or a father or colleague or doctor who's going about their everyday business. One catastrophe strikes I wonder if you would give us a sense of just one telling story of what he did find when he was there What it was that so shocked American readers who had no idea what was unfolding in Japan. One story that particularly resonated with him. He interviewed a young female clerk who was in her company when the bomb was detonated. This's the clerk I mentioned in the intro exactly one of the most famous introductions in journalistic history, and when the bomb exploded over her factory bookshelves fell upon her, and she was nearly crushed to death by books. And he thought How ironic it was to have somebody nearly crushed by books within the first moments of the atomic age, and literally when he was leaving here, Oshima and standing on the surprisingly intact train station platform, he thought that he was going to have to write about that line. And that's one of the incidents that most resonated with readers. So August 1946 The New Yorker publishes. What was the reaction? Both in the United States and around the world to this story. Well in her sees own words. The reaction was quote explosive mean, I try not to use that word in my book for obvious reasons. But he did, And the article was simply titled here, Oshima, and it comprised nearly the entire contents of the August 31st 1946 issue of The New Yorker. It's sold out immediately. You're even black market copies of it going for, you know, astronomical sums. It was syndicated in its entirety, and this is a 30,000 word story in newspapers across the country and around the world. And editors and reporters and readers were enraged. They were horrified by the testimonies in her sees here, Oshima, and they also began demanding to know what else was the U. S government withholding from the US public And then, when President Truman was asked by a reporter if he had personally read it, he retorted. I never read the New York ER. It just makes me bad. But the fact is, is that the government had been put very much on the defensive. That said, You know, they didn't want to look like they were on the defensive, but they were and they had to scramble to try to reclaim the narrative.

New Yorker Magazine Oshima Leslie Bloome United States Hiroshi Mma Reporter Hiroshima Japan U. S Los Angeles John Hursey Wass East Asia John Hursey Miss Yoshiko Sasaki Douglas Macarthur Time Magazine Writer
Laverne Cox: Fighting for Trans Lives

LGBTQ&A

03:53 min | 4 months ago

Laverne Cox: Fighting for Trans Lives

"I want to start with your Time magazine cover if that's okay into dozen fourteen year on the cover of time and the headline, said the transgender tipping point. Wow, I wanNA to know if you knew that that's what the headline was going to be. And what your reaction was, it was a cover. Try so I wasn't. One hundred percent sure I be on the cover. They told me it stem news item happened. That was really big that I would be bumped from the cover so I didn't know that the cover. What's happening until I? Think the night before that was happening for sure. I didn't know what the headline would be. The first time I saw the cover, a friend of mine named Precious Davis. Who's a brilliant activist and human beings? She's in Chicago. She texted me a photo of the cover and then it was. The editor of time premiered on like think morning America. One of the morning shows that morning. And then it was and I think that certainly changed my wow, so, what was your reaction to the transgender tipping point part of it? You know it's I, don't it's hard for me to separate my reaction in two thousand fourteen from the subsequent sort of reaction. That community has had to that title. There was so much. Criticism. From my community of that title, and the suggestion of that tipping point and criticism of the way the article was written, and who was excluded in there was a lot of that. I like about my community, and what I appreciate about activists who are on the ground doing the work is that in their honesty they keep us accountable. They keep us pushing to go further to be more inclusive to think differently and harder about who is being left out and what? We're not talking about so it's hard for me to separate my reaction. Of the tipping point moment from. The criticism and the critical interrogation of that moment my engine Mitchell, it's we did a panel for variety magazine. A year ago about Trans Representation in the media. For Trans Actors, and she what she said, is that that moment in two thousand fourteen, with kind of all about Laverne is the way she framed it. And then she said Post Post because we're probably impose moment, even though poses still in the air. It's about all of us. Jin, Richards contended, and I like that because I think it was always my goal, that was very clear in two thousand, fourteen at that moment was not about me and man it was about. About a community that was part was about all the activist who worked for years to create space for me to have that moment on the cover of Time magazine, and so now that is coming to fruition that more of our voices are being elevated and more perspectives and It's taken a lot of pressure me I feel a lot of pressure in two thousand fourteen I gotta tell you reflecting on that moment is. Do you remember the criticism more than the celebration? Of both, they covered with revealed on my birthday, so my birthday now is not only my birthday. Anniversary of me being on the cover of Time magazine, which is pretty dope and I decided that year I said to myself. If I'm going to be on the cover of time, magazine, chiappa Party and so. I wasn't going to be on the cover. If I was bump for any reason I was like well, they could just be a birthday party, and so I had a party that year and Time magazine mistake were so generous that they gave us tons of copies of the magazine and my boyfriend at the time had posters made of the of the magazine as opposed to of my Time magazine, covering my apartment, and I went to my mom, and then we gave one. Away for charity, so we had a party and it was indeed celebration there were tons of Trans People at the Party and some people from orange, new black with the party, and so I have fond memories of the celebration of the moment as well but I think both can exist all about both end that I can be in the celebration, the neck, and also critically effect on the moment

Time Magazine Chiappa Party Precious Davis Chicago Editor Laverne America Mitchell JIN Richards
California City Bans Predictive Policing Software

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:06 min | 4 months ago

California City Bans Predictive Policing Software

"In the wake of black lives matter protests, governments across the country have been weighing how to reform their police, departments and address inequities law enforcement. One tactic that's come under scrutiny has been the use of surveillance technology last week, a city council in Santa Cruz California voted to ban what's called predictive policing software? It could be the first measure of its kind in the US, our reporter David. Bertie has been looking into this and joins us to. To explain hey, Dave. Thanks for joining US Qatari all right, so explain to us what is predictive policing? How does it work predictive policing technology as it's used in Santa Cruz or has been using Santacruz? Essentially a data analysis tool that tracks usually three types of data, crime, type, location, and timing, and essentially allows the police department project where hotspots within the city would be an argument for this type of technology is that would allow police department? To basically make decisions more efficiently in terms of how they allocate resources. So why is it coming under? Scrutiny is coming under scrutiny for a few reasons. One is sort of this national discussion. We're having about race and policing which has filtered down to local areas such as Santa. Cruz in California, but also people in that city had a first hand. Look at how this technology has played out the police department. There was an early adopter of the. The technology and decided that if we base our policing tactics on analysis of data that is inherently biased is going to produce an in some cases replicate biased policing tactics. So why is it inherently biased? Explain that to us. How does watching where crimes are happening now and using that data to predict new crimes? Why why is there bias in their book to Santa? Cruz Mayor Justin Cummings explained it this way. Basically, it's garbage in garbage out. Coming said to me if we collect data from police, stops or crimes that are reported in our current policing system, it's going to reflect a policing system in which underrepresented communities such as black communities or Hispanic communities face disproportionately heavy police presence, so we take data from a policing strategy. The disproportionately put officers in communities of color were going to get data reflects. Reflects that policing strategy so in ways in some cases perpetuates that cycle, so it's not I mean just to be clear. When we say, it's collecting data about crime that's happening. It's using data that the cops are giving them about things like police stops there stopping someone, and that is being recorded as crime whether or not actual crime place. They're not yet the. Gist of it and what Cummings would argue, and what the city council. Santa Cruz also agreed upon is that they will also reflect sort of the disproportionate ways. Cops have been shown to stop people of Color, so you know in some cases they might stop a black driver more often than a white driver for a regular speeding ticket, for example that's sort of a mundane example, but I think you could play the Dow and people in Santa. Cruz have played it out over the course of different types of potential crimes now, Santa Cruz isn't the only place in the country. That's used this sort of predictive policing New York. City has used it as. As well, and they've been under fire for many years for stop and Frisk. Policy which basically feeds into exactly what you're talking about. Roy New York pioneers a statistical modeling called COMSAT in one thousand nine hundred ninety S, which is a little bit more of a primitive version of this essentially uses big data from different types of crime committed around the city in order to project where officers should spend the most time in resources, so predictive policing technology basically takes that to the next level. It injects an artificial intelligence to the process. It basically allows software to learn crime patterns over the course of time in order to better project, police should go. So are other cities following I mean this is obviously happening in the wake of the killing of George Floyd and a lot more attention, being paid to the way that policing is taking place around the country. Are we seeing other cities and states kind of think about this in the same direction Santa Cruz is thought to be the first city in the country to actually ban predictive policing, and it did so in large part because. It has experienced with this technology actually in two thousand eleven time magazine named the Santa Cruz police departments. Use of technology is one of the fifty best inventions of the year, so they're definitely ahead of many other cities in this regard, but spoke to some civil liberties advocates over the last couple of days, and they said this is certainly a new front in this larger discussion we're having about police surveillance, which is really ramped up over the last few weeks. Particularly Municipalities, so you have places like Boston, which recently voted to ban facial recognition technology. Technology for its police. Department California, also recently stopped bill at the state level that would regulate facial recognition technology, and I think at the state and local level across the country you do see a lot of lawmakers and activists really start to push reconsider how police use technology

Santa Cruz Santa Cruz California Cruz Santa United States Justin Cummings New York Bertie Dave Reporter California David George Floyd Comsat
Tales From the Dark Web

Feedback with EarBuds

03:58 min | 4 months ago

Tales From the Dark Web

"This week's theme comes to us from Daniel Ocho and is called tales from the dark web. Here's why Daniel chose this theme. He says the Internet has a dark side hidden. Just below the surface, these podcasts will guide listeners through stories from the Internet's dark side where crime, drugs and murder are the currency of choice. Here are they episodes chosen by Daniel for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first episode comes to us from the missing Crypto, Queen and called Dr Rusia. It's twenty three minutes long. Dr Rouge promised financial financial, revolution and then two years ago, she disappeared. Why. The missing crypto clean is an eight part series from BBC sounds. The next episode comes to us from reply all and is called the snapchat thief it sixty nine minutes long. This week, a super tech support after Lizzie snapchat gets hacked. Things Start Getting Really Creepy Alex investigates. The next episode comes to us from case file, and it's called the Silk Road part, one and two. The first episode is eighty four minutes long, and the second is eighty minutes long. The Silk Road was an ancient network of trade routes that started in China in the second century BC via a combination of roads and sea routes goods like silk, paper, and spices transported from the producers in Asia to the markets in Europe. Eventually, it wasn't just goods that were traded. They're also ideas, customs, religions, and even diseases. The next episode comes to us from Lizard people is called Bitcoin was created by a rogue ai with Sam Baltar it sixty minutes long. Bitcoin is one of the great mysteries of the Internet. Age who exactly created it? Where's it going? How did it blow up so fast? What the fudge is a blockchain, and why don't I have won the delightful Sam Baltar of the equally delightful podcast? Weird work joins to talk about cryptocurrency and the possibility that the J. Cryptic coin was created by. Get this artificial intelligence. The next episode comes to us from breach and is called. Caution falling rocks. It's forty seven minutes long. The Yahoo data breach left three billion users private information vulnerable for three years before the public learned about it. How did it happen? And what can we learn from the greatest known data breach in history? Those are the episodes chosen by Daniel. Ocho for this week's theme tales from the Dark Web, follow along with the discussion of this week's podcast episodes by using the Hashtag dark web pods. Now for some podcast industry news from the inside podcasting newsletter. As always, thank you to Sky Pillsbury. Who writes the inside podcasting newsletter for allowing us to share it with our ear? Buddies on this podcast will share the top stories from this week's issue of the newsletter. I story. Sky Interviews James Kim on her podcast the inside podcasting podcast. James is the creator of the fiction podcast moon face a show. Time magazine named one of the best ten twenty nineteen. In Moon face a young Korean American man named Paul wants to tell his mom that he's gay, but they don't speak. The same language Paul Story is loosely based on James Kim's real life experiences. Next story layoffs public radio suffered a heartbreaking number of layoffs this week. Here are the details Minnesota public radio slash American public media has laid off twenty eight employees. APM has also stop production of live from here and the hilarious world of depression. Chicago public media has let go of twelve employees and has ceased production on sound opinions. Next Story. She. PODCASTS founder Jessica. Cup for men and Elsie Escobar have decided to postpone their organizations. Second Annual Conference until October twenty twenty one. It was originally scheduled to take place in Arizona later this year.

Daniel Ocho James Kim Sam Baltar Dr Rusia Paul Story Murder Lizzie Snapchat BBC Chicago Elsie Escobar China Dr Rouge Sky Pillsbury Time Magazine Arizona APM Alex Founder
"time magazine" Discussed on Daily Pop

Daily Pop

04:42 min | 5 months ago

"time magazine" Discussed on Daily Pop

"Time magazine just released a powerful cover for its new issue Titus Ghaffar. Ghaffar who is the artist depicts a black mother cradling the outline of her child to show a mother's loss. This cover also alludes to how George Floyd called out to his deceased mother, as he was dying on the border of the cover are the names of thirty five black men and women whose deaths have been linked to either police, brutality or racism. I mean the photos beautiful, and it's really poignant at it says that you need to say it's just so many women that that woman is representing have had to go through losing their child and the only silver lining I found after reading about this was just that George Voids. Mother Luckily had passed before her son. Did you know so? At least she didn't have to go through losing her child like so many women before her. Yeah, but it's. It's still upsetting because he has no family and children who? Still have to to go three bear the brunt of missing him and you know it's. It's I think that they're a lot of people are triggered right now. I had ice spoke with a friend earlier today who had watched the memorial of George Floyd and was completely triggered by a family member that they had lost to police, brutality, and so I think right now. Everybody is feeling the loss of obviously no. No one can ever feel what it's like to lose their own child, unless they been apparent, who has lost a child something like this, but I do feel like that losses really triggering to a lot of people. It's affecting you if you've never had a loss, but having won and having some something like this can really bring out a lot of emotion. People are are really going through right now. This is. Absolutely necessary unfortunately, but it's it's rough very. As many reflect over what's going on right now? Terry crews has come forward issued a new apology to Gabrielle Union for not initially supporting her when she was like Oh from America's got talent, he tweeted. He searched his heart on how to do better adding I. WanNa make further amends with black women. In particular, Gabrielle Union for not recognizing the privilege I have especially in the workplace and January, Gabrielle claimed offensive events were taking place onset glass month. NBC announced that an External Investigation found there was no wrongdoing. America's got talent. We should note is part of the NBC Universal Family which includes e. what do you think about this apology? I mean perhaps the time to reflect and realize that he could have done more, and he wanted to make amends for that and I don't think there's anything wrong with that <hes>. And maybe he just feels like he didn't handle things correctly at first, and he should have been more supportive of Gabrielle because I mean look I'm for the belief that people don't just make things up for no reason. and. She clearly has been very vocal about her experience and felt like she had to endure a lot of events. If things and I'm sure if I was here I would have wanted his support originally, so I I think it's good that he's coming out now and saying something. I have two points to make first about Terry. Let's see that action because I feel like he had some really offensive tweets. That saying. He didn't need to answer to anybody, but his wife that he he made some really strong statements on Social Media About Gabrielle. And that were really hard to swallow especially after the fact that she had stood by him after he had come out during the me, too movement said that he had had some issues with sexual assault, and she stood by him so to have him completely turn around, and not be supportive of her and be very dismissive of her. And how she felt that she was treated is definitely difficult for me to process. And you know this kind of like apology now makes you wonder what it's really rooted <hes>. So you know I feel like people need to see action I. Think People are really tired of hearing words <hes>. My second point is is that I think these. Claims? Gabriel Union made go around incentive on the conversation that are being talked about right now where we are having two different thoughts and points of view, because people have not understood with these microaggressions have done to black people, not only in society, but also in the workplace so something that people may not have necessarily deemed as tone. Death are now getting something of getting a spotlight. Spotlight shine and saying hey, this is what this is being perceived as and I think that's important so I think you know her conversations. It's important to look at what she was saying. Because I think that some people may not have understood what these things will actually meaning, and now may be able to have a little bit more cognizance of how important it is to look at. At when somebody saying that they feel that they're being mistreated,

tiffany haddish Gabrielle Union George Floyd AL SHARPTON George Terry crews NBC Titus Ghaffar George Voids Time magazine America Kevin Hart twitter assault
"time magazine" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

05:04 min | 7 months ago

"time magazine" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Do meet them on quote time magazine joined into wine quote health experts are telling health people not to wear facemask for qualifiers so why are so many doing it what do you think time magazine you morons article suggested believing in mask is some kind of superstition like not walking under ladders or being afraid of black cats yeah it's insulting it's ridiculous they tell you mass don't work unless you work in a hospital how does that work does mask effectiveness change based on what job you do the only useful if you're already sick what kind of virus can spread from a symptomatic carriers that doesn't make any sense whatsoever oh wait you're just too dumb to wear the mask okay is it really hard to put on of course masterwork everyone knows that dozens of research papers have proved it in South Korea Japan Hong Kong rest of Asia recorded buyer should be kept under control mash for key so look we understand there's a shortage of masks we understand only certain people should get them because it's a triage moment we get it but stop lying to us because it makes a cynical it divides the country tell the truth we can handle it I can agree with that more you know I'm not the Attorney General saying Hey people stop buying masks they don't do any good well now I don't believe anything you're ever going to say to me and I am not kidding why would I listening thing you've got to say yeah there's a Cambridge study that showed that even wrapping a scarf or bandanna around your face would stop half of the point zero two micron the thing that the coronavirus size do not at this and and we also know that the number of the the microbes to get into you is incredibly important how severe your infection is so something is simple and dumb as a bandanna can stop half of it N. ninety five masks worn properly are incredibly effective that was a terrible calculation binder properly they're pretty effective it was a terrible calculation for our government to not say make a mask where some sort of mask everybody in the country we run flatness Kerr fast and say listen our doctors and nurses are heroes they're fighting to save our lives they will die if they don't get the masks you don't need one yet unless you're around sick people or you are sick donate don't hoard them make it a moral imperative but the calculation was made we're gonna be dishonest to get more compliance center still saying it today we said we had we saw earlier today the affable wearing a mask could actually make it worse now if you if you wore a mask and went into a room full of people coughing the corona virus and then you went out of the room and blow your nose with the outside of the mask yes maybe that would be worse than wearing the mask but the idea that wearing the mask improperly what if it stopped ten percent of the corona virus that that could be worse than not wearing that's just it's idiotic and I hate anytime the paternal government in any at any level says something like we don't want you to get a false sense of whole perimeter security or whatever and that's not your job to decide Hey my level of hope should be that's really disappointing I just hope we the people and we the people's government learn something from this I mean I hope somebody's keeping track of the screw up soap there's an annual review or something like that well I I wish I had the truth because I'm not but we have some masks we have them from when the wild fires happened not a lot of them but I got a few but I would've been more in one in the crowded grocery store I was told by my government that they don't do any good so I was more I made the mistake of listening to them I won't do that again won't make that mistake again right now that's that's bad that was gamble they took suppose historians are will will judge them for it we need a nine eleven commission act the Kennedy commission there will be an it'll be partisan and slow and expensive and the conclusions will most likely be buried people figure out how to make a lot of money off of this right now we're gonna make it mandatory that each hospital have five million mascot after replacing every six months because they expire yeah for instance in yeah well the manufacturers will get that in the line make some contributions congresspeople but the worst form of government except for all the others I guess I am so cynical Chinese back to someone that's in the wet market is exciting news kids bats tonight I like to get a dead bat floating in a Big Five gallon bucket a grey water sloshing around in there a little bit get some shoes on there don't overcook that thing I like a nice and rare well thanks China thanks for that yet commie scum eight are you.

time magazine
"time magazine" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:50 min | 10 months ago

"time magazine" Discussed on KCBS All News

"After he was named time magazine's entertainer of the year Deborah Rodriguez CBS news it's four oh five of the bay area's news station KCBS we have widespread fog this morning cold temperatures thirties and forties showers by tonight I'm John Evans good morning all E. cigarettes are not created equal KCBS is Jim Taylor says the latest research points the heightened levels of toxicity produced by one local manufacturer in particular talking about jul tool one of the reasons the tools that they figured out how to pack a lot more nicotine into a us a lot more doctor Matt Springer all through the new study out of UCSF he says inhaling nicotine is an irritation or so on a regular re cigarette there is a limit to how much nicotine you can put in there before you just can't handle it anymore you're kidding but by chemically treating the nicotine with an asset to all figured out how to make the so called nicotine salts they're much easier on the airwaves and so you can take in a much higher concentration of nicotine which is why he says jul is so popular with team this is why these kids are are dancing and your parents are getting huge doses of nicotine and that they're hooked like that he says he's heard of kids smoking actual cigarettes in an attempt to wean themselves off of jul Jim Taylor KCBS the island of Alameda is considering a ban on plastic eating utensils KCBS is Melissa call Ross reports that band could go county wide to go food where in Alameda already has to be re usable or compostable Stanley ye with town tavern in China house restaurant on Park Street says his business has embraced the move and uses the compostable plastic bags for papers falsely classics roles which is great for the environment Madison enjoying a bagel from house a bagel supports reusable and compostable products I think it's important to do it on the city level you know and on a business level because it has a big effect that way now a proposal from county agencies stop waste could take Alameda's regulations a step further Alameda city councilman Jim o'dea orders a waste management authority and we are considering a similar type of ordinance that could be implemented county wide he says the city council will be discussing a couple of options at its meeting tonight including a proposal to require re usable utensils and other food where at all dining in restaurants in Alameda Melissa call Ross KCBS state officials are suing a billionaire who's been fighting for more than a decade to keep a secluded beach unsent insula to himself the lawsuit seeks a court order demanding that Vinod Khosla remove all gates and signs on or near the only road to Martin's beach on the seven tail county coast Alex helper and is with the California coastal commission he tells KPIX five the state will argue that the beach has been open to the public for more than a century all for a lot.

time magazine Deborah Rodriguez
"time magazine" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:33 min | 11 months ago

"time magazine" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"To about the third burger and her selection is first of the year of time magazine it sends out a message I believe that specially her message where we attack older people because of course they're responsible for the troubles of the world especially comes to climate change but we're living in an era where older people are becoming irrelevant in the old axiom of respect for the elders is no longer a pluggable the young and the woke and this is why Greta gets the position she gets because there's an agenda and it's not a climate agenda now I mean look everybody can say something about climate change has nothing to do with climate change even though her messages that you know has to do it it has to do with the fact that there are certain people in the political realm said see there is one group it's being out numbered or less number and so the young and the woke want to vote and that's the best the point right yeah we we have a sixteen year old saying all the omnipotence and brilliance of a child should be carried over into the sixteen and seventeen year olds and they should be given the right to vote about twenty countries have granted eighteen actually yeah sixteen and seventeen year olds twenty countries have granted sixteen and seven year olds the right to vote a handful of American cities have done the same and that's for local elections they can do this because states generally regulate their own voting laws as do cities that are governed by their own charters the sixth amendment of the constitution states that eighteen is the minimum age at which voting rights could be protected but it doesn't prohibit cities and states for making it even lower in twenty thirteen to come apart Maryland became the first U. S. city to lower the voting age for local elections to sixteen and early data point suggests that the experiment has been very successful in all of your local election would normally yield a low voter turnout seventy percent of the city's voting eligible were sixteen and seventeen year olds that are casting about sixteen seventy year olds were casting their ballots that and now that might sound load you but it was double the eight point five percent turnout of those eighteen and up so the voting age of course the the younger voters will get out and vote the voting age in Oregon where I live is sixteen years old they're just made six years old by our wonderful governor Kate brown so that's so that's also I think the reason why she got pursue the is because there's a there's a big push for younger people to vote now and and so you have a six year old making decisions you know our order being example and of course they say well yeah I'd if she can do that why can't we vote I seen signs to I'm young only on a more massive scale what format what's more.

time magazine
"time magazine" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"time magazine" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"The scientists settled. That's the new secular replacement for thus saith. The Lord and students across America are buying it for the Colson Center. I'm John Stonestreet this. His breakpoint on Friday tens of thousands of students around the world staged a walkout leaving their classes to demand action on climate change inch well. Some students walked out many school districts including across the state of New York. Just gave all the students today off to join the protests and it's still unclear how many students students actually did join the protests and how many just enjoyed an extra day off. What is clear is that there's no further room for anyone who questions that the planet is indeed warming that warming is human caused and that it is catastrophic. Oh and that we have run out of time to do something about it. Not only was that the loud and in clear message from Friday student protesters it was also the loud and clear message from last week's issue of Time magazine titled twenty-fifty. How Earth survive live the issues written from the perspective thirty years in the future and it describes how we managed to avoid complete annihilation from climate change it is an issue four of breathless melodramatic dogmatism not least of which this paragraph from times editor in chief and CEO Edward Thousand Doll- in the the opening editorial quote notably what you will not find in this issue are climate change sceptics court to our mission is bringing together diverse perspectives experts can and should debate the best route to mitigating the effects of climate change but there is no serious doubt that those effects are real. We're witnessing them right in front of us. The science on global warming is settled he writes. There isn't another side. There isn't another moment will one of the people that time doesn't want us to hear from his Judith Curry who prior to her retirement was the chair of the School of Earth and atmospheric sciences at Georgia Tech Curry. Doesn't I think that the science is settled in her words. If all other things remain equal it is clear that adding more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere will warm the planet however however the real difficulty is that nothing remains equal in other words. We simply don't know enough about how as she puts it. The Sun volcanic eruptions and the interactions between the atmosphere and ocean impact the climate to claim that the science is settled about human caused climate change how how much of the measured warming and recent tropical storm activity is the result of these factors which are beyond human control. How much is increased? Co Two the result of human activity seventy. We are simply not sure now. There's typically nothing wrong with admitting uncertainty however when it comes to this issue by claiming the science settled and treating anyone who disagrees deniers in heretics uncertainty is no longer allowed for many people a certain kind of environmentalists vire minimalist catastrophic has become a religion and arresting climate change has become a crusade. The first casualty of the crusade is the honest pursuit of the truth breath. David Wallace wells book the uninhabitable Earth Life after warming is treated by many in the media and universities as scripture complete with prophetic prophetic warnings about the end of the world yet as my Colson Center colleague Warren Cole Smith Points out there are scientists who strongly disagree with Wallace Wells for example Michael Man the creator of the hockey stick graph and he isn't alone another climate researcher called Wallace Wells predictions quote sloppy and hyperbolic Alec. Now of course I'm not saying here that Christian shouldn't care for the environment or that. We shouldn't take a threat of climate change seriously. What I am saying is that there's no way to know what challenges we face much less how we can confront those challenges if we take the sort of sciences settled approach that time. Time magazine has if you'd like to understand this issue come to breakpoint dot Org and Click on this commentary. I'll link you to a series of five articles written by Warren Goldsmith and and the series Warren asks the tough questions about the history of the Earth's climate doomsday scenarios why the climate is changing and what we can do about got it again come to breakpoint dot org and Click on this commentary to learn more about these issues surrounding climate change even if Time magazine refuses just to for breakpoint. I'm John Stonestreet.

Wallace Wells Time magazine John Stonestreet Colson Center Warren Goldsmith Judith Curry America New York School of Earth Georgia Tech Edward Thousand Doll Warren Warren Cole Smith hockey editor in chief Michael Man Alec
"time magazine" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"time magazine" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Time magazine raves rocket man is magnificent. Maybe I should be more. He would never ordinary in astonishing chievements, unlike anything ever seen. It's much rocket. Friday or on the move is feeling Francis. And you're on the move. Band. Good. They were. Gee. Got it. Game show twenty five times in a row who's done this and on what show it's next on the move..

Time magazine
"time magazine" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"time magazine" Discussed on World News Analysis

"I said why I could earn more in had life there. I said then what about your dream? Okay. Doesn't roundabout way she came back. So sometimes it's the demand how you were needed by the society that she learned accounting wanted to change her life and getting away from nursing people. But then she decided to go back. So that's living proof. She's a living proof that notion fun. She's happy now working as a nose again. Well, these study shows that the there has been mounting evidence. That wants personality can be chain. Changed throughout one's life. So why is worse? I is that of saying early career choices can influence personality for the young people. Do you think that they should actually consider the personality as very important factor when choosing job online don't think the job? Okay. These people. I think is the employing company who are considering, you know, hiring good personality people. How do you define good personality? Easy going, you know, team spirit and high. High level of recognition on the sending things quickly smart. You know, practical problem solving all these capabilities are considered an and Mary happy, you know, self-motivation, you know, all these things considered as good personality. Havi do agree. What we say? You can't take make a silk purse out of a sows ear out of you know, pig's ear so good analogy today. So sometimes I mean, if people if people are shy shy shy you can't change that maybe you can shape edges a little bit. So there's nothing wrong with being shy. There's different kinds of people. But you know, looking at what's more ideal. What helps people get ahead? Yes. It's helpful. If you have good interactive social skills. Yes. It's helpful. If you're pleasant. Yes. It's helpful. If you know a little bit about what's going. In on in the world is helpful. If you pitch in and have a team spirit. So I think there is one preferred route but to make everybody travel the same highway is wrong. Yeah. Yeah. Definitely I agree. But by the way, I have to tell havi that interactive social skills can be attained can be trained, but they need to be desired. Yes. Yes. Hope the young people can have some of the tips from our guests. It doesn't necessarily mean if you have good personality or not what matters is whether you'll love the job or not. And that's it for this weekend edition of today. A quick wrap of today's topic's time magazine has chosen journalists as person of the year as a ranks best places to work in the US in twenty nineteen and the California considered charging residents attacks for sending text messages and study shows early career choices influence personality remind our listeners to hear this. Again, or to catch on previous votes. You can download our podcast by searching for world. News analysis, you download the app, easy, FM or China. Plus in the app store today in a studio, we have Harvey's Odin sinner, fellow of center for China and globalization in our come into Malinche. Thank you all for coming. Thank you. Thanks with news analysis today keeps you informed and inspired wheel. Thank you so much for joining us.

China Malinche time magazine Mary US California Harvey
"time magazine" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"time magazine" Discussed on World News Analysis

"He made a car that's both stylish and practical, and now is a company that does rockets going into space, and we'll take people into space, and he has a company called the boring company. Not boring, but it's boring holes through the ground to develop a system of moving people at very high speeds. So I think although I heard he's kinda difficult guy. He's really creative. And unlike most people because we all have great ideas, he did him. But what an politicians, you know, those who are making a difference. I'm just now, I was, you know, Trump's picture just image came to my mind. Yeah. Yeah. But if I mention China's president. Doing things I remembered then shopping twice, you know, a late Chinese leader twice appeared on time magazine because of the opening up and the reform, and he the resumption of gal definitely brought me or made me what I am today speaking together with havi otherwise, I would be maybe toiling in the countryside receive reeducated by the farmers, you know, working in a factory. So I'm thinking, you know, what China China definitely we are not locked with the US ride in kind of old kind of whatever. So otherwise people that who's doing things that to make things normal back to, you know, no malady again, if it's pilot the politician of the year if there's a category. So he is initiating doing lot of things like the one belt one road influencing a lot of countries a lot of people and no question. He's in the ball. The park. But I think there's other Chinese to who are in the ballpark. Once I went to a conference, and I heard this guy speak scientists what did that scientists? Do. He found a way to dramatically increase the yield of rice. And this means Laurien, right? Yeah. More people just the paying more people can eat less people can die. This is a person who made a difference. He's a better choice is person of the year would be someone who made a difference in a world. And just now we have talked about a Rhonda person of the year for twenty eighteen and Nellis come to the second topic, which we entered into twenty nineteen. A recent survey by glass door has come up with a list of ten best places in the US to work in twenty nineteen management consulting from paying.

US Trump China China China time magazine Nellis Laurien president
"time magazine" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"time magazine" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Everything meeting friends and making a point moment, and then sending pictures GPS locations to people. So that they can find me everything. So I think this one this one thing is my choice of of the thing of the year. I have a thing about things I think the person of the year ship person, and they they have chosen computers when years okay and the same as you talked about we chat saw. Is the person who started we right? But I give this. The person. Yeah. I want to say that I want to say that there needs to be more than one list. So I had this idea that the back cover they should have the monster of the year. There are people who made a difference in. What is your standards of choosing the person of the year somebody who made a difference big difference and positive not necessarily positive unless they have if they have monster of the year, then then richer. It would be I would be positive, but I have other things to other categories like invention of the year. So I think there's a whole list of things. So I think time needs to do a brand extension of person of the year. They're they're thinking twenty two twentieth. Century twenty first century, we need to talk to time magazine. Right. We do. Let's call them up. Actually, my choice would be Shoghi because he basically he did his job. He did it very well. And he got butchered by Mr. bone saw for it. I think which is reprehensible, and so I think that for many reasons he's the person who exemplifies promoting truth under great pressure. And in this case at the cost of well, there's a saying online many argue that he is more like a victim rather than a influential person. So how do you assess that I still think he made a made a difference by being? Being a victim before there's so many people in the world that it's really difficult to make a choice of one person. So I think that he's an appropriate choice. But I do think that time would do well and would profit by having several lists several categories because there's so many people now making a difference. What if somebody invents a great new dish? You know, some great food. They should be the chef or the restaurant of the year. Why not feeding machine we don't need to walk. And then they, you know, he just get fed that eating is fun. Okay. Said you have do you have a list of the person of the year choices or you simply have one we chat, and then the a VR people in the future, very new future. IV a know these robots in the we are stepping into. To a very different area, and who will have a whether it's going to be a scary wodel in a future, or it's there are people welcoming it. It's under the issue. But these people I making our lives, totally different. These are the people that I actually wanted to call the world's attention to. I do have a somebody actually and he could have been last year or the Europe before this year. But go ahead deserves it. He Lon musk. Okay. Because he's crazy. But crazy like a FOX he wanted to do electric cars, and he did the tesla and he..

Lon musk Mr. bone time magazine Europe FOX
"time magazine" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"time magazine" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Malinche welcome. Thank you. Now, let's I I'll goodbye so time magazine has chosen person of the year. No time magazine has chosen the guardians. A group of journalists who have been targeted for their work as person of the year, the grouping glues Khashoggi who was killed in October and other cover features two Reuters journalists who were arrested one year ago Imia mar US President Donald Trump was the runner up for this year's person of the year, title and special counsel rubber moola ranked number three. Okay. So first of all, do you agree with times choices, should they be titled the person of the year in twenty eighteen and white? Well between China and India there's three billion people and then in the rest of the world there's four billion people about so that makes seven billion. It must be an impossible job to choose one person. Or in this case several people or a category of people. But I believe that these people these journalists both get an alive both imprisoned and free good choices among other choices. And so I have no problem with it. It's a thankless job. I think stuff that's the word. And journalists have such an important function. All the functions say in China and my country are somewhat different. But doesn't matter. Journalists are important and the people who were chosen brought out the news at great cost to themselves. Whether it was imprisonment or death by dismemberment by being butchered by Mr. blown saw or whatever. And so I have a great feeling for these people. And I think it's a they're excellent choices. Just thank Covey on behalf of all the journalists in it will you in the in in this field, right? Yes. Journalists on some hero. Sometimes. And like you say sent thankless is the word, but the only regretful this is that these chosen ones either died all arrested in tropical. But what about you know, millions of steel working and not causing Cho's catching the attention of the world. So they were honored after you know, such things happened. So that's the only regret and some unusual for a group of journalists to receive such an honour. So I'm happy actually. But I think that their place holders for the other hundreds of thousands of journalists in the world who are more unsung than they are. They may be safe, but they do very difficult jobs and trying to fair recognized either the ferret out the truth, sometimes they speak truth to power. Sometimes they perform great functions for people in we might not even know their name. I mean is people who read a lot of newspapers or read information online? I think we look for people's names to see well who wrote this. But most people they just want the data. That's all that's it. So there there really are unsung. Now, there could have been many other good choices. But I think that there is always a dilemma about who to choose and many still working on this threats kinds of threats and pressure especially threatened by big institutions, including the government pressure. All these not only the government by company by terrorists by special interest by people with an ax to grind, some of the people who are are under threat are from people who are just playing crazy and. So when you're out there in the public, whether you have a face out there on TV or on the internet or on the radio where it's more anonymous, you're still kind of a public figure. So like, he say Japan that it's the nail that sticks out that gets hammered down. Gets tax right. The magazine is solve it. 'cause that the war on truth. And they're also the guardians of truth. Besides that if you can decide if you have the opportunity who would be your choice of the person of the year twenty eight I would choose you. Choose hobby but nice lettering, which other you know, when you when you throw this question that me I was like what about Trump because time maxing has used to choose the most influential worse. Make the better bet. Make the word better or worse. Adolf Hitler ones of heared on their list. So if somebody who's making some many splashes on. To this world. Right. So Trump is still there, you know, with his reckless remarks and doing things a lot of things..

Donald Trump time magazine China US Reuters Adolf Hitler government Khashoggi special counsel Covey President Mr. blown Cho Japan India one year
"time magazine" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"time magazine" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Number seventeen yesterday on cnn that's pretty amazing stuff i talked about the time magazine cover which is a slanderous smear of president trump time magazine president trump shown from the back in our rendering on the cover of time magazine stanton looking in a mirror now and the rendering where you're looking at his back he's in a brooks brothers suit and in the mirror he's dressed as king henry the eighth with a golden crown encrusted with precious jewels with the dalmatian for around his shoulders white with black dots and of course the cape and snow is sort of like the cowardly lion and the wizard of oz and he sees himself as a king you'd see because he's imperial now he's not the ones zapping american muslims overseas about due processor betraying our allies are going around congress saying i've got a pen and a phone and i don't need branches of government now that was barack obama but but for president trump of course he's the imperial presidency because i'm not really sure why but they don't need to explain themselves there the media after all so yesterday on cnn alison cammarata and dana bash we're discussing the time magazine cover knowing of course that time magazine time warner the parent company of cnn and of time magazine they have the same bosses so it's not as though they're they're free to be critical of time magazine and their absurdist art work on the cover of time magazine cammarata and dana bash time magazine is preaching to the choir not a single person and president trump's base has read time magazine for a long time if you know who does time donald trump he likes to real and not real covers all of that his golf club that was not going to get up with the golf club that's what we call journalism in america today first of all none of president trump's base reads time magazine that's you know because they don't read that you know they have no teeth and they live in the mountains of west virginia and they're not smart like allison cammarata and dana bash they didn't go to the right schools they're not in the media they don't have tv shows trump's supporters don't read they don't read time magazine.

cnn time magazine president stanton king henry congress barack obama trump west virginia allison cammarata brooks alison cammarata donald trump america
"time magazine" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"time magazine" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"Is here do you have time magazine did you how did it make you feel to see you on the cover of time magazine oh man look at that so that's crazy this crazy every time i look at it put it now twenty eight team mercedes am g e sixty three s sedan unrivalled luxury meets unbridled power test drive one today for sadi's am g driving performance duran and the morning show so it's bad enough when i see a bag of tate's bake shop cookies got open them and eat them i don't care who thinks they own them they belong to a but they now have these tiny tate's yeah in the single serve packages either the signature chocolate chip or the oatmeal raisin it says on their single serving size one bag how many do we today scary how many do do we we cloudy takes his tiny anyway tonight's bake shop signature thin crispy buttery chocolate chip cookies made me so happy in even though we have access to create them for free here at the station i still buy them because i just wanted to support my kathleen tate's bake shop all sorts of different recipes now gluten free to gluten filled it doesn't matter give the gift of cookies whoever i take these two always smile huge thank you thank you elvis give the gift of cookies makes it when feel good visit tate's bake shop dot com if you enter the promo code elvis you get twenty percent off your next order that's tate's bake shop dot com promo code elvis twenty percent off.

time magazine mercedes sadi duran kathleen tate twenty percent
"time magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"time magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Me and put me on the cover of entertainment weekly in time magazine i had everyone turn on me i had friends tweeting against me i had anderson cooper who i loved who i thought was best friends i look on twitter and he's calling me disgusting you know and that hurt so i thought okay i got to try to spin this or i'm gonna lose my mind and one of the reasons i feel so strongly about doing this tour is i want everyone to know that i'm not broken at all i mean i had a couple of bad days i had really bad press conference that was that was a hot mess that was kind of wild i remember watching that it's been brutal.

time magazine anderson cooper twitter
"time magazine" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"time magazine" Discussed on KKAT

"Save healthy we can all ideas which is a belonging why doesn't lawyer while love the part which is belong in why big time magazine time magazine p larry king and enlarging see imus in the mode which is an along and why carbon said time out of them right yahya to lega shades are yet jesus by not three relics so desperately clinging to relevancy donald trump manek right there the answer is a time magazine does not belong because unlike the other two fossils time magazine doesn't spend half the night wondering whether helis wife is if it rains are free it's a long day jesus not funny our guys to serbs governor levels boards carl's earth although served broad now medlen the ha in gig man non dan an reagan's day sean li youwei and in the ludi lin kaby lake as wage see land and old gambling la la land you and me woo.

larry king imus yahya fossils time magazine reagan ludi lin kaby lake big time magazine time magazine donald trump carl dan sean li youwei
"time magazine" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"time magazine" Discussed on KTRH

"Now he put them had put them around the classroom uh anyway of course you hide be hoverers are just absolutely ridiculous and everyone seeing them and agreeing with them and and it's very tough to be conservative now in the cooked at half it's been away for a long long time what what was this class this is actually english class is as english time magazine covers all over the place yeah and and often we'd have to read liberal articles and react to them and of course you don't wanna you don't wanna disagree with the liberal authors cause them to keep your might might grade you poorly so so there's very little opportunity for you to actually show your opinion let me ask you this did did this teacher teach everything but english was her course was her class mostly every day a current events class promoting her political point of view it was quite often that yes uh what at one point we actually he gave around a little paper that that was to dine uh stand up for for lgbtq community and we had it we didn't happy but it was a choice that we could sign and put on our locker for this clashed with extremely serenely political so you're let my got a point here if if you have an english teacher what what us sensibly was this was his english composition was this english literature was this learning to read and write english what what kind of english class was the supposed to be derek front be reading and interpreting literature kwy okay and there was some of that but mostly you've got this woman's of.

english time magazine derek
"time magazine" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"time magazine" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"For the time magazine and i have been on their cover fourteen or fifteen times i think we all her i think we have the alltime record in history of time magazine while trump was on the cover cover eleven times and nick sinn appeared fifty five times that's almost the same number it's it's very when you compare it to the billions of dollars the donald trump doesn't make right so folks were are going to bore you and go to every every single live but this is a fine compilation a by the new york times has some details in their his exact quotes and so the next time someone tells you and there there are other conservative trump supporters out there let's say all he doesn't lie or that everybody lies no he does line he does it more than most and i think it'd be wise for everybody to remember that i agree with the concept that perhaps the president is somehow trying to shade reality i mean would do you believe everything that you say because your your your someone's listening will that the the the telecom mincing lie one is to believe it yourself that weights lot easier for you to convince everybody going forward if you say it with conviction it must be true yes the thing is the the when you do that at you know off the top of your head or just as you know the thing that you do it becomes habit and then you do it out of instinct and out of a job just you just do that rather than you know i'm trying to think of things also he's put himself in a position now where he's either a liar or an idiot one of the two either he is completely and totally misinformed ignorant or incompetent or incompetent and that's a terrible place to be in a get another some mm conservatives out there and you must be just spinning around go on please donald stop the door and fighting talk is is that if you have strong and a decent conservative values if you believe in the conservative ideas of politics your arguments being completely muddled and not even heard because the front runner of your part of your party is lying all the time sued by proxy the rest of your stuff everything you say is tainted.

time magazine donald trump new york times president nick sinn trump