35 Burst results for "Tim Ferriss"

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

05:43 min | Last week

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Happening at the moment. There is a land grab for talent and big shows and audiences. Joe Rogan. Purportedly a $100 million deal. I actually think if I had to guess, I don't know this, but I would suspect it is substantially larger than that over time with earnouts and so on. And performance bonuses. I would guess it's much larger than that. I think there was somewhere between 60 and a $100 million deal for Dax shepherd, something like a $60 million deal for call her daddy. I think that's a three year deal. You will notice that the deal terms appear to be getting more and more onerous. Now, those are not all comparable deals. Those are different people, different properties, and so on. But I believe as part of the deal with call her daddy that Spotify has a first look or write a first refusal or automatic ownership of future properties and creations, not just current. Joe Rogan has a licensing deal. Which is very different from an IP purchase agreement. But this is all to say that if I had, let's just say, who knows? The four hour podcast. If I'd called it the four hour podcast, and I owned that trademark. And slowly brought in other hosts or co hosts to help. One could foresee an option of building that up into a property with many different personalities and selling that property. After which I, as the initial builder of that brand could be free and clear to go on and do other things. It is not possible to do that simply with a podcast called the Tim Ferriss show. So there are drawbacks, but net net, that's the story of how I got there. And I don't think about building a personal brand to be clear. You have a personal brand. Already, everyone has a personal brand. Guess what your personal brand is. Your personal brand is what your closest friends and family and coworkers think of you. That's it. What do they associate you with? If they had to pull four or 5 adjectives out of the air, how would they describe you? Whatever comes to mind, most naturally, when people think about you, that is your personal brand. So we all already have a personal brand. If you want to create a personal facade or a stage persona, not saying you, Chris, but just in general, you can do that, but you should be very careful of that. And I remember I was told and I'm paraphrasing here, but by Andrew zimmern, who is an amazing television host who is very smart and very, very thoughtful. Who's been on the podcast, his story is incredible. I mean, I think sleeping on a mattress under an overpass at one point as an addict and now is who he is. It's really remarkable story. When he was just getting started in television, and he and I spoke when I was doing some television, not too long ago, he had some choices to make in that first episode about who he wanted to be. How did he want to deliver his lines? Were they going to incorporate any particular types of shticks? Were they going to be funny? Were they going to make fun of certain things? Were they going to use the cheesy jokes? And he made a lot of decisions early on the ended up being critical to the future of his career, because he said, in effect, be very careful of who you are in episode one because that's who you have to be for the rest of the time you're on television. And I think that's true podcasting. So be really careful about what you pretend to be. Because you'll have to maintain that and you may actually become whatever you pretend to be. So I don't think a whole lot about personal brand. Although I do think about what I want to stand for and if I were really true to myself, if I were really true to myself, what would I do? Who would I interview? If I were just doing this for me, what would I do? And I always get the best results when I do that. When I try to predict the movement of the masses of some potential audience like this flock of birds, where I'm trying to guess which direction they're going to fly, it never turns out well. For me, especially. It's not fun, and it's not particularly effective. One of the things you mentioned in that story was about these podcasts getting these licensing deals or different things. A common thing that I know happens with podcasts, especially as they start to gain traction and has happened to me in the last couple of weeks is some podcast network will reach out and say, hey, do you want to join our network? Do you want to be an iHeartRadio podcast? Do you want to and usually get to keep all your IP, but they basically say, hey, we'll sell ads will keep 50% will help you grow your show. We'll do all this stuff. You don't have to think about it. We'll just give you the money we make. And it seems to your point about monetization, don't spend any time on it, spend time honing your craft, spend time making a good show. Is that a good way to kind of take all of that off your plate from thinking about it? Would you encourage people to take those calls? Because they don't result in having to spend time selling ads, though you lose upside for whatever term that deal is. This is a worthwhile topic to explore. Clearly, or maybe it's not clear, but I do not work with the network or a partner of that type. A lot of people do. A lot of people do. And I think it depends a lot on what.

Joe Rogan Dax shepherd Tim Ferriss Spotify Andrew zimmern Chris
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

04:33 min | Last week

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Right fifty different sponsors at two spots a piece. If you have high churn rate meaning a lot of those people take two episodes and then split and never come back. You're just going to have to do that again next year. That's exhausting so. I wanna make sure there's a high level of commitment but there's also a high level of vetting on my side. Therefore high probability that the product and the company will do really really well in the podcast. Because i don't want them to do two or three spots and we do insist on test of multiple spots not sure to right now might be three and my podcast expensive very very very expensive. I mean it's a premium podcast. I want them to spend millions of dollars on the podcasts over a long period of time so everything is geared towards that. Because it's it just simplifies everything for everyone. But the point i wanted to make is question. Best practices and if you are not in a position to question best practices your product isn't good enough or you just don't have enough leverage for some reason and you should take a very close look at those reasons but it doesn't hurt to ask for instance what does every almost ninety nine percent of authors out there. Do they publish a book in hardcover. Six to nine months later the book comes out in paperback and they hit the press junket once again and they go on tour to announce the launch paperback. None of my books have ever gone to paperback. Why is that. Tim ferriss. I'll tell you it's because and the numbers vary but not by that much. Let's say that you're getting a twelve percent royalty on your hardcover book. Paperback royalties is probably going to be six percent. Six and a half percent so broadly. Speaking paperback royalties are. You'll get paid fifty percent of what you're currently earning per book by going to paperback. What does that mean that means you have to sell twice as many books to make the same about of money..

Tim ferriss
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

05:18 min | Last week

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Not applying constraints in such a way to ensure that your life does not become a miserable existence of just being a pinata for every ask and request of dozens of sponsors. As it might be in the example that you gave. That could be a huge pain in the ass. So what constraints could you apply to ensure that it does not become a monster you have to feed or a huge distraction? A very simple constraint that I applied was a, we're going to have our own insertion order document that is going to be non negotiable and everyone is going to prepay for their spots. We will not have any terms. We're not going to have accounts receivable. We're not going to chase people for payment. Everybody is going to pay up front. And what do you think the response was from sponsors initially? The response was, what the fuck are you talking about? We get terms from everyone. That's how this is done. I said, that's fine. We don't have to work together. This is just what allows me and my tiny team to remain sane. So if it's not worth it, it's not worth it. I totally understand. Let me get back to work and make the podcast so good that there will be at least a few sponsors who are going to say, you know what? Fuck it. We will pay you up front. And that is something we have stuck to and I can not tell you how much that has simplified. Our lives and our operations. It also acts as a litmus test for commitment from sponsors. Because, as you noted, to fill, let's just say in your case, right? 50 different sponsors at two spots a piece. If you have a high churn rate, meaning a lot of those people take two episodes and then split and never come back, you're just going to have to do that again. Next year, that's exhausting. So I want to make sure there's a high level of commitment. But there's also a high level of vetting on my side. Therefore, a high probability that the product and the company will do really, really well in the podcast. I don't want them to do two or three spots. And we do insist on a test of multiple spots. Last year, it's two right now. It might be three. And my podcast is expensive. Very, very, very expensive. It's a premium podcast. I want them to spend millions of dollars on the podcast over a long period of time. Everything is geared towards that because it just simplifies everything for everyone. But the point I wanted to make is question best practices. And if you are not in a position to question best practices, your product isn't good enough, or you just don't have enough leverage for some reason. And you should take a very close look at those reasons. But it doesn't hurt to ask, for instance, what does every almost 99% of authors out there do? They publish a book in hardcover, 6 to 9 months later, the book comes out in paperback and they hit the press junket. Once again, and they go on tour to announce the launch of paperback. None of my books have ever gone to paperback. Why is that Tim Ferriss? I'll tell you it's because and the numbers vary but not by that much. Let's say that you're getting a 12% royalty. On your hardcover book. Paperback royalty is probably going to be 6%, 6 and a half percent. So broadly speaking, paperback royalties are you'll get paid 50% of what you're currently earning per book by going to paperback. What does that mean? That means you have to sell twice as many books to make the same amount of money. I'm skipping over some specifics here, but more or less, you have to sell twice as many books to make what you are making right now. What is the benefit to the reader of this? Well, we live in a world with audio with Kindle and the benefit to the customer. We also have libraries where you can get E format for free oftentimes, and actually I learned of a very cool, I think it was a Chrome extension on your podcast. In fact, about this, the benefit to the consumer used to be, they could save whatever it might be. $5 on cover price. With Amazon, which is generally selling it almost close to wholesale prices, that benefit is no longer exists. So for a marginal to nonexistent benefit to the end reader, you are going to voluntarily cut your royalties in half, which means you have to sell twice as many books to earn the same amount per year. That made no sense to me. So I've never done it. And to their credit, my publishers early on, were open to this logic for staying in hardcover, and it worked out really, really well. I did not have a lot of leverage in the beginning. I did not have Tim Ferriss and Mark he lights as people or some people perceive it today. I simply laid out the logic..

Tim Ferriss Amazon Mark
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

05:37 min | Last week

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Boys and girls, ladies and germs. This is Tim Ferriss and welcome to another episode of the Tim Ferris show. We have had three technical failures, but we've made it happen, and this is an improv episode. I'm very excited about it because my friend Chris reached out with many questions about podcasting. Good questions. He had already read much of what I had written. He'd listen to several interviews, and this is intended to be an updated guide to all things podcasting. The last time I wrote anything at length about this, I think the Tim Ferris had about 60 or 65 million total downloads. Now it's past 700 million. The show has grown a lot has happened, technologies have. I want to say developed, not always evolved as we may end up covering. But Chris, why don't you take a moment to tell people who you are? We've known each other now for at least 6 years, maybe closer to ten. I can't really even recall how we first met, but we have a mutual friend and Kevin rose and many other people. Who are you, Chris? So hi, everybody. I'm Chris. Chris Hutchins. I'm a bit of one of those crazy life hacker optimizers, take it to the extreme sometimes. And I host a podcast. Hopefully soon to be award winning podcast called all the hacks where I document my journey to upgrade my life, money, travel, all while spending less in saving more. Outside of that, I'm building new products at wealthfront. And before all of this, I've started a few companies sold a few companies, worked in venture capital, investment banking, management consulting and travel around the world for 8 months. So a bit of a seasoned set of random things Jack of all trades, maybe Master of None. And I'm excited to be here. Well, I am excited to jam because I actually haven't spoken at length in detail about the latest and greatest. Or in some cases, the old and the tried and the true that I don't think needs to change. But I want to underscore that you really do know what you're doing when it comes to certain obsessive deep dives that you've done. Particularly, I shouldn't say particularly, but including travel and points and not just saving or cutting costs, but improving the immersive experiences that you have in life. And so you've traveled to roughly 70 countries, mostly for free on point and there's much more to it. How many episodes have you recorded and published so far of your podcast? Just so people have some context. This is relatively new. I think I just released episode 19 when we're recording this. So it's been I started in May at September, so only four or 5 months. We'll come at this from many different angles. But where do you think it makes sense to start in preparation for this hoping this would be sort of the one stop shopping or at least the jumping off point for anyone who really wants to study maybe not best practices, but good practices within podcasting. Where do you think it makes sense to start? So there were two things that you've done that I think really gave me a lot of background. And one was the post you mentioned that you wrote in 2016. And then you did a maybe two hours or something interview with Rolf pots on his deviate podcast and talked a lot about this. So I thought maybe to kick it off. I'll just highlight some of my takeaways from doing my homework. And, you know, feel free to say, wow, that's wrong, that's changed, but we can kind of run through what I learned and then we can kind of run through that same series of getting started, picking gear, finding guests again and kind of dive deeper on what's changed and how it's evolved and questions that maybe were left unanswered in the original stuff. Let's do it. Perfect. So when it comes to getting started, this is something that I like you took a while to decide to start a podcast. And one of the pieces of advice that you gave that was really valuable to me was you don't have to commit forever. I think it always feels like a thing that you have to do forever once you start it happens every week forever. And you can kind of set a date and say, let's do 5, let's do ten episodes, and that's it and we'll reevaluate. So I think that's a really important takeaway is that no one you don't have to commit forever. And the other big one is it's a lot more work than it seems. And so you said only do this if you do it for free, which really means like it's gotta be you. It's gotta be what format excites you, the tone of voice, the kinds of guests, the questions that are exciting to you. Otherwise you'll get bored. And the final kind of getting started advice I took away was, look, if you don't have an audience, don't be afraid. Everyone started with some lack of audience at some point. And plenty of people with massive audiences have totally failed in podcasting. So the quick way is just get a couple episodes out there, keep it simple, do something you love. Don't worry about the business side and experiment. And I think that kind of sums up what everyone needs to know in a very concise way before getting started. Let me add to that. So I agree with all of that. And I want to add a couple of nuances are just additional comments. So it's helpful to bracket the minimum and then a check in point for your commitment to podcasting. In other words, you could say, I'm only committing to do.

Tim Ferris Chris Tim Ferriss Chris Hutchins Kevin rose Jack Rolf
How to Build an Audience

The $100 MBA Show

01:58 min | 5 months ago

How to Build an Audience

"I want to start this two part episode on building her audience with a simple fact. Everybody that you know in your industry has a humongous audience in the business world. It could be gear trucker. Tim ferriss or seth godin. No matter how large anybody's audience is today. They all started in the same place. They started with zero people. They started with zero email subscribers. So if you're getting started if you still do not have an audience you want to build your audience. Take on the fact that everybody starts in the same place. I also want to mention that. Most entrepreneurs i know their biggest regret is not building. Their audience sooners every day. That goes by that you do not implement the stuff. You are learning in this. Two part episode is a day wasted. Because you wanna be able to start building this audience as soon as possible because every audience member every email list subscriber every person that joins your community is a potential customer. A potential lifetime customer. It's a potential person that you can help that you can impact that will then tell other people and bring you more customers. So it's imperative you do this work. It's imperative do not put this off anymore and if you are building an audience it's time for us to kick into gear to make it our top priority in our business women and enjoy our software company with our podcast one hundred dollars and the hunter on ba building. Our audience is our top priority. I know from experience that if either email list of thousand people i email them. I almost no to the exact dollar. How much money i can make from those thousand subscribers by email them and offer. I know what my average conversion rate will be for. Just multiply the number of potential sales by the price of my product. I know exactly how much money i can make from that audience.

Tim Ferriss Seth Godin Ba Building
How To Make Better Decisions, Faster With Matt Bodnar

The EntreLeadership Podcast

06:40 min | 8 months ago

How To Make Better Decisions, Faster With Matt Bodnar

"Every day were making decisions. Now hopefully take our business to the next level. What do we do with this particular team member. How do we find the best vendor. What colors and fonts should go on the website for next marketing campaign and hundreds of other decisions like these that we have to make every single week. The stakes are high. We can't afford to make a bad decision from the ramsey network. This is the entreleadership podcast where we business leaders grow themselves their teams and the prophets. I'm your host. Daniel tardy am i guess. Today is matt bonner match the chairman at fresh technologies and he's done a lot of cool stuff. He's helped star businesses run businesses launch. New business turn businesses around and especially as passionate about helping businesses scale up from the startup stage to be in a big deal. He knows a lot about decision making strategy and how to align our behaviors with our goals. But he didn't start out in this space in fact he actually started out as a successful analyst on wall street. He was making a lot of money at goldman sachs and so. I was super curious to ask them. Hey matt why did you leave. One of the biggest influences in this is a book. That's influenced me tremendously. Was the four hour workweek. The whole tim ferriss thing and so reading that and really thinking about what do i want to do with my life. And and where do i wanna spend my time and and thinking about. I mean in a place like that you can see the trajectory. Stay here fifteen years. I'm back. I if i stay here twenty years on that guy etc and so i could see what the future looks like and all they wanted to do something more entrepreneurial and i had this epiphany i was reading this article on bloomberg about one of the founders of google. I forget if it was larry page or or sergei would basically set this thing. And they've saying you know which everyone is. The ceo at the time and their salary was one hundred thousand dollars and as a first year analyst at goldman. My salary was more than that. And so i read the article and i kind of had. This chuckled to myself as like a twenty one year. Old or twenty two year old. And i'm like. I'm so awesome like i have a bigger seat salary than the ceo. Google and then literally there was a comma and the next half. The sentence was like andy's worth twenty seven billion dollars stock or whatever and so it was just like an anvil like crushing on the head. That was like oh. You don't get wealthy from a salary you get wealthy from having equity in something and that was really. That was a big difference for me that that made me realize that having a having a high salary doesn't really mean it helps but but ultimately ownership equity is really where you generate the most value. So did that. Prompt you to think i wanna start my own thing. I wanna build something. My dad's a very successful restaurant tour and he he had been doing. A bunch of stuff in nashville. And kind of the southeast. Broadly for you know. While i was in middle school high school all that stuff and he was always when i was up at at goldman he was always like a bug in my ear. Hey come back and you know. Help me out. Come join me join me. And so eventually I answered that call in and move back to national got involved with him in a in a company called fresh hospitality which is an investment business. Essentially that invests kind of across the food and restaurant world and scales various different restaurant brands. How big was the team when you joined basically me my dad My brother and one other gentleman whose name was nikola haggas is basically four of us at the time and There for yeah. Yeah and i mean there were there were other. I mean we were essentially almost like a small private equity or venture capital firm and so I mean the operating companies that we invested in obviously had a bigger sure employees based but really that was it at the beginning. And and since then we've built this whole kind of ecosystem and infrastructure of businesses. You've worked with a lot of businesses here locally many that. I've personally been a patron and i remember martin's barbecue when we went when they were a little like double wide trailer out. South nolansville autobody shop was yes barbecue around. And nobody knew who they were. Unless you live like right in that little community and now i mean if if you know martinsburg if you've been in nashville you know martin's barbecue i mean it's just it's the spot that you go if you're a nashville I'd love to hear that story. You know i mean you you you guys. Clearly were part of them you know becoming a big deal and kind of putting him on the map And i know you guys do that with countless other. You know restaurants But how do you. How do you find the martin's barbecue when they're just this little local story and nobody really knows who they are. I mean we're we're at a point. Now where and i think you see this in a lot of different businesses where you get inbound deal flow right and so i mean we. We met pat actually through a A point of sale reseller that we that we had a relationship with was selling terminals and that he's a hey. This guy's got a really cool thing. You should go check it out and so we went and we went and just had lunch. They're checked it out and got to know him and You know helped partner up from from day. One when they were back over that little auto body shop and You know our whole thesis for for how we invest in a company's specifically within the fresh Platform is we have this whole ecosystem that we've developed over the last decade or so of everything from technology to accounting to Real estate expertise marketing the whole the whole suite of services that sit around a business and we go in and we ate we provide them growth capital but we also provide them what we call our intellectual capital of all those different things to help them scale up and so you know we. We plugged that infrastructure in and really helped him. I identify a great site. And that was their store nolansville. That they moved to that was across the street. The kind of bigger flagship store and then started very strategically looking at. Hey what are some other great opportunities for this brand and and really one of the biggest strategic decisions we made up martin was we ultimately decided that we needed to have a presence downtown and to to truly be a competitive player in the in the nashville barbecue space and plant our flag so to speak. We we needed. We needed something downtown in. That's how we ended up ultimately finding the property at martin's we call it rutledge but the downtown martins barbecue and and that's we now we sort of we. We jokingly referred to it as the mothership because it's it's this behemoth compared to the other typical martin stores but it's been a really great opponent of that business.

Goldman Ramsey Network Daniel Tardy Fresh Technologies Tim Ferriss Matt Bonner Nashville Nikola Haggas Larry Page Martin Google South Nolansville Sergei Bloomberg Matt Andy PAT Rutledge
How To Get on Podcasts as a Guest

The $100 MBA Show

10:25 min | 10 months ago

How To Get on Podcasts as a Guest

"One of the most free questions. I get asked about podcasting is how do i get on other podcasts as guest and its frequent for good reason because people know that podcasts are powerful way to market themselves to get out there to be known. Nobody wants to be ignored. But how do you get on a podcast. You just use cold outreach. Do spam people in their inboxes. Asking to be on their podcast. What is the most effective way to regularly show up on other podcasts. Well i'm going to tell you share with you my system so you can lineup guest appearances for the rest of the year. First of all. I want to address something. That's very very important. One of the things. We all have to come to terms with no matter where you are in your entrepreneurial. Journey is understanding. Why you should be on a podcast. Not talking about the benefits here. i'm talking about. Why would a podcast host. Won't you on their show. You have to honestly answer that question for example. Take a look at some of the bigger podcasts. Out there W f by marc maron. Joe rogan the jordan. Harbinger your show. Why is elon. Musk being interviewed by. Joe rogan. Why did richard bring it on the dribble. your show. Why did president. Braga obama get on w. f. with marc maron. How did that happen. That cold email. joe rogan. No probably the other way around right so the first thing we have establish is the more value can add to an audience. The more likely it's going to be that you're going to show up on that podcast. Let me say that again. The more value you can add to an audience the more likely you will be a guest on that podcast so elon. Musk shows up on. Joe rogan because joe rogan knows. His audience wants to hear from him. He sought after the something here. There's something that he can offer. That makes it worth him trying to get him on the show. One of my favorite podcast interviews is with jamie fox on the tim. Ferriss show and tim for a shares that it took him years to get to the point where he knew jamie foxx enough to convince him to get on his podcast. He had to put a lot of work in a lot of time. A lot of sacrifice a lot of investment and. I'll talk a little bit about how he actually got jamie fox at the end and how relates to today's lesson. Why did tim ferriss go through. All that effort will because he knew the jamie foxx would be a brilliant episode who share incredible stories. He has a lot of value to add. So i want you to start thinking in that way. Yes we all are not jamie fox or president barack obama but we can add value to an audience and we could start somewhere we will have to start with the can show right. We can start with smaller podcast with audiences that are more niche that can really benefit from what we can offer but a lot of us get disappointed that. Hey i'm reaching out these podcasts. And they're not getting back to me. I can really offer a lot of value. Omar will one of the reasons why they're not getting back to us because they just never heard of you or they don't really have any kind of rough of what you can deliver so we're going to solve this problem immediately. One of the best ways to get on a podcast. If your brand new is to be noteworthy that means you have to show people that you can deliver for example if somebody wanted to get on a podcast and they just reached out by email and said hey podcast. I'm an expert at seo. I think i'd be really valuable to your audience versus somebody who says hey. I'd love for you to have me on your show an seo expert. I should talk about how. Google has become the dominant search engine and y. Here's a link to that ted talk hoover's opening the email whoever's reading the email whether it's the host or the executive system that works for the host. They have a lot more mature work with now. They have a reason to say. Yes they have a ted talk to watch and say. Wow this person's credible they really delivered Enough people in that room were willing to listen to this person. He commanded an audience. Might be worth having on the podcast so you have to really give them something to say. Yes. this is why your own content is really really important until you have a few great interviews under your belt where you can share those in your pitches then you need to shoot something else whether it's a youtube video whether it's a bestselling book up performance onstage. Give something to. The decision is easy. It's an easy s now. Our which is one of the ways you can do. This is one of the strategies. I used in the beginning where i literally would go to the pages of all the podcasts. I wanted to go on. I emailed them and Ask them to be on. And i gave him some materials to kind of look through to know that. I'm legit but a more effective way is what's called a warm introduction. Introductions are one of the best ways to get on podcast and it's the fastest way to get a. yes now. there's a few things you can do. Let's start with one of the easiest step step number one is do you know anybody. That's been on amy podcasts. As a guest. Look at all your friends on facebook on social your emails. Is there anybody in your network. That's been on a podcast guest. That knows that can vouch for you if so ask that person. Hey can you introduce me to that. Podcast you're on. A warm introduction is an easy way for them to say. Hey that gas was good and the recommending somebody. There's a good chance that somebody is going to be worth my time. This is why. I really emphasize the importance of building. Your personal network making friends in your industry because you can always help each other out vouch for each other and remember. I talked about how a lot of just don't know who you are. The more you network the more. You're well known. There are so many people. I know that are so good at networking yet. They don't have a best selling book. They are not a social media phenomenon. But if i say their name people know they are because they are great at networking. They're great at making friends in their space and people like that will never starve because they can always find opportunities because they know somebody. So get a warm introductions one of the best ways to get on podcast. Next piece of advice is your aim. Should be trying to get on five. Podcasts doesn't matter the size of the audience or how newer old the podcasts. Is you wanna get some rips. You wanna really understand the process and you want to deliver. Will you wanna do in those first. Five is be the absolute guest that podcast has ever had. I'm talking about study. This podcast study everybody. Who's in your niche or have spoken about the topics that you might talk about in the interview or in the podcast episode and cover things that haven't been covered address issues. Problems challenges that other people haven't addressed on the podcast before you want to be the most guests they've ever had you want to be the jamie foxx episode. Okay why because this is how you're gonna viral market yourself if you knock it out of the park. And you're the best episode for each of these. Podcasts podcasters listen to other podcasts. And the here episode the blake. I gotta get this person on my show and that really worked for me. I work super hard on making sure. I nail my first interviews. That i crush it that i really deliver value. It's my only goal. I'm not trying to promote products and services if the host talks about my websites or my products. That's great. that's fine. But i don't even mention the asking. That question is are any way people can reach out to you. I give out my e mail or give out my twitter handle and try to get the conversation to continue on those mediums. The point here is that you just got to really nail. This not only will help you with the viral marketing of a. But it's a great set of interviews that you can use as samples of your work when you reach out to other podcast to be a guest on. My next tip is make a list. Make a list of all the podcasts. You want to be on. And it's okay if you shoot for the stars and he may even wanna work to that list so like number. One is joe rogan number two. Is tim ferriss. Show whatever just you know naming names here. But you have your favorite podcasts or the best podcasts you want to be on and work your way down. you know. it's okay if that list is one hundred. Two hundred three hundred podcasts. And see as you know a a bucket list you know. I wanna cross these off. And i want to get through all the podcasts as much as possible. And don't forget new. Podcasts are being launched all the time. so you're gonna want to update this list but the list is great to have so you can track your progress and is literally just a spreadsheet on google sheets. You know the podcast name. The podcast host The link to the podcast. And then i actually have a column or linked to my episode. Once i'm on it when you're starting out on another quick tip. I have to say this. But i've noticed some people don't do this but when you're starting out when you're trying to get on other podcasts. Dopey a prima donna. Okay don't be too precious. A lot of people. Don't want to fill out forms. They wanna do pre interviews. They don't wanna do the initial chant. Sometimes they think well this established business successful This is beneath me and this podcast is not popular anyway. Why should i do this. Well you should do it because if you wanna get on the show. That's what needs to be done. There's no room for pride here. You want to get on the podcast. Go through the format. It's good for you helps you prepare helps you do your best when it's time to actually be on the podcast and you're on the road of the actual episode. You gotta earn your stripes. You might be successful in your own area in your own business. But you're entering a new world podcasting and you're nobody here. I don't want to speak on your behalf but if you're a beginner you are still earning your stripes. You're still proving yourself as good guest as a gray guesses a valuable guests so run through the steps in the is as needed. And sometimes you're going to have to do all these kinds of hoops and prepare and schedule months in advance before the episode of airs. The better podcasts. Actually you know. Have a pretty long lead time. Some of the bigger podcasts. I i've been on. They had four five six months of lead time. But as you know time flies so put in the work now so you can reap the benefits later.

Joe Rogan Jamie Fox Marc Maron Jamie Foxx Tim Ferriss Elon Musk Braga Obama Omar Jordan Barack Obama Hoover Richard TIM TED Google Youtube AMY Facebook Twitter
Forget About Your Resolutions And Focus On Your Habits

Trent365

01:48 min | 10 months ago

Forget About Your Resolutions And Focus On Your Habits

"Reminder from my mate de damon and i met each other during the lockdown here in malaysia back in march where hanes lovely wife were stuck here in malaysia and stranded and we used to meet up during a how yod time when we did a little walk around the block each day and he posed this question on his instagram yesterday. I how many people have figuring out the resolutions on nearly as meaningful as habits. Which i think is pretty important reminder at this time of year because a lot of course make these resolutions and then nine or ten months down the track we sit back and realize we haven't managed to achieve them and we kinda wonder why and the answer is pretty simple. Of course the answer is that. We haven't made the changes that we needed to make. We haven't created the new habits. We haven't basically done the work to make the change that we needed to michael that we wanted to make so forget about your resolutions. They'd done now. Stop focusing on building the right sort of habits that are gonna allow you to make the changes that you wanna make. So i will put a leak to damon's instagram handle in the comments below sake and follow him as well and also linked to an episode. I did a couple of years ago at the time. I think it was episode. Three eighty six where i shared an. Id from tim ferriss about doing a past year. Assessment robin a new year's resolution. The being you do an audit a what worked and what didn't work last year or in the gone and focused on the things that you do and or don't want to do in the coming year a timely advice as well and very much in line with what diamond is suggesting in his instagram post. Coaching out check him out. Real talk with the. I believe is the instagram handle. It's in the comments below. And that is it for today. And i do thank you for your time and i will be back again tomorrow.

De Damon Malaysia Hanes Tim Ferriss Damon Michael Robin
How to repurpose old podcast episodes

Podcasting Q&A

04:46 min | 10 months ago

How to repurpose old podcast episodes

"In today's episode you'll learn how to repurpose and republish old podcast episodes. Welcome the podcasting. Qna ruling the best tips and strategies to launch. Grow and. monetize your show. This week's question comes from ten. Hey guys my name. Is tim from melbourne australia. And on podcasting as thinking nutrition. My question is about republishing. Podcasts of been podcasting for betty doing weight glee episode shar. I'm getting to the stage. Where light to just republi some of my more popular podcast episodes particularly at times where i want to take a little bit of a bright from podcasting. My question is what is the best practice around republishing podcasts. Should you record a new brief introduction and importantly hazard you flag this in the title of the episode to show the listeners that this is a republican podcast. Thanks very much in love. Your work is thanks for your question tim. Repurposing and republishing older podcast. Episodes is a great way to take a break without missing and if you're publishing dates without affecting your publishing frequency and it can be a way to highlight some popular episodes from the past that some of your current listeners may not have heard before but one thing you need to keep in mind is you. Don't want your listeners to feel like they're getting a bayton switch where they showed up to. Your podcast downloaded that new episode expecting to hear something new and they heard a podcast episode. They've heard before so today. We'll talk about two ways. You can repurpose old content and make it fresh for your current listeners. And how to title your podcast episode. So people know what they're getting into when they download the episode. The first way that you can repurpose or republish older podcast. Content is take the entire episode. And drop it into your feet as a new episode. Now if you're gonna do this. I would recommend recording a new introduction to your listeners. Why re listening to this content is worth their time. Maybe the circumstances have changed. Maybe it's more relevant now than when you record it or maybe it's a really really good interview that not a lot of people have heard yet. Maybe you had fewer listeners and see you want more people to hear that particular episode. Whatever the case is make sure that you explain it in the intro. So people have been with you for a while can hear that intro and decide for themselves if they want to keep listening to the rest of the episode and for the series that may not have heard that episode before it's just to be free new content for them so they don't even mind you republishing that content in your feet the second approach to repurposing your old content is to do mashup episodes where you take clips from previous episodes and put them together and create something new. So let's say that you have a business podcast and over the last couple of years you've covered the hiring process how to get hired how to get a great job had an interview multiple times in multiple ways. You could take the best bits best audio clips from all those episodes and make one awesome master episode that you can share with your audience. You don't have to rerecord though segments. You just chop them up. Rearrange them and put together for your listeners. The other thing you can do is a best podcast episode so if you have a recurring guest that on multiple times. Maybe it's a family friend or an expert that you have a really close relationship with you can create a best of from that person. So tim ferriss a very popular. Podcast has done this multiple times where he'll take a really popular guest that is recorded multiple interviews with and it'll create a super interview of all of their best tips. So that's something else that you can do now. How do you actually. Title these episodes. These republicans these repurpose episodes so that people know it's older content but they still want to listen to it but they still feel like is going to be worth their time. Well number one be transparent an old episode if it's older content you want to communicate that in the title again. You don't want your listeners to feel that bayton switch. They came in with the expectation of hearing new content from you and they got something old instead. So you can use words like rewind or replay or you know back catalogue or something like that. Where when they see that word. They're gonna instantly no okay. This isn't current this is from sometime in the past. But it's depending on what it is. I might want to listen to it and then from there. Consider what you can say. That would intrigue. Someone peaked your curiosity to check out that particular episode. That's a good practice for podcast. Titles in general but particularly when it comes to republish to repurpose episodes what can you say. That will get someone to click on that episode and wanted to listen through the entire thing.

TIM Betty Melbourne Australia Tim Ferriss
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

05:45 min | 10 months ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"I didn't thinking about kids with off the table for me up until very recently and quite frankly i felt up until a few years ago the too flawed to in good faith bring another life into this world so i took it off the table. I say first and foremost for a longtime certainly with my close pressure suicide in college. I assumed i wouldn't make it past thirty. And then there's a point rasim probably not gonna make forty whether these dangerous hobbies that i have or something else probably will make it to forty. Should really make this time count. And it's really only with the support of my girlfriend who. I love very dearly that i've arrived at a point where i feel like that's a possibility so i would like to have kids and i think that i've taken that emergency break. Only because i have reached a certain level of self acceptance and self love which are things i never would have taken seriously i twenty serve. Maybe even in my thirties. I mean i've those the idea of self love as self indulgent recipe for complacency and. I've certainly changed my mind. I think that if you don't love yourself completely our kids can learn to love themselves completely. So that's that's a project. That i i certainly don't impose on anyone else but i take it very seriously for myself when you think about when you think about like all of the things that you've packed into your forty three years that's a lot of stuff and you're you know you've got several more chapters of you including maybe father. How much of that of of of what happened you do you think is because of how hard you worked in a smart you are. And how much do you think is just because of luck you know. I wish i had enough self-awareness perspective to give you a seventeen percent thirty five percent. I'm sure you could by your numbers. I could figure out how to qualify. But i think there's a tendency among people who have some modicum of success when they're asked a question like that public to say oh it's all luck or believe their own hype to the extent that they think it was all grit and determination and planning. I think it's got to be a mixture. I do think there are a handful of things. I've done right. And the fact of the matter is gotten a lot wrong guy have made so many mistakes and have brought myself to the brink of destruction. I mean not just once but multiple times right. I mean a lot of days. Roll out of bed. And i i look like your and then like get up and somehow managed to get to basic level of consciousness by jumping into a cold pool and like eating a handful of walnuts and then i like putz around and i'm not sure what to do for three hours and then i spend the next three hours beating the hell out of myself and my own head because i'm so unproductive and on and on and on right that is the majority of my days look something like that. Despite that i think i am very good at thinking about bets in experiments that have limited downside that having credibly high upside if they work out and i put those in a calendar and i try a lot of things and for that reason i i would really hope that where i've ended up not all luck because there's nothing to be learned there there's other learned and i don't think it's all i guess just to keep doing what i'm doing. I have to tell myself some version of that story. But i think it's true it's true. That's tim. Ferriss entrepreneur author investor and host of the podcast. The tim ferriss show by the way there are so many incredibly.

putz tim ferriss tim
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Be harris one us instagram. Dan harris facebook at dan harris. Abc is there anywhere else any other urals or anything that that might be helpful to mention for people who want to see and learn more about what you're up to check out the podcast. We've had illustrious guests such as tim ferriss and many of the all of the meditation teachers who've been referenced in the course of this show on the show on the show. We post episodes twice a week so basically it's a fiesta. Of if you enjoy if you like thinking about human flourishing. That's that's all we talk about. And just like tim and salmon others do as well. So that's the check that him. What is the name of your podcast. Also called ten percent happier easy to remember grand continuity big investor in In companies and so brand new itys recently import. Yes very important. Dates can change in. So can you put your branch. Shouldn't change every tuesday. That is something that you probably want to keep more constant dan once again. Thank you so much for taking the time. This was just a great way to wrap up this week. Recording on a friday and really appreciate what you're doing in the world and what you're sharing. I think it's incredibly valuable. And incredibly practical also coming at it from the perspective of a skeptical investigative wartime journalists who is loathe to believe in any mythologised fairytales. I think that appeals to an entire large segment of the population who would otherwise not be open to even test driving any of these these tools that can so demonstrably help. So it's it's a it's quite a service that you put into the world so on a thank you for that and to everybody listening everything we've talked about. We'll be linked to in the show notes. You can find all that at tint up log forward slash podcast.

dan harris tim ferriss Abc
Interview With Matthew McConaughey

The Tim Ferriss Show

07:15 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Matthew McConaughey

"Matthew. Welcome to the show. Good to be here. Tim. How are you sir? I'm doing very well, and I have just an embarrassment of riches in front of me in terms of notes that I would love to to take some stab at covering even a portion of and I thought we could begin with a little backstory for those people who know your work perhaps not your personal story. Let's paint a picture of your parents now lives in preparation for this conversation doing some homework and I came across a quote of yours feel free to fact, check this of course is from the Guardian but it says one of the great images I have my father is on the phone with a cigarette at the airport on the pay phone always peddling. Peddling pipe and how What is what is that for those who don't know been coupling? So he ruin the old business and to drill you obviously pipe couplings connect the pipe to drill for oil. So Dad was in the pipe coupling business and he was he would call it peddling pipe, Paralympic no John Pendant peddling pipe and that twenty did on the phone eight to six, and then he hit the road and Go make personal appearances China. So pipe, he started off as a truck driver than Texaco station down you've Audi we moved to longview Texas oil boom within like six months after being in Longview. Dad like twenty six employees under him. That's how big of an oil boom was, and then obviously at that business through I think around eighty two and he kind of held on from there he was always. Always, peddler is line was great. He was always be never did it never went bankrupt and that was a piece of honor for him not to go bankrupt but he was always after all boom sort of busted he was always act boys if I could just. I just hit a lick and he never did hit that lick. But if if he lick is. Big Sale Olympic is a big cow lick is okay Mr. Jim Magana. Hey I want all my pipe from you and we're going to drill two hundred thousand feet above abide. So says huge count on my Gosh I'm going to supply the pipe to this one large account that would be a lick he never quite yet. So we're going to jump to the other track with mom for a second here and at like to have conversation about or description maybe of mink oil. Could you tell us how oil entered your life? Please I would not be here talking to you right now if it wasn't for the oil of Meek Yeah It was about home fourteen, fifteen years old ninth grade adolescence. My mom starts pedaling again Pentland Milan family was pedaling something my mom starts pedaling this oil of me product door to door sales. Look here you put this mink oil on your face it brings out all the impurities that you have and watch those impurities all come out. You then have clear glowing in for the rest of your life that was sort of the sales pitch right? Well, I'm fifteen I got a few pimples as any fifteen year old does one night. My mom goes well, you should choose this all. Great you're let me do that. Sure. So I started putting this oil make on my face every night before I go to bed, and after about a week, I wake up and got more pimples than I had a week. And I check in the mirror go to Mama as don't she goes that exactly what is supposed to to pull out all the impurities keep doing it stick with it sure. I'd just religiously keep putting it on after two weeks. Now seem to be run into a problem. He I've got I've. got a whole full of pimples and it's it's it's getting pretty severe back. She's Oh. Wow. You've just got more impurities then I thought you just keep keep doing it going to keep bringing out those impurities I keep it up three weeks. Go by now I've got full blown acne and I'm really concerned my mom's staying on with no stick with it all coming out well I sneak off to the dermatologist on my own. And this was not my mom's recommendation I, sneak there on. In, take a bottle of this Mako. Doc Look at my face. This is put on your face shown this bodies liberty reads ladies like Oh no, no, no, no, no no. No this is i. someone that's like forty year old or not a teenage child who's got oily pours anyway this blocking your pores your pores can't breathe. You are ten days away from having ice pick holes in your face from acne get you off this. Okay as we also have to get you on this stuff got accutane. It's a years worth of medicine. It will dry you up there will have its complications, but it'll be better than in the acting that you can have APSO boom. I could on the accutane off the oil of make and around that time my dad who's always as peddling and look and how to hit lick. says. Damn Boy I. We got a lawsuit against his company. Them becoming I mean you're you're looking at me look you. You're all swollen up. So he takes me to see lawyer remember lawyers, Jerry hairs. So I'm sitting down with my dad and his lawyer Jerry Harrison new think we got a case and he asked me like you know, hey, did you confidence lower? We know with these these pimples you've got this acne down by guess Sir because we are you doing good with the girls and I said, no, sir, not at all he his eyes light up and I can tell that even at my age fifteen he he's building his case goes. Emotional. Distress you were under emotional are under emotional distress and I look at them and I'm like Sure Yeah Moshe stress in Jerry's. Gosh Dog, we can get thirty five to fifty thousand dollars. Emotional distress go long way Jim Medaglia caught. At fifty thousand dollars a way to goes on, and so that's getting all excited about this deal. We're GONNA make fifty thousand dollars off of my emotional distress is youngest son. So anyway, meanwhile on accutane. Takes a year to get clear up and you get Scaly Dandruff in your knees. Hurt you get slits in your mouth and everything else but much better than this acne and this Jackie clear in this acne up on my faith well, as lawsuits go they drag on awhile. So come two years later I'm back in Jerry Harrison office sitting across the table from the from the defense attorney and now my Hackley's cleared up. Okay and this lawyer sits there and starts off the conversation with us. Oh my gosh. Must have been so emotionally distressful and I'm like he's Lavin Mu Softball here I'm going to knock this out of the par. Yes. It was highly emotional distressful and he's got you confidence was down. He did it again with this guy dude he's a horrible. Tea In me up we're just it out apart. Yes. It was almost the distressful. My confidence was low wasn't doing well with girls. I mean man it was bad stuff. Sir and I'm sitting here thinking we got this case.

Jerry Harrison Longview Guardian TIM Matthew. Jerry Hairs Mr. Jim Magana Pentland Milan John Pendant Texas Jerry Audi Texaco Station Jim Medaglia Apso Hackley Jackie Lick. Attorney
Busting Through Limiting Beliefs

The Daily Boost

06:06 min | 1 year ago

Busting Through Limiting Beliefs

"So I got an email today which was kind of cool I get a lot of emails some questions somewhere. Thank you somewhere just hey, and some are like, Whoa, my mind was blown. Hannah thought handed. Epiphany. And that's what happened today now, not going to share the exact email or who even sent this email ball say this. Every single day. My quest is to help you stand up, take a step and repeat get the life of your dreams. Whatever that is you get to decide. You truly get to decide what you WANNA. Do I just believe that my job is show up and drag you get there okay. Sometimes people acquainted with be trying to design lifestyle for you're not trying to do that. Tim Ferriss and lifestyle designed guy believe this you wake up in the morning you go through your entire day I just think you should be the way you wanted to be. You should feel the way you should feel you should be able to do the things you want to do, and with a little bit of conscious adjustment, you can get there. As long as we can break you out of the autopilot thing, a lot of people get stuck in. So when I got an email that says, Scott I never quite understood the lifestyle thing I use to think like you I don't WanNa Packers I. Don't WanNa farm like you have. But that's not is it. It's not she said, I've been working this corporate job getting new job I keep going up to the top and the top. The top things are getting better and better and better, and I'm not happy. It takes my weekends. It takes up my nights. It's cool but it's not think I finally. Got It. was. So cool to see that to say but I smile and get all happy when I see stuff like that. Wow, they broke through call. Whatever you doing today? Whatever's holding you back. I want you to remember that's really the only mission I just think you should get out of bed. And you should have life that makes you happy in the things you do every single day how you work you live we'll you know what you do all that stuff and when you go to bed at night, you're like, wow, it's a good day I'm tired and worn out but you know let's let's do it again. That's what I go for here. If you can do that and I think you're GonNa have a happy life. But sometimes it's limiting beliefs. That crash you isn't it. So I work with a lot of people all the time but limiting beliefs have you ever felt like something's holding you back. You probably have them. Now you've heard a lot of talk about this I think Tony Robbins and some of those guys years and years ago was kind of NLP concept right and I certainly live and breathe in that world. But I don't talk about it all the time. But what are they by the way? But Elihu believe is just something that you have installed into yourself. You born with it you're not born thinking a certain way. You got out and lived. You had experiences. You met people you made decisions, and however that decision affected you at the time it made an impact on you and you lodge it in your brain. You have a belief a lot of times. What happens is when you can't move forward it's because maybe you've had some experiences in the past before that if taught you, you can't do it. I'm not good enough. I never get to do what I WANNA do. It never works out for me stuff like that. Okay. Happens all the time. So I'm working with clients I always go here because nine times out of ten when a client gets on the phone with me, they're gonNa have a limiting belief. How do I know that because ten times out of ten I have one. So I know they do in just a matter of breaking through and figuring out what's going on. So, when I, was this, I always seek to identify it. So I listen very closely. My ears are in full full full active mode. I hear something that POPs up like a block ago that was interesting and I. Identify. Did you hear it said? Did you did you hear that? Now I can help do that but unique, you can do it yourself to it's harder though you have to give yourself some time. We're so busy with our phones and everything else going on in this world. It's so busy right now it's Kinda hard to catch set to catch that action. It's easier to feel like Oh my God why is on the world not working out for me and not even know that you're thinking that way so the first thing is to catch that thought. To pause a little bit and to identify what you're feeling again. That's what I do clients say hey, wait till. You hear what you just said. And I'll say something like this next. What do you mean by that? What I'm doing is a began test process. I'm beginning to see that if they have a feeling attached to it I mean, what do they actually feel about it and why is it making them feel certain way and lots of times they don't even know it's been lodge in there. So long ago ohno civil explored what he really feel about it is it real? Is it automatic? What is it? Is it necessary if you enjoy your life or do you need to keep it, you want to get rid of it. What is that? So first thing is I'm just identified a capture at I say well, look there it is secondly. Essentially saying what's up? I'm testing it. I'm just trying to see what what's really going on there and honestly about nine and a half times out of ten people say I don't really know. Something's hold you back. You don't even know what it is. Yeah and that's exactly what happens. So then what do I do? Well, once I've Kinda tested a little bit to find out what's going on there that I want to validate it because when I test when ask somebody so what are you thinking? What did you say that for what's going on here? They start talking about they kind of randomly go off. All come back and so so what you're saying is that serves a good part of your life or what you're seeing is you don't really mean that you don't need that. The you're seeing is that's not what's holding you back. Your back just begin to validate and here's what happens usually ten times eleven times out of ten. When I identify it. When I test it, and then when I make them validated as simply what I'm saying is this. Does it serve you or does not serve you. Is it real or is a real. And if they defend it. It's probably real. NOPE that I feel that way for a reason that's who I am. It's part of my my character, my personality that's my value I have that before reason. So it's not really limiting. Is it? It's kind of guide isn't it? Yeah A S- lots of times I will validate it and they can't defend it. So, what are you living on that belief or if you can't defend it? I don't know. All right. Let's do something else. And usually they'll say. What would that be? And of course that highly paid position I mean right now i. I usually say something like. I duNNo. What would it be? I know you don't know what if you did what would it be?

Tim Ferriss Hannah Tony Robbins Elihu Scott
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Boys and girls, ladies, and Germs Tim ferriss welcome to another upset of the Tim. FERRISS. Show where it is usually my job to sit down with world class performers of all different types, startup founders, investors, chess champions, Olympic athletes, you name it to tease out the habits that you can apply in your own lives. This episode however is an experiment in part of short form series that I'm doing simply called books I've loved I've invited some amazing pass guests. Close friends and new faces to share their favorite books. Describe their favorite books, the books that have influenced them, change them, transform them for the better and I hope you pick up one or two mentors in the form of books from this new series and apply the lessons in your own life. I had a lot of fun putting this together inviting these people to participate and have learned. So so much myself I hope that also the case for you please.

Tim ferriss
Mark Toft  How to Build an Authentic Brand in an Insincere Age

The $100 MBA Show

09:59 min | 1 year ago

Mark Toft How to Build an Authentic Brand in an Insincere Age

"Guests. Teacher is mark. Toft and marked off is going to be teaching you how to build an authentic brand in an insincere age. Everybody is trying to project their brand on social media on Youtube with Webinars, beating their chests with bravado, and it's just falling on deaf ears how you stand out when everybody's trying to brand themselves and. Look like they're winning will that's why we brought on Mark Toft to teach you how to build a branding strategy. The actually works that's real and Authentic Marta is a chief strategy officer and Co founder of the narrator group and he's an absolute branding expert. He was the lead digital writer on the staples easy and project. He has over twenty five years of experience in business and branding, and he wants to give you a gift today a great lesson on how to focus and craft a brand that matters into these noisy world. We got a lot to cover in today's guest lessons. So let's get into it. Let's get down to business. This message is brought to you by windows and HP everyone has a different way to work whether it's typing on a computer sketching out notes with a pen or accessing all your stuff on your phone with windows HP. You'll have all the tools you need to work the way you want. So whatever you do, make it you with windows and HP see how windows dot com slash HP. We brought on Mark Toft today to teach you a great lesson on building an authentic brand a brand that stands out brand people talk about a brand that really has a message and resonates with people they say brand or your brand is what other people say about you when you're not around, let's make sure they say, well, we want them to say it's your job to craft that narrative. So GonNA, hinder over a mark to t shoe his guests lesson on doing just that. Back, to rally the lesson, give my takeaways but for now, take it away mark. Hello everyone. This is mark talked I'm grateful join me today I'll be teaching you about why brand authenticity is critical to success and three things that all authentic brands do. So let's get down to business. Before we dive in. Let's pause on that word branding a lot of businesses get knotted up by especially start-ups. Here's a helpful and pragmatic way to think about it. If you pulled five people aside at your company and ask them what you do and why you. Would you get five different answers? This. Is the kind of challenge branding solve. But the truth is at a lot of what passes for branding materials and consultation are thickening agents meant to make businesses feel they've paid for something substantial complex defying an order to profit Tim Ferriss has called it. But branding is in fact, very simple. You don't need pages of charts and graphs to define it just a few words or a sentence. Branding. Is what you stand for and what people experience from your products and services. It's not what you claim to be. It's what you are. Your brand is your purpose advertising takes that purpose and assembles it into compelling story. That's twenty five years of frontline branding and advertising experience packed into a few words. But why is authenticity important to branding? Because the temptation to tweet or share things on social media in order to be accepted has never been greater. In a sense, we're all performing for each other like never before. Judging by our music or movies social media, not to mention her branding and advertising being true to ourselves. As novel we're after we want to seem to be true to ourselves want the appearance of authenticity. Than the fact. The wise words of Simon Sinek provide good corrective branding is an exercise and trust building. He says when we fake our way to trust that trust will eventually collapse. One level of brand authenticity relates facts. Is that cookie made with natural ingredients is that watch rolex a knockoff? Now this kind of authenticity isn't unimportant. But it's only a starting point. It's like telling people your height or your eye color. These details don't penetrate to who you are were to who your brand really is. It's easy for companies to get hung up and telling the history of their founding. In exacting detail they feel they have to recite information about their origins founded in this year by these two people humble beginnings in a garage or basement. I'm not saying these things should be hidden, but they frequently don't matter. When you think of authenticity branding, think of it, this way brand authenticity is believing in and delivering on what you claim about yourself and your products and services. It's your brand's essence not it's facts or its features. And this gets us to the first thing that all authentic brands do they're built on a clear purpose. In the movie office space and Unhappy Employees named Peter Gibbons, guts, sufficient his cubicle and fights the desire to throttle the CO worker who tells him must be having a case of the Mondays. It's funny because many of us have had jobs like peters bad jobs jobs that seem to have no function other than to make us move paper around in dream of the day will quit. Meaninglessness is deadly for brands because humans are wired for purpose, employees leave jobs when they don't find sufficient meaning pay and benefits are rarely the cause. You can't capture your purpose with long mission statement and pages of brand strategy employees and customers need something clear simple and true. They can go back to again and again. My partners and I call it the hill you defend it's the first and the final ground on which you stake the life your business. Their other popular ways to describe the same basic idea. Jim Collins argues that all successful companies adhere to a hedgehog concept. They succeed by finding and focusing on one thing that they do really well. Simon Sinek talks about the golden circle and starting with why The center of the Golden Circle is a brands reason for being it's why. Don't be afraid to embrace a seemingly humble purpose that you can actually live out rather than a high falutin purpose that has little relation to the products or services you provide. One Young Entrepreneur I met was launching a firm dedicated to sustainable architecture, her passion and her intelligence. Clear. Although. Her purpose was staring right in the face building better buildings that is buildings that are more affordable and more beautiful and friendlier to the environment. She was clinging to a phrase that she had fallen in love with. We're going to change the vernacular architecture. She told me do you know what that means? Neither do I. Should be more likely to find her company's authentic purpose by thinking of it this way. Could someone call her office and say? Hello I'd like to buy a change in architectural vernacular please. nope. But they could call and say I like to commission a building that's better and more efficiently designed. A strong purpose answers a lot of questions and even help inform business decisions. Why should we design packages this way? Why are we expanding into these markets or reaching out to these customers? Why are we aging our cheese like this? Or for employees, why do they perform their work this way or not another way? Because that's what a company dedicated to. This purpose would do. Think of Fedex with their purpose of guaranteed on time delivery. United. Airlines being the friendlier line. Now they've lost their way it seems in recent years but that purpose at one time catapulted them to being the number one carrier in the world. The second thing that all authentic brands do is they seek conflict. As. Social creatures most of us try to avoid or minimise conflict that's perfectly rational but conflict is at the heart of good stories and it's also at the heart of effective branding and advertising. Most products and companies are created out of conflict. To take a prosaic example, a busy parent is confronted by an unhappy teenager whose favourite redshirt is fading in the wash. It's a problem that needs to be solved. Tied Color Guard offers a solution, a detergent that doesn't fade reds and other bright colors even after multiple loads of laundry. The importance of conflict and branding and advertising is often overlooked. Ultimately, address in resolving conflict is why people will pay for your products or services. Conflict interestingly can help you locate and focus your brand purpose if you're struggling to pinpoint. If you're not sure how to express your brands purpose think of the conflict or the problem solve for customers. Finally the third thing that authentic brands do is they cause with caution. Not long ago people greeted with this news KFC announces buckets for. The Cure. You don't really need to learn more details to sense the approaching doom. Kentucky Fried Chicken Partner with Susan G Komen to donate fifty cents to cancer research for every bucket of chicken ordered. Funding, breast cancer research is, of course a noble cause. KFC simply wasn't the brand to do it at least not in this way. Maybe they could have donated money directly without making it depends on the consumption of fried chicken. The campaign was met with House of disapproval and was quickly withdrawn. The public is onto brands looking for cheap grace. Your customers. Dishonesty sensors are set to high. They're quick to see self interest masquerading as selflessness, and they're ready to pounce on publicize instances of inauthentic.

Mark Toft HP Simon Sinek KFC Toft Youtube Chief Strategy Officer Writer Tim Ferriss Jim Collins Fedex Co Founder Peter Gibbons Kentucky Peters House Susan G Komen
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"This is Tim ferriss welcome to another upset of the Tim Ferriss show where it is usually my job to sit down with world class performers of all different types, startup founders, investors, chess champions, Olympic athletes, you name it to tease out the habits that you can apply in your own lives. This episode however is an experiment in part of short form series that I'm doing simply called books. I've loved I've invited some amazing pass guests. Close friends and new faces to share their favorite books describe their favorite books, the books that have influenced them, change them, transform them for the better and I. Hope You pick up one or two mentors in the form of books from this new series and apply the lessons in your own life. I had a lot of fun putting this together inviting these people to participate and have learned so so much myself. I hope that is also the case for you. Please enjoy. Thanks for having me back to talk about some of my favorite books and I wanted to do something different today, which is I. wanted to recommend some books that I've never recommended before on this podcast and that I haven't heard other people recommending things that people may not know about I wanNA turn people onto some new staff. That's like so central to me. So My Criteria were what are the books where I've underlined the most amount of things some of these books that I'm going to recommend I literally have underlining or marks on every single page I have kind of involved system I. Use to mark books depending on the residents of the idea and different things going on in the book. The second thing is brought together these books sort of. Encompass like..

Tim ferriss
Books Ive Loved  Neil Strauss

The Tim Ferriss Show

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Books Ive Loved Neil Strauss

"Hello Boys and girls ladies and Germs Tim Ferriss. Welcome to another upset of the Tim Ferriss show where it is usually my job to sit down with world class performers of all different types, startup founders, investors, chess champions, Olympic, athletes you name it to tease out the habits that you can apply in your own lives. This episode however is an experiment in part of short form series that I'm doing simply called books I've loved I've invited some amazing pass guests close. Friends and new faces to share their favorite books describe their favorite books, the books that have influenced them, change them, transform them for the better and I. Hope You pick up one or two mentors in the form of books from this new series and apply the lessons in your own life. I had a lot of fun putting this together inviting these people to participate and have learned so so much myself. I hope that is also the case for you. Please enjoy. Thanks for having me back to talk about some of my favorite books and I wanted to do something different today, which is I wanted to recommend some books that I've never recommended before on this podcast and that I haven't heard other people recommending things that people may not know about I wanNA turn people onto some new staff. That's like so central to me. So My Criteria were, what are the books where I've underlined the most amount of things some of these books that I'm going to recommend I literally have underlining or marks on every single page. A have kind of involved system. I use to mark books depending on the residents of the idea and different things going on in the book. The second thing is brought together these books sort of. Encompass like. The body of. What I think right now, the kinds of things that I write about and posted on instagram and teach in coach and have had so much value in my life and change them, and I'm going to walk you into them from. Let's say the simplest book to the most complex from one that's just so easy to read to one. It's almost like a textbook safer into these the beginning and see how far along you get I. Love All of these. They're really great on the path to understand yourself and who you are and the obstacles again, your way and where he's self sabotage in your relationships and. Real. Freedom. The first author is Sherry Huber and I wanted to tell you about her past but I looked it up online and I can't find anything there. So I don't know if it's public but as a child Sherry, probably faced one of the worst traumas a young person can ever. Go through and only survived it. She became a Buddhist monk. Ever met in my life I. Think She's one of the most. Centered. Wise. Powerful presences I've ever been around there's just something about her that. I can my I would like to get to one day. I really would she writes tons of books I'd love to read every one. And her books very simply written just still to pure wisdom almost like a wise mentor is giving you the advice. There aren't like supporting arguments and footnotes in research studies is just like the wisdom from high on the mountain. It's also unique font where part of the story and the power and the impact of the words is done through the font and style of writing changing as well. The illustrations by June shaver or could be shiver. The illustrator in the book so really. Looked through all her books read anything but I'll share with you the two that have had the biggest impact on me. Actually to read but I would want to read the rest. But I started with fear Book and fear book is so powerful because so many of us. Have a certain area where fear and doubt and uncertainty get in our way, and the book walks you through the of of of how to embrace them and move beyond them, and often it's very counterintuitive. But so true I highly recommend this for dealing with it and want to read you one quote from it. I WANNA read a couple of quotes from it. And her basic idea is that moving toward your fears and getting past them is the path to freedom and I love this part. And her books by the way very short hundred, fifty pages at most. She writes if you no longer believe what fear tells you you will live and it will not. That is a point on a spiritual journey that almost nobody gets past when the terror arises. When it gets backed into a corner and a matter of its survival years almost nobody has the required combination of courage desperation willingness to stand up to it.

Sherry Huber Tim Ferriss
interview with Maurice Ashley

The Tim Ferriss Show

05:19 min | 1 year ago

interview with Maurice Ashley

"Hello Boys and girls, ladies and germs. This is Tim Ferriss. Welcome to another episode of the Tim Ferriss Show where it is my job as always to deconstruct world class performers to tease out the habits routines, influences, favorite books, and so on. The you can apply to your own life. My guest today is a friend Maurice Ashley. Maurice Ashley is incredibly impressive human being on so many levels and we get to really dig into a number of facets of his life story and lessons learned Maurice Ashley is the first African American international grandmaster in the annals of the game of chess, and he is translated his love to others as a three time national championship coach published author Espn commentator iphone APP designer puzzle inventor, and Motivational Speaker in recognition for his immense contribution to the Game Maurice was inducted into the US chess hall of fame in. Two. Thousand Sixteen his book chess for success subtitle using an old game to build new strengths in children and teens shows the many benefits of chess particularly for at. Risk youth his tax talk working backward to solve problems has more than a million views. He's also appeared with me in the Brazilian Jujitsu episode, which has some chests of the Tim Ferriss Experiment TV series way back in the day joined by our mutual friend, Josh Wade Skin Maurice is very well known for providing dynamic live tournament coverage of world class chess competitions, and matches his high energy unapologetic and irreverent commentary combines Brooklyn Street smarts, which we talk about quite a bit with professional espn style sports analysis his covered every class of elite event including the World Chess. Championships the US chess championship, the grand chess tour and the legendary man versus machine matches between Garry Kasparov whereas Kasparov. and IBM's deep blue traveling the world as a spokesperson for the many character-building effects of chess where he's consulted with universities schools chess clubs executive in celebrities on chest principles and strategies can be applied to improve business practices and accelerate personal growth. You can find him online Maurice, Ashley Dot Com on twitter at Ashley and on Facebook Grandmaster Maurice. On instagram Maurice, Ashley Chess Without further ADO. Please enjoy this wide-ranging conversation with none other than Maurice Ashley. Maurice Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me I've been looking forward to this and hoping to have you on the show for so many years now, and we've had many different points of connection. But of course, it began with our mutual friend and also popular PODCAST Gas Josh. Wait, skin who is known you for a very long time. Indeed, he has a quote in fact that is Impreza praise of your book chess for success and it goes as follows Maurice Ashley. Has Been like a brother to me since I was twelve years old I know the man I know the competitor I know the artist no, the teacher there's a lot of train for us to cover a lot of Nixon crannies to explore but I thought we would begin with Maurice the Jamaican and I was hoping you could describe for us your beginnings and we could start with the with the genesis while yes I was born in Jamaica. Island. Not the area of Quaid's and I grew up there. I was there until I was twelve years old before I came to this country. But probably, the most significantly got happened for me in. Jamaica. Was the fact that my mother left Jamaica to come to the United. States, when I was two years old, my brother was ten. My sister was seven months old and. Opportunity to come to the US, she couldn't bring all of us at the same time. Cheech only bring herself. And her leaving was really quite an event in our lives. My father wasn't with us but living with us at the time. So we grew with our grandmother. and My mother would send. down. Stuff supplies to Jamaica Whether v Foodstuffs Flour and rice she sent him in a barrel and she said, well, she said notebooks in armor sending like a softball and a glove, and of course Jamaica. Nobody played softball baseball nothing. So I threw the glove to the site, not knowing what to do with it and use the softball as a soccer ball. Got Pretty warned down already quickly a really turn into a softball very quickly to that. But. We just being raised by my grandmother she was a teacher by training. And so she would teach us so much as young people. So we were really well prepared educationally because of my grandmother and she was sixty four years old at the time of my mother left the imagined a sixty, four year old having had seven children for own. Now suddenly taking on the care of her daughter's children at that age when thinking about maybe slowing down and retiring enjoying herself. But for the next year, she took care of us and I was really a hugely significant part of growing up living there. Until finally my mother got the resources in the paperwork through green and finally bring us to the United States.

Maurice Ashley Grandmaster Maurice Jamaica Chess Maurice Welcome United States Tim Ferriss Softball World Chess Garry Kasparov Quaid Espn Facebook IBM Motivational Speaker Josh Wade
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Boys and girls, ladies and germs. Tim ferriss welcome to another upset of the Tim. Ferriss show where it is usually my job to sit down with world class performers of all different types startup founders, investors, chess champions, Olympic athletes. You name it to tease out the habits that you can apply in your own lives. This episode however is an experiment in part of short form series that I'm doing simply called books. I've loved I've invited some amazing pass guests close friends. Friends and new faces to share their favorite books describe their favorite books. The books that have influenced them change them transform them for the better and I hope you pick up one or two new mentors in the form of books from this new series and apply the lessons in your own life I had a lot of fun putting this together, inviting these people to participate and have learned so so much myself. I hope that is also the case for you. Please.

Tim ferriss
7 Myths & Mistakes To Avoid When Launching Your New Podcast in 2020

The Podcast Domination Show | Grow your audience, make money and have fun doing it

04:35 min | 1 year ago

7 Myths & Mistakes To Avoid When Launching Your New Podcast in 2020

"What's going on welcome back or welcome to the show for the first time? I'm musty as your host, you'd help you. Launch and grow a successful podcast helps you grow your business. Build your personal brand and become more successful and better known whether your goal is more impact or income or all of the above. This is the show for you. When you want to use a podcast to do just that now today. We're GONNA. Be talking about something that trips up a lot of entrepreneurs and business owners when they start their podcasts, and is why it becomes such a chore, and then they eventually fail and give up and to be. Debbie. Downer or someone who's really negative, but I'm going to share with you today. Seven myths slash pitfalls about launching your podcasts at I've coached a lot of people through have helped a lot of clients through and I've seen this happen over and over again even if you're a year into the podcasting game or your year to growing your podcast, and you're like my shows is. Is kind of idle like it's. It's not growing anymore. I'm not getting any leads from it. I'm not getting any new customers from it I'm not getting anything from his just another thing for me to do on my to do this. Well are some flaws are some things you're doing? That are causing you to think like that could help you reshift. Reposition your exact your mindset. Mindset around this in this training Oh this episode so before get into this one. Definitely just circle back had a share something. That's for me kind of illustrated. This point in in real life got a client who's done amazing job for their their podcast. They're up to about twenty thousand downloads month. They're doing great. They get all of media the interviews they are able to reach big. Big Equal, but they often compare themselves to people who have been doing undoing podcasting eight nine ten years, and they're only about a year or two in the game, and that's a big issue that really is that truly is one of the biggest things you can was taken over one I would say is, is this and this? Is this whole conversation that we had with? This client recently was all about this. It's about comparing your niche. PODCASTS was show. That's much much much broader. Here's the deal. If you have a niche podcast meaning, you're talking to a very specific market, and you compare yourself to Joe Rogan or a very much a bunch of punch broader podcast that has reached because they bring on guys like ee. Lan Muss. It's hard to compare really look at your podcast success. Getting to twenty thousand dollars for most people is is isn't hard or sorry is easy and the fact that they've done in less than a lesson. Two years is pretty remarkable so especially in this world now. Now, maybe in two, thousand, sixteen, two, thousand, fifteen much easier, nowadays, not so much a lot more competition out there, so I'm happy for them, but they're comparing themselves to a lot of people have been doing this for eight nine years I mean. If you've been doing this for eight nine years, you should expect to have a way bigger show especially consistently the way they're who they're comparing themselves to. If you go back and look at those shows a near year twos I. Bet you. They weren't doing the numbers they're doing now and they're still doing the same numbers. They probably wouldn't be doing for this long. I can guarantee. GUARANTEE THAT SO NUMBER ONE! Don't compare your niche podcast. Show to someone who's doing something much broader Joe Rogan Tim Ferriss you name it like those those guys are in a broader market. They have experienced They were mainstream before they got into podcasting so yesterday some anomalies. There's Louis Houses who've been doing this for years again. That's START OUT PODCASTING, but no, it's time it takes time trees on grover night. Why would you podcast overnight? So that's number. One number two is comparing your launch to somebody who's way bigger than you so listen. If you have a small audience, you can expect to demand hundred thousands of downloads. Downloads out the gate. I've only seen. That's probably a handful of times where someone is able to do that and every single time it's it's from somebody who already has a large of a name in their in their space. They may not be like Oprah, Winfrey big, but they have the in their space carved out a name for themselves. So if you're coming in doesn't have a name for themselves. You can expect your podcast. Be This game changer? It's a reflection of you, your podcasts and your content of reflection of you, so a big mistake. People make is comparing their launch to someone WHO's ten times bigger than them. You're trying to go into battle with someone who has way more firepower than you compare your launch or or that you're more of your podcasts. That is a mistake. Big Big mistake that I see people

Downer Joe Rogan Joe Rogan Tim Ferriss Lan Muss Debbie Grover Night Louis Houses Oprah Winfrey
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Boys and girls ladies and germs. This is Tim Ferriss. Welcome to another upset of the Tim. Ferriss show where it is usually my job to sit down with world class performers of all different types startup founders investors chess champions Olympic athletes. You name it to tease out the habits that you can apply in your lives. This episode however is an experiment in part of short form series. That I'm doing simply called books. I've loved I've invited. Some amazing pass guests close friends and new faces to share their favorite books. Describe their favorite books. The books that have influenced them change them transform them for the better and I hope you pick up one or two new mentors in the form of books from this new series and apply the lessons in your own life. I had a lot of fun putting this together inviting these people to participate and have learned so so much myself. I hope that is also the case for you. Please.

Tim Ferriss
Rana el Kaliouby  AI, Emotional Intelligence, and the Journey of Finding Oneself (

The Tim Ferriss Show

13:33 min | 1 year ago

Rana el Kaliouby AI, Emotional Intelligence, and the Journey of Finding Oneself (

"And I'll keep this short going to jump straight to the guest. My guest today is a pioneer in emotion. Ai will define what that means. Ron L. CALL UB PhD. Who's also co founder and CEO of Affect Tiba and author of the new book girl coded subtitle a scientists quest reclaim our humanity by bringing emotional intelligence technology. A passionate advocate for humanizing technology ethics and diversity. Ron has been recognized on fortunes forty under forty list and as one of Forbes top fifty women in Tech Ron is a world economic forum young global leader and Co hosted a PBS Nova series called wonders. And she's also appeared on and appears in the youtube original series the age of a hosted by Robert Downey Junior Rahall PhD from the University of Cambridge. And a post. Doc It's doctorate from. It can find her on Lincoln Kelly. Ub TWITTER AT K. L. O. U. B. Y. by the way instagram at Rana Website Ron L. DOT COM Rana. Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. I'm excited I'm excited to have you on and if so much to cover and I thought I would begin with a question that will hopefully open up a whole different doors. A whole different set of doors. I think is the proper English expression that could potentially walk through. And it's related to a book. This is affective computing crime if. I'm getting any of the pronunciation wrong by. Rosalind Picard A. R. D. How did this book come into your life so I am concerned? I grew up in Cairo and around the Middle East. But at the time this is like nine thousand nine hundred ninety eight. I had just graduated from computer science from the American University in Cairo and my career plan at the time was to become faculty like wanted to teach and so. I knew teach had to do my master's in it was all very calculated and so I was looking for a thesis topic and my fiance at the time went on Amazon and he said Oh. You know there's this really interesting book by this. Mit professor called. Rosalind Picard Called Affect of computing and. We ordered it through Amazon. It took about three months to shift to Cairo. It got held and customs for reasons. I don't really understand but eventually I got hold of the book and I read it and I you know. I think it's safe to say that it changed my life because so so the thesis in the book is that computers need to understand human emotions just the way people do and I read the book and I was fascinated by this idea and it you know I made that my research topic and it became my obsession and it just really changed the trajectory of my life. What besides the thesis in the book had such an impact on your was it just that that world view that perspective or was there more to the book or more to the author. Yeah a great question. Soon let's talk about the author. I so rise is one of the few and I mean this was true back then. It's still true today. She's one of the few kind of female you know. Computer Science Machine Learning engineers professors in the space. And you know I kind of learned about her over the years I've eventually actually. She ended up being my co-founder many years later. But there's a story around that but but essentially I was just fascinated by her and she you know she's a mom she's three boys. I just thought she was like a Rockstar. So that was kind of one part of it but just the way she wrote the book and how she you know. I'm very expressive as a human being and I just really like. I think emotions really matter and are in the way we communicate. Non Verbally is very important and it struck me that when we think of technology that piece of how we communicate is completely missing and I was like. Oh yeah like it seems so obvious so I just got fascinated by the thesis. I got fascinated by the implications. Like what happens when technology becomes kind of clued into how we that's going to open up a whole new world of possibilities and I was intrigued by that. So let's travel back to that point in time you were with your then fiance and this book is ordered at the time. You're planning on becoming a teacher professor. Why were you on that track? To begin with I mean was it. Take us back to Egypt at that time were there. Many women striving to be faculty members in similar departments. I'm assuming computer science or or perhaps it was a different department. Maybe could tell us more. Yes so I went to the American University in Cairo and I study computer. Sciences an Undergrad. At the time most of the faculty were were guys except for one female faculty Dr Hulda Husni which became my role model and my mentor. And I just wanted to be like like she was awesome. She was you know. Very smart. Very approachable very fashionable. And I was like Ooh I like that and and I just wanted to be like her and so devised a plan also geek. I'm a geek and I'm proud of it so I I kind of devised a plan. I was like okay. I'll graduate top of my class which I did and then I was like okay. I'll go get a masters and PhD abroad. Because that's what you do and then come back and I'll join joined the faculty and so at the time because I was getting married to my fiance and he had a company based in Cairo coming to the. Us was not an option because it was way too far so he was like a let you go study in the UK. Because it's close enough so I applied to Cambridge and got in. That was kind of the impetus for going abroad and doing this. Like focusing on this research. So when did you then end up going to the? Us was that a difficult conversation with your family or your then-fiancee walk us through how that happened because it doesn't sound like that would have been just a hop skip and a jump to second conversation so walk us through that experience. Yes okay so then. I moved to Cambridge Right Cambridge University in the UK not not Cambridge Massachusetts and I will Cambridge Cambridge original Cambridge And we got married so basically I got married and got the scholarship to go study at Cambridge and my house. So He's now my husband right. Well he's my ex now but at the time he was my husband he was very supportive. He was like you gotta go. This is your dream. I'll support you will have a long distance relationship now. My family. My parents and his parents were horrified. They were like what you can't do that so so I do like to give him credit for for for making this happen and being supportive so I ended up in Cambridge and he was in Cairo and we did that for five years and towards the end of my PhD Ros Picard was visiting Cambridge UK. To give a talk there. And I ended up meeting her in person and we totally hit it off and she said why. Don't you come work with me at MIT as a post doc and I was like Oh my God. This is like a dream come true. I've been following you like forever and this is why you know like I told her my story. And then I caveat it I said that just you know I've I've been married for the last five years and have had a long distance relationship so I have to go back to Cairo otherwise and I actually really said that. I said otherwise in Islam because I'm Muslim my husband can marry up to four women and if I don't show up eventually he'll just like Mary more women so I said half jokingly right so she was like that's fine just like commute from Cairo and I commuted from Cairo Boston for a good a good three or four hundred years going back and forth between MIT and Cairo. How often did you go back and forth. Or how often did he go back to Cairo? Maybe is a better. What else get so. Initially I would spend a couple of months in Cairo and then go spend like a few weeks and Boston and then I would move with my kids to Boston over the summer so summer break we just all go there and so initially. That was okay. So this was between two thousand and six to two thousand and nine was okay Things began to kind of really follow parts when I decided to start the company so we started to get a lot of interest in technology and displaying. It they really encourage you to spin outright. So in two thousand nine united started affect. Eva and I was literally spending two weeks in Cairo in Boston. Two weeks or two weeks in Boston. It was insane and that was when like just goes out of balance everything was out of bounds unless tough it was tough and and and you know. I'm divorced now. Imagine how that didn't go very well. It was just it was I think. In retrospect it was not a very healthy lifestyle. And I I. I wouldn't want to be in that place again. I wouldn't want others to be in that. I talked publicly about that time yet. Let's let's hop around chronologically a little bit. We're GONNA come back of course to starting the company and that decision but for people who don't have any real firsthand exposure to the Middle East much less. Egypt for instance What was it like growing up in in Egypt and based on at least some of my reading you for instance wore a hit job for quite some time. We're not talking short period of time. Maybe you could also speak to that. Yeah yeah and it sounds like you've spent some time in the you've you've you've been to Jordan. It's time in Jordan of spent some time in a few places in the Middle East but not in Egypt never met each and when I was we chatted a little bit before start recording only have a few words here and there in Arabic but it's Levin Arabic right. It's it's what what you'd run across in Jordan or or the Lebanon and I remember though having many people recommend that I not study the sort of standard Arabic textbook Arabic but that I study Egyptian Arabic because all of the as they put all the entertainment and movies that I might WanNa consume would-be an Egyptian Arabic. Needless to say I didn't get that far but I haven't spent any time in Egypt. Well your Arabic spreading goods and you're right about Egyptian accent. That's kind of the most common but but I think the key thing is like there's no one Middle East. There's no one form. I grew up in a family. That's kind of an interesting way quite conservative but also quite liberal so my parents were very pro education. They scientist the They put all their money towards our schooling and they made a point during the summers that we travel abroad and experienced kind other cultures. And I think that's why like I was so comfortable moving from one country to another and ending up in the United States. Your parents do certain interject. But what is your parents do professionally okay. So my parents met. So my dad taught computer programming in the seventies and my mom was probably the first female programmer in the Middle East. He attended his class and he hit on her and they ended up getting married so so I guess I should give them a little bit of credit for ending up. Being a computer signed sub. Sure they had something to do with that. That's so so they both. My mom was a computer programmer at the Bank of National Bank of Kuwait. So we were in Kuwait for a while and my dad is. He's always worked in technology and culturally. What was it like where you grew up Or or within the family. You said that they were for instance on one hand very lesser with the right a cosmopolitan. Perhaps in their perspective and Dr Related to education and and what what were the other ingredients in the household there was there's definitely like clear gender role so even though my mom worked her entire life. it was always. She was not allowed to ever talk about her job post. You know she would leave work at three. Pm Be home like whatever for pm when we got back from school and that was it. She was never allowed to take a conference call at home. The evening never allowed to travel for work and I didn't realize that until I was an adult like I just assumed this was the way it was but it did hamper her career progression and it was this implicit understanding. That's does your. Oh this is my role and we all stick in our lane so that was interesting We were for example. I have two younger sisters.

Cairo Middle East Egypt United States Cambridge Ros Picard Boston University Of Cambridge Cambridge Right Cambridge Univ American University Professor Ron L. UK Youtube Jordan Robert Downey Cambridge Cambridge Rosalind Picard A. R. D. Lincoln Kelly
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

09:40 min | 1 year ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Boys and girls ladies and germs. This is Tim Ferriss. Welcome to another upset of the Tim. Ferriss show where it is usually my job to sit down with world class performers of all different types startup founders investors chess champions Olympic athletes. You name it to tease out the habits that you can apply in your lives. This episode however is an experiment and part of short form series. That I'm doing simply called books. I've loved I've invited. Some amazing pass guests close friends and new faces to share their favorite books. Describe their favorite books. The books that have influenced them change them transform them for the better and I hope you pick up one or two new mentors in the form of books from this new series and apply the lessons in your own life. I had a lot of fun putting this together inviting these people to participate and have learned so so much myself. I hope that is also the case for you. Please.

Tim Ferriss
"Your Next Big Idea" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"Your Next Big Idea" Week

"This week's theme is your next big idea. The curator is Daniel Brooks. Here's why Daniel chose this theme. He says hi. My Name's Daniel Brooks nine. The host of the unlocking creativity podcast theme. I've chosen is. You're next big idea. The reason I've chosen this is quite simply running away from changing our whole lives. These podcasts are going to help inspire you to go in and discover yours. Here are the PODCASTS and episodes chosen by Daniel. Monday's episode comes from the Tim. Ferriss show and is called Eric Schmidt lessons from trillion dollar coach. It's one hundred and four minutes. Long Eric. Schmidt is a technical advisor and board member to Alphabet Inc where he advises its leaders on technology business and policy issues. Eric joined Google in two thousand one and helped grow the company from a Silicon Valley startup to a global leader. In Technology. Tuesday's episode comes from design matters with Debbie millman and is called Lisa Khandan. It's thirty six minutes long in this episode. A conversation with artist and illustrator. Liikanen about getting started creatively. Wednesday's episode comes from creative. Boom ranking on big regrets being different and discovering life begins at fifty. It's fifty eight minutes long. Rankin is the British photographer publisher and film director renowned for his portraits of Bowie and Bjork and for being co founder of dazed and confused. We chatted to the fearless man behind the lens about his career. And we're surprised to hear him open up about his childhood. His father his regrets and mistakes. This is an honest delve into the heart and mind of one of the biggest names. In photography Thursday's episode comes from Happy Place and is called. Joe Wicks it's forty nine minutes long in this episode. The body coach himself turns up at ferns door to discuss being a father of two meeting. Your work goals and being named Gq worst-dressed of the year Friday's episode comes from unlocking creativity. And is called. Darren Brown the creative mind. It sixty two minutes long about this podcast. Daniel says creativity is the power that allows us to imagine a world. That isn't our world yet to consider what doesn't yet exist and make it exist. Welcome to the PODCAST. That will help you make that happen. Those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Daniel. For this week's the your next big idea. Listen in and let us know what you think you can find these episodes and listen to them as a playlist on Pod chaser just had to pod Chaser DOT COM and type in your next big idea into the search bar and the playlists will be right there for your enjoyment joined the discussion of this week's theme by using the Hashtag creativity. This is usually the section of the show where we bring you podcast news since the news is so filled with corona virus and Kobe nineteen lately. There's honestly not that much podcast industry news instead skype. Pillsbury who writes inside podcasting the newsletter? We usually read our stories from is asking for your participation she writes. I'm determined to keep this community connected so while we live through this bizarre moment in history. I'll publish reader submitted issues of the newsletter. I need your help to get this done. Please send me any or all of the following one episodes or podcast that have brought you. Joy provided relief over the past. Few weeks sky will share them in her newsletter and may eventually start a Google spreadsheet where people can add browse information at their leisure. Please include a link to the show and explain why it has been helpful to you during this time two stories about how the pandemic has impacted or not your work as a creator. Feel free to mention your show in the context of your story. Three stories about how the corona virus has impacted your ability to listen to podcasts or your interest in them four requests for help with your podcast need an editor a guest. Anything else. Five any ideas you have for future reader submitted issue you can send sky any and all of your suggestions return on twitter at sky. Pillsbury that's S. K. Y. E. P. L. L. S. B. U. R. Y. You can also reach her by email at sky at inside dot com. We'll be back next week with podcast. News and PODCASTS. That are keeping US happy during the Super Weird time.

Daniel Brooks Eric Schmidt Pillsbury Google United States Debbie Millman Darren Brown Happy Place Twitter Gq Worst-Dressed Joe Wicks Ferriss Editor Skype Kobe Rankin Lisa Khandan Alphabet Inc Advisor
Ryan Holiday  turning the tables, it's okay to walk away from something you're good at because you can always come back

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:44 min | 1 year ago

Ryan Holiday turning the tables, it's okay to walk away from something you're good at because you can always come back

"Am very very accepting of the fact that there are many things I don't know and there are many things I take for granted and there are many things that I don't see therefore I tr- I spend a lot of my time developing experiments. And that's that's my constant framework like how can I be sure that I know ex? Yeah which relates to two thousand fifteen walking away from investing so I was like all right if I look at the track record of these various companies not only my portfolio but others for the biggest winds taking for looking at a shop by Uber et Cetera. Taking seven twelve years to come to fruition. And your final. Tally is not known. Until you've liquidated all of your holdings effectively. It's a little more complicated than that. But but not by much so even though on paper and also in exits it would. I could convince myself that I am good at this and people tell me. I'm good at this. That remains to be seen right and so I stopped and the larger assumption. Just because you're good at something does not mean you have to keep doing it for the rest of your life. Yeah there are many things. I'm good at that. I shouldn't do it all and It's think it's it's challenging for anyone myself included to shift gears if you if you're good at something being rewarded for something and yet you have this creeping dread that you don't want to do it that that that is a challenging situation for. I think just about anyone and certainly has been challenging for me but the the the parachute right the the safety net is realizing that for almost anything you can leave and come back almost anything and I'm sure there are exceptions. But if we're talking about businesses and professional capacities and careers if you are really good. That's a big as the ultimate leverage. That's diet is that is a huge hurdle that you need to be able to pass but if you are really good and dedicated to your craft or crafts could be a combination of of unusual crafts. Right right you might be a quant also really get a writing and then you a newsletter surely could be an unusual combination of traits like Warren Buffett and public speaking writer Jeff Basis and writing Entrepreneurship Cetera. You can always come back right right. It's so I try to keep that in mind and making a lot of my

Warren Buffett Jeff Basis Writer
The Minimum Effective Dose of Product Management

All The Responsibility Podcast

08:50 min | 1 year ago

The Minimum Effective Dose of Product Management

"The minimum affected dose is a concept that comes from a book by Tim. FERRISS called the four hour body. Now you might know Tim Ferriss. He's most well known at this point for his podcast but of of course he's written several bestselling books at least four or five. The first one was called the four hour workweek great book. It's very inspiring. Although most people it turns out in reality can't really have four hour workweeks much as we would like. He followed that with the four hour body. A really good and interesting book focused on fitness and health more your personal well-being thing whereas the four hour workweek was focused on your income and lifestyle. Both books can kind of change the way you think about things. Like in common entrepreneurship fitness and health in the four hour body. One of his most important concepts are one that I took away. That was very important is what he calls the minimum effective dose. What's the smallest amount of work? Mark Treatment Activity. You need to do to get most of the benefit for example. If you want to build muscle you can vote a lot of time to like a bodybuilders regime and eventually get your body to an amazing state but it turns out that to get kind of an eighty percent of a bodybuilder state you become very strong you become very fit. Your body changes shape shape in a noticeable way. But you aren't ready to compete. It turns out to take a much much less punishing less time consuming and less rigid regime. Then the bodybuilder has to go through like it's a lot less so applying the same idea to product management. We want to think about so. This is kind of a thought experiment as much as anything. How much do we really need? In terms of structures are in terms of activities to be able to make some effective changes as as product managers in other words. What's the minimum you can do to get the effect that you want? Or as I mentioned I like to think of it in terms of how much do I have to do to get eighty percent of the of of the total effect that I could get and sometimes eighty percent is enough versus perfection. What's the least you can do for the most effect so I came up with this idea idea? I'm not sure. He invented it from medicine and sports physiology and I mentioned the idea of the eighty percents bodybuilding. It also happens with things like medications and supplements if you take a certain dose. You get the effect if you take any more. The effect doesn't change. You've already gotten the full effect in some cases. Maybe there's a problem you know for example. If you think about vitamin D you can go out in the sun for fifteen minutes a day or into the daylight for fifteen minutes a day and your skin will make enough vitamin D for You. I mean unless yes. You have a serious condition related to Vitamin D. That's the rule of thumb if you live in a temperate climate if you go out in the sun for longer than that. There's no reason not to accept it's not going to help you get more Vitamin Vitamin D. Your body has made much vitamin D as it needs in fifteen minutes now you can also overdose on Vitamin D. You can't do that by going out in the sun but you can do it by taking supplements supplements and that's the flip side of this minimum effective dose idea. You have either the eighty percent idea what. What is the minimum I need to do? Or what is the amount actively I need to do to get to the eighty percent result. And you also this other idea of more is not better. I can do a certain amount and I get really everything. I'm going to get from the treatment. So let's now apply this idea of the minimum effective dose to product management. Since that's why we're here and there's a few good examples. I think actually some of the practices that were starting to do. An Agile and other areas of software product development are kind of examples of the minimum effective dose for example you can maybe think of stack ranking your feature backlog as kind of a way to implement the minimum effective effective dose of features. I need to think about right now constantly. Paying attention to your whole backlog. All the time is kind of like doing that bodybuilders workout. The hard one. Even if you have no plans to go into bodybuilding. It's kind of a huge waste of time and so the minimum effective dose is. Let me focus on the features that I can deliver the next month month or the next quarter and I'll forget about all the features just aren't GonNa make it and I'm going to remove those from my cognitive load and that's a way to achieve uh-huh minimum effective dose of features another good example against something that's becoming more and more common. Nowadays in in software companies are two things that are related to roadmaps roadmaps. The first one is the idea of the now next later roadmap where you talk in some level of detail about what you're planning to deliver right away. That's that's the now portion us much deal you use much less detail about items that are in the near term but not coming immediately. And then maybe bullet points points are tweets about the ideas and themes that you're looking at for later so that's the now next later roadmap. I'll put a link in the show notes to an article about about the now next leader roadmap concept and how to build one a related innovation and roadmaps is the theme based Roadmap instead of going into great detail about the features are delivering. We'll all the attendant risks that entails and unintended expectation setting you focus on the themes of the work you're planning to deliver and often these. The ideas are used in conjunction the now next later roadmap and the theme based roadmap the less risky an upcoming feature is which usually means. You're nearly ready to deliver it the more detail you can provide and for things where there's a lot more rescue provide a lot less detail you'd think about things just in terms of themes also linked to an article that I wrote wrote about roadmaps it. You might find interesting. That kind of goes more into some of these ideas but I also have another sort of richer and longer example apple of how to think about the minimum effective dose of product management and. So let's go on a little boat trip and you'll see why say that in a minute so first of all a reminder I talk about a framework for thinking thinking about product management overall. Our job is product managers is to find invalidate market problems. Drive the creation of solutions to those problems and help take. The solutions is to market that encompasses really the full life cycle of successful products. There's somebody out there that needs some problem solved or some opportunity enabled we can create some technology. That will help them do that. And then we have to make sure that those people can find out that we have the solution and that our solution is a a better alternative than there a better choice than their other alternatives. So I also have another little saying that I've sometimes said there's always product management and what I mean by. That is that we're always building something and there might have been a well-considered decision on what to build or someone might just said. Hey this would be cool to build an all build it now. I really think that in one sense. Product management is at root level. The Art of making a good decision about what to build in fact. I don't think anybody would disagree. Disagree with that so the idea that you're going to build something. Somebody's going to make a decision or not. Make a decision and something's going to build anyway. That's sort of the the background of this phrase. There's always product management because there's always something being built and did somebody make a good decision about it or not so. Let's tie this all together so consider a small startup company so small that it doesn't have a product manager on staff because it's not big enough which means one of the founders is making these decisions or something like ah a metaphor that kind of like especially for a startup is that you have a boat and it's got a big engine. which is the team in a lot of startups? It's all DEV team. You know. There's very little other people very few people in the organization. So it's like a boat with a big engine and if you turn that big engine on the boats going to go forward. It's going to go. Oh somewhere. The problem is if there's nobody standing at the Tiller at the steering wheel the boat my go around in circles or a my crashed into some rocks or Michael out to sea never to see land again without someone at the Tiller. It's probably not gonNA take anyone to a destination that's desirable there has to be somebody who's done some amount of steering in order for the boat to be an effective way to get where we WANNA go. Okay so let's move back to. Let's move back. To actual product. Companies software startups startups and other kinds of startups are kind of the same thing. There's always going to be some amount of product management. That's the person at the Tiller making sure that you're generally going the right direction but when in a little start up you have to think about. What's the minimum amount of product management? You really have to do. And so that's what we're GONNA talk about. Well if you go back to my model you have to be working on solving a market problem. You're creating a solution with your developers but if you're solving a problem that nobody cares about that's not gonna be very successful in the end and that's why you need to at least have done this piece of will let me find a market problem and make sure that somebody will pay for a solution to that.

Tim Ferriss Product Manager Tiller Product Development Apple Michael
The Product Management System of Record

All The Responsibility Podcast

09:57 min | 1 year ago

The Product Management System of Record

"Today's episode number three thirty three is a blast from the past. I I started this podcast back in November two thousand fourteen and this is actually the second episode. It's on the topic of the product management system of record and kind of how to cobble one together with a wicky and is from way back there in November two thousand fourteen. You're probably haven't heard it because it's only been available on the secret. Product Manager Handbook site but not in the regular all the responsibility feed. I did change. PODCAST feeds the next year. Now I mentioned at the beginning of small product conference. I was speaking king at the weekend. After a record the episode and at that conference I presented my idea about a product management system of record and the little prototype that I mentioned that I built in confluence more importantly at that conference Hubert Palin who was in the process of starting product board at that time now at the time and still today I consider product board to be the closest assist application in the market to what I would consider a product management system of record as I describe in the episode so it was really great timing now product board is obviously not baling wire and chewing gum. which is what I describe using in the episode but I'm afraid most project management organizations don't even have the version I describe in this episode? Let alone on product board. Now I have two interviews with Hubert Palin from back in two thousand fifteen put links into the show notes to those. I think you'll find the ideas about the product management system system of record as a concept. Hold up pretty well five years later even if the way I suggest building. One is slightly obsolete given that product board and some other applications are in the market thou I'm GonNa Talk Today about what I've been calling the product management system of record partly. This is because it's been top of mind for me lately but also next week as I speak this I'll be giving a workshop on the product like management system of record on building. One out of what I call Baling Wire and chewing gum at the product summit in San Francisco there will be a link to this workshop shop and the rest of the product summit in the show notes now product managers. We create products shirt. That's in our name but but don't forget the rest of the process that we go through to be successful. Those products need to solve an urgent pervasive market problem for a defined group of customers who who are willing to pay for the solution and when we create that solution we need to get it to market. We need to have the salespeople in the marketing people know what to say to the market market so that people will know that they wanted and will buy it so to do that. There's a bunch of activities that we do as product managers we talked to customers. We innovate around what we hear from the market. We validate those findings of new market problems. And we define product plans to create the solutions to those problems we specify features we guide the creation of the solutions and we work with sales and marketing to get the solutions to market. However we don't have a system of record for any of those activities except for potentially stuff around features if we're using a bug tracking system or requirements management system? But all the rest of it. We don't have a system of record for example. If I or you go out to a customer customer to do some market research what happens. Well we'll talk to the customer will interview them. We'll take some notes might be in word or on paper in evernote when we come back from the customer. We'll tell everybody had visited the customer. That's awesome. I'm I might send out a copy of my notes There might be some snippets of information in there and the notes that that seem important so I might highlight those maybe even pull them into another document where I might look at them later in the future. Hopefully some of that conversation when will float up in my brain when I'm talking to another customer or after I've talked talked to several customers and I'll start to see that there's a market problem that I can do some innovation around around. That's all what happens today. What doesn't happen today? Usually is that the interview notes become an enterprise asset. No the words they become accessible to everyone and valuable to everyone and the key snippets of information. Those things that I highlighted the tidbits. They don't become an enterprise asset either which it means that other people can't make use of them now. This is just one example of a lot of activities where we PM's do something important but there's no official place to put the outcome of the the activity and I can name dozens of these things that we do where we create something that you certainly could imagine as an enterprise asset but it's not stored in that way. So what would we better well. Let's get back to the customer interview example. I'd like to be able to easily compare the snippets. I learned today with what I learned last week last month last year and of course maybe I can do that with a lot of work based on my old notes but also like to be able to compare what I learned today with what you learned yesterday or last month last year or what some product manager. WHO's no longer even with? The company learned last year or last month. The reason I'd like to do this is that one of the ways you discover. Mark problems is not by talking to individual customers but by talking to multiple customers and seeing how the things that they talk about start to overlap. I'd also like a way to show. How the snippets I gathered last year are turning into features this month? This is really valuable. For talking to developers for example it turns out to be very very compelling for developers and motivating just as it is for US product managers to understand how what they're working on is driven by the needs of a customer summer and by helping a customer have a better life in some way. Now of course whenever I talk about my snippets also mean your snippets and all the other snippets from the Enterprise Prize. And I'd really like to see just in general be able to go back to all the things we've learned from customers at any time and rifle through them to see if new insights pop up. That happens pens all the time. If you have a prepared mind or a system of record where all that information is stored now as I mentioned. There really aren't tools out there that can support this today. At least not in so many words so my goal in the workshop that I mentioned earlier over time is to come up with some ways to you take what we already do in other words. We're already doing a lot of manual work to capture this information and figure out. What's the minimum amount more manual work? We can do to make it a lot more value valuable in the way that I described so I have some criteria for the kind of manual work that I'm willing to do first of all there has to be too much of it. It has to save me from repeating myself and I'll talk about that later in the context particularly of sales materials. But but basically it means I don't have to do the same thing over and over again There's a lot of benefit in the resulting information. I Want I want my manual work to give me a lot of benefit in return for doing doing the manual work. And ideally there's benefit and actually doing the manual work. It's another opportunity opportunity to have insights for example. One of the things I'm going to describe is capturing these snippets that I talked about earlier which we may already be highlighting but I'm talking about highlighting them than copying them but by doing thing this interaction with these snippets. I'm probably expanding my brain in terms of coming up and being able to see more easily problems at the customers having so the real question is what's the maximum payoff. I can get for the minimum additional amount of manual work. If you're familiar with Tim Ferriss and his forearms body book he talks talks about the minimum effective dose. So what's the minimum effective dose of manual work. That will get you a really good payoff. But it won't be that much work and you can think of this manual work. Also as kind of a concierge version of the ultimate product management repository which vendors may create as based based on maybe these conversations that we're having today now all quickly run through a basic outline of my vision of a system of record that's built out of Baling Wire and chewing gum. In fact it's really built from a wicky and I've been working a little bit with confluence as my system of record and I'll tell you about how I'm sort of setting that up. I'm calling it a system of record but that might be a little too grand for some of you. You can also call it a product management repository but the key point is it's capturing data that we already create but in a way that makes it more usable more valuable more multiple of the way that I've divided up are SORTA at the front end of the process in other words the finding market problem part of the process and the back end the go to market part of the process so the components for the front end of the process or the finding market problem pro part of the process. Are things like customers. I'm GonNa have a page in my confluence at LaSalle the customers customers. I've talked to and for each of those customers. Going to be a page and link to that page the interviews awesome and then linked to each of those interviews is going to be the snippets that I've gotten out of those interviews and I've got a particular way of doing this. It's a little bit of a manual process. You go through the interview. You highlight the snippet. That seems interesting interesting. You copy that into another page. Just all the snippets from all the customers. And it's a that's essentially a table that table of snippets Has the snippet it has. The customer has the date it may actually have multiple customers. Because what might happen is as you go through. You might start to see. Oh I've I've heard the same thing for multiple people people. That's actually one of the things you're aiming for.

Product Manager Hubert Palin Enterprise Prize San Francisco Tim Ferriss Official Lasalle
U.S. Podcast Ad Revenues Hit Historic $479 Million in 2018

podnews

04:20 min | 2 years ago

U.S. Podcast Ad Revenues Hit Historic $479 Million in 2018

"Podcasting made four hundred seventy nine million dollars in US and revenue last year. That's according to the bay, and PW WC, and it's an increase of fifty three percent year on year. It's estimated as well that the industry will be making over one billion dollars by twenty twenty one for comparison be. I a Kelsey estimate US terrestrial commercial radio to of earned fourteen point two billion in two thousand eighteen Sirius XM satellite radio earner further five point eight as predicted apple will create a brand new apple podcasts app for MAC OS, which will come in version, ten point one five of the operating system called Catalina. However, I tunes will continue as you know, it on windows machines, the new app, also clearly displays chapter points, which is nice apple also announced that podcast progress will be sink. Between devices and the availability of full text transcript. Search as well. Google ready offers both of those features that his Craig federici, the VP of software engineering and announcing it in the main, keynote. Our tension to podcast. It brings a dedicated podcast listening experience to the MAC and features all the great features you use to in Iowa's like, listen now, we can see new episodes and keep track of your listening across all of your devices, and it has a great new feature and it has to do with search, you know, sometimes you hear about something on the radio. Maybe our new podcast, something on the news. And you think I want to hear more about that? But you're not sure what show was on, or even that it appeared in the title will, now we use machine learning to index the contents of the spoken content of podcast. So now you can search that content and buying the podcast with just a few clicks in the app. It's great. Also from Apple's WW DC in the next version of IRS on the iphone and ipod touch apple podcasts will be on the front screen right next to one of the most used apps in the world, the app store, notes vox media's Zack Kahn, in a tweet. He says this will help first time listeners, discover podcasts and they also announced that watch OS the operating system on the apple watch will be capable of operating without an attached phone, and we'll also have access to a new streaming API Daniel j Lewis notes that this could be great for podcast consumption with only an apple watch in other news as we reported yesterday Tim Ferriss has made a decision to ditch the ads and just take donations for his podcast. Is that a wise, move, mayor valley any does the maths to take a look? I TV the UK commercial television company has signed a two year agreement for its podcasts to be placed in the global player. Radio and podcast app from global the UK commercial radio company. I TV have also signed with globals Dax advertising, platform target spot isn't to deal with signal the integration with the signal identity platform. The company says, in Abel's targets spot to precisely target the right listener, the right moment on the rights device shortly in the right spot golden age of podcasting, cliche news, now, as being t publishes an opinion piece from a costs Austrailia, and New Zealand boss, Henrik Isaacson, who predicts the next chapter in Austrailia, and podcast market. W also interviews, Edison research is Tom Webster on podcasting, route to mass media and event for you a podcast festival in Lisbon in Portugal. It's called poed and he's today's English, and it's on the ninth of November three new podcasts to tell you about this week the history of standup returns for new season today. Let. Of love in World War. Two is a true story from the second World War brought to life to Mark the seventy fifth anniversary of the d day landings this week written by Anna priest land and the podcast from the us national association of broadcasters. This week has a special guest editor that's me twenty two minute rump round the world in terms of podcasting.

Apple United States Tom Webster Iowa Twenty Twenty Google Austrailia Mayor Valley Craig Federici UK Vp Of Software Engineering Vox Media Tim Ferriss Editor Lisbon
Apple to kill iTunes: why it makes no difference for podcasters

podnews

02:36 min | 2 years ago

Apple to kill iTunes: why it makes no difference for podcasters

"Has been widely reported over the weekends to be killing issues. What does it mean for podcasting, nothing because you're an apple podcasts, not on, I tunes. So what else will announce at W w well, apple podcasts, went on the web, in April this year, but there's no front page for this experience here. But there is an unusual era. Is it moving to the web fully this week with a proper front page had a method of subscribing, his more wilder speculation in the apple podcasts page code as mention of requires subscription for episodes, and price equals free. Now is this a paid for subscription service or just apple using a modified version of a web schemer, it's probably the latter put who knows our editor me wrote podcasting, what apple should do next in March recommending apple at paid subscription services and Android app and proper robust API? Is I wonder how many of those ideas will materialize in other news, the Tim Ferriss show is trying in you experiment? No aunts, no sponsors, just a donation model. A blog posts explains why we linked to it from our show notes, and our newsletter today, podcast brunch club like book club. But for podcasts published, it's June listening list. The theme is understanding China and the playlist includes four episodes, that get into the country's history economy and culture, the London international awards, a long running advertising awards have added podcasting as a separate competition this year and podcast, one have revealed their spring two thousand nineteen slate. It's a Monday, so it's opinion day it's time for a podcast creation, tool from apple says website, nine to five MAC, it's now time, they say for apple to simplify the podcast creation experience. Nick Hilton writes about his first year running a podcast production company, and he notes that the market is shaping up. Be much less indie, much less counter, cultural much less innovative going forward. Good in podcasts, a new podcast from labour, spin doctor, Alastair Campbell football feminism and everything in between his comedian daughter. Grace Campbell is also a co host. The very important podcast is a branded podcast from air freshener air, wick, featuring both hosts and guests sitting on the toilet classy, how to build a dating app is a new podcast from a company building their own dating app and Molly of Denali is a new action packed adventure for kids rooted in native storytelling.

Apple Alastair Campbell Tim Ferriss Grace Campbell Nick Hilton China Editor London
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"And you're going to have to force something within a context of group like the entrepreneurs organs. Station where people are going there splits for that purpose to learn from one another to teach and so on. Otherwise, I would encourage you to reform the question in your head. So the question isn't how do I get a mentor of the question is how can I encourage people? I aspire to be like who are ten twenty thirty years. A head of me to respect me and want me to succeed. That's a better question. How do I get people say five ten twenty years ahead of me whose paths I might want to emulate? How do I get those people to respect me and want me to succeed? And if you do that that's a precursor to them, helping you in ways that resemble those of a mentor, but the word mentor is probably a word that will never come up even though in practice. That's what they will be doing for you does that make sense yet it does. And I think that it's one of those Tim Ferriss hidden gems. And I think that the exact answer was hoping for that type of. Answer. I was hoping for any too. Yeah. I think you answered it perfectly. And so it just a last question. Here's what do you think about the the handwritten follow up note, sometimes they say, you know, emails or better Tennessee handwritten, you know, thinking, even just, you know, asking these questions via, you know, handwritten letter or what have you do you have any thoughts on if one is better than the other? I don't think a handwritten letters necessary in a lot of people myself included do not want to give out their mailing addresses. Even if it's a PO box. So I would say it's it's unnecessary giving someone a handwritten note at an event is a different story, and I do recommend that. But you can listen to Z talk that I gave on that topic at south by south west and on the podcasts, which I mentioned earlier and that will get into details on that. All right. My man. I will leave you to it. Good luck. And nice chatting with you. Incur. You're a great day. All right. Bye. Steve this is Tim Ferriss calling good afternoon. Oh my gosh. How are you doing? I'm doing great. I'm doing fantastic. It's beautiful day..

Tim Ferriss Tennessee Steve ten twenty thirty years five ten twenty years
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Hello, boys and girls, this is Tim Ferriss. And welcome to other episode of the Tim Ferriss show. This episode is not going to be a long form interview where I distill and deconstruct world class performers. In fact, it is going to be nothing the sort it is a a episode, this is tea time with Tim or TIMMY or Timbo if you're for where I solicited phone numbers from all of you and called a handful of you to field any questions that you might have. And I've done these before they're always a lot of fun for me to do and among other topics covered in the various phone calls that you will hear in this episode how to find mentors. How do I think about finding mentors? How have I found mentors in the past discussions of meaning Victor Frankl? And so on how to get rid of anxiety or train into confidence. We talk about that as it. It's two handful things cocktails relationship advice, if we go all over the place, and I hope you enjoy this as much as I enjoyed recording it so without further ado here is teatime with Tim. Hello. Is this add one? Yes, it is that when the Tim Ferriss calling good afternoon. Eight Tim how you doing man? I can't believe this is real it's real I'm afraid. I have I have my senior me too. Okay. Me too. So let's jump right into it. How can I help any? I can't promise I can help try to answer. Whatever questions you might have. I appreciate that. So my question is about mentors. So what guidance? Do you have four finding a mentor to kind of help maybe gain a better understanding about an industry? And I think more importantly, how would you or would guiding you have for asking someone to be a mentor how to approach them? How do you kind of break that or make that initial contact? I can I can actually answer this one. So the the first rule of thumb is that I would highly advise against ever asking someone directly to be a mentor in using those words because the people you generally will want as a mentor, unless they're retired are probably quite busy and will hear mentor is unpaid part. Time or a fulltime job before ever. And therefore, you wanna approach it somewhat indirectly. And there are a few different ways to do that. There's also a resource I can recommend which is a book called the third door, which I think is very good job of exploring real life case studies of communication that works and communication that doesn't work when you're reaching out to people who are where you'd like to be or could be possible mentors even remotely by what they rights and so on. So I would suggest checking out that, you know, actually, I have it in my hand. I heard your interview with Alex benign on your podcast and men I have to say I on the fan at gun me some hard times. And that's why I initially came across his book, and I'm right around that chapter. A maybe like the sixty seventy pages in I just read the pride kind of goes into the intro. He kind of talk to you. And so I think that's where that question came from an I'm just. Perfect. Great. I just yes. So I'm just trying to break into this. And I'm trying to not repeat those mistakes that he highlights in. So lemme lemme lemme take stab at the saving you from some pitfalls. The way that I I connected with people who later became mentors in a sense when I landed in Silicon Valley in two thousand was through volunteering so I highly recommend volunteering and the reason for that is that many organizations, including entrepreneurial or entrepreneurship focused organizations that could be the the entrepreneurs organization could be young presidents organization. Why peo- it could be any number of others? There are many of them in Silicon Valley. I volunteered time. Which is the Indus entrepreneur. Even though I'm clearly not Indian and volunteered at Esa vase, which. At the time was the Silicon Valley associate association of startup entrepreneurs, and they given their location and given their focus were able to get media to attend to cover speakers, meaning to feature.

Tim Ferriss Silicon Valley Victor Frankl Esa vase Alex
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

14:53 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Brand new website. Check it out. Hello, boys and girls, this is Tim Ferriss. And welcome to other episode of the Tim Ferriss show. This episode is not going to be a long form interview where I distill and deconstruct world class performers. In fact, it is going to be nothing the sort. It is Acuna episode. This is tea time with Tim or TIMMY or Timbo if prefer for where I solicited phone numbers from all of you and called a handful of you to field any questions that you might have. And I've done these before they're always a lot of fun for me to do and among other topics covered in the various phone calls that you will hear in this episode how to find mentors. How do I think about finding mentors? How heavy found mentors in the past discussions of meaning Victor Frankl. And so on how to get rid of anxiety or train into confidence. We talk about that as it. It's two handful things cocktails relationship advice, if we go all over the place, and I hope you enjoy this as much as I enjoyed recording it so without further ado here is teatime with Tim. Hello. Is add one. Yes. It is Edwin the Tim Ferriss calling good afternoon. Hey, tim. How you doing man? I can't believe this is real. It's real I'm afraid. I have I have my senior me too. Okay. Me too. So let's jump right into it. How can I help any? I can't promise I can help try to answer. Whatever questions you might have. I appreciate that. So my question is about mentors. So what guidance? Do you have four finding a mentor to kind of help maybe gain a better understanding about an industry? And I think more importantly, how would you or would guiding you have for asking someone to be a mentor how to approach them? How do you kind of break that or make that initial contact? I can I can actually answer this one. So the the first rule of thumb is that I would highly advise against ever asking someone directly to be a mentor in using those words because the people you generally will want as a mentor unless they're retired are probably quite busy. And we'll hear mentor is unpaid part. Time or a fulltime job before ever. And therefore you want to approach it somewhat indirectly. And there are a few different ways to do that. There's also a resource I can recommend which is a book called the third door, which I think is very good job of exploring real life case studies of communication that works and communication that doesn't work when you're reaching out to people who are where you'd like to be or could be possible mentors even remotely by what they right and so on so I would suggest checking out that, you know, actually, I have it in my hand. I heard your interview with Alex benign on your podcast and men I have to say I on the fan got some hard times. And that's where I initially came across his book, and I'm right around that chapter a maybe like sixty seventy pages in and I read the primary kind of goes into the intro. He kind of talk to you. And so I think that's where that question came from an I'm just. Perfect. Great. I just yes. So I'm just trying to break into this. And I'm trying to not repeat those mistakes that he highlights in. So lemme lemme lemme take stab at the saving you from some pitfalls. The way that I I connected with people who later became mentors in a sense when I landed in Silicon Valley in two thousand was through volunteering so I highly recommend volunteering and the reason for that is that many organizations including entrepreneurial or entrepreneurs ship focused organizations that could be the the entrepreneurs organization could be young presidents organization. Why peo- it could be any number of others? There are many of them in Silicon Valley. I volunteered time. Which is the Indus entrepreneur. Even though I'm clearly not Indian and volunteered at Esa vase, which. At the time was the Silicon Valley associate association of startup entrepreneurs, and they given their location and given their focus were able to get media to attend to cover speakers, meaning to feature speakers in articles, and so on for Forbes, or fortune, whatever might be and that meant if I were to volunteer, even if I were simply taking tickets or refilling water glasses both which I did. I would have an opportunity if I over performed which is easy, in fact in most volunteer capacities because the people who show up very often have the attitude I'm not getting paid for this. So I will do the bare minimum that they ask of me. So if you are proactive in asking for additional responsibility, or is there anything else I can help with finished X? Can I help with anything else if you are proactive and really responsible and get things done on time? You'll very often find that they will. Be more than happy to give you know responsibility. And that is how I ended up ultimately sitting in on planning meetings and volunteering to act as a speaker liaison for an event which allowed me to reach out to people. I wanted to get to know like Jack canfield who is the co creator is the co creator of chicken soup for the soul, which sold hundreds of millions of copies the person who commercialized creating I critique monohydrate that is the creator of the Brock. I had a very motley crow of folks I wanted to assemble and there had to be something in it for them. And what was in it for them was speaking in front of an audience of entrepreneurs with media in attendance to cover them. So I was not asking them for any favours. In fact, I was asking them if they'd be willing to receive media coverage, in fact, and also. Interact with other people at their level. And it was it was during that event. I wanted to do one thing, and it was not asked them if they could be a mentor. It was to demonstrate to them that was very very good at doing my job. So I wanted it to be the smoothest speaking experience if ever had a wanted it to be an event to remember I wanted to ensure that they had the media context they wanted to have interactions that is and following that event. I later much later maybe a month or two later reached out after thanking the speakers each speaker separately and as a group to. Say ping. I think it was Jack can't fill the time and used an approach that was similar to what I find in the four hour workweek when reaching out to experts who are above your paygrade and ineffective said Jack really enjoyed our interactions. I hope we get to meet again. And if it's okay with you. I'd love to very rarely. But if the occasion calls for it send you a question that overlaps with your deep experience, if I'm totally stuck after trying to figure something out, and it was along those lines and Jack then. I kept in touch with. No, it's important for me to qualify. What that means? Keep in touch with does not mean pester does not sit does not mean sent him quarterly updates. It does not mean clog his inbox. It means that maybe once every six to twelve months, I would send him a legitimate question. And I would indicate what I'd already tried to do to answer the question. This is really important. So if you reach out to a potential mentor or someone who has more life experience, and you say, hi, Tim. I was just wondering I'm studying this school. What should I do? That's terrible question because it doesn't reflect if you've actually tried to figure it out on your own or if you're using the your personal Google it also does not lend itself to a specific answer. So you have to ask yourself is this a question that this person could answer in four lines or less, and if you're if you look at the question and realize it's gonna take them. A half hour to answer because you're asking them for the meaning of life and to explain their trajectory and how they grew their career that it's a bad question because you have more time than they do, and you should be aware of that from the outset. So generally the question like the question I'd love to ask you X here. The things I've already tried my tentative plan is this. If you have any other thoughts, I would really appreciate them. And if you're too busy to respond. I totally understand. So give them an out office that they feel comfortable not responding and completely unpressured. This is very important, and and perhaps counter-intuitively that that'll get you more answers because what many younger go-getters will do is they'll send an Email, and they'll finish it with looking forward to your reply or I have Tuesday at two pm Thursday at one pm central open, which one works for you. And it's so presumptive and aggressive that. The no matter what the content of that Email the person receiving it will be likely to think to themselves well shit. If I if I reward this person with a response to this Email, I am encouraging them to send me twenty more of these emails, and I don't wanna do that. So not going to respond. So that's that's one one approach. And I would also encourage you to look for a south by southwest talk that I gave which funny enough coincides with south by southwest starting right now today tomorrow in Austin, Texas in early March, but the talk is titled how to build a world class network in record time or something equally hyperbolic in any case, it it is though an accurate reflection of the talk, and you may be able to find on the podcast. So there's a chance. That I took the audio and put it on the on the podcast. But if you if you Google how to build a world class network in record time, and Tim Ferriss something will pop up whether it is video recording of the presentation at south by or it is audio on the podcast itself. Which I do think I had repurpose the audio for. So those are my thoughts if you're eating the door. I think that will also complement a lot of what we're talking about. So I hope that helps does that fill in some gaps. Hopefully or give you some direction. Yet. Definitely. I mean, I must say it's one thing they read in a book or two here on your podcast. But kinda to hear it straight from you, it just a little more weight to it. And it definitely just makes it sound doable. So I really appreciate it. And I think you for your time. And I just you know, your your shows definitely has been a game changer for me. So thank you for that. And keep doing what you're doing. And I really appreciate it. Thank you so much Sexwale much. My pleasure, of course. And I should point out one other thing, which is when I mentioned, Jack canfield, for instance, I said it once every six to twelve months that's a long time that that as an indicator that I'm playing the long game. Right. The question you shouldn't be asking. And I don't think you are. But the question you shouldn't be asking. How can I find a mentor for the next twelve months? If you're looking for something like that it's going to end up being somewhat transactional. And you're going to have to force something within a context of group like the entrepreneurs organs. Station where people are going there splits for that purpose to learn from one another to teach and so on. Otherwise, I would encourage you to reframe the question in your head. So the question isn't how do I get a mentor of the question is how can I encourage people? I aspire to be like who are ten twenty thirty years ahead of me to respect me and want me to succeed. That's a better question. How do I get people say five ten twenty years ahead of me whose paths I might want to emulate? How do I get those people to respect me and want me to succeed? And if you do that that's a precursor to them, helping you in ways that resemble those of mentor, but the word mentor is probably a word that will never come up even though in practice. That's what they will be doing for you does that make sense yet it does. And I think that it's one of those temperatures hidden gems. And I think that the exact answer was hoping for that type of. Answer. I was hoping for any too. Yeah. I think you answered it perfectly. And so it just a let less question. Here's what do you think about the the handwritten follow up note, sometimes they say, you know, emails or better Tennessee handwritten? You know, thank you notes. Even just, you know, asking these questions via, you know, handwritten letter, or what have you do you have any thoughts on if one is better than the other? I don't think a handwritten letter is necessary in a lot of people myself included do not want to give out their mailing addresses. Even if it's a PO box. So I would say it's it's unnecessary giving someone a handwritten note at an event is a different story, and I do recommend that. But you can listen to Z talk that I give on that topic at south by south west and on the podcast, which I mentioned earlier and that will get into details on that. All right. My man. I will leave you to good luck. And nice chatting with you. Anchor. You're a great day. All right. Bye.

Tim Ferriss Jack canfield Google Victor Frankl Silicon Valley Esa vase southwest Alex Timbo Forbes Austin Edwin Tennessee Texas twelve months ten twenty thirty years five ten twenty years four hour
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

12:03 min | 2 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Optimal minimal. This out too can. Flat out for a half mile before hand starts shaking royals. Now, it is. I must have a knitting organism living Bishop over metal interest. Two. This episode is brought to you by linked in marketing solutions, the to tool for BB, marketers, and advertisers who want to drive brand awareness, generate leads or build long term relationships that result in real business impact could be all of the above. I've had Reed Hoffman co founder of Lincoln on this podcast number of times often called the oracle of Silicon Valley for many, different reasons, and he among other people and friends of mine have made me more and more interested in Lincoln as platform as an ecosystem in the last few years, and it's it's very nuanced. It's very subtle, but can be used in some very powerful ways with a community of more than five hundred seventy five million professionals Lincoln is gigantic, but it can be hyper specific you have access to a very diverse group of people all searching for things they need to grow professionally that is explicitly the purpose of Lincoln. So you can build relationships that really matter that can drive your business objectives forward that can also have a high. Hi LTV. Lifetime value. Lincoln has the marketing tools to help target your customers with precision right down to among other things their job title company name industry cetera. This is important because better targeting equals, a message that your customers actually care about. And it also means your advertising, more effective and cost effective. So why spray and pray with your marketing dollars when you can be surgical? It just makes sense to redeem a free one hundred dollar Lincoln, ad credit and launch your first campaign. Good Lincoln dot com forward slash T. F S that stands for Tim Ferriss show. So that is Lincoln dot com forward slash Tf s check it out. That's where you can go to get your free one hundred dollar ad credit. Lincoln dot com. Ports. Tf S. Terms and conditions apply. This upset of the Tim for show is brought to you by ninety nine designs. Ninety nine designs is the global creative platform that makes it easy for creators and clients to work together from logos to apps and packaging to book covers just about anything can be found on ninety nine designs, which is a Goto creative resource for any budget that I've used for many many years now ninety nine design now offers guess what custom video which is very exciting. They will match you at the right video professional to help. You explain your product spotlight a service and bring your brand to life. And like I mentioned I've used ninety nine designs for all sorts of things. I've used them for book covers some of the mockups for the four hour body, for example, which went onto become a number one year times bestseller, illustrations, beautiful illustrations, cover and inside illustrations for the multi volume the tau of Seneca, which you can find online for free that is a collection of my favourite letters that. I've read hundreds of times by Seneca. And other graphic design projects. Most recently I used ninety nine designs to update the station's layout of my five morning rituals e book, which is something that I offer as an incentive on my website for people to sign up for my free newsletter. The oh street turned out fantastic. And I love working with the designer who selected for the project. You can check out a bunch of these projects, you can see real life examples of what I've done and the stories behind them at ninety nine designs dot com for slash Tim. The number nine nine designs dot com slash Tim, nine designs will match you with the repression for your project from their created community of talented, creators and stay with you every step of the way. So you love the outcome. Stick it out head to ninety nine designs dot com Ford, Tim to learn more and get started on your project today. Hilla was and girls, ladies and germs is Tim Ferriss. And welcome to another episode of the Tim Ferriss show where it is my job to deconstruct world class performers of all different types. Whether they come from military, entertainment sports business, it's pretty wide spectrum and today. My guest is Graham Duncan you can find him at Graham, Duncan dot blog. East rock cap dot com at Graham, Duncan NYC on Twitter, grandma's the co founder of east rock capital investment firm. That manages broccoli two billion for a small number families and their charitable foundations before starting east rock fourteen or so years ago grim worked at two other investment firms. He started his crew by co founding an independent Wall Street research firm, Graham, graduated from Yale with the ethics politics and economics. It's a lot of stuff. He is a member of the council foreign relations and serves as co chair of the sewn conference foundation, which PD. Matric cancer research. Just wait skin. One of our very good mutual friends will probably pop up here and there in this conversation thought of most often as the basis for searching for Bobby Fischer. Although he would cringe to hear me limited that calls Graham, quote, the tip of the spear in the realms of talent tracking judgment of human potential and high stakes mental arenas and quote. That is a very Josh sentence, and grab is a real pleasure to be sitting here with you taking the time. And we we've had many conversations we haven't caught up in a while. We've also had terrible food poisoning together along Josh. So I feel like we've we've seen each other in high stakes maybe not mental physical Rina's. We if I recall correctly almost decapitated each other when learning to paddleboard with Josh at one point. And I am excited to chat for a lot of reasons. Number one. I always learn something when we sit down and talk, and I don't think of you, first and foremost as an investor you certainly do that very well, but I enjoy watching your thinking and listening to your thinking. So I think that for people who are in the audience and who might be wondering right off the bat. How will this apply to me? It is hopefully transferable to just about any domain. I think that thinking clear thinking is really a lot of what will be discussing. But for people who just heard this bio and are scratching their heads as to what you exactly do. How do you? How do you explain what you do? Well, I try to find people who are better at doing a thing. Than I am doing that thing. And I I came to this twenty years ago. I just started a firm professor mining ill. And we're running this independent research from and I had hired a sales guy who were two years in. We're gonna group meeting and he says to me at a certain point grim. What the fuck do you do here? And that point I had some real imposter syndrome going because I was hiring and firing thirty people much older much more experience than me as I sat there for thirty seconds. What do I do? And I I've had to, you know, Robert when you first interviewed to come to affirm you're applying to be an analyst, and I was interviewing you as an analyst. I didn't see your eyes light up when we talked about political analysis economic analysis, but then you proceeded to stock me for the following floor weeks. You called me a home back. Then you emailed me twice a day. And I had this moment. Revelation also interviewing salespeople brought to bear salesperson and you trust to be enough to come and try it. And now you've built our entire business. And I'm not a good analyst. I'm not a good sales person. But I put you in that seat. Now, we've built this thing put you into this positive feedback loop that we're calling a business here. And that's what I do. And I feel like I wouldn't pick that skill on the lineup as my thing. It's the cards. I was dealt. What I end up being compulsive about an interested in this world seems to like me doing it. But it's kind of an odd. It's an odd center gravity. But today, I think about it my mission life is get as many people as possible into positive feedback. Loops and there's a it's a good skill to have because it's right next to a weakness, which kind of lazy. That's why we get along. So I like getting the design right up front. So that I don't have to. I'd had to be talking to Robert once week as a political analyst saying, look, you're not do this don't do that. That would have been. I don't. I don't wanna put something into somebody. I wanna have them. Do the thing that they wanna do anyway. And if you if you construct oranizations teams that way you unlock a lot of stuff to today use that philosophy lot 'cause I act in effect as a general contractor profanity's to manage their wealth in order to do that my team, and I meet over thousand a year to try to hire the best investment craftsmen of any given sub strategy. And sometimes those craftsmen those best managers who were trapped inside large organizations start their own firms on their own over there help you unleash all this extra investment, energy and genius. They weren't accessing in their prior context, and we have to participate in that together with them. So it's now been twenty years, but I feel like basically been playing different variations in the same game. And at time how old were you roughly twenty four calling twenty four. So we're going to. We're gonna talk. I'm sure a lot about this. And I won't make this just the eight list of Josh quotes. But me, I was texting with him. And he reiterated I think you said and Josh my policies. I know we didn't talk about me reading your text up front, but this is pretty safe. So a court genius for Graham is talent hunting finding funky plus funky were on at some point. We're talking about a potential mental performance in the finance space. And then then he goes on at you have systems and frameworks that you use for this at twenty four though, I I would be really curious to hear you try to describe what made you good at it than also if there's anything that comes to mind is there any any is there are there things that you. You see that other people tend not to see or are there any types of questions that you ask yourself that even at that point. Perhaps you had picked up along the ways is is there is there anything that comes to mind. Well, I think of it is having a certain taste in people, and I like taste because I think I had a certain taste back then, and it's all I can articulate a little better than it could back then. But I mean, if you think of taste I like taste over judgment because judgement implies there's one answer. Whereas tastes is. You'll have a certain taste in podcast guest. Right. There's something similar to the group, and you could pick Tim guest out of a lineup in a told her handsome.

Tim Ferriss Graham Duncan Lincoln Josh Lincoln dot Seneca Robert analyst Reed Hoffman co Bobby Fischer Silicon Valley Yale founder Goto Hilla Twitter Rina
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"And your job now is to help your son to have a problem. Let. Your son have his problem it well intended, you'd be well intended to. But you've got it all wrong you've got to let him own it. If he doesn't have a problem if he if everything's taken care for him. He moved forward he can't get better. And so now of it's a strong used exempt with the examples that you've you've led this conversation with, but, but it is a symbol of principle is the has to be abound and the hash to be an education or going you've made this from my from right now, let me just lay this out. So that you can own the problem. So the future we can do this to happen. The best way. It's it makes perfect sense. I was told something not not too terribly long two years ago, which along the lines of. Align you could use such people all aid probably have to dress it up a little bit. Which is your lack of planning does not constitute my emergency. Right. And which is which is supposed in theory makes a lot of sense. But it sometimes falls by the wayside in practice. Due to fear of social repercussions, which we can get to in a second. I've had some awful experience. And I don't wanna turn this into a one hundred percent, Tim Ferriss therapy session. But just what people know those people out there who may be like. Oh, yeah. That Tim Ferriss? You never agreed to X or whatever it is..

Tim Ferriss one hundred percent two years
"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"tim ferriss" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"And your job now is to help your son to have a problem. Let. Your son have his problem it well intended, you'd be well intended to. But you've got it all wrong you've got to let him own it. If he doesn't have a problem if he if everything's taken care for him. He moved forward he can't get better. And so now of it's a strong used exempt with the examples that you've you've led this conversation with, but, but it is a symbol of principle is the has to be abound and the hash to be an education or going you've made this from my from right now, let me just lay this out. So that you can own the problem. So the future we can do this to happen. The best way. It's it makes perfect sense. I was told something not not too terribly long two years ago, which along the lines of. Align you could use such people all aid probably have to dress it up a little bit. Which is your lack of planning does not constitute my emergency. Right. And which is which is supposed in theory makes a lot of sense. But it sometimes falls by the wayside in practice. Due to fear of social repercussions, which we can get to in a second. I've had some awful experience. And I don't wanna turn this into a one hundred percent, Tim Ferriss therapy session. But just what people know those people out there who may be like. Oh, yeah. That Tim Ferriss? You never agreed to X or whatever it is..

Tim Ferriss one hundred percent two years