13 Burst results for "Tim Lantern"

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

03:10 min | 4 months ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Showed off his playing. Franz Liszt wrote music that reflected his native country, Hungary. Other pianist composers put their roots into their music, too, like Spaniard isaq Albania. He made the piano imitate the guitar. While we're on the subject of pianos pretending to be other instruments, Louis Moreau got chalk, the first American pianist to become famous in Europe, used his instrument to imitate the banjo. There was a 19th century pianist composer who invented the short piece called the nocturne. Joan field was born in Ireland, but he spent most of his career in Russia. One of the last of the great pianist composers was Sergei Rachmaninoff, Rahman of lived long enough into the 20th century to make recordings. Some of them for Thomas Edison and some of them on paper rolls for player pianos. Some pianists didn't necessarily compose, but they did make arrangements of other people's music. When Vladimir Horowitz played his version of the stars and stripes forever, and almost sounded like John Philip Sousa's entire band was on stage. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at WGU Cincinnati. Please join me again for more classics for kids..

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:11 min | 5 months ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Say polish in French. At the time when the pollen is was a fashionable dance in the Polish court, Polish courtiers also thought it was more fashionable to speak French. The polonaise is a very dignified dance, actually, more like a procession. At first, only men did the polonaise, sweeping off their hats or drawing their swords at various points in the music. Later on in history, women were allowed to join in the polonaise, which became the dance that opened every ball. Since the polonaise involved a procession through all the rooms of a palace, it was a good way for the host to show off his home. The most important person at the ball headed up the polonaise procession. He was known as the lord of the dance. The pollen is caught on all over Europe, and even migrated to America. John Philip Sousa wrote his presidential polonaise after president Chester A. Arthur said he wanted a piece to replace hail to the chief. That's the music that's played whenever the president makes his entrance. Needless to say, it didn't. People in operas, especially Russian operas, dance the polonaise. Modest musorgsky put one into his opera Boris Godunov. And in tchaikovsky's opera Eugene on jagan, there's a wonderful poem is. After a while, composers began to use the slow rhythmic one, two, three of the polonaise as a form for non dancing instrumental pieces. Franz schubert wrote this polonaise for his violinist brother to play. Antonin dvorak composed a polonaise that he could play at the piano along with a cellist friend of his. And when they asked Anatolia to write music for the unveiling of a statue at the St. Petersburg conservatory, he composed a polonez. Since he was born in Poland, Frederick Chopin was probably more passionate about the polonaise than most composers. In fact, the very first pieces he wrote were polones. Because of the way Frederick Chopin has the piano imitate the sort of drum used to keep soldiers marching in line, another one of his polonaises is known as the military polonaise. The military polonaise, one of 16 polonaises for solo piano by Frederic Chopin. Next week on classics for kids, more music with a military theme. I'm Naomi Lewin, I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at WGU C Cincinnati. Please join me again for more classics for.

Polish court Chester A. Arthur John Philip Sousa Frederic Chopin Antonin dvorak Boris Godunov jagan St. Petersburg conservatory tchaikovsky Franz schubert Eugene Europe America Anatolia Poland Naomi Lewin Tim lantern WGU Cincinnati
"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:50 min | 8 months ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"I'm Naomi Lewin. Welcome to classics for kids. Lots of movies use classical music, but sometimes the music is such a big part of the movie that the two become linked forever. Even though Scott Joplin's music had been around for years, it was relatively unknown until 1973 when Paul Newman and Robert Redford made a movie called the sting. The sting is about a couple of charming crooks who outsmart a bunch of crooked ear crooks. The movie used a lot of Scott Joplin's music, especially that piece, the entertainer. After the sting came out, Joplin and his music were enormously popular, and it became impossible to think of the movie the sting without thinking of the tune the entertainer. That's happened with more than one piece of music used in a movie. Hardly anyone had heard of Johann pachelbel, who was born in 1653 until 1980 when the movie ordinary people came out. After that, pachelbel and his cannon, a cannon is a kind of a round, became household names. The movie breaking away is about a kid from Indiana who's in love with two things. Italy and bicycles. Well, three. There's also a girl. To go along with all the racing bicycles in breaking away, you hear Felix mendelssohn's symphony number four, known as the Italian symphony. There's also a bit of opera in breaking away, but in the movie diva about a teenage boy who can't stop thinking about an opera singer, an aria from Alfredo catalani's opera, la vali is the real star. The year 2001 seemed very far away when the movie 2001 a space Odyssey was made. Back then, people never dreamed that computers would get small enough to fit in the palm of your hand. That's the opening to Alzheimer's, the tone poem thus spake zarathustra by German composer Richard Strauss. 2001 a space Odyssey uses music by two composers named Strauss, who weren't related to each other. You also hear on the beautiful blue Danube by Austrian waltz king, Johann Strauss junior. Your parents or grandparents may remember a movie called elvira madigan that featured the slow movement from a piano concerto by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Mozart would probably be very surprised that people started referring to his piano concerto number 21 as the alvara madigan. There's a movie you've probably seen that's impossible to think of without the classical music that's in it. When farmer hoggett takes his pig babe in his arms, he sings. If I had words to make a day for you I'd sing you on morning golden truth the tune is from one of my all time favorite pieces, the symphony number three by Camille saint saints. It's pretty unusual to use, let alone star and organ in a symphony, so that piece is also known as the organ symphony. This show started out with music by Scott Joplin, one of the great African American composers. Next week, music by other black composers, not all of them American. I'm Naomi loon. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at WGU, Cincinnati. Please join me again for classics for kids..

Scott Joplin Naomi Lewin Johann pachelbel Alfredo catalani la vali Robert Redford Paul Newman Johann Strauss Alzheimer's pachelbel Joplin Felix mendelssohn elvira madigan alvara madigan Richard Strauss Indiana Italy farmer hoggett Strauss Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:47 min | 8 months ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin. I'm sure you look forward to a party every year to celebrate your birthday. And you know exactly when that is. These days, birthdays are very carefully recorded, but that wasn't always true. No one knows exactly what day or year Scott Joplin was born. The first time Scott Joplin's name turns up is in the 1870 census. The census is the official headcount that the United States government takes every ten years. According to the census taken in July of 1870, Scott Joplin was two years old, which means he was born in late 1867 or early 1868. No one's really sure where Joplin was born either. It was probably in northeast Texas. Japan's father was born into slavery in North Carolina. His mother was a free born woman from Kentucky. Both of them were musical, Joplin's mother played the banjo and sang, and his father passed his love of the violin on to his children. When Joplin's parents separated, his mother supported the family by cleaning houses. In one of the places she worked, Scott was allowed to use the piano. After Scott Joplin taught himself to play, a local piano teacher offered to give him some lessons. Julius Weiss didn't just teach Joplin the piano. He also taught him about different musical forms and how they were put together. As a teenager, Joplin started traveling, first to Missouri, where he played piano in saloons, and then to Chicago, where he led a band and played cornet in it for the 1893 world exposition. Then, Joplin went back to Missouri to a town called sedalia, where he published his first piano rags. Instead of letting someone buy his pieces outright for $25, which was what publishers usually did, Joplin arranged to get royalties, a small payment for every copy sold. That turned out to be a very smart move when Joplin published the rag he named for an African American social club in sedalia, the maple leaf. One of Joplin's pieces was based on something he'd seen at home in Texas, a train wreck that was staged on purpose by a railroad official with the interesting name of William crush. In Joplin's great crush collision, you can hear the whistles of the approaching trains. Somehow, between working as a pianist singer and bandleader, Joplin also found time to take classes at George R Smith college, an African American college in sedalia. After that, he moved to St. Louis, the hotbed of ragtime music. At the St. Louis world's fair of 1904, Scott Joplin played the rag he called the cascades. By now, Joplin was more interested in composing and teaching than in performing. He kept on moving, eventually winding up in New York City. Even though he was famous for his popular music, Joplin really wanted to be taken seriously as a classical composer. He wrote two operas, the first one was about Booker T. Washington, author of up from slavery, being invited to dinner at The White House. Unfortunately, that opera is lost. Joplin's second opera is tremendous about the daughter of former slaves. Scott Joplin earned the nickname king of ragtime writers. Next week on classics for kids, I'll tell you more about ragtime music. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at wgc Cincinnati. Please join me next time for more classics for.

Joplin Scott Joplin Naomi Lewin sedalia Julius Weiss United States government African American social club Missouri William crush Texas George R Smith college African American college Kentucky North Carolina St. Louis world Japan Scott Chicago St. Louis
"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:34 min | 8 months ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"You probably recognize that tune as America, my country tis of thee. But we borrowed it from the national anthem of the United Kingdom of England and Northern Ireland, which is God save the Queen, or king, depending on who's on the throne at the time. In the 1790s, when Josef haydn visited England, the king was George the third. The British ruler who lost the American colonies in the Revolutionary War. Haydn was so impressed with the song God save the king that when he got back home to Austria, he wrote an anthem for his country. The tune to haydn's anthem God saved France the emperor in German, got a health Kaiser, was so good that haydn put it into one of his string quartets, which is known as the emperor Quartet. For a while, haydn's tune was the national anthem of Austria. Now it's used with different words as the German national anthem. It's no surprise that haydn discovered the power of patriotic music in England. English classical composers have written a lot of patriotic songs. Thomas Arne composed rule Britannia in 1740 for a mask, MAS QUE, an elaborate theatrical production full of music, dance, singing, and acting. Rule Britannia caught on pretty quickly because at the time, England was fighting the war of Jenkins ear. I'm not kidding. That's what it was called. Almost two centuries later, right after the First World War, Gustav holst adapted music from Jupiter, one of the planets in his suite the planets to the patriotic poem I vow to thee my country. Yet another English man, Edward Elgar turned part of his pomp and circumstance march number one into a coronation ode for King Edward VII. King Edward had mentioned that he thought the march would make a good song. If you're a composer and the king makes a suggestion, you usually pay attention. People in England love to sing land of hope and glory at concerts and at soccer games. In Italy, opera is almost as popular as sports. Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi was highly patriotic and highly political. In verdi's opera nabucco, there's a chorus of captive Hebrew slaves singing about how much they miss their country so beautiful and lost. Verdi wrote nabucco in the 1830s when Italy was under Austrian rule, so the chorus really struck a chord with Italians. They felt verdi was talking about their country so beautiful and lost, and the chorus wa pensiero became an unofficial Italian national anthem. Around the turn of the 20th century, when Finland was under Russian rule, Finnish composer Jean Sibelius wrote finlandia for an event protesting Russian censorship of the Finnish press. 40 years later, sibelius took the part of finlandia that sounds like a hymn and turned it into an actual hymn. The finlandia him is another unofficial national anthem. American composer John Philip Sousa got into the act two with lyrics to his most famous march. The stars and stripes forever. Suza did not write three cheers for the red white and blue, or be kind to your web footed Friends. He did write hooray for the flag of the free, May it wave as our standard forever. The real words to the stars and stripes forever, by John Philip Sousa. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it at wgc Cincinnati with Tim lantern and Bruce Ellis. Please join me again for more classics for kids..

haydn United Kingdom of England Josef haydn England Thomas Arne Austria Haydn Northern Ireland Gustav holst verdi Kaiser Edward Elgar King Edward VII George Jenkins King Edward America France Giuseppe Verdi Italy
"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:56 min | 9 months ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Hello, welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin. I'm sure you've heard stories about composers starving in attics who died poor as church mice, and then only became famous after they were gone. Well, that's definitely not what happened to francios haydn. Haydn was born on March 31st, 1732 in the tiny Austrian town of roura. His father was a wheelwright. He made huge wooden wheels and wagons, and his mother was a cook. When the haydn's noticed that their oldest son was musical, they sent him to study with a relative who was acquired director, haydn learned to sing, and to play violin and keyboard instruments. When haydn was 8, he went off to the big city of Vienna to become a choir boy at saint Stephen's cathedral, the original Vienna boys choir. His brother Michael followed close behind. Michael was a bigger star in the choir than his brother, but he wasn't a bigger practical joker. One of their fellow students wore his long hair in a ponytail, and as a joke, haydn snipped it off. The choir director was not amused. He used that as an excuse to get rid of haydn, who was actually getting too old for the choir because his voice had changed. All his life, haydn continued to love jokes and put them into his music. For 8 years, haydn did spend time in an attic apartment eking out a living giving music lessons hoping that one day his prince would come. And he did. Prince Paul Anton esterhazy, a member of a very rich, very powerful family of Hungarian nobles, invited haydn to work for him. Prince Paul Anton loved music. He played several instruments and kept his own choir and orchestra to entertain his guests, and himself. When Paul Anton died, Nicholas esterhazy became the prince. Prince Nicholas like music even more than his brother, and he especially loved opera. He built a magnificent new summer palace and had them put an opera theater into it, so haydn began to write operas for the prince, including one that starred a sea monster. Haydn is most famous for writing string quartets and symphonies, more about the symphonies next week. String quartets began by a happy accident, or so the story goes, one day, haydn and three other musicians were invited to play at the home of a rich baron. The baron asked hiding to write a piece for the instruments they brought with them, two violins of viola and a cello. Haydn took that combination and ran with it. Haydn wrote 68 string quartets, some say 83. One of them got nicknamed emperor after haydn put his hymn to the Austrian emperor in it. That tune is now used for the German national anthem. Haydn spent over 30 years in one small corner of Europe, serving as music director for the esterhazy family. But thanks to publishing his music was known all over the continent. When Nicholas Esther hazi died, the next prince wasn't interested in music. He got rid of the orchestra and haydn retired. Then a man showed up at his door and announced I am Salomon from London and I have come to fetch you. Johann Peter Salomon was a German born violinist who ran a concert series in England. He brought haydn there twice. Each time he went to London, haydn composed a new set of symphonies. He was amazed that everyone wanted to take him out to dinner and that all the English newspapers wanted to interview him. At the end of his life, haydn was both rich and famous, and had gotten along well with his employer. Pretty unusual for a composer. Next time on classics for kids, more heightened symphonies. I'm Naomi Lewin, I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern and W GUC Cincinnati. Please join me again for classics for kids..

haydn Haydn Naomi Lewin francios haydn roura saint Stephen's cathedral Vienna Prince Paul Anton esterhazy Prince Paul Anton Paul Anton Nicholas esterhazy Prince Nicholas Michael esterhazy Nicholas Esther hazi Johann Peter Salomon baron viola Salomon London
"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

01:32 min | 10 months ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"The opera ends with a miracle. Amal, who couldn't walk without a crutch, is cured. As he gets ready to go with the kings to give his crutch to the newborn baby, he says goodbye to his mother. Crunch and tie it to my back don't forget to wear your heart I shall always wear my hands so my daughter would. Mind I shall miss you over. Those three pieces of classical music, Amal and the night visitors, hansel and gretel, and handel's messiah have all become Christmas traditions. And, of course, so has tchaikovsky's ballet, the nutcracker. I'm Naomi Lewin. I produce classics for kids with Tim lantern at wgc Cincinnati. We'd like to wish you and your family all the best this holiday season and to invite you to tune in again next time for more classics for kids..

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:35 min | 10 months ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Some composers in tchaikovsky's day didn't think his music sounded Russian enough, but to most of us, it sounds plenty Russian. His name was certainly Russian. Tchaikovsky. Here's how Russian names work. First names first, in tchaikovsky's case, Kyoto is Russian for Peter. Your middle name is a patronymic. It tells people what your father's first name is. If you're a boy, you add each or ovich to your father's name to make your patronymic. Tchaikovsky's father's name was Ilya so his patronymic was ilich, son of Ilya. If you're a girl, you add ova or oven to your father's name. My father's name is Frank, so my Russian name is Naomi Franco na. Tchaikovsky was born in 1840 in Watkins, a town in the Ural Mountains. When he was 8, tchaikovsky's family moved to St. Petersburg, which was the capital of Russia back then. Fortunately for a kid like tchaikovsky, there was lots of music going on in St. Petersburg. Unfortunately for tchaikovsky, music wasn't considered an acceptable profession, so his parents made him study law instead. But that didn't last long. First, tchaikovsky started studying music on the side, and then he gave up law to study music full-time. After he graduated from the conservatory in St. Petersburg, tchaikovsky became a professor at the brand new conservatory in Moscow. Soon, he was being asked to compose music for all kinds of occasions. For almost 14 years, tchaikovsky had a very unusual pen pal. A rich woman who was a big fan of his music decided that she wanted to be his patroness. A patron, patroness, if you're a woman, is a person who gives money to support someone or something like an artist or arts organization. Tchaikovsky's patroness was nadie de von meck, nadie is Russian for hope, by the way. For years, she sent chinaski money so that he could spend more time composing and less time worrying about making a living. But she didn't want to meet him ever. So for years, they just wrote letters back and forth telling each other almost everything about their lives. I wonder what they would have thought of email. Tchaikovsky dedicated his fourth symphony to his patroness. In addition to symphonies, ballets and other instrumental music, tchaikovsky wrote music for singers, songs and operas. His best known opera Eugene on jagan also has some wonderful dance music. Tchaikovsky traveled all over Europe to attend performances of his music, and in 1891, he even came to America to conduct his music at the opening of Carnegie Hall. One kind of music that tchaikovsky wrote better than almost anyone else was ballet. The tchaikovsky ballet that gets performed most often is the one that pops up every Christmas. The nutcracker. That was the Russian dance from tchaikovsky's ballet, the nutcracker. Next week, more ballet music by tchaikovsky and more about the ballet. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at wgc Cincinnati. Please join me next time for more classics for kids..

tchaikovsky Tchaikovsky St. Petersburg Ilya ilich Naomi Franco Ural Mountains Kyoto chinaski Watkins Peter Frank Russia Moscow jagan Eugene Carnegie Hall Europe America Naomi Lewin
"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

02:15 min | 11 months ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Where you want to. Of course, there were also American born composers who wrote operettas. Once upon a time, it was hard to go to a wedding without hearing this song from the operetta Robin Hood by reginald the coven. John Philip Sousa, the march king, also loved to write operettas. His most famous one is El Capitan, but this gallop is from a susa operetta called the Irish dragoon. After a while, in both England and America, the operetta began to develop into musical theater. Leonard Bernstein's candide is kind of a combination of the two. Music from the operetta candide by Leonard Bernstein. Leonard Bernstein grew up around Boston next week on classics for kids, music by other composers with a Boston connection. I'm Naomi Lewin, I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at wgc Cincinnati. Please join me again for more classics for kids..

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:33 min | 11 months ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"When he was growing up, Leonard Bernstein put on all kinds of musical shows with his friends, even operas. Eventually, Bernstein got a job putting on shows at a summer camp. After he graduated from college, Bernstein shared an apartment in New York with one of his coworker friends from that camp, adolph green, who was just getting started in the theater. Adolf green was a performer, and he also became very famous along with his partner Betty Camden for writing lyrics. The words to songs in Broadway shows. On the town is a musical that started out as a ballet. Jerome Robbins was a choreographer, the person who thinks up steps for how a dance should go. During World War II, he asked Leonard Bernstein to compose a ballet about three sailors who spend a day on shore leave in New York City. That ballet, fancy free, was such a success that Bernstein condon and green turned it into a musical comedy called on the town. The Bronx is something the batteries down the people ride in the home of the ground to your New York. There were people in the classical music world who criticized Leonard Bernstein for writing musical theater. They thought he was wasting his time composing music that wasn't serious enough. Fortunately, Bernstein ignored them. His next big Broadway musical was also about New York, and it also had town in its name. Wonderful town is based on the play my sister Eileen, about two girls from the Midwest who moved to the big city. Why did I love evil? Why did I walk too far? When life was so cold I had. Leonard Bernstein's Friends, Betty Camden and adolph green wrote the lyrics for wonderful town, too. But they weren't involved in Bernstein's most famous musical. As you can hear, the music for west side story is very dramatic. In 1957, when the show opened, Broadway had never seen or heard anything like it. The plot was familiar enough, it's based on Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet about two 14th century Italian teenagers who fall in love even though their families are at war. But west side story takes place in New York City and the teenagers are caught between warring gangs. Tony is a Polish American who falls in love with a Puerto Rican girl, named Maria. I've just managed a real and suddenly that name will never be the same to me the lyrics for west side story were by a young man who went on to write both words and music to his own shows. Stephen Sondheim. Okay, by me and my family. Everything freaking amazing. Not all of Bernstein's theater music was composed for the Broadway stage. In 1971, the John F. Kennedy Center for the performing arts opened in Washington D.C. with a new theater piece by Leonard Bernstein called mass. Speaking of Washington, Bernstein also wrote a musical called 1600 Pennsylvania avenue. Some incidental music for the play, Peter Pan, and two operas that were eventually combined into one. Trouble in Tahiti and a quiet place. Another Bernstein theater piece candide has been revised so many times, no one is exactly sure which version to perform. Stylish char. Thousand chickens. He's a cabbage. That's one of the tunes Bernstein put into the overture of candide, which is based on a book by the 18th century French philosopher Voltaire. The candide aria glitter and B gay is sung by a coloratura soprano, someone who can sing very high and very fast. Lemon Bernstein's candide falls more into the category of an operetta than a musical, more about operettas next week. I'm Naomi Lewin, I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at wgc Cincinnati. Please join me again.

adolph green Leonard Bernstein Bernstein Betty Camden Bernstein condon New York Jerome Robbins New York City Bronx Eileen Washington D.C. Midwest Juliet Romeo green Puerto Rican Stephen Sondheim Shakespeare John F. Kennedy Center for the Maria
"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:44 min | 11 months ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Hello, welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin. His grandparents wanted him to be named Lewis, so that's what it says on the birth certificate. But his parents called him Leonard and to his friends, he was always Lenny. Leonard Bernstein was born in 1918 in Lawrence, Massachusetts, and grew up in the Boston area. For years, the only music in the house came from a wind up victrola and a radio, both of which Bernstein loved. When he was ten, his aunt Clara gave the family a piano, and he was hooked. It didn't take long before his first piano teacher told his parents they'd have to find another teacher because she couldn't keep up with her pupil. Bernstein's parents were both from Ukraine, where one of his grandfathers was a rabbi. So the Jewish religion was a very important part of Leonard Bernstein's life as he was growing up. He spent a lot of time in Hebrew school at synagogue, and the music he heard there had a big influence on him. Bernstein's father did not want his son to become a musician. Sam Bernstein sold wigs and beauty supplies, and he wanted his oldest son to take over the business. But there was no stopping Leonard Bernstein. He went to Harvard University where he majored in music. There he met conductor Dmitri metropolis, who encouraged him to become a composer. Then Bernstein met composer Aaron Copland, who became a lifelong friend and encouraged him to become a conductor. Throughout his career, Bernstein continued to be a musical triple threat. He played piano conducted and composed. Leonard Bernstein's first steady job was assistant conductor of the New York philharmonic, and that's how he got his big break. Bruno Walter, who was supposed to conduct the New York philharmonic in a live national radio broadcast from Carnegie Hall, got sick. So 25 year old Leonard Bernstein stepped in to conduct and the rest was history. The audience loved him. His picture made the front page of newspapers the next day and his conducting career was launched. Then his composing career took off too. In one year, 1944, Bernstein had his first symphony, ballet, and musical comedy performed. Bernstein was in demand all over the world as a conductor. He was the first American to conduct at the famous la Scala opera house in Milan, Italy, and he had a long association with the Israel philharmonic, but Bernstein is most famous for being the first American to become permanent conductor of a major American orchestra. The New York philharmonic. With the New York philharmonic, Bernstein used television, which was brand new back then to bring classical music to a much wider audience. When a composer writes a piece of what's usually called classical music, he puts down the exact notes that he wants, the exact instruments or voices that he wants to sign those notes. And he also writes down as many directions as he can think of to tell the players or singers everything they need to know about how fast or slow it should go allowed us soft. It should be and millions of other things to help the performers give an exact performance of those notes he thought up. A whole generation of kids and grown-ups learned about music from Bernstein's young people's concerts. Teaching young musicians was very important to Bernstein. He spent his summers at tanglewood, the Berkshire music center in Massachusetts, and he also helped start music festivals in Germany and Japan. Leonard Bernstein refused to put limits on any of his musical interests. He composed the score for the movie on the waterfront, and he wrote some great musical theater. More about Bernstein's musical theater next week. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at wgc Cincinnati. Please join me next.

Bernstein Leonard Bernstein New York philharmonic Naomi Lewin Sam Bernstein Dmitri metropolis Lenny Leonard Aaron Copland la Scala opera house Bruno Walter Clara Israel philharmonic Massachusetts Lawrence Lewis Ukraine Harvard University Boston Carnegie Hall
"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Right? Incidental music illustrates the action or creates a mood for what's going on in a movie or play. For thousands of years all the way back to the earliest theater in ancient Greece, people have been using music to spice up what's happening on stage. The first time someone composed incidental music for a particular play may have been in 1664 for the first performance of John dryden's play the Indian Queen. But that music is lost now. A bit later, Henry Purcell wrote that music for another production of the Indian Queen. I have a composer friend who writes incidental music for plays and jokingly refers to it as accidental music, but since he and other composers spend hours getting the music just right, it's anything but an accident how music is used in the theater. That's some of the incidental music Felix mendelssohn wrote to set the mood for the fairies and magic in William Shakespeare's comedy amid summer night's dream. One of the human characters in a midsummer night's dream, bottom the weaver spends a good part of the play wearing a donkey's head instead of his own. In another piece of mendelssohn's incidental music for the play, you can hear the donkey going, he ha. He ha. The braying donkey is just one way that mendelssohn lets you know that amid summer night's dream is funny. Good composers use their music to show whether a play is a comedy or a tragedy. Definitely not funny, right? Ludwig van Beethoven wrote very noble music for the play egmont about a noble man who stands up to the Spanish inquisition. It's hard to stand up to the Spanish inquisition without losing your head, or getting hanged, which is what happens to egmont. The tragedy egmont is by the German poet Goethe, who really knew how to put words together. Unfortunately, Goethe had nothing to do with the German play rosamunde, which was so terrible that both the author and the play have pretty much been forgotten, but not the wonderful incidental music that Franz schubert wrote for rosamunde. If people like Beethoven and mendelssohn were composing today, they'd probably be writing music for the movies. Lots of classical composers have written film music like Erin Copeland, who sets just the right tone for the movie version of Thornton wilder's play our town. Of course, movie music has only been around since the mid 20th century, so all the composers who lived before then, like edvard grieg wrote their incidental music for plays. You can tell just by the sound of it that something very creepy is going on in the hall of the mountain king. In the hall of the mountain king is just one part of the incidental music that edvard grieg composed for the play peer gynt. Next week I'll let grieg's incidental music tell you the story of the play. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at wgc, Cincinnati. I hope you can join me again for more classics for kids..

mendelssohn John dryden Henry Purcell Felix mendelssohn Goethe William Shakespeare Greece Ludwig van Beethoven Erin Copeland Franz schubert edvard grieg Thornton wilder Beethoven Naomi Lewin grieg Tim lantern Cincinnati
"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"tim lantern" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Hello welcome to classics for Kids I'm Naomi Lewin. . The mighty handful may sound like a rock band or a bad babysitting job and the mighty five may sound like a basketball team. . But both of those were nicknames for a group of Nineteenth Century Russian composers interested in developing a Russian sound for classical music. . Obviously, , there were five of them. . Mighty handful refers to five fingers. . The ringleader of the mighty handful was mealy Bollock, , a pianist and composer who wanted to promote nationalism in Russian music in music nationalism refers to a south. . That's distinct Taylor country. . Sometimes, , that's done by using folk tunes, , rhythms, , or dance forms and a piece of music, , but it can also mean including historical characters or legend from a region. . While Akira, , wrote an overture in which he put pieces of three Russian folk songs. . Eventually Bala of became director of the Russian Court Orchestra. . But for a while he quipped music and went to work for the Russian railroad in fact, , every member of the mighty five held a nonmusical job at one time or another. . Alexander Borodino was never a professional musician. . He was a professor of chemistry. . From the time he was a kid Borodino was very musical but he decided to study science instead he wound up founding the first Russian School of Medicine for women. . After he met Bollock. . The great cheerleader for Russian Music Borodino. . Began composing. . But since science and medicine took up most of his time, , he didn't get a chance to finish very many pieces. . One of the other members of the mighty hand full wound up putting Borodin's opera Prince Ebor into its final form, , the man who cleaned up Laura Dean's music and music by quite a few other composers was Nikolai rimsky-korsakov. . Rimouski. . Korsakov was in the navy when he met up with Mealy, Bollock , Kiro and decided that. . Should be his life rimsky-korsakov quit the maybe to study composition after teaching himself to compose he wound up as a professor of composition at the new conservatory. . In Saint Petersburg Russia rimsky-korsakov was great at orchestration knowing what instruments to assign to which lines of music in order to get the best sound. . He finished a lot of pieces that some of his fellow Russians left unfinished and he also rearranged a lot of music some of which didn't necessarily rearranging. . The. . Last member of the mighty five was Cesar. . Has An unusually UN Russian sounding last name because his father was French. . In fact, , he was a French military officer who decided to stay in Russia after being taken prisoner there while fighting with Napoleon's army. . says. . We started out in the military too but you guessed it after he met Mealy Bala. . Cesar qe became a composer. . Even, , though he had no Russian ancestors, , his mother was Lithuanian qe became a big champion of Russian music just like the other members of the mighty handful. . There, , you have the other for Russian composers who made up the mighty handful. . Bella Kiev Alexander Barra Dean Cesar qe and Nikolai rimsky-korsakov. . The fifth of course was this month's composer Modeste Ski. . <music>. . That's no Muss G. N. O., , M. US. . The GNOME. . An m. e. from pictures at an exhibition by modest Mussorgsky's

Alexander Borodino Bollock Kiro Dean Cesar qe Nikolai rimsky-korsakov Cesar qe Mealy Bala Russian Court Orchestra Saint Petersburg Russia rimsky Russian School of Medicine Akira Bella Kiev Alexander Barra Tim Lantern Laura Dean Muss G. N. O. professor of chemistry Cincinnati officer Naomi Lewin Russia Korsakov