15 Burst results for "Tierra Del Fuego"

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

05:16 min | Last week

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"It's like the more that they try to regulate this, the more, in my opinion, innovation is heading out, right? They're going to Singapore. They're going to Gibraltar or they came in islands or whatever. Like, what can we do as Americans in America to ensure that all that innovation doesn't leave us as they're putting in all these regulations? Listen. I think there's a fucked up perspective. Innovation doesn't leave us. Who the fuck are we? We have a distributed world that we are trying to get behind to make not people in America, nor people in China or Australia, nor Tierra del Fuego, not to make them powerful and owners, but to give up that shit. Why don't you go back to The Beatles and listen to John Lennon's imagine one more fucking time? Imagine there's no country. It's easy if you try. Imagine there's just people living day to day.

Gibraltar Singapore America Tierra del Fuego China Australia John Lennon
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

01:46 min | 4 months ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"In Beijing for the monitor. Next up. First person sense of history and a window on how leaders define freedom and build relationships from our reporter who has attended many of these summits over nearly three decades Howard la franke writes, I have attended 6 of the past 8 summits of the Americas. The 9th is being hosted by president Joe Biden in Los Angeles this week. And at some point, I concluded that the summit's peaked early, perhaps even at the inaugural gathering in Miami in 1994. Miami had crackled with anticipation for where the summit process could take the hemisphere. President Bill Clinton led the proceedings, which touted a free trade area from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. Inaugural post summit, stories headline, task for America's leaders, keep spirit of Miami summit alive. But with only a few exceptions, that task went unfulfilled. When the Trump administration, which revived talk of the Monroe doctrine, sent vice president Mike Pence to Lima in 2018, his reception was frosty. Attending the LA summit is Chile's young socialist president, Gabrielle borich. He plans to let President Biden know that the exclusion of Cuba, Venezuela, and Nicaragua over their lack of democracy and poor human rights records was a mistake. One measure of the summit's ultimate success may be whether mister Biden manages to hit it off with any of the hemispheres leaders. I will be watching in particular for any signs of rapport between mister Biden and mister borage. This first person account was written by Howard la franke in.

Howard la franke president Joe Biden Miami Trump administration Beijing Americas Tierra del Fuego President Bill Clinton Gabrielle borich President Biden Los Angeles Mike Pence Alaska mister Biden Lima America Chile Nicaragua Venezuela Cuba
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

07:13 min | 5 months ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Around you, and you don't have to go to Tierra del Fuego to experience that. I want to get more into what the sublime is actually. So I honestly, it's a word that I never really thought of. I feel like I have an intuitive understanding that it's something sort of surprising and wonderful, but with not sort of big. Amplitudes the wrong word, but there's something relaxed about it. Like a warm bath is sublime. But this idea of it being a threshold, something that you're seeing beyond into something new. That's a new take on it for me, which is far more interesting. Well, it's the sublime is not a warm bath quite the opposite. It's a mix of pleasure and pain. It's a mix of two opposing emotions, a sense of fear and a sense of awe, almost consecutively or at the same time. Right. So if you go to see a horror movie or you're on a roller coaster, the excitement comes from the fact that you feel kind of at risk that there's sort of danger there, but you're safe, right? So you're feeling two things at the same time, kind of anxiety and kind of about the pleasure that you're actually not being threatened. So neuroscientists have shown that the mixing of two sort of contrary emotions creates an incredible intensity of affect much more than just a single emotion. So the quintessential experience of the sublime when it was first written about in the 18th century was climbing the Alps, the Matterhorn, or wherever it was, right? And you got a sense of how small you were, how, you know, you could die very easily if there's an avalanche and how fragile you were in the face of this immensity, and yet the awesomeness of it, the beauty of it, was overwhelming. And so they were fascinated with this idea of being able to feel these two contrary emotions at the same time. So it's not at all a warm bath. I can only the sublime is an experience. It's hard to it's something hard to put into words. So Robert's trying to write a book about it. I know, believe me, I know. But let me give you an idea. Give me one example of something that is so insanely sublime that you can't ever think the same about the world after you contemplate this. Okay? So here you and I are sitting here talking in this incredibly high-tech, amazing house, with all the insane technology around us. All right, consider this. Our planet's some 4 billion years old. Around 3.1 billion years in some little bit of pond, some kind of organic life began we don't know how or why or what triggered all those scientists are getting closer. Some form of single celled bacteria, self created itself, out of chemicals, it came from other planets, right? Carbon, et cetera. Okay? This single celled bacteria dominated the planet for billions of years. It was the only form of life, right? Okay. And then sometime in the past, I've forgotten the exact time frame in my mind in my book. The first multicellular creature was created. Maybe that was 2 billion years ago or so. Okay, and it was a complete freak accident. One piece of bacteria swallowed another bacteria and created a multicellular organism. It's only happened once in the history of our planet once. Contemplate that, we know that because there's only one line of DNA that we can trace back to the first time that it happened. There's not a second line of DNA. Only one. So it happened once. It's never happened again. It was a freakish example, if that happened happened, forget everything else that occurred on this planet. Okay, but it did happen. Okay, so these are called bottlenecks. Certain things occurred that created evolution going to certain direction. And it could have occurred differently. I'll skip to 60 million years ago. When an asteroid the size of New York City hit earth hit in the Yucatan Peninsula, and it was the most insane explosion ever, like the equivalent of all the nuclear bombs on our planet. It destroyed the dinosaurs. It destroyed 99% of the life on this planet, right? It was the Holocaust of all Holocaust. If it and this meteor almost missed the earth asteroid, very easily could have missed the planet because think of the emptiness of space and the smallness of earth, it was a freak accident. If that hadn't happened, dinosaurs would still be walking around here. Mammals would have never emerged as the dominant creature, I'll skip to 80,000 years ago. Humans at that point were only like 10,000 humans left on the planet. If one single virus, I'm talking about homo sapiens. One single virus would have wiped us out at that point, we were extremely vulnerable. If that number had gotten down further, anything could have wiped us out, right? A change in climate, et cetera. Okay? If that had happened, I wouldn't be here and Neanderthals would have probably taken over the planet and who knows what that would look like right now, okay? Then think of your own parents and how unlikely was there ever meeting and the fate that happened there. If they hadn't met Tom wouldn't be here or you would be somebody else, right? There are 70,000 generations more or less going into you going back to the first homo sapien, all right? That one time encounter between you and your parents multiplied by 70,000 chance encounters. So to bring us to the present that you and I are sitting here together in this office with all the stuff around us, it's you and it's me, the Oz against it are so unbelievably astronomical that you can't even compute. So what does that make you think about what was happening to you right now? If you really contemplated, it will alter how you think about everything. Everything you see around you, the plants, the animals, they didn't have to be that way it's extremely unlikely. It's a weird world that we live in, right? So that is an example of a sublime thought, it's a little bit scary because it has to do with annihilation, Holocaust, deaths, but it's also an awesome thought about the fact that you just alive. So that's sort of it's something I went into in the second chapter of my book. I find this so interesting. So.

Tierra del Fuego Holocaust of all Holocaust Yucatan Peninsula Robert New York City Tom
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

06:02 min | 5 months ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Egypt. 3500 years ago, but back then they had a circle it was just a different circle, right? Okay? So you're not supposed to think these thoughts you're not supposed to do this is that this is the circle that we live in. Just outside that circle is the realm of the sublime. It's something that we're not really ever supposed to think about or we're not really supposed to ever do. It's something that's filled with a slight transgressive energy, a level of excitement, because deep down inside a human nature, we don't like limits. We rebel against them. We want to be free, our spirits are yearning to be free. And that sense of these are codes that you have to abide by is very restricting. It feels like a prison almost. So we're inevitably attracted to things outside of that. And that is the realm of the sublime, and it's incredibly exciting. It contains so much energy because in that circle, all of your energy is kind of crushed. You compounded inside of you. It's kind of you have to feel this way. You have to do this. When you let go and you go out and explore outside of it, it's like suddenly you're Tapping into something that's in the cosmos. Incredibly energizing. It's what Maslow called a peak experience, right? Okay, so the ultimate form of going beyond that circle is death itself. Death is the ultimate limit obviously to our lives. And people who have peered through that door because the word sublime literally means up to the threshold. That's the Latin up to the threshold of a door, so imagine that circle has all these little doors in it, peering through it. This is something that I haven't thought of before, right? The ultimate door is death, right? And people who've peered through that door have had a near death experience a little bit to some degree. It changes you. It's like that is the biggest blast of the sublime that you can get. That's the strongest form of the drug imaginable. You no longer look at being alive anymore the same way. You no longer see the trees, the birds, the people that you love in the same way. Everything's universally that people see something better than they did before. No? It's not true. It's a good point. There have been studies of near death experiences, I don't remember the percentage, but there is a percentage the smaller percentage that has a negative experience. It's very painful and ugly and demonic and hellish, and no, they're not having this. So thank you for bringing that up. That's true. But most people, for most people, it has this effect where, and the reasons why the people have the hellish view, there are other things going on. That's just not normal. Is, you know, you came very close to death and you're alive. So everything has a different meaning to you, right? Things that you took for granted before no longer have that same sense. And there are other things that go on. Well, anyway, to my story here, I wrote that chapter with those ideas in mind, and then two, three months later, I came this close to dying myself. So what had been this intellectual abstract argument about near death sublime, blah, blah, blah, became very real, right? I was in a coma. I was driving my car if my girlfriend had stopped made me pull over. If the Maddox hadn't come quickly, I would have permanent brain damage, or I would be dead. I came very close, I was in a coma, I didn't have like visions of angels, et cetera and all the other things that people sometimes claim they have. But I had some very strange things. Some feelings in my body that not as often anymore, but I still sometimes get a feeling that my bones were kind of melting from the inside. It was kind of like a sort of dissolving. What was solid about me was dissolving, right? And then a sense of a very, it's only for a brief second and sometimes I'm not even sure if it's true or not, but I had an image of me up above looking down and I had died and people were talking about me, right? I'm not sure whether my brain in memory is playing a trick on me, but I seem to have that recollection. Anyway, it became very real to me. This subject, right? And so now it wasn't just this intellectual thing about writing a book about the sublime. It was very, very real. The last thing I'll say is, when I had originally planned the book back in 2005 or so, I was going to be jetting off to Tierra del Fuego to see, you know, the South Pole. I was going to go swimming with dolphins in the Caribbean. I was going to be going on top of Mount Everest. I don't know whatever. That kind of stuff. Having sublime experiences. Obviously, I had a stroke. I can't even really walk outside my house and take a normal hike. I can barely walk a few blocks. I can't do any of these things, right? So what I've had to discover is because I can only write a book if I'm in the mood of the book, right? So I have to be feeling sublime to write the book. I have to find it in everyday things. I have to find it in the little garden in my house. I have to find it in the cats in my house. In my girlfriend, you know, and in her eyes, looking outside my window, in the books that I'm reading, I have to suck the sublime out of every little trivial little affair that I goes on in my life. And putting that in the book, I think so if I had written that other book, people would go, oh, that's great, but this kind of rich white guy he's able to fly off here. That doesn't even do with my life. I'm living as a stricter life as you can imagine. There are people much more restricted than me, but pretty damn restricted. And yet I'm able to find this in my daily life. If I can find it, there's no barrier for other people, no matter if you're flipping burgers at McDonald's, the world is sublime..

Maslow coma Egypt Maddox Tierra del Fuego Mount Everest dolphins Caribbean swimming McDonald
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Not often here on film spotting, we get to talk about movies that feature clever crustaceans. Josh, but that's the case with the new the tale of king crab, which is about Luciano, who's a wandering outcast in rural 19th century Italy. Alcohol and forbidden love send him into turmoil. And after a tragedy, he is exiled to the distant Argentine province of Tierra del Fuego, where with the help of ruthless gold diggers and that clever crustacean. He searches for a mythical treasure on his way toward redemption and we have not seen this film yet, Josh, but in terms of the movies that it bears resemblance to. Some films that are pretty notable and appreciated by us, including lucretia martell's zama, reviewed here on the show and one of my favorites. It's a film that had some stiff competition, I think, in round one of film spotting madness, Werner Herzog's agera, the wrath of God. Yeah, aguirre mentioned so many times on the show clearly a favorite of ours. Another title that's been thrown out there that is somewhat in the same vein of the tale of king crab is Roland jaffe is the mission. I love the mission. And zama, you're so right. I think in 2018, I forget exactly where it landed, but lucretia martell zama, Adam, was on my top ten lists. So impressive company there for this film to be compared to. Yeah. Absolutely. Our friends at IndieWire call it part Herzog and ecstatic ethnography and part puzzle linen picaresque well done IndieWire and the international cinephile society says an atmospheric masterpiece, an unforgettable chronicle of humanity. You can see the tale of king crab now presented by oscilloscope, the can in New York film theft's favorite, opened April 15th at film at Lincoln Center for tickets, visit film link dot com C dot com.

Josh lucretia martell Luciano Tierra del Fuego Roland jaffe Werner Herzog lucretia martell zama Italy aguirre international cinephile societ Herzog IndieWire Adam New York Lincoln Center
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

03:10 min | 9 months ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Cracking me up. That's beautiful. I actually I can't wait to read it. I can't wait to read the book. I know I know I'll learn a lot from it. As you'll read and transcend Maslow towards the end of his life, he had a heart attack a couple years before he eventually had his fatal heart attack, and he called it those last couple of years of his life, the post mortem life. And he said, if everyone could have a post mortem life or they have a near death kind of experience and then continue to live, then they could access higher levels of transcendence than they ever known imaginable. And another thing that I think is expressed in a book in a particular book that I should read. It's in my book because it's transcribed from lectures. He gave George the all of his life. So this is unpublished unpublished stuff. I went through all of his personal diaries, his personal diaries, and also another idea a lot of people are not aware of that. I think you'll really deeply resonate with his idea of he's the Proto experience. He said, and he realized during this post mortem life that the peak experience is not where it's at. He said it's the Plato experience. It's like lounging in heaven but not getting so excited about it. Seeing the miraculous in the every day, he said, you know what? That's better than the peaks I've been talking about before. Well, he describes that in his book peak experiences in that book itself where he contrasts the plateau with the peak experience. And he kind of I think if I remember correctly, he kind of compares it to like a meditative state that send Buddhists would have they kind of were able to kind of peek experiences on the sort of level plane throughout their life and the experience of day by day to day. Yeah, I've been writing about how these sublime is in our everyday life. You don't have to. The weird thing is Scott. When I originally decided to write the book, which was 15 years ago, I had wanted to write this book. I had this image in my mind that I would be shedding all parts of around the planet, having these sublime experiences I would go to Tierra del Fuego in Antarctica. I would swim with dolphins and the Caribbean. I would have and then I had my then finally I got sidetracked by other projects. And now after my own new death experience, I decided I'm going to write the book on sublime. But now because of my physical limitations, I can't fly anywhere. I can barely even take a walk outside my front door. So I can't do what I originally did. So I personally have to find the sublime in order to write about it in just looking out my window and just going in my car and seeing certain things. Just interacting with my girlfriend or my cat, you know, I have to suck it out of every flower that comes in my way. Get that nectar in the smallest thing. Because it's the only avenue I have. And so in writing the book, I'm going to make it clear to the reader that you don't have to go climb Mount Everest. Literally to have a peak experience. It's there around you and everything that surrounds you. All of that. And just to conclude your writings really do, instill this sense of wonder.

heart attack Maslow George Tierra del Fuego Antarctica Scott dolphins Caribbean Mount Everest
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

08:16 min | 11 months ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"It changes you. It's like that is the biggest blast of the sublime that you can get. That's the strongest form of the drug imaginable. You no longer look at being alive anymore the same way. You no longer see the trees, the birds, the people that you love in the same way. Do you think it's a universally that people see something better than they did before? No. It's not true. It's a good point. There have been studies of near death experiences, I don't remember the percentage, but there is a percentage of smaller percentage that has a negative experience. It's very painful and ugly and demonic and hellish, and no, they're not having this. So thank you for bringing that up. That's true. But most people for most people, it has this effect where, and the reasons why the people have the hellish view, there are other things going on. It's not that's just not normal. Is, you know, you came very close to death and you're alive. So everything has a different meaning to you, right? Things that you took for granted before, no longer have that same sense. And there are other things that go on. Well anyway to my story here, I wrote that chapter with those ideas in mind, and then two, three months later, I came this close to dying myself. So what had been this intellectual abstract argument about near death sublime, blah, blah, blah. It is very real, right? I was in a coma. I was driving my car if my girlfriend had stopped made me pull over. If the Maddox hadn't come quickly, I would have permanent brain damage, or I would be dead. I came very close, I was in a coma. I didn't have like visions of angels, et cetera and all the other things that people sometimes claim they have. But I had some very strange things, some feelings in my body that not as often anymore, but I still sometimes get a feeling that my bones were kind of melting from the inside. It was kind of like a sort of dissolving. What was solid about me was dissolving, right? And then a sense of a very, it's only for a brief second and sometimes I'm not even sure if it's true or not, but I had an image of me up above looking down and I had died and people were talking about me, right? I'm not sure whether my brain in memory is playing a trick on me, but I seem to have that recollection. Anyway, it became very real to me. This subject, right? And so now it wasn't just this intellectual thing about writing a book about the supply. It was very, very real. The last thing I'll say is, when I had originally planned the book back in 2005 or so, I was going to be jetting off to Tierra del Fuego to see, you know, the South Pole. I was going to go swimming with dolphins in the Caribbean. I was going to be going on top of Mount Everest. I don't know whatever. That kind of stuff. Having sublime experiences. Obviously, I had a stroke. I can't even really walk outside my house and take a normal hike. I can barely walk a few blocks. I can't do any of these things, right? So what I've had to discover is because I can only write a book if I'm in the mood of the book, right? So I have to be feeling sublime to write the book. I have to find it in everyday things. I have to find it in the little garden in my house. I have to find it in the cats in my house in my girlfriend, you know, in her eyes, looking outside my window in the books that I'm reading. I have to suck the sublime out of every little trivial little affair that I goes on in my life. And putting that in the book, I think so, if I had written that other book, people will go, oh, that's great, but this guy is kind of rich white guy. He's able to fly off here. That doesn't even do with my life. I'm living as a strict of a life as you can imagine, other people much more restricted than me, but pretty damn restricted. And yet I'm able to find this in my daily life. If I can find it, there's no barrier for other people, no matter if you're flipping burgers and McDonald's. The world is sublime. And it's all around you. And you don't have to go to Tierra del Fuego to experience that. I want to get it more into what the sublime is actually. So I honestly, it's a word that I never really thought of. I feel like I have an intuitive understanding that it's something sort of surprising and wonderful, but with not sort of big. Amplitudes the wrong word, but there's something relaxed about it. Like a warm bath is sublime, you know? But this idea of it being a threshold, something that you're seeing beyond into something new. That's a new take on it for me, which is far more interesting. Well, the sublime is not a warm bath, quite the opposite. It's a mix of pleasure and pain. It's a mix of two opposing emotions, a sense of fear and a sense of awe, almost consecutively or at the same time. Right. So if you go to see a horror movie or you're on a roller coaster, the excitement comes from the fact that you feel kind of at risk that there's sort of danger there, but you're safe, right? So you're feeling two things at the same time kind of anxiety and kind of about the pleasure that you're actually not being threatened. So neuroscientists have shown that the mixing of two sort of contrary emotions creates an incredible intensity of affect much more than just a single emotion. So the quintessential experience of the sublime when it was first written about in the 18th century was climbing the Alps, the Matterhorn or wherever it was, right? And you got a sense of how small you were, how, you know, you could die very easily if there's an avalanche, and how fragile you were in the face of this immensity. And yet the awesomeness of it, the beauty of it was overwhelming. And so they were fascinated with this idea of being able to feel these two contrary emotions at the same time. So it's not at all a warm bath. I can only the sublime is an experience. It's hard to it's something hard to put into words. So Roberts trying to write a book about it. I know. Believe me, I know. But let me give you an idea give me one example of something that is so insanely sublime that you can't ever think the same about the world after you contemplate this. Okay, so here you and I are sitting here talking in this incredibly high-tech amazing house with all the insane technology around us. All right, consider this. Our planet's some 4 billion years old. Around 3.1 billion years in some little bit of pond, some kind of organic life began. We don't know how or why or what triggered all the scientists who get it closer. Some form of single celled bacteria self created itself out of chemicals that came from other planets, right? Carbon, et cetera. Okay. This single celled bacteria dominated the planet for billions of years. It was the only form of life, right? Okay. And then sometime in the past, I've forgotten the exact time frame in my mind it's in my book. The first multicellular creature was created. Maybe that was too billion years ago or so. Okay, and it was a complete freak accident. One bacteria swallowed another bacteria and created a multicellular organism. It's only happened once in the history of our planet once. Contemplate that. We know that because there's only one line of DNA that we can trace back to the first time that it happened. There's not a second line of DNA only one..

coma Tierra del Fuego Maddox Mount Everest dolphins Caribbean swimming McDonald Roberts
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


07:44 min | 2 years ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"And this goes to another question you had, I had an experience some time ago that was through doing some creative work with Nina liki, the Danish writer, Nina, and I have been digging around in each other's psyches and each other's intimate dark places and through that aerating of our soils and our sediments. I was able to find a thread for a storyline in relation to my own experience of capitalism as the young child of economic migrants in the U.S. and I saw my parents thrive and achieve the American Dream as it is known or at least it was known in the 80s and 90s I don't know if it still stands as a illusion probably not popped bubble but during the time that I lived there it was very much alive and accessible. One of the ways in which my savvy father accessed that was through his ability to play sports and he always used his physical ability as to achieve social status. Ever since he was a young child, earlier I mentioned skiing and this was also because he used his ability to glide to get into the realms of those who are able to ski. But later, he used it in New York to play golf with bankers. It was really good at it, so high end bankers love to have him alone. And eventually this led to a spending some of our summers on another island called Long Island. There's a part of Long Island that's called the Gold Coast. So it's not far out in the Hamptons, so it's a better known place in terms of money and wealth. But this Gold Coast is another one of those pockets, and there my parents rented a small house in the actual gulf club. There was a little Cavani or little cabin, and that's where we would spend our summers being trained by my father to be just as good at sports because he knew that this would lead to us achieving things in the world. While I was there in the afternoons, I would go with him to practice this sport. And so we would walk, and I would often walk barefoot along these grassy nose, with a club in my hand, playing with this ball, the club was already closed for users, but because we were staying there. And I had erased from that idyllic memory, a memory that had to do with access and with forward mobility, the fact that there was always on the sidelines a lawn mower, usually with a Mexican immigrant who was spraying these fields with pesticide, glyphosate, known as roundup from the Monsanto company. The build up of this residue in my own body eventually many, many, many years later, created a complete disarray that triggered a virus that I had in a way inherited through my mother's body, and this is the Epstein Barr virus. It's a virus which can eventually lead to cancerous manifestations. If, in right combinations with toxic substances, and so this twisted loop of how these resourceful lives then sort of flip back in on themselves and are met with other history that are layered through bodies and bodies and bodies of different manipulations of water I want to say because I do think it is all different states of water that move through bodies and outside bodies because this Epstein virus that I'm talking about. It came into my body through my mother's breast milk, or maybe even through that water in the womb, but it's mostly been studied that it comes through breastfeeding. So even at a second stage of me sucking from her body. And it's a virus that has developed through history every time that a cure has been found for it. So a vaccine for this simple herpesvirus because it's Epstein Barr's a fourth stage herpesvirus and it's mostly been in the female body that it's been the laboratory for testing these cures because it creates hormonal disarray. It's mostly perceived in women who begin to suffer depression or craziness or altered motivity. And so it's a strange and roundabout way to get to this question of water and virus long in the future for unforeseeable after effects of our thinking of anything as a resource. While writing that text with Nina, liqueur, and to write with Nina is such a joy. What appeared was an example of something that she so eloquently called synthesizing, and it's having the experience, maybe something that's close to an experience of empathy, but it's that you perceive your body as the body of the other. I'm sure that in other ages that might have been considered a mental illness, whereas right now, I think it may be our future, and that's where I see a lot of potential lying to navigate far away from this idea of the other. My first experience of synthesizing came many years before meeting Nina and its related to Tierra del Fuego, and it's that when due to the virus, the Epstein Barr virus tumor is mass in this body, I felt like the island of karuk Inka and that within it was this other object but that was part of it and that was displaced and dysfunctional. It's confusing and senseless, so whatever I'm saying now is not going to make sense. It's not reasonable. It's not a figure, an algorithmic figure of this happened to me and it is like what happens to Tierra del Fuego. Simply that that experience was mind-blowing or mind breaking in the sense of what Gloria calls nip banter. It is a break with a prior mental structure, which is a form of life, and I and Tierra del Fuego became conjoined in a lemniscate sort of way. It gave me access to these infinite multiscale synthesizing relations. The virus is never the virus. It's viruses and it is viruses in movement in and within and without other bodies or other intra activities and the possible I see a lot of potential that they're the impulse of the possible within that is to more feeling. Less Camila more feeling viral. That's what I can say..

Nina liki Epstein Barr Nina gulf club Gold Coast Long Island Hamptons skiing Monsanto U.S. golf Epstein Tierra del Fuego New York Barr virus tumor depression Gloria Camila
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


02:15 min | 2 years ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"And this is something that the cheltenham community knows very well. Kim Annie Molina talks a lot about how the silence that her grandfather and her mother had to keep was a conscious non choice to generate livability for their children. The conditions of that livability or the quality of that livability can then be questioned by the children when they have to reanimate the oral histories that were sequestered by those secrets that were being imposed, but at least there is a possibility to question that's what then is heard from their ancestors saying it's those ebbs and flows. And so with cuckoo and her fishes act one, I think we've sort of armed ourselves with some invisible shields that we've learned to make very light and we can pack them in our camping bags and take with us because we often also have to take them to Tierra del Fuego as well, but they are the shields are mostly needed to guard yourself from the wind and how it can make you crazy. I often get asked by people like, oh, will you buy something in Tierra del Fuego or do you hope to live there? Because you talk so passionately about it. You've committed somehow all of your political energy towards it. For me, it's the opposite. I certainly don't want to live there. I don't want to own any part of it. If anything, it owns me and at some point that might become a problem. And this is one of the things I talked about with Denise and Valentina in our political therapy. How we streamline the direction of our desires and often forget to see that thing that we desire be at an object or an animate peer of somehow is operative. I'm thinking of this shape, which is maybe like what's this shape called that has a nice name, lemniscate, lemony.

Kim Annie Molina Tierra del Fuego Valentina Denise
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


08:09 min | 2 years ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"I want to redo something. Your story about wanting to slap this man made me think of this. I love that. So it's called with a forked tongue. So the Catalina valve. There is joy in movement. In discovering the boundless possibilities of consecutive actions allowed by the body in space. The mental tendency, however, is always to start with the known, with the informed action, faced with a blank slate, it is therefore no surprise that Catalina's initiating movement is a regimented form that represents her universal female body as a productive machine. Yes, our awesome hands can make things. Our energy can be channeled into labor power, but what happens when we move aimlessly? What emerges when we let go of utility and surrender to an exploration of movement and form without the intention of material gain. Of signification. As I observed panacea, we first give into composition, our free hands free, explore abstract shapes, unexplainable signs, and uselessness. After that comes the pleasurable discovery of tactility of sensorial drifting, giving way to beautiful, endearing gestures full of volume and subtle tenderness. A self conscious embarrassment snaps us out of this indulgence in reverts the whole aimless dance towards those repetitive, mechanical movements that domesticate the hands, ridding them of idle experimentation. Brisk determined movement, contrast with that sweet and surprising, fluidity of experimentation. Embodiment is a chain to all of the above stages and as each act supersedes the next we experience the changing tone of the body, plasticity is a marvelous thing and to exercise it is nothing less than a cure to the ills of a conservative mind. To make bread. Making bread is considered women's work. It is related to the domestic basic the ordinary a routine almost to the insignificant. Once early in 2010, I arrived soaking wet so the door of a police station lost in the pampas of Tierra del Fuego. There, while drying my clothes next to a precarious stove, Luis offered me to stay for tea, since I was not in a rush I happily accepted, and thus witnessed one of the most moving performances that I have ever seen. In the first act, he rolled up his sleeves, then he proceeded to wipe the melamine cover of the only table that was in the back room of the humble house that served the function of both official venue of the state and home to Luis in his exile, repeatedly plunging the cup in this big sack of flour that was resting in the corner of the austere room. We began building a soft mountain of processed wheat, the right before our eyes. With his stick right hand, rhythmically turning over the wrist joint, he created a well in the center of the volatile, white, pile, the well was filled with water, oil, and a pinch of salt. After this climax he began to spontaneously fluid in tender, choreography of mixing the dry components with the liquids. It could have been ten minutes, 5. I got lost in the time of his atypical gestures. I became fascinated with his muscular ease, but above all I reveled in being the spectator of this little transfer of roles. I was not alone, beside me, was manuela, my lover, both, in our lesbian complicity, enjoyed the dance of panacea without measure. It goes on, but it's longer. So this transfer and how we manage that transfer, I remember that moment of us observing this, how, if we would have said anything about that transfer of roles, it would have broken that plasticity of that signals that we can move. We can shape shift in a binary roles. In a way that restraints that you showed, I would say it's not so much restraint in the sense of a contained force, but that you were taking that force to enable that plasticity. A question that you have on your list, which I read, which was about cuckoo and her fishes. Coco and her fishes. I'm in love with cuckoo makes me laugh. Over and over again, just last night, Christy Gaston and I were working on the subtitles of cuckoo and her fishes, which is in its first act now a video piece that was edited from two performances that took place over Zoom and these performances were built out of 5 months of what we call inside Jos rehearsals. These rehearsals came out of a need for inside to think itself at this ten year mark. In Seuss is a practice, it's not a collective, it's a collective practice. We don't identify as a collective. We identify around that which we do together, and sometimes the together is two, three people, non people, and so on, the dynamics of the groups and the architectures of the groups change, according to the questions that we're asking, and they also change over time as lives come and go. But at this ten year Mark, I was seriously wondering whether inside needed to be needed to continue as a practice, and was asking around and was getting very quick. No. But of course it needs to continue, which was surprising and also somewhat demanding. And so to have it be ten and in a way to be asking whether we wanted to repack and get this responsive or super we're just getting started was okay, so what is to be done? To know how old we are, how much we've matured and how much we still need to, and not how much we need to grow, but what you tentacles do we need to grow. I've been spending some time with Marie Denis, the Cuban playwright, who left an amazing legacy of creative writing work, creative performance work, both in terms of her own scripts and dramaturgical stagings, but also from people who were her students, has been born an archive of narratives around her experimental exercises and how she got people to write for theater. And I've been working with those exercises thanks to a little clan of witches that I was part of while living in Melbourne, much older ladies surely cast and Clara Braque and anthropologist and a poet and I don't know which one's which they're both both. And we would gather twice a week to just delight in writing with each other and for each other using Maria for this is prompts past through the sieve of our own experiences so these prompts are never scores in a strict sense..

Luis Catalina Tierra del Fuego Christy Gaston manuela Coco Marie Denis Mark Clara Braque Melbourne Maria
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


07:45 min | 2 years ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"This pocket of the Pacific Rim. I don't know if you've heard or know of what's going on in the Pacific right now. There's talk of it being pregnant, but there's a circle of fire that's say the description of the womb and this room has been growing and it's pulsating. We don't know how long the gestation period will be, because we know very little about these larger processes of the earth, especially at least in our contemporary understanding of what knowledge is. Indigenous peoples of the Pacific know a lot more about this and it's sad or rumored or understood that in the next year or two this birth will occur. And this specific room is huge, so you mentioned Japan and someone saying to you that Japan was not an archipelago, but the same could be said about the Fuego or Australia. This is what I'm getting at with this both with the story of gavrilo talking about the relationship between ocean and land or sea and land. The archipelago somehow still seemed to be our need to classify and our need to call things as different but not related. So the Pacific Rim really conjoins all of these peaks or all of these aisles in the basin of the Pacific Ocean, this womb that's alive that has now started to show signs of pregnancy, and it is so large that whatever is to come from there. It grew me up. I described to you that moment in which it first make as if up until then and that it was in 2009, placed me up until 2009, I was displaced, and that was fun. It's like you're a teenager and you're just crazy and you're all over the place. And then all of a sudden I came to be seen and I came to see and from then on, it has been teaching me to see what has been hidden or why things have been hidden on purpose as well. So the beginning of that process of being taught by karo kinka, it commenced, I would say, a year after I had that experience I asked a bunch of people that are very important to me to join me in Tierra del Fuego to discuss with a group of local scientists what was to be learned. What was to be learned from karuk inga, and what was to be learned if we didn't consider it as useful. This was a very odd construction that I came up with and it was based on my experience as I moved further north. Is hundreds of kilometers hundreds of kilometers when I began to spend time there. There was no road that connected the north from the south. It has since then the road has been built, so the first time that I got the further south that you could, it involved walking for many hours, many, many hours, 16 hours over peat Vogue, and on the way back, I was struck by how we make sense. How we're constantly making sense of things that are much larger than us, and we can't just enjoy being overwhelmed, where we can't sit with the uncomfortableness of not knowing you were discussing not knowing before as well. And how could the scientists that I had run into, who were doing conservation work, be brought into a more ambiguous space of understanding conservation work. As useless, and that doesn't mean that I don't think it should be done, but just as useless within the much larger patterns that are at work on the planet and in the cosmos, so to try and dismantle the importance of our individual human project on the planet. That was the beginning of inside us. That's what we tried to do with insiders. We try and dismantle our importance. It became evident to all of us who were there for a couple of weeks walking and talking on the land and over the sea. To get to the main island of the del Fuego, you have to cross the Magellan strait and sometimes you can do that on this bigger transport ador boat that takes a couple of hours, but sometimes it has to turn around because of the currents and the wind. It's quite an arrival and when you arrive, you arrive, nowhere in particular. On the Argentinian side, it's more developed and so you have that sense of ushuaia. You've gotten somewhere, and this is the end of the world. On the Chilean side, you don't really have that experience. And so you begin to move. And you realize that that's really all that there is is movement. It's a dynamics of elements and that some of those elements are missing or unavailable or are less accessible either to mind or to feeling. And one of the things that was visible but in a conflicted way unavailable was the life of beavers in Tierra del Fuego. So beavers were introduced in the 1940s on the Argentinian side to create a pelt industry. So they were meant to be hunted for their fur, which would then feed the military complex in Europe with these furs to be used for soldiers at war. But when this idea came about and it was during Peron's government and in relation to some Canadian trappers who had the beavers, this was before the end of the Second World War and there was a sense of enthusiasm about this great new business that they had come up with. They brought 20 pairs of beavers down to Tierra del Fuego and the story of how they got there is just surreal. They were on a train, then they were on a boat, and then they finally arrived at their other flag and they are in a way or given citizenship and are allowed to roam freely so that they can reproduce and hopefully populate the island and create this wonderful pelt industry, but for there to be enough beavers to be able to create this economic haven for peoples of the south, the beavers needed to have many years in which they were not hunted, so by the time that any type of hunting starts to be able to be done, the pelt industry has crashed, the hunting culture in Tierra del Fuego was also a faced earlier during colonialism. It's a completely perverse idea of control and manipulation and introduction and sort of who gets to live when and where that this story. And how we came to it. And when I say we, I'm talking about a group of people who came together around inside us, artists and scientists and philosophers, one of them being Bruno latour, who came to Dara del Fuego with us. Him and Chantal, his wife, and he.

Pacific Rim gavrilo karo kinka Pacific Japan Fuego archipelago Tierra del Fuego Pacific Ocean Australia del Fuego Peron Europe beavers Bruno latour Dara del Fuego Chantal
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


07:49 min | 2 years ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"Going back to this story of the Javanese taking this little piece of fabric that's given to them by Darwin and he's placed so much value on this handkerchief and it signifies something or at least it has a very clear function for him and they take it and dismantle its function and his world and this question of property and the private is very alive in an archipelago in any I would say but especially in the Val Fuego because of its violent colonial history as well and how the way that the four indigenous peoples that are of Tierra del Fuego have been displaced and they've been categorized and their stories have been parceled in a way that takes away so much of their complexity and that is very much in relation to how they themselves understood their relation to the territory or to the marital to the seascapes that involved the land because archipelagos are of course always land bound by water so it's the water that defines your position. The language tells us that neighboring peoples had complete different takes on each other. The sense of a unity was based on their differences and the richness of those differences, so if you look at the attempts at dictionaries of the different fuegian languages and is already a fiction, something that we've come up with to cluster this difference. But it's the languages are situated. So the way I'm going to call you Sonia is from here from Papua and seeing you in a tightly little screen and I would call you very differently and maybe you would hear it in my voice a tenderness maybe if I were in your own home or a shyness that I would have because I'm physically proximal to you and I can smell you, let's say. So all of those things are constantly operating when wording or worlding was happening and that was sucked out of the physical experience of this place when this abstractions geometrization that you described was layered onto Tierra del Fuego. And what I wanted to redo was from Gabriela mistral. The book is coming and walking you see it. So I'll read it in Spanish and then I'll translate. It's just a paragraph that I found as I was thinking about you. We are now going to enter into the zone of Patagonia, and we can talk about that word later. And in Cinderella. The Chile, abbasi and el mapa, ravioli, dos elementos, the Tierra. At the long kavi, begins the most southern region of Chile. It appears on the map as a type of rage for fight between two elements, earth, and water. The ocean holds to devour it all, and the cordillera, the mountains, dip themselves into the sea. Is a former national level. The sooner the layer more spectacular, the extra menial entre continentality that you see, ivas, Kimi parisi, a Kelsey de islas on a busier, the this over there. So she ends by saying that that rageful fight between this land and sea. It appears that this mountain that dips into the ocean that is somehow sucked into the ocean, would not reappear, but it does. And it does in the ara del Fuego. That's when the archipelago reemerges. So you've got tips and fjords and peninsulas and these bodies of sort of like fingers that are arising from the sea, and it's this spectacular debacle or debate between continentality and the ocean. An ocean that is the saddle. That is beyond or out of themselves. Well, how would you say this at Taro? Untied? Well, unleashed, unleashed his good. With Gabriella is saying is so eloquent in relation to the description of this meandering and sometimes very violent and penetrating relation that the ocean has with the land here, Chile is, like you said, to sort of all coast, like it's front. It does have a back body, the back body and the spine is like or the Ellis and this and there are secrets there that I won't talk about because they shouldn't be talked about, but it's front body where it's more exposed is to this Pacific Ocean and Pacific is I think it's a dignified name because Pacific usually generates a sense of something beautiful in the mind and it is the most beautiful being I've ever seen the Pacific Ocean is just. That's all I can say about it. And it tastes so good, especially around the 5th region of Chile and down to the Fuego. It's so cold. In it lives so many different buggy beings and when you get to el senor a long kavi around Chile a, which is another archipelago, a thousand kilometers north of Tierra del Fuego is when it does seem like the ocean starts to somehow devour the land. And the land just breaks. It rips open into thousands of little scattered islands, as if the lover has really destroyed or consumed. The other. And then Tierra del Fuego is this moment of it's not a fight, I think it's more of a sensual relation at the end. It does seem to kind of reappear reemerge from this sexual act of these two earth beings. So different from another archipelago that I'm somewhat close to because I lived for four years in Australia. And there the main island of that archipelago was so large that we call it a continent and we hardly think of all of the other islands around it and the Australian continent, which at some point would have been joined with Tierra del Fuego in what's called one one land, prior to there being another sort of movement in the depths of the earth that would have created this divide this Pacific divide, has now created.

Tierra del Fuego Val Fuego Chile Gabriela mistral el mapa Kimi parisi ara del Fuego Darwin Papua abbasi Sonia Patagonia Pacific Ocean Gabriella archipelago Ellis Pacific Australia
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


Phenomenal Ocean


05:38 min | 2 years ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on Phenomenal Ocean


"I have a tendency to start questions to start telling stories way before the actual beginning of the story. And so I caught myself answering your question in my mind saying, I had a lot of fun inside the womb. I loved being in water. And my mother was very young when she conceived me. She was very agile. On top of a mountain and was skiing, so I thought of how her gliding over this other form of water, whilst I was in water, just generated an enormous love for that kind of mobility that water allows that's so different from moving through air. You know, that's a little early. From that moment on my young parents moved to the desert sonora on the U.S. side. So in Arizona, Addy sona. So an arid zone. And that's where I was born. My first breath was taken in this very arid zone. So I think that my love of water also comes from having known it since conception, but then having been born without it somehow or a space that's so dry, so, so dry. And I know that it is dry, not just from that childhood memory, but because 30 5 years later, I visited for the first time as an adult, this place that I was born, and I was sent there by Alejandro ski. Through one of his psycho magic tasks. He gave me one. Years prior, not knowing that I had been born in Phoenix, he sent me to my birthplace. He said, you have to go to your motherland, and you have to figure out some this issue with your identity. Where my from, what can I or where do I claim responsibility for being from that place, and from where do I enunciate also my opinions? I took a road trip and went to Phoenix. He said that I had to dig a little hole in the ground, stick my head in, and have a conversation with my mother. She said, you know, whatever it needs to be said will be said, you might need to spill your secrets. You might cry, you might hear her response. It was so hot in Phoenix, a so hot that the only moment that I could be outside and digging a hole so physically exerting some energy was prior to the sunrise. Though I went to the hospital where I was born, it was obvious to me quite quickly that I wasn't going to be able to take a shovel and dig a hole outside of the hospital because the bodyguards already came up to me as I was snooping around. So I went up a mountain called piestewa peak, and that's a renaming of that mountain after an indigenous woman who fought in the war. The U.S. and Afghanistan and digging a little hole in that ground, it was just parched that ground. It was so dry. It was sandy, but caked sand. After I did my thing, I had my conversation, Alejandro said, take a little bit of that earth with you. So I put it in a glass jar and brought it with me to Tierra del Fuego. That's probably obscene to have done that. My biologist friends have heard me say that. And I married that ground to the peat bog in Tierra del Fuego. I had the meat and peat bog is rotting. It's so wet and alive with bacteria and mosses and fungi. And I'm sure that there were things in that dry earth live things, but they were in a state of dormancy and having these two, I don't know if they were contradictory, but they were so materially different. These two beings, these two earth beings that I joined, I got what Alejandro was saying. I was okay. I had these and many other aspects to my identity, and they could come together. And so my relationship with water is a relationship of intense intimacy. I live by the ocean, so I fall asleep. Hey, hearing it. Speak to me, whisper in my ear, and sometimes it pounds so loudly that it rocks my house and I love that. I also live on a fault line that creates a lot of tremors and it's very connected to the tides, so often my House is shaking and I'm very aware of those volumes and if the density of all of that happening and really recently, just a couple of months ago, a pandemic surprise having to stay grounded here to my house and not moving around for work reasons. I have taken up surfing. So I am now daily dipping into the sea and understanding its architecture from within. I'd always been a swimmer and had loved the ocean, but it never done it with a board, and it just allows me to stay in the water much longer. That's something new. I'm understanding the speed of water. It's daily rhythms, but much better from within, to use a term that Annie sprinkle and Elizabeth Stevens came up with. I think I'm an ecosexual and water.

desert sonora Addy sona Alejandro ski Phoenix Tierra del Fuego skiing U.S. Alejandro Arizona Afghanistan Elizabeth Stevens Annie sprinkle
"tierra del fuego" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

10:13 min | 2 years ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on KCRW

"Just took even Cal. Just John finally. I see a face in the reflection is Pull back. Eating. Sure. Oh, They are my new friends. Whole Co cool. Use a couple new and The truth is way back when it was going back. No cash in my hands. So here I am. I am how you see me? Snugly explain Edie's match company. Now. Now. You're listening to K C R W My name is Travis Holcomb. This is music from Taiana out of Argentina. Wrapping the Nafi crew. Lemon offer Tierra del Fuego release. Right before this year from Kelly Lee Owens covering a Leah on more than a woman G off the what we drew mix tape that was money can't by featuring nappy Nina. Aside from kingdom from right here in Los Angeles is album Neuro Fire..

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"tierra del fuego" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The were too to archaeologists there. They really didn't know who we were. They'd just knew we were interested in Chickasaw the mounds and they were busy printing an article and when we walked in, they introduced themselves and they said here, this article Has everything you need to know about chick Asaba, innit? It was the same article that my professor had written that we had found a couple of days before we went there, and I then asked. I took the article said Thank you, and I looked at it. I knew it was the same. And I said, What do you know about the giant large skeletons that were removed here? And the archaeologists looked at me, he said. What? I don't have never heard anything like that. And I said, Well, it's right here in this article, you handed to me and I flipped it open. I said right there, it says they pulled all these that even up to 1976 a seven footer was pulled out. And her response was well, I've never read that before she turned around. That was, Yeah, she wouldn't even look at it others Now skeptics today deny all the old archaeology that even says there were seven footers there because there's too many of them. In modern times. One of every 146,000 people is seven foot tall, most of the N ba players that everybody says they're seven feet. They're not actually seven feet tall, they budget they wear these sneakers. They stand on their tiptoes when they're measured. About half of that would say there's seven feet or not. It's very, very rare, actually, and they don't all have gigantism is not a physical disorder. It's just the it's a type. Of hereditary height. This position that's what it is. So we've had this problem with loads of archaeologists saying We don't believe anything the Smithsonian put out back Then they all miss identified. They miss measured or they pulled Master Don bones out and fought mastodons were people. But all these bones that we've looked at all of the studies we've looked at were mounds Native American Indian mounds that were excavated. They had people in the very clear That's not the only thing that we know about. We know in South America, for example, there were people. I mean, an incredible Litany of people that saw and actually physically measure some of these so called Giants startling Magellan Magellan went there 15 20 measured some 10 foot tall people. Now he was an extreme South America Thira del Fuego at basically the Magellan Straits name for him in his first trip there. Hey, actually captured two of them and tried to take them back to Europe. Unfortunately, they died on the way back and they dumped him off the boat. Sir Francis Drake was there Sir Francis Drake saw several that were 7 to 8 feet tall. Lord Byron was there He saw nine foot tall people and met a seven foot tall chief. On the last person. There were several others. The last person is surprising, but it was Charles Darwin Charles Darwin went to Tierra del Fuego, which is in the land of Patagonia, which is the whole southern end of South America. Darwin was really interested in what was happening with the extermination of these very big tribes. There were only a few left the the Spanish And every other explorer that had gone there from the time that they found gold, which was basically when the Spanish one in 15 25 they decided in order to get the gold they needed to get rid of these tribes. So they began to systematically exterminated, and that's what Darwin was, therefore, and he wrote a great deal about it. He saw some young boys that were still living. Almost all the men had been killed off. All of the young boys were over six feet tall. Now we're talking about hundreds and hundreds of because there was only a handful of them left to begin with, and Darwin was greatly upset by it. But they deny all that to they say, Oh, they all exaggerate. Everything's an exaggeration. It's sailors tails. None of it's true, but we know for sure that they were there, and even DeSoto in North America. Yeah. Tuscaloosa, Alabama is named after a chief called Tuscaloosa who was over seven feet tall. His son was over seven feet tall, Tremendous, incredible story told by six of the Sotos chroniclers. It's absolutely true. These these tribes In ancient times were ruled and the shaymen and medicine people of these ancient tribes were these exceedingly tall people. That were robust, physically strong on they held certain types of knowledge and that knowledge we call the path of souls on, really, That's that's how all this started. We were on this path or this track of trying to figure out what the ancients believed about death. Where their ideas came from. And did they, in fact, build some of these earthworks mounds or pyramids in places like Egypt or Gobekli Tepe? Did they build these structures to somehow target areas of the sky? Consistent areas from continent to continent? For whatever the purpose we, but we call it a death ritual. Oh, and that death ritual is what really ties together Gobekli Tepe, which is in southeastern Turkey, which, by the way, since the last time Andrew was on your show. Andrew's books have been banned in Turkey. And Andrew has been banned from going back to church. Jeez. Oh, is that that ad That is absolutely true. It happened when his books have been translated into Turkish, and there's a turkey publisher that put them out there. And they won of a prisoner in a prison was reading a copy of Andrew's books. The guards took it and they saw that he had dedicated it to the Kurds. And that was it. Ah, Judge actually banned the book and banned Andrew. S so anyway. Politics enters all this, of course, but Gobekli Tepe is tied to America, Sal and North America's tied the Central and South America because of a shared belief system. A belief system is also found in Siberia. It's found that almost every ancient belief system that we can dig into and figure out what they actually believe they all had the same ideas about death, and it was a journey to the sky. Sighing. We've gone. What this does is just go a huge distance through archaeology through time frame's looking at these different types of humans, whether they were The Neanderthals or the Dennis Evans or modern humans or or others that will go unnamed and others that will be discovered in the future. There's still some missing links out there, although they're not missing links in the way most people think of it there just Lineages that died out that probably we carry bits and pieces of their DNA to, but it goes way back in time moves through time to the present. Moves to the time of when all these giants were found today, when there's a controversy and you get skeptics, saying they they never existed to begin with. It's all tied together by this path of souls Death journey on Maybe that's what we ought to talk about. That's what I'm really most interested in. Let's do that Moon return because we have another break to take on here. But I just wanted to mention one thing before you go into this break. You note that some of the quibbles and most hotly debated issues and archeology are utterly trivial. And unimportant to the general public, and I was going to ask youto give us a few examples of that. But I just wanted to make that point. Because you made that in the book taking a break here with Dr Gregory Little Denisovich Origins, hybrid humans Gobekli.

South America Andrew Gobekli Tepe North America Charles Darwin Charles Darwin Sir Francis Drake gigantism Asaba Tuscaloosa professor Turkey Tierra del Fuego Europe Lord Byron Alabama Dr Gregory DeSoto Dennis Evans