35 Burst results for "Time"

Networks stick with Trump in his unusual goodbye speech

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 1 hr ago

Networks stick with Trump in his unusual goodbye speech

"The media is marking president trump's departure from office The New York Times exhaustively documented every single person president trump insulted on Twitter before Twitter suspended his account The Washington Post updated its count of the number of lies and misstatements he's told thirty thousand five hundred thirty four on CNN Dana bash watch president trump walk out of the White House for the final time and said he looks small he just looks like a small man fox and friends host Ainsley Earhart lamented the many people watching the president apart from she said have a hole in their heart this morning I'm ready to fall lay

President Trump Twitter The New York Times Dana Bash The Washington Post Ainsley Earhart CNN White House
Mega Millions jackpot now $970M; Powerball up to $730M

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 1 hr ago

Mega Millions jackpot now $970M; Powerball up to $730M

"Lottery players are hoping for a big payday the mega millions jackpot has reached nine hundred seventy billion dollars after Tuesday night's drawing failed to produce a winner that's the biggest in more than two years and the third largest jackpot in U. S. history but that's not all the Powerball jackpot is at seven hundred thirty million for the Wednesday night drawing it's the first time both lottery jackpots have topped seven hundred million dollars for mega millions the odds of matching all six numbers are one in three hundred two billion and for power ball they are one in two hundred ninety two million I'm Mike Hampton

Mike Hampton
Amanda Gorman makes history as youngest inaugural poet

Brian Lehrer

02:06 min | 2 hrs ago

Amanda Gorman makes history as youngest inaugural poet

"It's interesting that Democrats choose to honor poets and Republicans aren't really into that. That aspect of the inauguration. I think it's really Really beautiful the way poets have been able to stitch together an American collective narrative through their poems. You know, in the past democratic inaugurations, I've remember my Angelou. Marry Angelo reciting that poem, and I think that was the first time that I was moved really internally moved by hearing her words and then, obviously Elizabeth Alexander. So I'm looking forward to today. I think s so many of us feel a five relief but also cautiously optimistic. I mean, we we do know that there are domestic terrorists of sort of threatened to ruin this day, so I think a lot of people want to get to 12 o'clock. And they want to get sort of. They want to savor the day but also get through the day. So it feels like a new administration is on followed footing. And here's maybe where the poetry and prose meat a little bit as reported in USA Today this morning. Amanda Gorman told the AP that she was not given specific instructions on what to write for the inaugural poem, but that she was encouraged to emphasize unity and hope. Over quote, denigrating anyone or declaring Ding Dong. The witch is dead over the departure of President Donald Trump. She's calling her inaugural poem The Hill we climb. Woman says she has been given five minutes to read. I believe the My Angelo poem also was five minutes prior to what she called the Confederate insurrection on January 6th. She had only written about 3.5 minutes worth, she told the AP. She said That day gave me a second wave of energy to finish the poem, adding that she will not refer directly to January 6 but will touch upon it. She said the capital mob did not upend the poem she had been working on because They didn't surprise her and quote the poem isn't blind. It isn't turning your back to the evidence of discord and division. So some

Marry Angelo Elizabeth Alexander Amanda Gorman President Donald Trump Angelo Poem AP Ding Dong USA
Examining The Diplomatic Deal Between Israel, United Arab Emirates

Morning Edition

06:29 min | 2 hrs ago

Examining The Diplomatic Deal Between Israel, United Arab Emirates

"Newly established diplomatic ties between Israel and the United Arab Emirates are having an effect. The U. A. E is welcoming thousands of Israelis President Trump's administration. Promoted these diplomatic ties as a historic breakthrough, which was true Israel had been isolated from many Arab nations for decades. Israel's leaders says the agreement proves that peace does not have to come at a cost. NPR's Daniel Estrin traveled to Dubai and the U. S a toe ask just what kind of peace is being promoted? It's not hard to spot Israeli tourists and devise busy gold market way. Silas are very noisy, and they understand us here. I feel no tour guide. Lisi is wearing a sequined shirt and a blue scarf around her strawberry red hair she poses for pictures with elaborate gold wedding garments in the window displays. Later, she'll ski at Dubai's famous indoor ski slope in Jordan. I don't know if I will feel like this Not in Egypt Way make fine here and next month I come again. Egypt and Jordan share a cold peace with Israel and most other Arab countries refuse relations with Israel, as long as Palestinians don't have independence, but the U A E. I gave Israelis what they have long sought. A sense of acceptance in the region were wanted in our country Don't feel wanted by the Arabs. And here they want me here. L a needs Ziegel Boy Wonder's Dubai Spice Market. With six friends, all elementary school teachers and Moratti's in the market are reluctant to speak on tape about their countries embrace of Israel, which is still controversial in the region. I asked the Israeli school teacher is this piece? I don't know if it's a real piece or not. I think that both countries have interest in this peace because we need them. They need us. The Israelis gain business opportunities. One Israeli I met, signed a deal to grow lettuce using pipes and the Emirati desert. And the Emma Ronnie's Get Israel's blessing to buy American made F 35 fighter jets, Bahrain, Sudan and Morocco also normalized ties with Israel. And it was the U. S offering the incentives without concessions by Israel so long to watch a loom. Which alone middle. What's MMA Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu promoted the U A e deal as peace for peace instead of the old paradigm land for peace. He says It sets a precedent. Israel doesn't need to give up land to the Palestinians to win friends in the Arab world. But I Moratti's still want Palestinians on their side U A e ambassador to the U S. You said fellow Taipeh. We still want to see a two state solution. We still want to see a negotiation between the two parties. Perhaps just perhaps we might be able to have more influence and more leverage when we do have a relationship with Israel. Emirati commentators say the love fest Israelis feel Just the honeymoon. Tough love will come later. But Israelis are seeing it more Netanyahu's way. Everybody by him from then a tourist to get just his first name to discuss his political views, says the Moratti's embrace proves Israel doesn't need to make sacrifices. Rather, it's the Palestinians who will feel pressured to follow their Arab brothers and make a deal with Israel. Even a prominent Israeli peace advocate returned from a trip to Dubai, saying, I think that the Palestinians need to rethink the way they treat Israel. Femi Paris The son of the late Israeli President Shimon Paris, runs the Paris Center for Peace that reaches out to Palestinians. He wants to promote business with the eh Moratti's and approach he wants Palestinians to adopt. I think Their point of view has being that's first sold the political issues and then we can start normalizing things and move forward. I think those days have gone. I believe that the only way for us to really, really achieve peace, comprehensive peace And save the region from backwardness is to focus on moving together forward. I put that to Nabil Shaath, adviser to the Palestinian president, He says. Palestinians can't just move forward and ignore their day to day realities is an occupying our land. Israel continues to Great second mints in our villages destroyed our houses. And yet It is legal had 23 is very better. Who is it? That should be doing what to whom the occupied the occupiers. Palestinians and many countries say real peace requires Israel to compromise land for peace. Shot says the U. A e deal removes the incentive for Israel to do that, Even if the Emirati say they'll keep pushing for it. There's radiated out of the problem, not us on the right. Is that looking for exclusive or what? There's not sisters myself and lewdness. Be that fan board down a desert dune. Their Palestinian Arab citizens of Israel, not from the occupied territories. And they're thrilled to finally visit a part of the Arab world that have been off limits to them as Israeli passport holders with the azure Allah Allah Dolly are a beam can look hope. Jewish travelers to Dubai with see Arabs in a more positive light. Could it lead to less discrimination against her community at home? Or would it all just be for gotten on the flight back commotion on the runway and Duke? By Lee's Eve, the Jewish Tour guide You heard at the beginning of the story happens to be sitting across from me and does not want the flight attendant to crowd the empty row in front of her with an Arab couple and their baby. Also tourists from Israel. A second Arab couple accuses her of racism. Give your time CC Zaeef says. Are you psycho woman? Can Lieutenant Mark going up? And Israeli flight attendant gets on the loudspeaker. Respect each other. A young Arab dad stands up and addresses the plane. Okay, mate committed. I don't being bumped out of it. No, but they must you all were just in an Arab country. Not in Las Vegas. Look at what's happening here. Disgusting. A Jewish man shouts back! Don't generalize. Quarreling passengers don't make amends or apologies. They spend the flight back to Israel in a kind of cold piece. Daniel Estrin NPR news Dubai

Israel Moratti Trump's Administration Dubai Daniel Estrin Dubai Spice Market Israeli School Emirati Desert Emma Ronnie U. Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Egypt Jordan Taipeh Lisi United Arab Emirates Silas Femi Paris Shimon Paris Paris Center For Peace
Biden to halt border-wall construction, rejoin WHO, Paris accord on Day 1

Steve Scott

00:35 sec | 2 hrs ago

Biden to halt border-wall construction, rejoin WHO, Paris accord on Day 1

"Elect Biden will waste no time in reversing some of President Trump's Policies. I'm jamming McCormick in his first hours is President Joe Biden is expected to sign 17 executive actions, ending construction of the border wall and the so called Muslim travel ban rejoining the Paris climate accord and the World Health Organization. Mr. Biden is also expected to revoke approval of the Keystone Pipeline and change the government's response to the pandemic, his aides promise there will be more to come. He is also expected to extend a pause on student loan payments and Interest.

Elect Biden President Trump President Joe Biden Mr. Biden Mccormick World Health Organization Paris Government
Netflix Tops 200 Million Subscribers for the First Time

The KFBK Morning News

01:01 min | 3 hrs ago

Netflix Tops 200 Million Subscribers for the First Time

"They just continue. I mean, even though it's very crowded in their space. Think about all the new entrance into streaming. Ah, you know, they still are adding millions of new subscribers. They've topped 200 million subscribers for the first time ever. Uh, they hit 100 million subscribers back in 2017 that cassia an idea of how quickly they got from 100 million to 200 million subscribers. Also, they're saying We're not going to need the outside financing anymore. We're going to finance all this on our own. If you'll recall 23 years ago with Netflix is all about how much they had to borrow to create the original content They were putting on that Flix no longer now they're doing that internally. So Netflix is gonna open up by about 14%. Off the opening bell. Today, his inauguration day. The market likes a peaceful transition of power and looks like well, we're going to get it today anyway. And what else do we have A lot of earnings coming out as well. We'll go through some of those two

Cassia Netflix
Biden to sign 15 executive actions on Day One

Wayne Cabot

00:27 sec | 3 hrs ago

Biden to sign 15 executive actions on Day One

"Is going to be unlike any other in modern times, and so are the challenges awaiting him. That's why he's planning to take immediate executive action to help the struggling economy And, of course, fight the pandemic and sign a bunch of executive actions We understand in his first hours in office, Mr Biden will we are told Sign executive actions, reversing President Trump's orders on abandoning climate change about immigration about the handling of the pandemic. 12 National Guard

Mr Biden President Trump National Guard
Los Angeles Dodger Hall Of Fame Pitcher Don Sutton Dies At 75

Mornings on Maine Street

00:16 sec | 4 hrs ago

Los Angeles Dodger Hall Of Fame Pitcher Don Sutton Dies At 75

"Fame pitcher and longtime Atlanta Braves broadcaster Don Sutton died yesterday at the age of 75. Sutton was a four time All Star and pitch for the Dodgers, Astros, Brewers, athletics and Angels. He had a career record of 3 24 and 2 56, and he retired in 1988. You can find more

Don Sutton Atlanta Braves Sutton Astros Dodgers Brewers Athletics Angels
Theresa May rebukes Boris Johnson as UK welcomes Biden era

Hugh Hewitt

00:42 sec | 5 hrs ago

Theresa May rebukes Boris Johnson as UK welcomes Biden era

"Prime minister has some scathing criticism for current Prime Minister Boris Johnson. It's not the first time Theresa may has criticized the government's decision to reduce the aid spending target or denounced its threat later dropped to break international law by going back on a treaty. But the former prime minister has chosen the day of Joe Biden's inauguration to issue a sharp rebuke. Theresa May says a new administration in Washington should again allow the UK and us to rally around shared values in a leadership role. But she has a blunt message. Mrs May says the world does not owe Britain a prominent place on the global stage and its actions that matter to BBC's band, right. High

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Theresa Theresa May Joe Biden Government Mrs May Washington UK Britain BBC
Cheap Steaks (MM #3591)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 5 hrs ago

Cheap Steaks (MM #3591)

"The minute with kevin mason through facebook and somebody in one of my memories of pages was talking about a place called york steakhouse. I remember. York steakhouse from back in the day. We had them in virginia. No they had them here in tennessee. And those cheap steakhouses. Like bonanza like ponderosa like western sizzling like the sizzler. All of those. You could get a steak really cheap. You get the full salad bar. It was quite an outing for young college student. Quite an outing. When you had a lot of kids in the family you go have a stake and it was darn right cheap. I don't know what happened to all these places. But they're all gone. Now i haven't seen a bonanza or ponderosa or york steak house or a western says lenora sizzler for a long time. But it just kinda weird what happened in our world at these places. Went away to other restaurant. Chains start making better stakes for the same price and they just kind of went away. I'm kind of missing them. And i'm kind of missing the memories. I gotta look down and see. Why my belly's so big. These days probably aided them way too many times when i was much younger.

Kevin Mason York Steakhouse Lenora Sizzler Tennessee Facebook Virginia York
Cheap Steaks (MM #3591)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 5 hrs ago

Cheap Steaks (MM #3591)

"The minute with kevin mason through facebook and somebody in one of my memories of pages was talking about a place called york steakhouse. I remember. York steakhouse from back in the day. We had them in virginia. No they had them here in tennessee. And those cheap steakhouses. Like bonanza like ponderosa like western sizzling like the sizzler. All of those. You could get a steak really cheap. You get the full salad bar. It was quite an outing for young college student. Quite an outing. When you had a lot of kids in the family you go have a stake and it was darn right cheap. I don't know what happened to all these places. But they're all gone. Now i haven't seen a bonanza or ponderosa or york steak house or a western says lenora sizzler for a long time. But it just kinda weird what happened in our world at these places. Went away to other restaurant. Chains start making better stakes for the same price and they just kind of went away. I'm kind of missing them. And i'm kind of missing the memories. I gotta look down and see. Why my belly's so big. These days probably aided them way too many times when i was much younger.

Kevin Mason York Steakhouse Lenora Sizzler Tennessee Facebook Virginia York
Last Trump Job Approval 34%; Average Is Record-Low 41%

KILF Morning New Podcast

00:30 sec | 6 hrs ago

Last Trump Job Approval 34%; Average Is Record-Low 41%

"The president prepares to leave the white house. Thirty four percent of americans approve of the job. He is doing as president. That's a worst evaluation of his presidency is over here. A four year term His average approval rating was forty one percent. That's four points lower than any of his predecessors at least since gallup's been doing this poll trump's rating show dad record eighty one percentage point gap between republicans and democrats eleven points wider than any other time before.

White House Gallup
"Pandemic" Pet Adoption - Always Great No Matter When It Happens

Talk, Tales and Trivia

07:23 min | 14 hrs ago

"Pandemic" Pet Adoption - Always Great No Matter When It Happens

"I was in a new apartment in a new city after just having broken up with a partner of ten years. I didn't leave my home. I had very little outside contact with anybody. Virtual or otherwise. I was all alone for the first time a very long time. I became even more introvert than i'd ever been before. Feeling sadness sorrow and kind of use on a daily basis. Let me just say that. I am inherently a cat person. But i was compelled to do everything the opposite way of. How about my life up until that point. The all quote. Nothing is working this way. So i'll do it the opposite and see what happens. It can't get much worse in quote. That was my line and my way of thinking at that time. We'll in october of two thousand eighteen. My precious cat when he had just passed away. It was very sad. And so i thought briefly about waiting on getting another pet altogether. Maybe i'll just wait. It was just so painful to imagine going through the worry and commitment. And plus i had just start to travel a little bit more but somehow i didn't dismiss it as the weeks went by. I saw an ad on pet finder dot com for a dog named frank and the ad it stayed that frank was quote body sensitive in quote in other words he was a biter. But guess what that did not deter me. As i read the ad i learnt that he had been in a few bad homes been rejected and returned to the shelter. But the ad also said that wants the bonding phase was established. He'd be a companion for life. I was intrigued as ended up. I wouldn't be all alone for the rest of my life. Like i thought i would. Happy ending for franken me for sure. But here's another pet story. That's just as cool on. Us news and world report. I found this doctor. Liz dare a family medicine. Physician in western massachusetts had wanted to adopt a dog but she hadn't quite found the right time to do it with work travel and other commitments. They're just never seemed to be a great time to adopt a pet and her two cats kept her company. Well enough with fewer knees dog. And isn't that the truth. But in mid-march the world changed when the coronavirus pandemic was declared overnight workplaces closed and like many other people. Liz began working from home. A lot offering visits with patients. Virtually from their homes. Having a dog would help stave off some of the isolation that accompanied the radical change and it is radical in lifestyle so many of us have had to cope with since the coronavirus pandemic began. She says i'm single. And i live by myself so it felt like a really right time for me. Well according to its july seventeenth twenty twenty covid nineteen impact report. The number of dogs and cat adoptions. Were actually down. Twenty seven percent when compared to the same time period a year ago. but foster's were up nine percent. Many states have seen a significant decline in the number of animals. Entering the shelters as volunteers observed stay at home orders but the increase and fosters suggests that more people are willing to take on sick or older pets that might otherwise not have found a safe home to call their own for any period of time because this is an ever changing situation and each shelter faces unique challenges adoption and fostering statistics will vary at any given time. It's so obvious. But there's no doubt that the response from community residents across the nation to support their local shelters by fostering vulnerable animals has been enormous and unprecedented. And isn't that the coolest thing well for liz. The rush to adopt meant. She had to be patient to find her pandemic pet orla name eventually. She connected with a shelter and connecticut right here where i am that brings dogs up from the southern united states. So that's how. She found sophie a two year. Old thirty pound terrier boxer mix. She's chestnut brown with white around her face and white paws and she's got spots running down her chest. She sounds adorable and she is and sweet and she's a very low key dog. I needed to find a dog. She says that was going to get along well with my two cats and as it turns out. Sophia's very good around the cats. Who are still a little freaked out by her. Well let me just tell. This story has a great ending to. She brought sophie home of month ago. They're still adjusting to the new routine. She's totally fallen in love with this dog. So after those two stories. My story about frank and liz's story about sophie. Do you even need to hear the bullet point benefits for adopting a pet. No well here. They are anyway well. They offer companionship. We know that this is important. If like myself you live alone before. I adopted frank who is a dachshund maltese mixed breed. I had no one to look forward to seeing no one to share my love with and no one that needed me and there is something to be said about the human to dog touch. That feels so good. Well provides a purpose to the sense of purpose. Everybody needs pet. Ownership is an important responsibility and one that can be a powerful antidote to depression and anxiety. There are more opportunities for exercise to well this time to walk. Frank during the lockdown played an important role in my wellbeing and his two dogs need to be walked and katz needs to be played with and there is no doubt that these activities with your pet is crucial to your physical wellbeing. as well. as there's getting dose of fresh air is important for both of you. Also it provides a reason to go outside smelled air and be alone with your thoughts. That's right. I said alone because when you're outside there's so much to see and you're using all your senses of very good thing and there's good medical news two that's right. Having a pet can reduce blood pressure the center for disease control and prevention the cdc reports that pet ownership can be a key to reducing stress cholesterol and triglycerides levels. All things that we need to do to be healthy and you know what there doesn't even have to be at pandemic for you to adopt a pet but you can't anyway. It's a good excuse if you need one. If you need a laugh live alone. Want to potentially meet other like-minded pet owners be more peaceful and happier and calmer. This is something to really consider. I know you know this. It's not only you but that furry pet that just may need you as much as you need them. Still a cat person. But i adore my frankie.

Frank Liz Dare Sophie Franken LIZ Massachusetts Foster Connecticut Sophia United States Center For Disease Control And Katz Anxiety Depression
Treasury Secretary nominee Janet Yellen calls for "big" action at Senate confirmation hearing

CNBC's Fast Money

01:09 min | 18 hrs ago

Treasury Secretary nominee Janet Yellen calls for "big" action at Senate confirmation hearing

"President-elect joe biden is about to speak at a memorial honoring the more than four hundred thousand americans who have died from corona virus. We'll bring you the remarks. As soon as they begin in the meantime we wanna talk about his cabinet. The senate finance committee holding a confirmation hearing today for biden's treasury secretary pick janet yellen yellen urging lawmakers to support a biden's one point nine trillion dollar covert relief. Plan saying it is critically important to act now and not only ask now but act big because why not. Interest rates are at historic lows. The seems to make a lot of sense. Dan nathan but how about the debt. That was the big question. That was a big push back. I mean they didn't care about the debt in the last few years. I don't know why they would care now. I think if Mnuchin was still the treasury secretary yellen predecessor. I think he was on board for something that looked like two trillion for a lot of the same reasons. So i think you make the point now with interest rates here with interest rates net. Really going up anytime soon. And largely because of the fact they've tacked on four or five trillion dollars in debt in just the last few years. This is the time to do it. I agree go big

Elect Joe Biden Senate Finance Committee Pick Janet Yellen Yellen Biden Dan Nathan Treasury Mnuchin Yellen Cabinet
A Simple Choice

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

06:55 min | 1 d ago

A Simple Choice

"I'm nora mcnerney and this is terrible. Thanks for asking. There comes a time in every romantic relationship where you need to talk about where things are going. Okay you gotta be honest about what you want and don't want out of the relationship is heading toward marriage. Are you going to live together. And if so where are you going to live and do you want kids. That's a big one because kids are a big commitment. It's a lifetime commitment and not just for your lifetime you're committing to their lifetime and mark's girlfriend once kids and he does not and that's a fully valid life choice. A lot of people don't want kids. They are one way to find meaning in life. They're not the only way but mark's decision is a little bit deeper than just a preference. It goes a little further than just simply not wanting kids. Okay so mark. I would love for you to tell me. What did your mom look like. Wow my mom was five foot eight. She had wavy brown hair and she wore glasses. Kind of i mean. I think she felt that they were pretty artsy for her time. When she was younger she used to wear like the cat style. Glasses from whenever that was like the fifties or sixties she was really the most social person i've ever encountered for sure. She used to probably starting in september. Just have our kitchen table. Full of christmas cards. This is pre social media. So she didn't have any way of getting a hold of people on the interweb so she just would pile christmas cards on the counter and then right personalized christmas cards to probably two hundred. Maybe more of her friends from the state's not just a generic letter. She would write personalized things to every single friend of hers that she can think of. And then our wall in return come november and december are wall in. The kitchen was just everybody else's cards back to her. It was pretty amazing when mark was seventeen. His mom got sick with cancer and she didn't want him to worry so she kept it from him as long as she. She wanted him to enjoy his last year of high school and he did but when he was about to go to college he knew she was sick and she asked him. Will you stay home with me and dad. Will you help out in mark. Said mum of course so while all of his friends went off to college. Mark stayed in his small hometown in canada. His girlfriend karen was just going into twelfth grade and cared about her a lot so he broke up with her. I didn't want to be home and have that. Be the reason i was home. I didn't want to have my mindset so focused on karen that i wasn't there for my mom during that So yeah i think that makes sense and also young relationships are really consuming. And what's even more consuming. Mark is that you are coming of age and having a really singular experience. I don't think i have to do a survey of your town to assume that you are probably the only your age taking care of your mother. Yeah i can't. I can't think of anyone else at the moment for sure. It was just mark just mark spending a few hours a day escaping to the sanctuary of his church playing the drums alone in a big empty space coming home to keep his mom company and bring her water and love her. Breaking up with. Karen was a protective measure. It helped mark focus on this time with his mom and it also protected karen from spending her senior year emotionally caretaking. Her boyfriend. Mark doesn't see much karen during this time but he knows karen still cares about him and that she cares about his mother karen. Her mother used to come visit. My mom in the hospital and karen and her friends would come and sing songs to my mom and just hang out with her for an hour or and then my money's the journal a lot of like who came to visit her during the day and all that stuff so i would. I would look through a journal and see that that happened when mark mom dies. It's christmas time. He still just a kid and he has no idea what to do or how to fill his time but across the street from his house. There's an event center. And there's a christmas play that is being held there and some of his friends and karen are in it. So that's where he goes. So i went there to see a whole bunch of my friends. Do this thing. And then canonized briefly spoke that night and then slowly over the next few weeks there was like a phone call here there and then i think what happened was i ended up just inviting her over to watch a movie at our house and we hung out and classic movie. Okay yeah no. That's that's what it was and then we still weren't dating. But she came over and i started working at a local video store back when people went and got videos and like my first day of work. She brought me like the best sandwich i'd ever eaten and a bunch of stuff for my suffer and with a huge letter. What did the letter say. I think she was just expressing to me. How sad she was that. I lost mom. And how amazing my mom was. And i'm pretty sure. I have the letter somewhere still. I don't know where it is. But it was pretty much just saying that she felt so bad for me and there might have been a hint of that she missed being around me and stuff like that and i think that's pretty much when we just said okay it's back on.

Karen Mark Nora Mcnerney Mark Mom Cancer Canada
The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself

Untangle

04:55 min | 1 d ago

The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself

"Welcome to untangle so happy to have you here today. Thank you pitcher. Share happy to be here. The i love your work. You've done such incredible stuff. And i just for our audience. I just think this first paragraph in your book was so interesting it starts like this in this incredibly competitive society of ours. How many of us truly feel good about ourselves. It seems like such a fleeting thing feeling good especially as we need to feel special or above average to feel worthy anything else. Seems like a failure. Tell me a little bit about that. And what led you to really do this. Work on self compassion. Yes so i started practicing self compassion. When i started learning mindfulness actually my last year in graduate school. Uc berkeley a man. I did two years post doctoral. Study with one of the country's leading self esteem racers. And i started really becoming familiar with all the research. Showing the downsides of self esteem. It's not a downside of having high self esteem but of pursuing it trying to get it the shenanigans. We go through trying to go good about ourselves compared to others and so i kind of thought that was practicing self compassion and seeing the incredible benefits my personal life and i just thought this is such a healthier way to think about. How did we late yourself. Positively themselves esteem. so that's kind of really would give me the. You might say that confidence to actually start researching self passion. But what's wrong with self esteem. So many parents today want their children to have self esteem and self competence. Tell us a little bit about the difference between self esteem and self compassion right. So there's absolutely nothing wrong with self esteem feeling. You're a person of worth in value. And we definitely want people have a sense of high worth as opposed to 'having themselves and and that's the wellbeing goes about question really. The problem is how people go about getting their high self esteem so for most people s steam involves a process of social comparison. Right so i mean again. If i said patricia your podcast yet savage. How would you feel. You probably feel good about that. Evaluation right asked this kind of the way. The system is stacked against us. We all have to feel average at least in those areas that are important to us to feel like that's just like baseline minimum self esteem. And so we're always comparing ourselves to others. If someone else does something better than we do. We often feel inadequate comparison. The really big problem with self esteem. as it tends to be contingent in other words we only have self esteem roomy succeed. We lose it when we fail so when things are going well for sure we lacquer cells we feel we have value but what happens when we fail. We blow that big job assignment or get rejected soon as fail ourselves esteemed desserts us which is actually precisely when we need that. Self confidence. The most self compassion. It's not about judging yourself positively. It's not saying. I'm a good person. Or i'm better than other people i most great is just about relating to yourself kindly so there is a sense of self worth inheritance self compassion but self worth comes from just being a glide human being where the like all other flawed human beings as opposed in necessarily succeeding or on being better than others. So you're done research showing the sense of self worth linked to self compassion as much more stable over time than just a simple self-worth judging yourself positively but how did we get in this culture to a place where we are so critical of ourselves and where we need to study something like self compassion where it's not a natural characteristic. I'm not convinced that it's just a western cultural phenomena. I mean i think definitely hard in the west because there's so much pressure to compete and succeed. Same thing in east asian cultures with as a lot of pressure to succeed and compete. But i also think there are some natural reasons while we tend to our jump to solve criticism immediately a mess. Basically that when we feel inadequate in some way or we fail at something we feel threatened and when we feel threatened we naturally have the threat. Defense response right. We want to attack the situation. Get rid of the problems of. You'll safe again. Unfortunately when the problem is ourselves when we attack the threat we actually attack ourselves. So i really do. Think at some level our tendency to to be self-critical is really desire to keep ourselves safe.

Uc Berkeley Patricia
10 Trivia Questions on Real Names of Rappers

Trivia With Budds

03:32 min | 1 d ago

10 Trivia Questions on Real Names of Rappers

"Jake. Seven dollars trey songz hundred and fifty dollars and someone named Kill boy is fifty bucks so there you go a bunch of wrappers on cameo just wanted to lay it down with some prices before we get into today's episode. We're going to do that right now. Ten questions unreal names famous rappers. Let's get into it here. We go it is real names of rappers time. Here's question number. one. Sean carter number one. Who is a rapper. Aka. sean carter number one and number two belka lease almonds are belka lease almonds are number three. Aubrey graham. who is that number three aubrey. Graham question number four. Christopher wallis number four christopher wallace and number five naseer jones naseer jones number six on ika meraj number six on onondaga mirage. Rapper number seven austin post number. Seven austin post anna berate dwayne carter junior number eight. Dwayne carter junior followed by number. Nine william drayton junior number nine to juniors in a row number nine william drayton junior and your last one number ten chancellor bennett chancellor bennett. Those are all of your real names of rappers. Let's see if you could decode who they were with their stage names. In just a second we are back with the real names of rappers number. One sean carter was none other than jay z. Rapper and mogul jay z. Sean carter throwing the diamond up number two belka lease elman. Czar cardi b. is the translation there cardi b. number three. Aubrey graham is drake from canada number. Three drake number four. Christopher wallace r.i.p. The dettori is b. I g number. Four chris wallace notorious. B i g number five naseer jones took the first three letters that name became. Now's a ass now's number. Six mirage is pretty close to nikki. Manosh that sounds like Like how my mom would be like. Yeah i saw that nikki massage. But she would get all wrong and she'd say mirage number six number. Seven austin post is post malone who i read got his name from online rap name generator which would be very interesting. Austin post post malone number. Eight dwayne carter. Junior is wayne lil wayne and number nine william drayton. Junior is flavor flav

Sean Carter William Drayton Aubrey Graham Christopher Wallis Christopher Wallace Naseer Jones Naseer Ika Meraj Onondaga Mirage Dwayne Carter Anna Berate Dwayne Carter Trey Songz Bennett Chancellor Bennett Austin Jake Aubrey Czar Cardi Cardi B Graham
Accelerate Revenue Growth with VIP Guest Darrell Amy

Secrets to Win Big With Arjun Sen

09:17 min | 1 d ago

Accelerate Revenue Growth with VIP Guest Darrell Amy

"So let's talk about. Because i said this out about you. Being that super expert at help businesses grow. So i wanted to warn dokie different angles. I wanted to ask what gets you excited. Have businesses grow. Yeah and get excited. When you walk into a business you can usually tell what kind of business you're walking into either your walking into business where there's growth which means people are excited. They're energetic you can just feel it inside a business whereas if you go inside businesses not growing you can feel that vibe as well and i get excited about going into businesses. That are growing. Because i know that what's going on. There is two things first of all they're creating meaningful jobs and right now you know especially right. Now we need to create more meaningful work in company grows able to create meaningful jobs. And the thing. I'm most passionate about is nonprofits. I serve on the board of of two different nonprofits and i've noticed people that moved the needle. The most our businesses business leaders that are generous. And so i know when. I'm going into a growing business that the fruit of that business is not just meaningful jobs. It's also the giving that happens back into the community and in all of that adds up to make the world a better place so when it comes to growing revenue i get really excited about helping companies grow because the impact. Those organizations are able to have on the world and write ray girl what you shared. Is your excitement conferencing the impact. And i think that was great wisdom immediately at the beginning itself. Show it's not the revenue generated for the brands. You work with would how the trickles to other nonprofits and other areas in brexit community and the dubs. I really think to do it is it is and you know if you look at at where we are right now. Who's going to move. You know in so many ways. We're facing unprecedented challenges in our world and our countries who is going to solve their problems. What's going to solve those problems. It's businesses driving forward in helping nonprofits come along Behind them and all of that we're going to create a better world back. Gets me excited. Nunca a bitter and now before we go to the beker. The i want to come to nonprofits few cents. I wanted to go to the revenue growth. The core promise of your book. I just want to understand. What the real uniqueness what you've done to help. Businesses accelerate the revenue growth in this key areas that you held businesses focused to achieve this. So what things that you can share. The secrets for garros accelerated revenue growth. Well yeah thank you for asking either way and and i you know there are. There are several secrets. I wanna start with two today. That are are really really critical. When it comes to growing your company the first has to do with goal setting and when it comes to setting revenue growth goals were in a challenging time right now because a lot of conservative companies i found set goals based on what they've done historically may say well we've experienced this percentage of growth over the last three years so our goal next year is going to be that same number again ten percent whatever that number is however. That's real challenge. Right now is for businesses. Some businesses obviously have seen a sharp decline. So don't have a trend to work on their. That's very useful. Other businesses are exploding. They've had you know whole new areas of opportunity open in front of them in and so in either case. How do you set growth goals. What i found is the most powerful way to set realistic growth goals. I call them aggressive but realistic goals is to look to drivers of revenue growth. And if you oil it all down. I believe there are really only two ways to grow a company fundamentally you either get more net new clients or and or you grow your revenue per client and when both of those things happen at the same time arjun exciting things begin to unfold If you can accelerate your you can accelerate your growth if you can show reasonable growth in number of clients and simultaneously show reasonable growth in your revenue per client. When you add those two things up You see some really exciting results. I call it the law of exponential revenue growth for example a company that grows their number of clients by twelve percent. Simultaneously grows their revenue per client by twelve percent. They're actually able to double their revenue in just about thirty six months. Which now. I've got some things. I can really set some goals around. Not just setting the overall revenue goal setting the goal in terms of number of clients revenue per client. That's the first thing i would say is think about your revenue. Not just in terms that bottom line numb our top line number but in terms of what are the two factors that drive it. And how can we get more clients in selma current clients. And this is you make it so simple to me. Back to my beginning of my career in the b. to seaworld i remember What listen i losses. Amazing human being. She started as an admin and then she grasped the business and she learned. Explain to me the way you are explaining restaurants fix restaurants to convey simple vase. He said your sales depends on. How many guys you open the cash register how much you put in every time. Not that smart arjun. You could make thousand dollars. Yes one time putting thousand in a thousand times putting one in or something in between and based on that your strategy can be there. So i really love the simplicity as you start going through so as you have come here i just have to ask this question as a friend to understand how daryl get here like was. He warned that smart or not. Get in this journey. Get here well. the. I don't know that was a a that that smarter that i was certainly born this smart but but i did I think like a lot of us Most of what i've learned was has been in the university of hard knocks along the way. And i spent I've had a unique perspectives in that. I've spent half my career in sales in half of my career in marketing For the first twelve years of my career. I was in b. two b. technology sales sales management And then ended up ultimately starting a sales training company in the space. When i started that sales training company the fun part of my story was my very first came to me and said hey darryl everything you taught. Her team is fantastic. However our website doesn't say anything about it do you build websites and of course being my first client. The answer was yes sir. We build websites at actually built several for nonprofits. But it put me now and this was seventeen years ago when this happened over the seventeen years of had the unique perspective of having one foot in the sales world doing sales training consulting with companies about sales even helping some fortune five hundred companies build sales. Training programs have been very involved in that mad at the same time. I've also been on. This journey in the digital marketing space. So that first website turned into managing digital marketing for companies across north america and australia search engine optimization social media management inbound marketing now account based marketing. And so all of it. You know what i noticed was number one. There wasn't a lot of alignment in companies between sales and marketing. In fact i think that's an understatement. He knows it's kind of like your car. When you're driving your car in its non-aligned one wheels pulling the left. The other wheels pulling to the right and the poor driver is just trying to get to work. down the freeway Not only is. They're not allowed of alignment really. There wasn't even a common language between the two sales You know has their focus Marketing has their focus and there are a lot of finger pointing back and forth and where the lights came on for me. Arjun was when i had realization. That was actually getting ready to speak at a conference And had a realization. As i looked out over that that room of marketing professionals sales leaders in business owners realize this isn't about sales. It isn't about marketing. Those are just means to an end. What's the end. The end is revenue growth. And so when we started. When i started looking at things that way everything on this journey that i'd been on in in the sales world in the marketing world started to come into focus and out of that is where the revenue growth engine model emerged.

Dokie University Of Hard Selma Daryl Darryl North America Australia Arjun
"time" Discussed on About Time

About Time

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"time" Discussed on About Time

"Then. There's the issue of the cultural systems. We've manufactured to order time in our societies as we've seen the amazonian tribes do not use clocks or calendars or other mechanisms to mark units of constant passing time but in the west we've busting with the stuff graphs timelines hourglasses sundial clocks calendars we have created tons of of time referencing instruments that apply accountable unit to time and they shape the way we think and verbalised time without us realizing it it should come as no great surprise that cultures using the axes metaphor of time use the same direction for times movement as that found in in writing systems that the organizational patterns that are cultures develop directly impact how we represent time. There's one area. We need to discuss gramma rama specifically the role tents plays in how we indicate an order time english like most european languages is a tense language by giving the verbs sentences different tenses we can directly expressed the basic time of an event where the past present or future in many languages do not use tents at all tie mandarin chinese and mayan languages as well as the language faira has studied a treated as tenseness languages and others japanese only used to that's of past and non past so how do they indicate time sequences and construct past and future essentially tens languages use a lot of inference while they might use a time what to give context. Thanks to a sentence saying. I fly to london tomorrow for example. It's often not necessary to include one instead the timing of a scenario you can be gleaned from a thing linguists lighter cool aspect with aspect it isn't about when in action happened but whether weather or not that action was completed in timeframe the speakers using mandarin chinese aspects tends to follow this basic pattern. The president is implied by unbounded situations so where something is still ongoing and past is implied by bounded ones where something has concluded future situations require a bit more information like timeout verbs tomorrow or future-oriented fabs like to plan what to expect back so while some languages don't use a tense grammar it doesn't mean speaker can't locate events in time and trapped in some eternal present nor does doesn't mean that tense grandma's the best way of interacting with time well that we should be limited to three the african language by me lucky to shine for example abo- uses eleven it shows us the structure of time is far more complex than the absolute categories of past present and future allow a grandma can't always flex to acknowledge that past and future can have a relative or local meaning that a situation that is passed for me for example can still be present for you. Say what can we take from this. How can we understand. The multitude of different grammas was referencing structures and conceptual metaphors in the world's language for time. Is it even right to speak of a universal concept of time or two different world views news and cultural frameworks make it more appropriate to speak about languages of time plural well fastly. We can definitively say that the spatial official metaphor of time we're safe. Familiar with an english is not universal to all coaches raising close to be connected but we should be cool shoes in assuming that there is something people kind of metaphorical relationship between the whole domain nice on hope the name save time and we can't say that an absence of spatial in metric conception of time means people in event based cultures. Don't have time tom in o- couches have some concept of time. In old language is best concept of time so there are no people <music> who leave without time. Not everyone wedded by has the same concept thang so there is no invest concept of time in the sense. We have to instead understand that. Spatial metric view of time is itself. A cultural construction are very ideal of time is a result of the way in which we've historically construct artifacts measuring on on this give a concept take time to mind which is represented as a line which could memphis nick mentored lincoln town seconds and since we are so i used to talking about time in countable times we seem to have completely ignored another way of understanding. It event based time nice times all around around us. Why is nobody's at this before. It's my dad is really not. We seem to have forgotten that. Our language is also used offend base. It's time we can arrange to talk about something at lunch. Go somewhere in spring and indicate duration by the amount of time it takes to smoke a cigarette or drink drink. A cup of tea. Arguably event time is more universal than the concept of metric time. If you want to be on the vessel approach to this time i would say event based itemise everywhere event based on back. Not all language has a magical time the.

o- couches president memphis london official lincoln
"time" Discussed on About Time

About Time

08:31 min | 1 year ago

"time" Discussed on About Time

"The time is seen as possible fundamental grandma all the world because the sense that it's out there in our universe flowing from pasta future equally all of us wherever we are in the world we all exist at the same moment in a global now with a fixed passed an open future. We may not be able to see smell touch or taste it but we know time is that passing the movement of our watches that's so and this is the concept of time we use in our everyday lives it helps us organize and coordinate ourselves and leslie forget about bigger access dental issues but while useful there is no strong scientific evidence showing this physical view of time is actually true. The more scientists investigate time the more the idea of it's being a substantive physical property of the universe proves to be false after centuries of debate theories and experiments physicists still cons agree on what time i'm actually is or whether it even exists outside of the human mind in this episode. We'll take a brief tour of the physics of time looking at the biggest theories that have shaped current scientific understanding of it well. We can't promise to solve the mystery of time. Entirely we can hopefully mop up some of the biggest myths and misunderstandings so that concept of flowing time you've always held to be true is ally but who spread the idea in the first place and if it's not true what clocks measure let's start by clearing one thing the the idea of a universal flowing time is actually relatively recent in the history of physics. The theory the measurement of change stating that where nothing happened time would not exist in this sense time was nothing more than a way of counting the changing of things now in contrast to these more subjective ideas of time. Newton's theory was rigidly physical. He argued for the existence of an absolute true through time that existed equally across the universe it had substance and i forward in one direction passing independently of things on the changes unlike aristotle he believed it materially existed it would continue to pass relentlessly in the background. Even if you stop thinking think about it. It's hard not to understate the importance of newton's idea he essentially helped construct modern physics by creating a mathematically weekly true singular time that is constant everywhere accurate and repeatable experimentation could take place is the version of time that modern science continues. Can you see us called proper time and it's the time you watch meters out. Proper time has endured because it's so practically useful to society be under no illusions. Blowing time is an intellectual construction not a physical truth of our universe. It may bring more order into our lives but it doesn't explain what time actually is it would take another three centuries for newton singular view of time to be challenged but when it finally finally arrived the blow was shattering enter einstein the space space time continuum e. equals m._c. squared the theory of relativity. Even though most of us aren't fully aware of what they mean there familiarity speaks except the shift force of einstein's legacy within the world of science. He's revered developing. One of the two pillars of modern physics publishing will than three hundred scientific papers in his lifetime within popular culture. His name is a synonym for genius genius. So what exactly did einstein bring to the theory of time and why a century on from his theories of relativity a we still not over him him before we dive into the details is worth noting that he didn't completely destroy all proceeding on time he actually showed that aristotle a newton birthright to some extent he suggested when and where could always be located in relation to something as aristotle suggested with his change idea and then you turn you into mathematical time could exist as a special case in his space time theory of gravity <music> this concept of space time essential to all einstein's theories he argued that time cannot be understood without space or vice versa person event objects or action could be located in space and not also in time that we need both to establish distance and intervals between events uh it was this idea that effectively overturned newton's concept of an independent time that flows regularly and separately from everything and here is how did it. I'm stein blow number. One universal clock time is an illusion since time crime actually passes at different speeds in different places his nineteen ninety-five special theory of relativity argued time operates relative to an observer is ever it depends on how fast moving and our frame of reference if foster we move the slower time passes for us. Einstein blow number two time runs slower. Wherever gravity is strongest another way amass slows down time around itself. He detailed this in his nineteen fifteen general theory of relativity which suggested that time on earth moves faster higher up so somebody living in the mountains ages slightly slower than somebody living at sea level o'clock cloak placed on a table run slightly faster than one placed on the floor and time passes more quickly for your head than it does for your feet. It's a tough one to get your brain around an alternative way to imagine it is to think of a twelve inch record turning on a player to complete one rotation appoint at the very edge of the record moves faster and appoints closer to its center is not a perfect example but it might make it easier to visualize allies either way. This theory suggested something dramatic that time is relative and personal not absolute. No single clock tells the right time. There are instead a web of different local times throughout physical space and clocks at these points change relative tip to each other. There is many different times as there are locations in space and since speed through time can affect how quickly at past is is. There is not even a single correct time any particular place this anton gives way to einstein anglo number three. We live in a block universe instead of dynamically moving time that fixes the past and froze into an open ended future all time is instead mapped out with an r four d curved block of space with past present and future already being fixed all events events that have ever or will ever occur a permanently located to an exact point leading.

Newton einstein aristotle leslie anton three centuries twelve inch m._c.
"time" Discussed on About Time

About Time

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"time" Discussed on About Time

"Alcohol seeming to last longer than an equally long period containing fewer. If you want in to fight the acceleration of time with age try filling your weeks with hundreds of new different experiences but attention also plays a part and the expansion and contraction of time because in order to estimate duration. We need to pay attention to the passage of time. The crystal wide time speeds up slows dollars all related to attention so if you have ten to time at the prison moaned no one time slows down say distracted from time because we're in a very interesting conversation we're watching a movie and not attending to time time and then times on very cute so when we focus on time passing estimates tend to increase and when we are distracted from thinking about time time retrospectively seems to have passed quick this could be explained by the capacity. We have available to process time information. We pay attention to time. We have more capacity to process it but when we focus on something else in addition we have lashed. We are asking our brain into process more things at the same time. Whenever we attend to an unexpected event we actually increase our rate of information processing think we put more pressure on our cognitive load and this means more units are detected during an event so it seems to last longer but it doesn't stop there just by taking a drug that affects our dopamine production we can completely change our experience of of time taking meth cocaine which stimulate production makes time seemed to speed up heavy cocaine users tend to mate longer time intervals and show more impulsive decision making choosing immediate reward over future one even when that reward will be great and if we take a drug like jalapeno deal which inhibits dopamine production time seems to slow down similar to what people with parkinson's disease experience who's dopamine production is impaired by the disease they showed deficits in motor timing as well as difficulty discriminating times duration as if the coke has slowed down for them so we know dopamine plays a central central role in our time perception. It's all part of the body's reward system it essentially teaches the brain to predict the timing and magnitude of reward in order to take the appropriate action to get that reward a dopamine neurons fire more at event was better than expected and less when an event is worse suspected it provides us with an indication of how surprised the system was to receive a reward and we use this to help time motor actions and understand times duration itself but there's to establish mood and affective states as timekeepers mm keepers in their own right more and more we are beginning to acknowledge time estimation are inherently emotional judgments. The most obvious example apple is time dragging when your boards and flying when you're having fun while this comes down to where attention is focused our emotions and wellbeing can actually inform mm-hmm what we focus on whether we so bored we focus more on the slow procession of time or so excited. We completely ignore it. The best examples of this are in extreme emotive situations. When people are shown provocative a neutral images for the same amount of time they report being shown the provocative ones longer. Our perception of time depends on the arousal level juice by the thing we're seeing as well as the type of emotion evokes. You're being exposed to your worst. Fear has a strong association with long the time estimates so if you show a picture of a spider two in arachnophobia arachnophobia they will likely overestimate the time they were exposed to it. Interestingly different types of motion can have dramatically different effects on our time interception with positive ones working very differently to negative ones so very often <unk> by the time passer in creaky is actually an indication haitian that we are in a positive flow state so say if some challenging activities to do then so absorbed in this activity we lose our sense heads of self at because. I say it could be writing texts. Koby scripting programs in could be playing a musical instrument in band can be in sports and then you you don't feel time at all but say if we have some more than strong in those rooms more a relate to arousal system than we suddenly family received ourselves clearly not because you had some achieving body states and then time causes more slowly could be <unk> very highly aroused emotional. Santa claus would be something like waiting for the bus and the buses upcoming and then you subject yourself in the situation on the time haase's very slowly so we need to understand that time judgments are inherently emotional judgments and that is objective thomas domitian shen can tell you a lot about the mental state of the reporter.

apple dopamine cocaine arachnophobia arachnophobia thomas domitian shen haase reporter parkinson
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"Airplanes are good places to do work you just got download stuff this life is not that good this is true but it's it's fun it's fun to to play within intellect you know reddening go so i know we were running short on time i i do we have time for projects in news probably not we might have to skip the free software friday got about two minutes on the clock two minutes on the clock all right we do this so devi's her was in the projects in news thing and steve mentioned it go one dot dot to and go one dot nine to five is out there will be a lincoln the shown outs to this really cool intro to the compiler that it's actually in the go get hub repo i found a quote project called rat will link to that in the show notes and that's a cool way of like running multiple commands and window they win doing them side by side and then like annotating them based on kind of patterns that show up in there so that's super cool i think that's everything did i did it in two minutes let's see you have i'd say so you have thirty seconds less that should be a segment once in a while just like masters you can sixty seconds or hundred twenty seconds as many things as you can mention go into minutes ally all right so free software friday did anybody has anyone or any anything they wanna give shut out too.

steve devi two minutes hundred twenty seconds thirty seconds sixty seconds
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"And then we'd go back to the larger group just for feedback every once in a while rene was rene spent less time on the verbal part of the brand but she spent a considerable part on the visual part of the brand and she did so over time so she she was very involved with it she helped pick the color palette she helped name the colors particularly the gopher blue one she she worked with us on on every part of of the visual aspect that it that's tastic coming at whoever was involved today's job i personally feel like it so just gonna call my bias out thrones i i love it came out really really well could job thank you what's not that this is you know that important to dive into but i think it's kind of interesting the stark exact opposite response and i know hacker news is the best place to have comments it's not the best place to meet the most loving programmers however you know there's such a backlash from so many people i wonder why people feel so like they like this respond that way i didn't say that i mean it didn't look none of it seems for stephen you had to dig into some of this or at least be like come on guys you got a you know someone says they're incredibly sad that logos awful you know looks like somebody else's logo there's a lot of just you know.

rene stephen
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"It is me i have arrived and our special guests for today is the product lead on the go team asti francia welcome steve thanks for having me now we've had you on the show before so i don't know whether we need like a whole intro but do you wanna give just kind of a little bit of background about yourself and kind of the role you play on the go team maybe what's changed since the last time he talked to you anything change gained weight since last time you talked to me besides maybe with a long your role what's anything genes in your role no yeah it's so i've been at google about eighteen months now a little more actually closer to two years i've been product google on the go project the entire time i think i've settled into that role a little bit more over time but it's it's been the same role that's it there's not a lot of new with me as far as roles in stuff so how excited are you it's an exciting time it really is i'll say that there's i've had i've had some good experiences my career i've been a part of mongo db since at the very beginning and took it to when it was the most third most popular database early part of dr so i've had some some opportunities to have the part of something when when it took off in a transformed and end go is going through what i might even call his second surgeons her second search in that it's it's really hit it stride in you can feel there's something tangible about it doesn't happen very often with languages or projects in general it's just a really exciting thing to be a part of.

google eighteen months two years
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"Was was rene involved at all in this process with adam and team to interview in south examine the process rene was she she she was very mult in fact a lot of people were involved at the beginning for the interview and then and then we spent a lot of time after their interviews just working through everything in trying to consolidate things down and i was a much smaller group and then we'd go back to the larger group just for feedback every once in a while rene was rene spent less time on the verbal part of the brand but she spent a considerable part on the visual part of the brand and she did so over time so she she was very involved with it she helped pick the color palette she helped name the colors particularly the gopher blue one she she worked with us on on every part of of the visual aspect that it that's fantastic coming at whoever was involved the job i personally like it so just gonna call my bias out thrones i i love it it came out really really well could thank you what's not that this is you know that important dive into but i think it's kind of interesting the stark exact opposite response and i know hacker news is the best place to have comments it's not the best place to meet the most loving programmers however you know there's such a backlash from so many people i wonder why people feel so like they like this respond that way i didn't say that i mean it didn't look none of it seems for stephen you had to dig into some of this or at least be like come on guys you got a you know someone says they're incredibly sad that logos awful you know looks like somebody else's logo there's a lot of just you know.

adam rene stephen
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"And our special guests for today is the product lead on the go team steve francia welcome steve thanks for having me now we've had you on the show before so i don't know whether we need like a whole intro but do you wanna give just kind of a little bit of background about yourself and kind of the role you play on the go team maybe what's changed since the last time he talked to you anything change gained weight since last time you talked to me besides maybe with a long your role what's anything gene in your role no yes it's so i've been at google about eighteen months now a little more actually closer to two years i've been product google on the go project the entire time i think i've settled into that role a little bit more over time but it's it's been the same role that's it there's not a lot of new with me as far as roles and stuff so how excited are you it's an exciting time it really is i'll say that there's i've had good experiences my career i've been a part of mongo db since the very beginning and took it to when it was the most third most popular database early part of docker so i've had some some opportunities to have the part of something when when it took off in a transformed and go is going through what i might even call his second surgeons her second search in that it's it's really hit it stride in you can feel there's something tangible not it doesn't happen very often with languages or projects in general it's just a really exciting thing to be a part of.

google steve francia eighteen months two years
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"Golan weekly really really cool the stuff he's doing now it's it's way more complicated than most people can really understand right now just because it's so new but i find it very very exciting and they think it's going to be a tremendous addition to the go hardware oriented development community so definitely go check out go we've actually talked about it i think the last two weeks as the posts came out i still have yet to get to play with it but like i'm really excited by because brandon i tinker a little bit in our spare time on on hardware and the idea that i can use even something go like instead of c is super appealing oh yeah absolutely the few attempts to do this it's a hard problem i mean it's similar to the computer vision of problem like how the solve it but you know say at least that this case they got someone else did someone else flinched first boy am i happy thanks man 'cause i really wanna use this and also a want to evaluate what abilities there are for combining the powers of goba along with them go because you know go out is like you know ruby on rails and go is maybe like you know the postchris sequel driver for ruby you know it's a more that's a bad metaphor but what the idea being that you're going to need both of these things in the bunch more tools as well to actually create any serious production quality hardware oriented application.

brandon Golan two weeks
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"Welcome back everybody to another episode of co time today's episode is number seventy six on the show today we have myself eric saint martin carly in toews also here hey everybody and brian kettle john hello and our guests for today is matt jaffe who works for pelosi working on a open source distributed index is that the best way to describe it matt that's that's as good as i've heard so let's let's first step until like maybe a little bit of background about you and kind of your history and go and we'll kind of jump into what pelosi is and what makes it interesting sure i i started playing with go in early twenty fifteen i joined this company called unbel here in austin texas and a critical piece of their infrastructure was something that they developed in house called pelota and it was written go and when i first started learning about it i thought it was you know about the coolest thing i never been close to in in my career and so i immediately decided to to start playing with go and they quickly became very enamored with the language and my colleagues will tell you i started pushing it every chance i could get you know internally and so i led the platform team inside unbel for about a year and a half before we spun out pelosi as a separate company.

toews brian kettle pelosi texas eric saint martin carly matt jaffe austin
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"Welcome back everybody to another episode of co time today's episode is number seventy six on the show today we have myself eric saint martin carly's in toews also here tell you everybody and brian kettles hello and our guests for today is matt jaffe who works for pelosi working on a open source distributed index is that the best way to describe it matt that's that's as good as i've heard so let's let's first step until like maybe a little bit of background about you and kind of your history and go and we'll kind of jump into what pelosi is and what makes it interesting sure i i started playing with go in early twenty fifteen i joined this company called unbel here in austin texas and a critical piece of their infrastructure was something that they developed in house called pelota and it was written go and when i first started learning about it i thought it was you know about the coolest thing i never been close to in in my career and so i immediately decided to to start playing with go and they quickly became very enamored with the language and my colleagues will tell you i started pushing it every chance i could get you know internally and so i led the platform team inside unbel for about a year and a half before we spun out pelosi as a separate company.

toews brian kettles pelosi texas eric saint martin carly matt jaffe austin
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"I can relate to that but at one point i just forced myself to start producing videos in like to give you an example one of the things i've wanted to do for i think the last year and it's not hard to do i just haven't done it is when you're watching video you can't copy paste the code so it's one of the big downsides to video is that you pause the video in anybody who's watched a teaching video has had this point where they posit they try to code all the co that's on the screen they have some random typo and they just don't know what it is like what is going wrong wise my code network in his was working so with editors like adam envious code you can actually write a plug in relatively simply that will keep track of all the changes you're making in your files and then can sink them in you know either jason file or something that will just have timestamps or whatever and then you could think that up with the video so that on the website you can just actually give them a copy paste version of all the code on your editor at any given time in the video and just think the two so building that is really especially like adam i built the plug in fort in like i think it was a half hour and i'd never built an atom plug in before so i know building the plug ins easy it's just getting all that data sinking it up with all my videos recoding videos and you know going through all the videos and actually live coding them so i can keep the toussaint is just a lot and is much as i'd really think that'd be a cool toy to have to add everything it's it's always that constant struggle like you said of do i build the toy or do i release another video.

editor adam toussaint
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"Pairing in remote code reviews wore a group of women so it's kind of like a remotes meet up group that's really cool are you doing this activity on the regular basis always say on needed needed basis so there are several people take me up on my offer i work with them individually in direct messages but there i started a are helped start a black women channel so there was a picture that ladimir and janis kearney and brian lyles and shared widely at the last guber conroy which which sort of showed several dozen black men together and it was just it's a wonderful thing to show the growth in that particular area of diversity and then i tweeted i was like my goal is to have this same picture but with black women for gopher twenty team so we started a black women channel and i we couldn't get everyone there's so many people in different time zones we've people from all the way from a european timezones all the way to cal four times a nine hour time difference to be able to agree on a single time so i'm kind of mentoring two or three individually in kind of doing cobra views with them but i think now right now i'm just going to say it right now in public i'm going to revive that and see if we could do something in groups from here until gopher con it's very cool very cool speaking of women who go new york city i was talking with jonas just the other day and there is a strong need for speakers at bowman who go nyc so if anybody has something great they wanna share or something you wanna learn and teach everyone else reach out and i can put you in touch right on thanks for that plug bryant app i'm here only long.

janis kearney brian lyles jonas nyc nine hour
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"Yeah because i have i have interesting names for people in my address book that i would not want anybody to ever know oh really yeah like eric you know i don't i don't call him eric in my address book that's something completely different in eric knew that he would be mad at me for a long time so you know those are things that we don't want public all right so free software friday does anybody have stuff you know i don't i don't have free software friday this week how sad is that if brand is the nephew not so bad to now having one either just mainly because i didn't think about it it's like i haven't been heavy one it's hard sometimes it's hard based on what you're doing and if you're kind of doing the same thing for weeks on end you may not be exposed to projects or when you are you don't think till i write that down like i need to give this person shadow leo so at the end of every episode what we typically do something we call free software friday where we give shout out to a project or maintain her of open source does not have to be go just to kind of show our love and appreciation for what they do i know this is on the spot so it is okay if you don't have one but if there's anybody or any project that you absolutely love and helps you out feel free to give them a shout out.

eric
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"It really is difficult and intimidating in now if it if you're done it from me i've done it before and every time is like is such a throwback oh how do i do this as if i had never done it it is and but the other thing about as the fbi is every cfp can be a blog post every cfp can be you know another way of distributing your knowledge to other people even if it's not accept it so i always i was tell people like do it even if it's hard like just get it down in a few bullet points and and then expand on it from there absolutely yeah in that it itself it's of it so payoff for you if you do have cfb in the matter what you have a pretty much ready blockposts to put out yeah exactly and if you don't have a in if you don't have a blog uh those gophers academy go for academy that will probably accepted or it's so easy to open a medium the blog paying snow now so when you say you have opened your services do me like people can contact directly absolutely yeah i am i am one hundred percent fine was people contact me directly on slack on twitter my email is see salisbury at a google dot com or cls at galang dot org um my information is everywhere on the web now sell anyone's welcome yes simplistic advantage of the it's it sent that doesn't have doesn't get a me if she gets to the banks from people i'm sure she'll go turn around and say to google hey i have so many people pay me i needs more people to work with me so fat how right now as the idea is that dea exactly so the more though few bad about contacting her.

fbi salisbury twitter google one hundred percent
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"And then are welcome back everybody to another episode of joe time in today's episode is number sixty two on the show today we have myself eric saintmartin currently shia pinto's also here i dare an brian kettles in all the way from italy fuller said we know you could speak italian i can't and our special guest today is lindsay hello now i think we should make brian speak italian for the whole show do that i did all i know is literally every word well kregel and grassy in my city are you in milan milan nines if beautiful right next to my hotel is this just building that they have all lit up with you know pretty lights and stuff and so i'm standing outside looking at this hotel trying to figure out with herb if this building trying to figure out what it is so i walked around the block and there's a sign out in front in in now italian in english that says this used to be a farmhouse in the 1500s mike holy crap five hundred year old farmhouse right next to my hotel just crazy well we we have such a a short term view of things in the united states where in of the oldest buildings that we see year just a couple hundred years old and and that's only in the rarest cases generally everything's less than 100 years old it's just crazy.

eric saintmartin united states joe shia pinto italy milan five hundred year hundred years 100 years
"time" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"time" Discussed on Go Time

"And it let you see for example while what's what you're spending most of your cpu time on or where you're allocating the most memory the the better tools are visual and you can you can click on things and find out um now because the graph has bigger now this is where i'm spending more of my time in you can drill lenin and get all the way down to the function level all right this code takes more time than anything else or i'm calling this one function so many times that it's taking all of my cpu time so you can drill into your app and and fine performance issues that way kohl so it's a good video i'll go ahead at all i do have one and i'm gonna get to link now but i forgot to put it on the dock it's bill kennedy came out with a blog post explaining channels and if you so if you use to channels by you don't understand them braley completely don't use them because you don't understand what were how they work if you read the sparked post a promise you will it might take you i wire to digest everything but he explains of really well he gives really good contrasts and he speaks eds it in a very simple language it's so i thought i thought it was a really great public service for him to to do that post and i happen to know he he took him a month to put it together it's really well done around law.

cpu time lenin bill kennedy kohl