22 Burst results for "Tim Blanks"

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:53 min | 5 d ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Blow everyone. . This is Imran Ahmed founder CEO of the business of fashion and I am here with my friend and colleague Tim Blanks editor at large of the business of fashion, , and usually around this time of year timid I do a debrief on the fashion week has gone by and it's usually been informed by some of the chats the Timman I have. . In the back of a car shuttling from one show to another in in all of the fashion cities. . But this has been it goes without saying a fashion season that was very different but we wanted to continue our tradition and as it's been such a unique and unusual season maybe it's even more interesting to talk about the fashion season that's gone by so. . Cam Maybe, , we could just start with. . The decision that both you and I made not. . Any physical shows season in what what led you down that path because of course, , there were some things you could have gone to here in London but in the end that didn't transpire. . Well, , my husband Jeff is very high risk and we have been so extremely careful since March. . That it just seemed the sensible decision to extend vet caution and keep on extending it until we know there's not some kind of. . Remove as much as remove as many random elements as possible from alive I I feel. . Schizo being out of the House for all the months I found it <hes> so. . Wasn't even the novelty I just found. . The options that we would given. . If we wanted attending things in person, , we could zoom with design is we we could dive we can do deep dives into collections I ended up quite seduced by the virtual option I have to say. . Come on a room. . That's a surprise because you know at the early. . Onset pandemic, , we were talking about Sasha <unk> demonstrating graying potentially. . Some shows never happening again. . You know you're quite pro fashion meets Elliott. . and Pro fashion shows because fashion shows have been my exposure to fashioned for my entire time working in this industry and I was definitely on the side of. . You know that way of that way of encountering fashion, , but this has been an education in. . So many ways a pop aside from the fact, , I've actually you learned to use technology and in a way I never thought I would I would ever be able to. . It doesn't kind of. . Terrify me Oh bull made whatever. . You know the as so many people said, , and it didn't matter whether there were people like me who just sit and look at things or whether they will buy as you know people who have whose bread and butter is the touchy feely side of the industry seventy people were saying the. . The ability to go back and look at things and to have to think of something, , and then be able to go back and see whether it was what you were thinking of old. . To cross-references and to. . and to be entertained as well. . I think the difference this season as people really really got their virtual presence together. . You know we've had a couple of. . Dummy, runs , <hes> that went. . Wildly convincing. . And I think this time there was so much thoughts and creativity and ingenuity applied to new ways of doing business that <hes> anyways. . Bringing us to the world that that it was a very, , very different game I felt. . Yeah. . You also got to spend. . More time with the designers because. . So much more I. . Mean that was a mixed blessing in a way because normally it's three minutes backstage a few questions and he whiz off and do your review, , and now it was forty five minutes zooms and so you having proper it reminded me actually it's funny. . It reminded me of. . When I first started covering fashion and I would go backstage interview designers and and people weren't that many people doing it in those days when there was a handful of camera crews and and you would end up in these. . You know half hour forty, , five minute conversations in depth with you know it was a novelty for you to be told to. . It was a novelty for them to be talked to, , and you would get people. . You'd have these extraordinary conversations that would then be brutally truncated into like a thirty second sound by something for the for the broadcast. . Meanwhile, , the these conversations floating around in an archive somewhere at this, , this is in a funny way. . This is what it was like that. . You would be having quite you. . You'd be having talks with people and so when you went to write about the collection you when you're approaching collection a whole different level of insight I think you know it's so in a way, , it was more time consuming and even though I wasn't kind of car with you driving from place to place flying from city to city all of that. . It was more time can I was sitting in my room it was more time consuming and Matt sense that and more sought consuming and more and ultimately more rewarding in a funny way. . I guess.

Tim blanks Imran Ahmed CEO founder
Imran Amed and Tim Blanks on a Most Unusual Fashion Month

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:53 min | 5 d ago

Imran Amed and Tim Blanks on a Most Unusual Fashion Month

"Blow everyone. This is Imran Ahmed founder CEO of the business of fashion and I am here with my friend and colleague Tim Blanks editor at large of the business of fashion, and usually around this time of year timid I do a debrief on the fashion week has gone by and it's usually been informed by some of the chats the Timman I have. In the back of a car shuttling from one show to another in in all of the fashion cities. But this has been it goes without saying a fashion season that was very different but we wanted to continue our tradition and as it's been such a unique and unusual season maybe it's even more interesting to talk about the fashion season that's gone by so. Cam Maybe, we could just start with. The decision that both you and I made not. Any physical shows season in what what led you down that path because of course, there were some things you could have gone to here in London but in the end that didn't transpire. Well, my husband Jeff is very high risk and we have been so extremely careful since March. That it just seemed the sensible decision to extend vet caution and keep on extending it until we know there's not some kind of. Remove as much as remove as many random elements as possible from alive I I feel. Schizo being out of the House for all the months I found it so. Wasn't even the novelty I just found. The options that we would given. If we wanted attending things in person, we could zoom with design is we we could dive we can do deep dives into collections I ended up quite seduced by the virtual option I have to say. Come on a room. That's a surprise because you know at the early. Onset pandemic, we were talking about Sasha demonstrating graying potentially. Some shows never happening again. You know you're quite pro fashion meets Elliott. and Pro fashion shows because fashion shows have been my exposure to fashioned for my entire time working in this industry and I was definitely on the side of. You know that way of that way of encountering fashion, but this has been an education in. So many ways a pop aside from the fact, I've actually you learned to use technology and in a way I never thought I would I would ever be able to. It doesn't kind of. Terrify me Oh bull made whatever. You know the as so many people said, and it didn't matter whether there were people like me who just sit and look at things or whether they will buy as you know people who have whose bread and butter is the touchy feely side of the industry seventy people were saying the. The ability to go back and look at things and to have to think of something, and then be able to go back and see whether it was what you were thinking of old. To cross-references and to. and to be entertained as well. I think the difference this season as people really really got their virtual presence together. You know we've had a couple of. Dummy, runs that went. Wildly convincing. And I think this time there was so much thoughts and creativity and ingenuity applied to new ways of doing business that anyways. Bringing us to the world that that it was a very, very different game I felt. Yeah. You also got to spend. More time with the designers because. So much more I. Mean that was a mixed blessing in a way because normally it's three minutes backstage a few questions and he whiz off and do your review, and now it was forty five minutes zooms and so you having proper it reminded me actually it's funny. It reminded me of. When I first started covering fashion and I would go backstage interview designers and and people weren't that many people doing it in those days when there was a handful of camera crews and and you would end up in these. You know half hour forty, five minute conversations in depth with you know it was a novelty for you to be told to. It was a novelty for them to be talked to, and you would get people. You'd have these extraordinary conversations that would then be brutally truncated into like a thirty second sound by something for the for the broadcast. Meanwhile, the these conversations floating around in an archive somewhere at this, this is in a funny way. This is what it was like that. You would be having quite you. You'd be having talks with people and so when you went to write about the collection you when you're approaching collection a whole different level of insight I think you know it's so in a way, it was more time consuming and even though I wasn't kind of car with you driving from place to place flying from city to city all of that. It was more time can I was sitting in my room it was more time consuming and Matt sense that and more sought consuming and more and ultimately more rewarding in a funny way. I guess.

Imran Ahmed Tim Blanks Schizo London Sasha Editor Jeff Founder CEO Matt Elliott.
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

04:18 min | 5 d ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"To the podcast around this time of year, each season Tim blanks is sit down for a chat to recap the fashion season. That was it's a tradition that we wanted to continue again this year in this very unusual season even though neither of us have attended a physical fashion, show all season, but it was an interesting season for technological innovation and creativity. Here's Tim blanks inside passion. Blow everyone. This is Imran Ahmed founder CEO.

Tim blanks Imran Ahmed CEO founder
Michael Kors on Why He Left Fashion Week

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:59 min | 2 months ago

Michael Kors on Why He Left Fashion Week

"Hi this is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business fashion and welcome to the podcast. This week our editor at large sits down with the American designer Michael Kors discusses his plans for Fashion Week September in fact Michael Kors won't be doing a normal show at all like some of his counterparts in Europe including salary in Gucci Michael is questioning. The efficacy of the current fashion show drill calendar, and so he's decided to present in a completely new format launching globally on October fifteenth on the brands social and digital platforms. He talks to Tim blanks about all of this including the confusion around the nomenclature various seasons and how he wants to clean up to. Here's Tim blanks with Michael Kors inside fashioned. Hello everyone and welcome to the live today with told me to micro-costs from New York. Hello Michael Hello. Bear Ray to cedar great to see you and we are doing this instead of actually seeing each other in September. Yes. That's that's that's the God's honest truth. Unfortunately, what are you planning to do in September when we would have been seeing each other? Well I have to tell you long before. The pandemic. I really kept thinking to myself. I'm screeching in next year to my fortieth anniversary. So it. It has been time me to sort of reassess think about things and I and I just after forty years Tim I've seen that I really think the system has certainly been broken. We can't always just do things the way we've done them in the past. I fake. You, know everyone I think realizes that the whole systems mixed up doesn't make sense. So I certainly have my wheels turning about that prior to the band. And then of course, being in lockdown, you really start to analyze and I go back as someone who has been doing this for so long and once in a while back to the future is a good thing. And you know for many decades the New York collections were after the Paris collections ended. In fact, they were a week after Paris ended. And I think we never whenever inundated the consumer with too much information just as in September. Here, in the states, we have Labor Day, and it's you know the world opens up again hopefully, right? At why are we confusing the consumer? And the press with a new season when they haven't even absorbed the one that has just arrived in the shots. Adjusted it makes sense to me. And you know more than ever of course where people are they're not planning months and months ahead. You know we really are living in a time where fashion is very much always has been though it's about the emotion that you're in. So. Are you starting to land your wardrobe in May I? Don't think so I don't know who you are. You don't have a life. So I thought to myself. Well, we used to do this after Paris it allowed or journalists and retailers. And consumer to have a breath. And then. In October, it really became the perfect moment. To show a new collection without cutting off the previous collection that had just arrived shots.

Michael Kors Tim Blanks Gucci Michael Founder And Ceo Paris Michael Hello New York Imran Ahmed Europe Bear Ray Editor
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:29 min | 3 months ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"That that was the talk about the behind the scenes thing another thing that I was drawn by in an I've I consider myself pretty a pretty basic kind of listen, and as I I really like what should stuff being made, and you know dior couture. Had this film material Rooney Amazing Sewn Director. But he made the you know the mythic. This sort of mythic Re recreating myths with the deal could saw in very kind of white Very. Interesting. How why that was versus how're you know Joe men was inspired by black artists and Muse back models like the office, friends and family. and you'll was wide, quite blinding white. which is kind of A. Shock from this Directa. In and you know there was some controversy about that in regressive fury, said well. You know when you're inspired by Botticelli. You're looking at Botticelli's Czar Neil. Inspiration and Jewel has made the last couture collection last resort collection in Morocco was. An incredibly rich diverse on statement, and this just happened to be. A reflections I guess what they consider to be. The source material and people sit will help come. Nobody said anything about it and I was thinking afterwards. That material Baroni is such an amazing direct. I suppose Martin. Scorsese it made your collection so. The film Theo Collection I. Guess I don't Know How many people are gonNA. Say MASISCO Sese. You've taken meticulous track countless film and I don't know whether that we faced. A lot of people talked about it on on social media. I think maybe. The kind of mainstream fashion press didn't cover it in that way, but in terms of the conversation that was happening online. It certainly provoked to a response especially in light of. You know all the conversations that we're having inside passionate beyond. It's built. It felt distant that moment it's critically out of touch. But then the reason why I brought it up because the bit I liked in that film was actually the shots to be tally, because it was so beautifully filmed the sort of light through the motes of dust, ever in the women working because an end also in my when you see people selling, because it is such an extraordinarily met here it is. And in the same way that it's fascinating to watch film of Francis Bacon Painting. You know. Will a sculptor sculpting when you see actual hands and you seem. Botha fingers singer painting focus as he does. The that element I felt reminding people. That fashion is this very extreme evolved crossed. I thought was really good. I mean we're looking at fashion from from A. Looking at fashions from this. What this digital few weeks did was looking at session from a number of different angles I mean. I think Jonathan. Anderson did it better than anybody would. He made those boxes. He made a box zone out at boxx was..

Anderson Director Czar Neil A. Looking Baroni Scorsese Jewel Morocco Joe Francis Bacon Botha Jonathan Directa Martin
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:32 min | 3 months ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"In an actual show with the collection would be lovely to see the actual close in movements into feel has essentially whatever you got an amazing sense of the collection with. The film that Chris Cunningham edited. The footage that on Ombo Close Shaw Ghana. And in Jackie Nicholson mazing photographer May. I'm war. OPPRESSIONISTIC on. Film of the collection of most two of those two things together. You knew the clouds. You undestood the clouds you you got, you got. Attitude will sit up there. You've got the dream, but you've got the reality. I that was incredibly good on. The these these things that gave you a glimpse a Asandra Sartori on Friday doing his Zenya film For the hundred and tenth Zanu was planning to do a huge show physical show in Rivera where the ZANU meals were built under ten years ago and obviously that wasn't muscles. have he'd signed to show you something? You would never be able to see. See Otherwise which was? Three point three Columbia. Cat will which has to end up in the Guinness Book of Records Longest Cat will ever. It wasn't really it was A. It was a three point. Three kilometre trek that the models May. Combining digital and physical through the forest the ZANU. Forest actually is ZANU forest which is. Fabulous I wanted a wolf to. Jump out and grab a model as A. Or Dea to run through Sunday was apparently there. Lots of wools lex woods. And then I moved into the mill to the archives. Save the actual. The weaver, either looms an-and up on the roof where they. Ended with a little more traditional and will outrage scene and Alissandria was waiting for them to talk about the clothes. And all of this was a sort of I guess oil Santa Behind the scenes, but it was. They were wool so intelligence. You know and then, of course Gucci to the. Daddy of the mole with a kind of wool, holy twelve hour point the camera and see what happens. Man Sleeping for eight hours, implies state buildings or twelve hours. This was Gucci. The cameras pointed things happening were happening. WHO.

Gucci ZANU Ombo Close Shaw Ghana Chris Cunningham Jackie Nicholson Rivera Asandra Sartori Zanu Columbia Alissandria
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

08:05 min | 3 months ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Hi, this is Ron Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion and welcome to the podcast. Each season after fashion Mumbai. Sit Down with Tim planks, and we hash out what we've learned what we've observed and what we've taken away from the latest season, a fashion shows of course this season was completely different, but it was still worth having a catch up with Tim to explore. Fashion goes from here here's. Tim Blanks inside fashioned. Everybody a welcome to be oh ethel lives. I'm here with Tim blanks our editor at large, and you know usually around this time of year, Tim and I have spent. Several weeks on end in the back of a car. Navigating Fashion Week. And so we thought well. We can't do that this year, but <hes>. Tim, I've still been keeping in touch of course and <hes>. We usually record podcast conversation. Just reflecting on the fashion season that was <hes>, and so we thought well. There's still a lot to talk about so I asked him. To join me, welcome Tim. I am Ron. How're you doing good? Good I like your shirt. He said mutually good. I'm seeing. New, thing glamour. Lack Raw Glam rock. Okay Difference. I'm not capable of climate, but I am capable of Glam rock some. Well. Our conversation today is called where it is fashion. Go from here and I know it's something that's been. On your mind a lot, it's certainly been on my mind <hes>, but before we dive into that specifically you were I guess four months foreign a bit months into lockdown now or limited I, I sort of I date the transitional moment I came back from Paris on Much A. Figure that March the was the day that you could feel the storm, clouds had kind of well and truly Gabid of the fashion so I kind of date everything for much. The I think the last time that we saw anybody actually in our flat was March the seven nine. And said however many citizens. Zana's how how however long it is since we haven't seen anybody. <hes> and everything's being done like this kind of digitally signed the last time you and I saw each other in person was record our podcast for the end of that season and I. You know I don't know. I. Don't know if you remember what we talked about. It was obviously a very strange moment, and we didn't know what was about come, but one of the questions that we were grappling with. was whether we would all look back at that fashion week in and wonder if it was irresponsible for all of us to be sitting in a snuggled up next to each other at fashion, shows and dinners while this. Virus was spreading and what we know now tim is virus was spreading. It was readying actively in Italy and in France just as fashion week was going on so looking back now. What what do you think? I. I wasn't thinking irresponsible I mean there was. But because you know, we live Italy the the day we left Italy giorgione cancel the show. And Joe Digitally and there was a little bit of kind of. Huffing and puffing about that and Oh let's so dramatic whatever and I and then the airport in Milan at night was like. The fall of Saigon <hes>. It was just so crazy. Wasn't people trying to get out of the country? Where was people trying to get out of the county? No because they were panicking about virus necessary. Just it was a set. It was sense of. Some enormous. Ominous! Force? <hes> and then getting to Paris and finding that you know people were saying. Shall we shop wait? You'll have a show in nothing. Really the either a couple of shows cancel. was still you know I always competitive? This that whole moment in World War Two that was? One that was a sinkhole. The phony war before the war actually started. There was moment where everybody knew that was going to be a war, but it hadn't happened, so they were kind of. Suspended animation and that's kind of what it was. Td that this because. I don't think anybody knew it was gonNA. Be As bad as it turned out to be at coins. But still it was a solo. Remember I was in the I. Requirements often <unk> before his show. He said to me. You think this is the one. And <hes> I said well. Do you and I just didn't know that point, and and you know what the weird thing is. Allocating many months later, this March April may June five months later. We still don't know because I. Feel, the feel it. Still the the doctors who will leading out shaping our opinions on this I don't think. Completely show what it is at dinner would. It just it just feels you know when you read. Eddie meteorologists is so excited by this virus, because it is such a challenge and a multi focal. It's just this incredible. Opportunity to delve deep into something that human beings have never encountered before and inside the fashion industry has just kind. I'm concerned is still like everybody else is still not this dilemma. What's going to happen? But I think we do know that this is the one I mean. There may be others at come after this based on what I've been reading, but this pandemic is shaping up to be you know one of those. Collective experiences of complete. Change, yeah, an and I think it's at fifteen million cases now. You know hundreds of thousands of people at I mean I think it's as you said I. Don't think any of us knew back then. How bad it was going to be, but it's certainly. It's certainly shaping up to be much much worse than I think. Many of us expected I. Mean I think when I was talking to a couple of CEO's in this over closing. We thought we were closing our stores down for a couple of weeks. And then obviously that turned into months. And you know the all the talk about first-wave second-wave I am using the Spanish flu as a as a as a sort of. Precursor. You know the fact that the first wave was in the full in there was a summer at the second wave was in the following fool. Could Lord I mean. We have no idea of what we could be looking at in. Another four or five months so. <hes>. Yeah. It's A. It's being A. It's been a challenge I. Think Real, good huge challenge for the everybody on every level of every life almost everywhere in the world. And the nothing like that has ever happened.

Tim Blanks founder and CEO Ron Ahmed ethel Mumbai
Imran Amed and Tim Blanks on Where Fashion Goes From Here

The Business of Fashion Podcast

08:05 min | 3 months ago

Imran Amed and Tim Blanks on Where Fashion Goes From Here

"Hi, this is Ron Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion and welcome to the podcast. Each season after fashion Mumbai. Sit Down with Tim planks, and we hash out what we've learned what we've observed and what we've taken away from the latest season, a fashion shows of course this season was completely different, but it was still worth having a catch up with Tim to explore. Fashion goes from here here's. Tim Blanks inside fashioned. Everybody a welcome to be oh ethel lives. I'm here with Tim blanks our editor at large, and you know usually around this time of year, Tim and I have spent. Several weeks on end in the back of a car. Navigating Fashion Week. And so we thought well. We can't do that this year, but Tim, I've still been keeping in touch of course and We usually record podcast conversation. Just reflecting on the fashion season that was and so we thought well. There's still a lot to talk about so I asked him. To join me, welcome Tim. I am Ron. How're you doing good? Good I like your shirt. He said mutually good. I'm seeing. New, thing glamour. Lack Raw Glam rock. Okay Difference. I'm not capable of climate, but I am capable of Glam rock some. Well. Our conversation today is called where it is fashion. Go from here and I know it's something that's been. On your mind a lot, it's certainly been on my mind but before we dive into that specifically you were I guess four months foreign a bit months into lockdown now or limited I, I sort of I date the transitional moment I came back from Paris on Much A. Figure that March the was the day that you could feel the storm, clouds had kind of well and truly Gabid of the fashion so I kind of date everything for much. The I think the last time that we saw anybody actually in our flat was March the seven nine. And said however many citizens. Zana's how how however long it is since we haven't seen anybody. and everything's being done like this kind of digitally signed the last time you and I saw each other in person was record our podcast for the end of that season and I. You know I don't know. I. Don't know if you remember what we talked about. It was obviously a very strange moment, and we didn't know what was about come, but one of the questions that we were grappling with. was whether we would all look back at that fashion week in and wonder if it was irresponsible for all of us to be sitting in a snuggled up next to each other at fashion, shows and dinners while this. Virus was spreading and what we know now tim is virus was spreading. It was readying actively in Italy and in France just as fashion week was going on so looking back now. What what do you think? I. I wasn't thinking irresponsible I mean there was. But because you know, we live Italy the the day we left Italy giorgione cancel the show. And Joe Digitally and there was a little bit of kind of. Huffing and puffing about that and Oh let's so dramatic whatever and I and then the airport in Milan at night was like. The fall of Saigon It was just so crazy. Wasn't people trying to get out of the country? Where was people trying to get out of the county? No because they were panicking about virus necessary. Just it was a set. It was sense of. Some enormous. Ominous! Force? and then getting to Paris and finding that you know people were saying. Shall we shop wait? You'll have a show in nothing. Really the either a couple of shows cancel. was still you know I always competitive? This that whole moment in World War Two that was? One that was a sinkhole. The phony war before the war actually started. There was moment where everybody knew that was going to be a war, but it hadn't happened, so they were kind of. Suspended animation and that's kind of what it was. Td that this because. I don't think anybody knew it was gonNA. Be As bad as it turned out to be at coins. But still it was a solo. Remember I was in the I. Requirements often before his show. He said to me. You think this is the one. And I said well. Do you and I just didn't know that point, and and you know what the weird thing is. Allocating many months later, this March April may June five months later. We still don't know because I. Feel, the feel it. Still the the doctors who will leading out shaping our opinions on this I don't think. Completely show what it is at dinner would. It just it just feels you know when you read. Eddie meteorologists is so excited by this virus, because it is such a challenge and a multi focal. It's just this incredible. Opportunity to delve deep into something that human beings have never encountered before and inside the fashion industry has just kind. I'm concerned is still like everybody else is still not this dilemma. What's going to happen? But I think we do know that this is the one I mean. There may be others at come after this based on what I've been reading, but this pandemic is shaping up to be you know one of those. Collective experiences of complete. Change, yeah, an and I think it's at fifteen million cases now. You know hundreds of thousands of people at I mean I think it's as you said I. Don't think any of us knew back then. How bad it was going to be, but it's certainly. It's certainly shaping up to be much much worse than I think. Many of us expected I. Mean I think when I was talking to a couple of CEO's in this over closing. We thought we were closing our stores down for a couple of weeks. And then obviously that turned into months. And you know the all the talk about first-wave second-wave I am using the Spanish flu as a as a as a sort of. Precursor. You know the fact that the first wave was in the full in there was a summer at the second wave was in the following fool. Could Lord I mean. We have no idea of what we could be looking at in. Another four or five months so. Yeah. It's A. It's being A. It's been a challenge I. Think Real, good huge challenge for the everybody on every level of every life almost everywhere in the world. And the nothing like that has ever happened.

Tim Blanks Founder And Ceo Ron Ahmed Paris Italy Ethel Mumbai Saigon Milan Joe Digitally Editor Zana Eddie Meteorologists CEO France
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:01 min | 3 months ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"In. The momentum that change cannot be diverted cannot still it must roll on and I think fashion has to be part of that. What do you make of this digital fashion week? That's just happened. And how long do you think that has real legs? We've taken out of the actual physical experienced fashion show. With given this other, not physical human insight into why people do what they do and how they do. That by mood, then the finding. Shen. Hi, this is Ron Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion and welcome to the podcast. Each season after fashion Mumbai. Sit Down with Tim planks, and we hash out what we've learned what we've observed and what we've taken away from the latest season, a fashion shows of course this season was completely different, but it was still worth having a catch up with Tim to explore. Fashion goes from here here's. Tim Blanks inside fashioned. Everybody a welcome to be oh ethel lives. I'm here with.

Tim Blanks founder and CEO Ron Ahmed ethel Mumbai
Marc Jacobs: I Still Have Stories to Tell

The Business of Fashion Podcast

10:11 min | 5 months ago

Marc Jacobs: I Still Have Stories to Tell

"Mental Health Awareness Week and last week on Bureau F. Live our editor at large Tim. Blanks spoke to the celebrated American designer. Marc Jacobs who touched on a variety of topics from working through the krona virus crisis and maintaining his creativity but also on how the crisis is impacting his own mental health at this time of anxiety and stress for people around the world. Here's Mark Jacobs inside fashion. Hi Tam I'm such a pleasure to see it today. It's always a pleasure to see you. Tim and this will be out conversation for the next few seasons. I guess because we want you seeing each other in well who knows who knows where I am. I am in New York City in my hotel room in Soho Talking to you you've seen in a hotel rooms for the whole luck. Yes yes yes has that been. It's been let's let's put it this way. I'm grateful to be in a place where I'm comfortable. I'm going to start under the start on the. I'm going to start this chat on a positive note. So what have to keep going back to my mind is that I am grateful. I have my two dogs with me. I have clean made bed that I made this morning. I have what I need. I've got a closet full of clothes that I can play with. Have got a couple of makeup bags that I can play with. I have my iphone and my ipad which connect to other people with and I have the where I can sit outside and get some air so I am very grateful that I'm comfortable today and I feel like I'm taking care of and obviously you confidently connect with people. I'm finding. I'm actually connecting with people more than I usually do because quoting about connecting with now. But I have well. It's a strange thing. Isn't it connection? Because I never really I think of this as a type of connection and I we can use these devices of hours to connect with people in some superficial way or in some way that's different but I'm a luddite and I believe in live contact. I believe in note writing letter writing. I believe in seeing people across the dinner table or having a coffee with them I see. I don't see I didn't grow up with life on the screen and I didn't grow up with cell phone in my hand at or or night at or nih-funded whatever and I like live performance in live theater and I liked. I like going into shops. I like seeing people on streets so while this is some form of connection. It certainly. I don't have any kind of real connection to this form of connection. So but how how? How does this thing for you then? Well it's a kind of a kind of goes in waves and spurts. I mean they're I'm very sort of manic depressive. In a way I mean I am you know. My mental health goes from mania to depression. So there are days where I just feel extremely depressed and feel like it's the end of the world. And then your days were mannequin. I just think what a great opportunity for us all to learn collectively from this and move forward and then there's all the grays in between but I mean I tend to go from the basement to attic in five seconds. You know like In terms of emotions and so it's been very hard because I also not really in control of how you feel. You know the ceilings common. It's just a question of how I kind of accept them and and sort of you know honor them etc. So so I've had moments of feeling very productive and creative and moments feeling just like what's it all sore or is that all there is as I keep saying the south. You Camilla Louder. You have exactly. Isn't it funny? How life comes along to trip up those kind of those little notions and give them a sort of real time white. Will you see it's this? It's this computer right here. That fascinates me the most. And that's what I think is always this kind of amazing thing. I have this kind of faulty computer. Which is my brain and it's not faulty in the sense that it doesn't work but it just kind of works as it does right and so. I mean for absolutely no apparent reason. I could do everything I did yesterday. And Go to sleep on time and wake up on time and have my vitamins draped might juices for some reason the Sun could be shining and I can have the most miserable attitude about life and see things through the darkest leads and then I could stay up all night and and and not drink juices not my vitamins and like the sun isn't shining and I'm just like full of hope and you know like so who knows and then yes they're like these songs that comes my head in these things. I've seen in these performances. I know I don't know like books I've read and you know I don't. I'm not in charge of where the where where my brain sort of fires on a particular day but like it just doesn't it and it's like kind of fascinating as kind of goes through all of its little find sub dreaming a lot more. I have some very weird dreams but I've always had weird dreams that I've always been a bit of an insomniac because apparently that's a that's a huge side effect of this pandemic. Is People a happen. Incredible Dreaming Nkala at a lot about real people like either family members will celebrities or whatever but that they remember the dreams full of almost movie. And that's by to pick this. That people can depend up in the daytime and then the minds slowed us. I don't think that I'm dreaming more than I was before. And I think my dreams are kind of still of the crazy surreal content that they always work which combines a little bit of like the tape recorder you know things I've just recently heard but then then concocted into something that might have some other greater meaning but No I find my dreaming kind of the same. I guess you're making a movie while you yeah so via via recommended. I mean she. She had this idea. Unfortunately it was like four weeks in she was like. Oh you should have taped yourself every day. Like just videotaped yourself every day like you had this like you know daily journal like on tape like everything you did just like this endless documentary journal and I was like well if I had started it for weeks ago. It would have been great because we're already for weeks in if feels that will have to do something else. So so nick My friend my best friend and and someone I work with very closely you know at. Marc Jacobs He he and I came up. And we decided we'd do more of a fairy tale like this this kind of life in quarantine more of an louise or a you know like or a home alone or something like that right played all the characters who would normally be here at the hotel but or not like what kind of well everything from the porter to the manager to the chef in the restaurant to the housekeeping to the engineer to the different people who are residing in the hotel to the different things. I do in my room on different occasion to me documenting my set like just just just like I never any element of the other look creeping in. No just just just anything. I can do within the confines of this hotel. Your instagram is being incredibly vivid. The whole time that you've seen in Lucca. It seals almost like you are testing out characters in well. I'm not really I'm I'm kind of just you know I've always been this way. This is like this is nine year old mark who you always was in his bedroom. Escaping chaos of what life looked like you know like a very disturbed and dysfunctional childhood. And I went to my room and I sat with my clothes and I painted my jeans or embroidered. Jean Jacket and I put on my outfits. I comb my hair one way or the other and you know maybe I found a curler for my mother curled by whatever it was but that nine year old kid that me was like a in his own world in his bedroom and had to use his imagination to create a world. That was a happier place. And that's kind of what I'm doing I mean. I have two months worth of clothes that I packed to move in here. I'm I have a couple of bags of of makeup. That randomly for some reason felt were important to take with me and And then you know just and the dogs and Some hairclips jewelry and I'm just playing around and and keeping myself entertained and and doing what I do which I think is taking care of my mental health. I mean I have to get up everyday and shower and I have to Rome and I have to get dressed and I I just feel like not only do I have to do it for my sanity but like I enjoy doing it. So it gives me pleasure and it allows me to kind of be of service in some way. Because if I'm not well. In taking care of myself creatively and in every other way then. I'm of no use to anybody else. I mean I just can't lie an unmade bed all day long. It's the most pressing thing I've I mean. I used to see my mother who suffered from manic depression. She wouldn't get out of her bed sometimes for weeks and her bed was never made and the site of an unmade bed to be as just about the most horrifying thing. I can remember.

Marc Jacobs Mark Jacobs Manic Depression New York City TIM Blanks TAM Editor Soho Instagram Camilla Louder Lucca Jean Jacket Louise Engineer
2019s Pivotal Fashion Moments

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:33 min | 10 months ago

2019s Pivotal Fashion Moments

"I M I M Ryan. How're you doing good? It's the day after the election Friday the it's Friday the thirteenth. I'm sitting here with the inimitable. Tim Blanks were both about to get off on holiday but we thought thought it might be nice to end the year with one of our meandering conversations about what's important and interesting thing in fashion right now looking a little bit back at twenty nine thousand nine but really just thinking about. What's what's making an impact? But I do want the election I because because it kind of this cloud has been hanging over the UK for almost four years about waste. Is brexit going to happen or not and then it looks very likely to happen. What do you think the impact will be on our industry here on the people that you talk to create a people on well? I think the question is so what is it. Yeah you know after after the brakes done What's being done you know? What is it that I think? All those questions that existed three years ago is still waiting to be when my understanding is that on the thirty first of January or exiting the European Union and we have less than twelve months eleven months to come up with a trade okay deal with the EU the same kind of trade deal between the E. U and Canada took seven years. No she says a lot of questions about whether they're gonNa have time to actually negotiate the steel. I think the Irish prime minister said as much today and if the deal is not negotiated it doesn't know deal than there is a hard brexit So I actually think it's a lot clearer. What it is because it's it's unlikely they're gonNA come up with a deal? Oh but everything I read is is all about. Yes impossibility of coming up with the deal in that in that time frame and then will pretty well acquainted with what a no deal L. brexit would mean to the fashion industry in the UK. What it would mean to the fledgling businesses of designers and even Businesses at a better established than it. I think you'd think you'd you'd see an exodus. People would have to have to completely re conceptualize businesses the a couple of the designers. I understand London. Designers have been quietly evaluating what it might be like to move their businesses to Dublin not to Dublin but to Milan nearer to their some a lot of manufacturing Italy's they're worried about the supply chain Importing exporting complexities. I think there's also a talent question because they say they're gonNA move to the Australian points style system for like letting people into the country but it's already so hard to find people here as an entrepreneur work in the UK like it's hard to hire people and and you know the whole the whole in one of the stories of fashion over the last while is being as being the sort of borderless flow of talent on every level Now headdresses makeup artists. I mean designers assistance every at every level of the industry is this constant interchange and If you interrupt that flow well actually. What makes London a fashion capital is very different? From what makes these other fashion capitals fashion capitals. Paris is fashion capital because of history. Right right. Milan is a fashion capital. Because it's like right in. The heart of manufacturing Newark is a fashion capital. Because it's you know the most important city in the biggest country in the world. London is the fashion capital because of the talent. That's here and I think on a long-term basis if you this talent flow that has brought all these amazing people to London and made it this kind of incredible mix if we lose that what is already a somewhat somewhat fledgling fashion industry here in London which has primed itself in positioned itself as the home of creativity where all of the young on designers come from an indeed they do. They're in big houses around the world if we lose that then. What does London have left? Olenin what you have left. I guesses that back back to the wall Syndrome where when this kind of challenge London rises to the challenge. You know what we have left. What was it would be something different from what we have now? And who's to say that I think of nineteen seventy seven the way creativity thrives in in London the thrived in a in a very very difficult environment that has happened over and over and over again. which is something else which is argument? You know I've heard a lot of people make but I look back at London over. The last few years has been living in this. Create this kind of uncertainty in the post brexit referendum random period and. It doesn't necessarily feel like there's been any flourishing of creativity here since then. What's interesting when you think that designers like Mattie Boven have only known that situation they've only known this uncertainty it's completely new Mindset I think a which is which is foreign to somebody like me that you constantly book Oh can you constantly creating under this cloud On top of the other challenges that always face on designs. I think an interesting thing. That's come out of the sustainability debate is this idea of localization as opposed to globalization and you could see in localization in terms of watt. Everything is made and sold locally. Right now You could say that in in in the aftermath of UH of a stock brexit deal. No deal that that that might become actually this Leslau co-manufacturing seen gene blossoms because by necessity A people used to buy clothes made by somebody who lived down Rhode Before it was ready to wear I it's almost I suppose it's almost like that. It's almost like a couture sensibility Eddie. But some may be more doing manned that you. I'M YOU BUY CLOTHES AT A. I've been saying for ages in eight years that I could see. I could see time if we whether the rising sea levels in the unbreathable air in the raging FIS And so on and so forth where everything would go back to being dressed makers and Taylor's and a sort of feudal you know that credible article by Max read magazine about about this. This new feudalism and I could totally see that happening

London UK Milan Tim Blanks M Ryan European Union Rhode Newark Prime Minister Paris L. Brexit Mattie Boven Dublin Max Read Magazine Eddie Taylor Canada E. U
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Okay. Well on that slightly more serious note. Thank you. For your thoughts on autumn winter twenty nine thousand nine hundred I'm Imran Ahmed, founder and CEO of the business of fashion here with Tim blanks. Our editor at large we are saying farewell for this season. And for this week on inside fashion. Please tune in next week or more from us. If you enjoyed this conversation, please leave us a review on your favorite podcasting platform share with your friends. We are proud to tell you be OS podcasts have now received over two million downloads all around the world. So clearly, you are enjoying these conversations. Give us your feedback. Tell us what you want here about. We are here to vote the issues that you want to hear so with that little plug. I am signing off. Thank you. Thank you. If you enjoyed this conversation, you might be interested in B O F professional our global membership community from the business of fashion Buick, professional members receive unlimited access to all of our articles daily members only analysis, the Buick professional iphone app by annual print issues and all of our online education courses as part of your membership. For a limited time only, we are offering podcast listeners an exclusive discount on an annual of professional membership to get twenty five percent off of your first year. Click on the link in the episode notes select the annual package and enter the special invitation code podcast twenty nineteen at the checkout. We hope you enjoy it. And don't forget to tell your friends..

founder and CEO Imran Ahmed Buick Tim blanks editor twenty five percent
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"It's it's it's an illusion. It's interesting because for people who've been in the industry for really long time. I guess that might be the reaction. I saw some commentary on social media from a much younger generation who said that we were looking at it from a different vantage point, which is this is the beginning of the end of that generation, and it's making room for a new establishment like a new group of people to to kind of step in their shoes. I know what you're talking about. And the day that that person steps in cut Lago fill chanels day. I climbed onto my iceberg drift that into the ocean unable to be seen again. Okay. It was also this season of borsch wa and we saw this, you know, throughout the season. Probably most was it really the season of the bourgeoisie. It wasn't just the season. Everybody talked about the idea because it's not exactly like you'd think people talked about it. Because had he slim on put it on the run became a topic. And then everyone said, oh, it's the season. Joie everyone is Suming that that let what he does what he does. Press it presages a shift in sensibility in fashion as as it has in the past. It did seem like several other shows I think Dan is being exploring this idea Balenciaga for awhile. The he's talked about the bourgeoisie. A lot. I thought the collection was a fabulous collection. And. You could say that what Zhong an end Judas to two of being joing at ABC is a Bush wa from day one. Now, celebrating a certain kind of French dress that that is embodies that sort of you know, that that ethos. I'm Eddie Sluman. Did it did it? I didn't see the show, but did it with enormous scale and conviction and and a single dime. Exactly. As he does. There was no deviation. There was no theme in variation. It was you know, hitting the point home over and over again with a certain look, but as someone pointed out to me, it was less about the whole look was more about the bags and the outerwear. And that's what some people say is really going to sell. What do you think? I will isn't that. What people always say, no. I don't think they necessarily talk about outer where all the time bags, of course, was saline before a clothing business. Amani one thing people voice it about George Romani as the scale of that. It's unique in the scale of that businesses, basically, everything not not accessories wasn't ceiling. Liz, very accessories. Every business B's era was definitely an accessory is focused business. But I think what people were talking about was taking the model from salary where outerwear was a big driver of the businesses. Well. It just so happens that this outerwear is was more in a a different different aesthetic than that kind of rocker chic look that he became known as Lawrence sing. Interesting speculative moment because obviously a comment we heard from a lot of people was that. Oh, I wonder have to buy the close was my mother has Molineaux cub in the closet now that was old women saying that because obviously younger women would have wouldn't necessarily have mothers who will wearing let's that style of saving clothing from the original. I'm sailing moment. I just wanted. That was interesting for me that that would that look novel too young two young women. It looked a definitely look familiar to older women would the novelty appeal to the two young women and with the familiarity appeal to older women, it's kind of an interesting. Is I don't even think it was about the novelty of the look I think it was about catching everyone by surprise..

Eddie Sluman borsch wa Dan Amani Zhong ABC Liz George Romani Lawrence Judas
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"He's lab not not that. I think he would ever admit that. But sort of had that feeling. Fendi was a it was a beautiful show. And his presence was quite strong in that. There were elements of his dress incorporated into the clothing. Now. The the big the big thing, of course was set. I mean, Michelle Goldberg whose his musical collaborate ahead. Ref- reconfigured the Fendi soundtrack. So it was caused favorite song zeros and and ended with heroes David Bowie, which apparently is his was his favorite song. Which actually surprised me? I don't know why imagined it would be something by Marla or what is something. More more classical. Babs. But the the the soundtrack profanity was these the mix of songs was was quite buoyant wasn't remotely said am and then for Chanel Michelle used Philip clause, which of course, is soaring, and spiritual and kind of celestial and then ending in heroes again. And at the end of the Fendi show that were we're lot of tears backstage to a lot of tears. I'm I had a lovely conversation with Sylvia, and it was to see how much he was just ingrained in people's lives at Fendi there for six it's it's basically, it's your beloved grandfather dying, you know, and and and the patriarch and also at talion emotional. That was a joke about how you know front. Power Sloan w will be crying the end of the shown Paris for the French, the French don't cry. But but and then obviously, the Chanel show was huge. I mean, it was another great big rebuilding. An alpine village in inside the Grand Palais with smoke coming from the chimneys of the shallow in the snow deepen Crispin even on the ground. Not that. We'd synthetics now either it was quite nice fakes now. And then stick to your shoes. It didn't make me feel sort of asthmatic. Exactly. I'm and then at the end, and then again, a very superstrong show, which reminded me of those wonderful shows in the eighties celebrated the sort of bigness of Chanel, and the and the super model unless of Chanel, and the girls cannot heroes was playing in everybody stood up and just clapped and clapped. And Clint and waited and wasted. An is almost like they were waiting for him. It was like we haven't was craning their neck, and this is what we stayed in the area fresh leave. Yeah, they just stood in Clapton Clapton Klatt, and I found that. With heroes. I could almost cry. Now thinking about it. I found that very very emotional because that was probably the first time it really hit me because we didn't always see him at Fandy. I mean he'd come out in the distance. We didn't always talked to Mike was but we always talked to him after Chanel. That's it really hit me that we won't be going back stage to talk to him ever again. I'll never have compensation two hundred and fifty one with Kellogg the same way. Yeah. I think I realized in that moment that that you know, we'd had that opportunity, and it was was never going to happen again. And I was starting to think back to our last conversation with him. And we we didn't get to talk to him in January because he didn't come to the show. So it was way back in October. At the Lachapelle show. So yeah, that was that was really sad. I think also the finalists of that at the end of the Chanel show the final because that was it. You know, the this a it's there's no way that he's going to rise on the seventh day emerge from the shallow dole rolled back. The stone on the shell adore. The the finality of makes you reflect on your own finality. And I think you could see for you could see for a lot of people being in the industry for a long time that that was. You know, suddenly, the permanent said that that that we feel the permanent depend minutes that we feel we thrive on in some weird way. Suddenly. Selected the same as the lives in every other part of the world..

Chanel Chanel Michelle Fendi Mike David Bowie Clint Michelle Goldberg Clapton Clapton Klatt Grand Palais Paris Marla Sylvia Lachapelle dole Kellogg Crispin Fandy
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion and this week on the Buick podcast. We look back at the fashion season. That was I talked to Tim blanks are editor large about saying farewell to Karl Lagerfeld at Chanel and Fendi where there were emotional Oman shes to one of the greatest fashion designers that ever was. We also discussed the explosive second collection from sleep man who moved to abortion while look at selene, and we talk about the cultural impact and fashions reflection on social issues that were being discussed in and around fashion week. So here's Tim blanks. Inside passion. Tim blanks. You just poured an entire well. He's an Espresso shot into the glass, a double Espresso shot into a glass of water cold water. Why did you do that? It's my make Colo. Anyway, I guess you needed after the fashion month gone by all that coffee. You set it. I was the season. It was it was it consolidated everything we've been saying about fashion for the last little while always lead to Paris. But this is curious situation there that the fish of the days at nine thirty in the morning. The law shows at nine thirty at night. In on a on a few days felt like it was nice city at night, anyway, which which makes a very very long days quite tiring. Because it feels that there is so much more in Paris than look fresh as a daisy. Thank you. That's one does modern science. My homemaker cola. You know, we we had quite a. Quite a season. There was a lot that happened off the runways as well with the passing of Karl Lagerfeld. The regular racism scandals that were you know, erupting in different places. But let's start with the shows and talk about some of these kind of deeper issues bit later, I missed the comedy also show 'cause I had to record a podcast 'cause I'm so dedicated to our podcast, but it was your top show of the season. Talk to me about mass show. You know, that you said it was devastating. I thought it was I thought it was overwhelming. I thought that. Raica will right Kawakubo used to regularly nail the site guys. I guess you'd call it. And I feel that I feel that her interests kind of went elsewhere when she's to that stretch of shows where she was was she wasn't really doing close to as she had other things on mind. And then she reengaged with that process. According to an interview I read with ho Susannah Frankel last season and the season was back that will not back Ford to. A presentation that just seemed to really put us right where we are right now under the under the luring cloud of climate change and in a world of increasing conflict in division. And she did it by I felt she did it with with by using these sort of emblems of very high society of their very civilized society. You know, the dress codes of of the icing centuries in Pontiac as in and and we'll list sort of Lasorda of silhouette ideas, you associate with with court dress almost and then using these incredible industrial fabric site will rub. Oh, and and play with her and so on but making these beautiful beautiful shape set look like to me like that being drowned in an oil spill and then. The was the whole staging of the show is much more car graph than a shows. Usually are there was a big open space a squarespace actually of that narrow runway that so small, and usually I mean for years everybody was on the same level, and this was very tightly ID and very very enclosed at felt like a, you know, one of those courts at the minds used to play kinda pro baseball with the heads of their enemies, it felt really closed in like that really intense..

Tim blanks Karl Lagerfeld Paris Imran Ahmed founder and CEO Oman Raica Fendi Lasorda Susannah Frankel editor Pontiac baseball Ford Kawakubo
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:03 min | 2 years ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"The excluding accessories, it was. It was like this fabulous candy colored dream, you know. And it was such a weird thing to see it. I mean, the models will wearing like Jason voorhees mosques like Friday, the thirteenth, mosques, but done in sort of kind of like one was melting ice cream. Cone. So imagine the good humor man and Jason voorhees having a sort of juke out at the holiday camp, Jason killed all the teenagers and this this weird combination Makarov combination of. Light and heavy and it just. Yeah, and and I'm sure. I mean, he's he's, he's just it just was a very, very badly misjudged moment and he was taken to task for it. I mean there. The talking what I said before about being a season where more than ever women's issues were to the fore and books of me too, and times out and and a sense set that certain things have been going on for too long and need to be needs to be a reckoning. And so on. That. That will. Completely lost my train derailed. That's okay. I've one last question because we haven't talked much about young designers. I mean, London used to be seen as the hot spot for young creativity fashion, something that the city has owned for to better part of a decade or longer. What would young designers made a Mark for you? This season anywhere anywhere anyway. Will it sort of begins in London always for me, and I saw. The Mattie Boven show, and I know that he's he's kind of the anointed is the protege of k. grand. I think everybody's the annoying. You know, there's always, there's always that. Untrammelled creativity. There's always the guy who stands for no limits. And you know, komo's be damned like last season was incredible. Stephen Jones hats with the with the balloons in the nets. It was. It had that it was joyous, you know, actually, that's what I really really responded to. I found I found the joy, joyous collections were the ones that would which of course is reflective of the world at large. You want uplift. And they were the, it was a collection with so it so. Energized and colorful. It's actually was quite. Colorful season. And I would say we're talking about young designers, but Maddy Boven was somebody who I think you know what, Charles Jeffrey who shows during the men's, and I think they're good counterpoint. Think this threat of London that will never die. The three that feeds London and will sit at feeds the whole world of fashion. What about marine Seren shack? Muc- both showed early in para. Yeah. And who was sort of the new face of French fashion. Marine comes out of the vet mall philosophy of very, very committed to up cycling and she were down now? Yes, she did. She did very, very, very committed to making fashion relevant relevant relevance is as I was saying to you before, and we've being through the period of. Disruption, and then we went through the period of authenticity where everything was disruptive or Zantac and now I think the would that more and more I hear is relevance. Of course, it's such a challenge. Well, it it means that I suppose in in the age of me to its relevance is is this combination of appropriate and. An. I would say. Uplifting. Timeliness obviously is, is, is critical. I think opinion is really, really important. But I think relevance to me is not just. Pointing out the problem. It's indicating a possible solution also feels like those designers who continue to design in a little separated from what's going on in the world seem increasingly out of step, you know. So for Tom Brown, for example, to decide to stage a show the way he states shown regardless on how beautiful and well constructed and created those clothes were well-conceived those who are they didn't have. It wasn't well received because it wasn't relevant for well, we'll experience that was. It was interesting because I could almost contradict myself here, but rob Robin Gazon. Right? A very good piece in the Washington Post about the Alexander McQueen show where, again, gang that said thing where you just you just transported by the beauty and the work and the detail and and Sarah Burton had the most amazing. Beautiful back story of the collection. Now Rodman just says, who's going to wear those clothes? What's the relevance of them? And to me, I mean, I found that show just so gorgeous and it's true..

Jason voorhees London Mattie Boven Maddy Boven Tom Brown Rodman Seren shack Stephen Jones Washington Post komo Alexander McQueen Sarah Burton Charles Jeffrey rob Robin Gazon
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"You're walking, you're not dodging stinky puddles of water and this feeling like you need a shower every ten minutes. And it was funny because there was so much in Paris. They're always quantity wise, but. The quality, the range of. The range of. Work that you see there from new people to will, from marine says to Chanel from most of the most savage house to people who've desist second season, just the craft and the the execution and the breadth of vision is is incredible. And then there's a funny up the something else. Funny that happened, I thought was. I don't know how this this is the old habits. Everybody do the same thing at the same time in fashion story, but it's it's a sort of variant invent dress, did one of his bishops ever that shows beautiful and you just think, wow, you know, you think where he's been for the last few seasons, very good, very consistent, but suddenly it's I, he's like a new lease on life. Just maybe he's not worried about money anymore business. Well, the business was acquired. Yeah, and this is the first season since that aquisition where he, he said it made no difference at all. Really. You probably know. I think I, I think it did. I think maybe you know secure, but it was more than that. It was just what that collection was composed of it. The the sort of the. The kind of pragmatic glamour, you know, making these beautiful silhouettes. He's almost mature silhouettes out of humble fabrics, which felt like a film meaningful. You know, in a way to exalt the ordinary, to find the extraordinary in the ordinary this, it's something designers have been talking about for longtime, but you not for a long time, but for a few seasons, at least everybody looking for the extraordinary in the ordinary. But I don't think we've seen it so perfectly expressed as we didn't collection. Speaking of a lifting moments and amazing show put my glasses about one of the the first time I've ever seen you stand up at a fashion show was at the end of Pierpaolo Valentino show this season you Jenner was because I couldn't see. No, no, I still I still have stood up before. Four three times I don't remember or I wasn't there that show why this season. You know, this is he's coming off two of the most brilliant couture Shas. This show was different from it, didn't. It didn't take cues from what had done cure. It was a different statement based on the same things. He Pierpaolo petrole doesn't want to be exclusive. He. He said, I am against the notion of escape, which is which is interesting because then he makes clothes. They have this transporting extravagance. I mean, the silhouettes were just so gorgeous and they took you somewhere else. Maybe maybe another time or place or maybe I could could be the future. I mean, the craft is extraordinary again, the same thing like the fabrics and so on. He's he's making a statement that that about making a statement with humility and this very extravagant notion at the same time, and I found the the show. Oh, was so exquisite? I, you know. To do to those dresses embroidered and beat addresses and with is like six or seven types of fabric velvet and cotton and linen and and and sat in all kind of collage together seamlessly. You just just sitting there looking at these things and you have a hell. Do they do that? But on a on a dress as simple as a t shirt. And then of course. The cost about thirty four thousand times more than a t shirt, but it it was just, you know, it was it kind of, I think when a Duta cashew is the most incredible new model. I was been on ski about the model. Incredible. You model when she came out in that dress at the end of it. Owed. You just felt like you had to stand. Let's talk about. Do you skipped ahead to one of my questions. What is it about? Doot has got the whole industry. Just she closed Chanel, she close Valentino, she's she's going to be the next. We should say that you can't say other concept and we have some confidential information catch there. But what, what? What's going on with that? Dude? Why has everyone. Do you know it? It's it's. It was the season of of the black model. I mean, diversity obviously is is being this has been a. A touch..

Pierpaolo petrole Pierpaolo Valentino Chanel Jenner Paris Doot ten minutes
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"I think certainly that was the single most talked about moment in the nonsense season. The mother moment that people were really looking forward to was Burberry men. I'm curious to hear your point of view on the impact that Ricardo may with his first show. I. I didn't know what to I really didn't know what to expect. I guess I was guardedly optimistic because I thought that viral campaign with the new monogrammed. A new monogram was very funny. I thought it was very smart and it was it was global and the head sort of funny wit wit to it. So I guess I was God the optimist about the show. I think it was very much a throw everything against the wall and see what sticks. Kind of show me. They're one hundred and thirty something looks. There was too much. It was way way too much by the time. The handful of black evening dresses appeared at the end. They just seem seemed like such an afterthought. He kind of wondered why they even there and then thinking about what will recover to bring to Burberry. It was such it was. It was such a kind of odd fit. I'm I mean. It seemed like an odd fit you, but you couldn't imagine them throwing the baby out with the bath water. So I think the first forty two looks will like Ricardo tissue show. The next the next section which was street wear and also Ricardo's expertise in things like switch some t shirts. And so I sort of funky appeal. So that was sort of knock quite high low. But you know there was a sort of bit of a dialogue going on there. Lost me. The first thing was that was a sort of different take on Burberry was was quite had that sort of weird retarded tissue Russia's system. And I don't think there's ever been. There was ever a time under Christopher Bailey where people Say, Bory was erotic. Now. Which which seem quite promising. I'm that's always interesting direction to explore it. I don't know. I gain the, we'll see what happens when it hits stores, but there is, you know, these people knew have. Really, really loyal constituencies, like Ricardo, like Eddie. Like just, you know, the sort of. Follow his. Majors, they'll show it depends how many of them are. Yeah, and and also where they in the devotion because you have a favorite rook style. We'll say Repub stuff you have pop set on. He's he or she is not your favorite pop stuff forever. On Burberry just for another minute. You're one of the things that I think burglary is trying to own this idea of being the British luxury brand. So Marco, go Batty. The CEO has made it very clear that he wants to take the business market bit higher end than it was before..

Burberry Ricardo Eddie Bory Marco Christopher Bailey burglary CEO Batty Russia
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"He, he stood on the sidelines and watched that label go from strength to strength more or less using the blueprint that he created. And I guess I was disappointed that he felt the need to come back to the business and more or less more or less redo that as if he's saying this was mine and Rick to reclaim it. I mean, I guess it just felt. You know, I love an obsessive as much as an ex person does, but I, I just felt that. Maybe the felt like settling scores in a way, but I, I really thought that there would be something. I suppose richer because he's older and he's fifty now. Yeah, and he's. To see him still locked in to that moment in his adolescence, when those people, those boys and girls made such a huge impact on him. Somebody did point out to me very interesting thing that there was an actual magazine. There was a cover story. I'm Lee liberal. I was some that it was a cover story about kind of like bright young things, I suppose, but an how this it's attached itself to his psyche as a manifesto for the rest of time. And he I find, say with ref Simmons when when when you look at a designer who is really, really mesmerized by a moment in time and a place, you know, and, and this just grips them, you see that an all refs work. You see it in his work. You see it in his work for Calvin Klein is sort and his worked for Joel Sanderson. No, not much that there, but. Eddie is coming from the same place. This ideal, this sort of dream and this obsessive effort to recreate the dream. I guess as somebody gets older and hopefully wise, I would like to see how that dream evolved. I mean, the one thing that became very clear to me was essentially, you know, because he is so true or fixated or obsessed with this particular, maybe it was that cover number. It was that has created this. Create a vision in his head is become through that. That's the only thing he does. Well, is he did the same thing at your? Yeah. And he did it at center, didn't it sound but think about it? Think about at Saleen. He's not this. He has an absolutely blank slate before he had. He had deal. He had a blank slate deal sort of, but Santa Rosa, which was really his triumph. He. Always always was very careful to bring the central legacy and to what he did. He would point to something he had done and say, this is an echo walled, whatever the the, the the, the scandalous collection from the early seventies or the. The, they'd be something there that would echo Osama wrong moment because he worked with Mr. song. Yeah. Yeah. He has such a long. Yeah, history with that. Absolutely. But here this is this is used as unedited. Eddie. And so I think it's, it's very interesting like you say that he is. He just goes back to that archetype. And you know, of course, everybody after was saying, well, it's going to be a commercial smash, and you know the numbers speak for themselves in all the people like me who got on there. I got on their covered wagons and lumbered into town with the kind of dinosaurs opinion of what he's trying to do. Will will be left looking as obsolete as he probably imagines we will about. I'm curious about that because you know what good cheese proved is that there is an appetite for a sort of humanist imaginative. An as sort of exercise and just complete and utter liberation. Liberation of the soul l. asandra mckelway is like a shame. And in that respect, he leads his followers to this glorious promised land of Gucci. I don't get liberation from Eddie stuff. I get restriction. I get a sort of uniformity. But that may be appealing to certain people. I'm sure would it short will be born up what I'm saying that the world has changed since a was appealing and a wonder. If you know, I wonder if more people are clued into a sort of. If you look at what the youngest winners, we were seeing through the course of the month, especially in New York where I mean, I thought that was green, shoots real grounds for optimism there. They are very much that almost like hippies. And Eddie is definitely hippy, right? Well, it remains to be seen..

Eddie Rick Osama Saleen New York Simmons Santa Rosa Calvin Klein Joel Sanderson
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Mistreat and watch you just in the back of the car, actually, any way to selene happened later that day or the next day, I think. And that was probably the most anticipated show of the season. White is strongly opinionated. Review. Do you want to talk a little bit about how you interpreted that show and give it a little bit more insight into why you took the position that you took? Well, I, you know, I wasn't. I wasn't lambasting. I wasn't taking. I wasn't taking a strongly negative position because I couldn't. I can't believe what the done to say. Lean Phoebe had already quit when they hide Eddie. So it's not like she was replaced by Eddie. It's not like his. Everything she was was forcibly drummed out of town. My my feeling more was that I just expected some much more. But you know, it's it's really interesting when fashion is a very, very odd these. And when we were talking to Karl Lagerfeld the other day, and he said, you just can't leave for two years and expect to come back and everything's just the same as it was. I mean, in the two years that Eddie has not been involved in the industry Gucci happened and that was that was an absolute. That was a watershed that was a, I mean, everything changed after that Balenciaga happened. I mean, damn was solu- happened fashioned, found new leaders and new a new opinion formers. And I think. Also in that time, the center all the label that Eddie made his own so brilliantly, you felt about what he actually did the whole strategy and the and the whole creation of that entity was incredible. I mean, he's a Mazda impresario just incredible and credible entrepreneurial individual..

Eddie Phoebe Karl Lagerfeld White two years
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Inside fashion. I'm here with our esteemed editor at large, Tim blanks. And today we will be taking a deep dive into the fashion season that has just concluded last night in Paris every season, Tim. And is it in the back of a car and all of these fashion capitals. And we have a Chit chat about everything that's going on at the shows would also what's going on in the world. And we just thought it might be nice to have that conversation here and recap the season. That was all of you. We've got lots to discuss. I'm happy to turn it over and start with Tim, Tim. It's been a very intense season. It's been a season with a lot of conversations around the fashioned system. However, it's also been a season with very uneven fashion. So did you want to just give us what? How have you been thinking about this season? One, one thing that you and I talked about in the back of the car was this idea of escape and engagement and the shows kind of escape escape this a singer. Yeah. And how the shows kind of divided into two camps. Well, the division wasn't wasn't that acute, but I do think that. The world is the world is so extraordinary right now that that everyone is being compelled to take a position on on all the questions that are being honest. The things that are happening in politics and in society and fashions different from any other creative area where people. Choosen to to go for these sort of. The uplift of escape or to try and say something more meaningful. I think what what has been so interesting about this season? It is a women's with season, but. People have really been talking about women the season. I mean, really the issues that are confronting women and particularly women and. I mean. It's it's a, it was. It was. It was such. It was very intense month. You're right, but that particular moment in Paris that coincided with the supreme court hearings that those particular today's would just so. Interesting that I mean, so. It was just this. Extraordinary coincidence of current affairs and fashion affairs, which I can't. I can't remember anything like, well, no, I think obviously you have. You have events like nine eleven, which which impacted enormously on the industry. But I can't remember a time when. The were. There were political discussions. People people not people not being scared to not not invading issues, but actually confronting them. And I think I think what's very promising about this is I feel it will intensify over the next few years. Do you think that this was the intention of those designers to to kind of put these issues to the forefront, or was it just a coincidence that you know these Cavanaugh hearings happened in Paris, and then everyone kind of interpreted those shows through the lens of what they were witnessing happening? Well, was a coincidence. I mean, I'm Rick Owens this show, I think was one that really struck a chord with people because his staging head had three or four women black black models walking with burning torches and in the middle. Of the in the middle of his, his show space. There was a wooden tower which was set which was set afire and burned, and the tower representing. Authority and the show was called babble as in the tower of Babel. But I think the the tower represented the sort of solid stolid implacable patriarchy. Well, because that's what that's the spin that everybody Brian it, of course, instantly was that it represented the patriarchy now regards is never been that over in the past. But I think I think. Being an American in Paris and observing what's haven't been happening in this country. I think he he feels he feels compelled like I said to take a position, but it was so graphic to have these women his his women dress like dress like priestesses and dress like this is always an enormous quite eerie spiritual component and what he does, but to see that happening as Washington was was in metaphorically flames, figurative flames. I'm literally watching that hearing on mobile phones out God. Yes, I, I stopped..

Paris Tim blanks Rick Owens Brian editor Cavanaugh Washington
"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"tim blanks" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Hi i'm imron ahmed founder and ceo of the business of fashion and welcome to the b o f podcast cultural appropriation has become one of the most important hotbutton topics of two thousand seventeen in the fashion in history so we wanted to make sure we addressed it and we were really lucky to have dapper dan the legendary designer from harlem leyla petar of platform thirteen and tim blanks b o fs own cultural expert aficionado speak about this issue of cultural appropriation and to understand where it crosses the line between cultural exchange and cultural appropriation so here's tim blanks dapper dan and leyla tar at boise's two thousand seventeen voices is the most stimulating gathering of fashion industry leaders on the planet what makes boyce's different is that we mix our industry with fascinating people from other sectors from the worlds of economics activism health and wellness madison film philanthropy technology media and so many more fashion doesn't live in a bubble and nor should it this is one of the sessions from our two thousand seventeen gathering so if you like this talk please do save the date and look out for more information on business of fashion dot com forward slash voices for all the details just a quick known this conversation has recorded live in front of an audience so please excuse any audio issues and i'm really glad to be talking about this issue with two experts because it is a very very thorny one i think but you'll story dan you honesty couldn't make it up it's it's like a i i hope it's being made into a movie at some point your relationship with the great fashion houses how howitt's evolve devolved evolved to gang is is incredible i think right now the issue that there are people who come back up there at the accusation of cultural appropriation.

founder and ceo leyla tar boise boyce howitt imron ahmed harlem dan madison forward slash