35 Burst results for "Tiananmen Square"

Hong Kong Arrests Jimmy Lai, Media Mogul, Under National Security Law

3 Dimensional Wealth Radio

00:52 sec | 5 months ago

Hong Kong Arrests Jimmy Lai, Media Mogul, Under National Security Law

"Its influence the communist government in Beijing clamping down on freedom in many forms, including religion, but also politics. Hong Kong pro democracy activist and media tycoon Jimmy Lai now under arrest again, Hong Kong media reports lie is being charged on suspicion of colluding with foreign forces and endangering national security as authorities step up a crackdown on descent. He's the most high profile person. Out of more than two dozen charged under a sweeping law passed in June by Beijing. Responding to the Hong Kong protests that began in June, 2019 over proposed extradition law lie had discussed that law with Vice President Pence and Secretary of State Pompeii last year on a trip to the U. S. He's also endured three other arrests this past year, including taking part in what was termed an unauthorized vigil marking the anniversary of the June 1989 Tiananmen Square protests. George Burns on the reporting.

Jimmy Lai Hong Kong Beijing Vice President Pence Tiananmen Square George Burns
Trump signs order to bar transactions with TikTok's parent company

The Gee and Ursula Show

01:17 min | 9 months ago

Trump signs order to bar transactions with TikTok's parent company

"Because President Trump has signed an executive order now that would ban Tic Tac from doing business with US firms or the company that owns it. Ah, And the question is Is TIC tac, really a national security issue. Yeah, because the idea that it's owned by the Chinese company and that Chinese companies because of China being a totalitarian regime are one and the same with the repressive government there And, you know, I've never been a big fan of China, especially since the Tiananmen Square crackdown back in what, 89 I was around the same age is a lot of those college students. That just always stuck with me How they just, you know, wiped out so many of their up and coming generation in an effort to hang onto power. And so as technology has progressed, all these abs that most of us led on our phones were giving way. All this information about where we are who we are about what we like and what we do. I mean, the fact the idea of thinking about information going to AA Communist regime or the Chinese regime. I'm not sure exactly what they could do to me other than make me serve up more ads for me to look at for stuff I don't need to buy. But I can't. There's a part of me that's uneasy. Uneasy about the Chinese ownership of TIC tac and understand where Trump is coming from, which is probably just a bid to kind of reach up to the base in an

Tic Tac President Trump China United States Executive
Zoom says China demanded shutting activists' accounts over Tiananmen event

BTV Simulcast

00:23 sec | 11 months ago

Zoom says China demanded shutting activists' accounts over Tiananmen event

"Meanwhile Zuma's admitted shutting user accounts at the request of China during the recent anniversary of the nineteen eighty nine Tiananmen Square protests to accounts of pro democracy Chinese activist based in the US were deactivated and participants in the mainland were prevented from joining calls on the subject zoom is still available in China which heavily censors only reference of the Tiananmen

Zuma China Tiananmen Square United States Tiananmen
Zoom shuts accounts of activists holding Tiananmen Square and Hong Kong events

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:24 sec | 11 months ago

Zoom shuts accounts of activists holding Tiananmen Square and Hong Kong events

"Zoom is drawing fresh questions over its relationship with the Chinese government after it shut down a U. S. human rights organizations account shortly after its video conference on the nineteen eighty nine Tiananmen Square massacre humanitarian China say when it tried to access the platform Sunday it found the account had been closed without notification or explanation from the platform zoom quietly reactivated the account Wednesday after Axios reported the shut

Chinese Government China Axios Tiananmen Square
Nikkei rises to fresh 3-month high on recovery hopes

America's Morning News

00:20 sec | 11 months ago

Nikkei rises to fresh 3-month high on recovery hopes

"AFN markets and shares advanced in Asia today Tokyo's Nikkei closing at its highest level since late February gaining point four percent after opening lawyer the hang Seng in Hong Kong surging one percent after authorities showed restraint as thousands defied a police ban to join a candlelight vigil Thursday marking the thirty first anniversary of China's crushing of democracy in Beijing's Tiananmen Square

Asia Tokyo Hong Kong China Beijing Tiananmen Square AFN Seng
Police pepper spray Hong Kongers defying ban to mark Tiananmen

Vicki McKenna

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Police pepper spray Hong Kongers defying ban to mark Tiananmen

"Of people are to find a band in Hong Kong to remember the Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing boxes Simon reports a crowd of several thousand holding a candlelight vigil in Hong Kong marking the seventy first anniversary of China's deadly Tiananmen Square crackdown today they don't even know if we can still come out the vigil is an annual event but this year's was banned police citing coronavirus social distancing rules it comes as activists will China's central government is eroding Hong Kong's autonomy the vigil did turn ugly in parts police pepper spraying some protesters who were trying to set up road blocks

Hong Kong Simon China Beijing
Hong Kong marks Tiananmen anniversary, defying a police ban

Morning Edition

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Hong Kong marks Tiananmen anniversary, defying a police ban

"The day in nineteen eighty nine when China sent its military against protesters Chinese troops massacred many people as they cleared Tiananmen Square commemorating this massacre is forbidden in mainland China but Hong Kong has held huge rallies every year to remember the victims until this year when police band of that activity although organizers say they're going ahead and peers Emily Fang is covering this story from Beijing either Emily Hey Steve why is this anniversary so important in Hong Kong well that you're thirty one years ago nineteen eighty nine Hong Kong was still a British colony and this all these protests in Beijing as a parallel of their own struggle at that point that the U. K. in China had already agreed that in the future nineteen ninety seven Hong Kong will be returned to Chinese rule is the idea was if protesters in Beijing could create a democratic China then democracy might finally arrives in Hong Kong as well which we know didn't happen but after the military crackdown on June fourth Hong Kong served another purpose if you came this important counter factual of what China could have been with some limited civil rights here's Joe from saw an activist who now lives in New Jersey but in nineteen eighty nine he was one of the student leaders in Tiananmen Hong Kong show the odds are stacked up chime in C. spirit off the people yes this condo at the beach you it's represented to lawful street the ninety people that China could be different but in some ways nineteen eighty nine also sealed Hong Kong state that your Beijing and Hong Kong were drafting the conditions under which China would govern Hong Kong and Beijing after the Saudis tenement protests effectively took control of writing those conditions may include more stringent language on national security and the version that you see them citing today the latter is that candlelight vigil that Jones was just talking about in Hong Kong feels particularly existential despair because Hong Kong is now coming under threat from Beijing's control yeah and and of course the the very fact that they were able to hold this vigil at all this memorial for tenements where over the years suggests that there has been greater freedom in Hong Kong what's happening now that the government the central government's cracking down that could disappear quickly there is this proposed national security law which would effectively criminalize all forms of dissent in Hong Kong that will likely be passed this month by Beijing and then today Hong Kong's own legislature passed a national anthem law which criminalizes people who make fun of China's national anthem back in ninety three years in prison now or a hefty fine lawmakers try to block that vote one was dragged out of the chamber the bill passed anyways so now we have this anniversary which has been marked for generations for decades anyway and in Hong Kong and that that that that commemoration is banned water people going to do after this behind the rally said tonight they're still going to congregate they're going to risk arrest and fines churches which has more the way when it comes to corona virus related social distancing guidelines say that they're going to hold some smaller private events across Hong Kong and people are encouraging other individuals to light candles in their home if they don't want to come to a public space so events are still going to go forward now other countries are trying to put pressure on Beijing to not pass this national security law the US White House has said they'll revoke Hong Kong's trade privileges if the laws passed but Beijing will likely bear that cost and the United Kingdom the former colonial power that ruled Hong Kong actually set this week to open a path for citizenship for about three million Hong Kongers if the national security laws passed Kelly thanks for the update

China
"tiananmen square" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"So like I said Chuck, there was about on the high end, ten thousand residents of Beijing killed June third and fourth. Eighty nine The really yeah. I mean the account from the one guy said it was at least ten thousand. Wow, and that was from his supposed source from inside the Chinese government, and that's that's just killed. It's not killed or injure the total casualties it's. Yep? the the the government of China whenever they they did acknowledge that this even happened, which will get a little bit?.

Chinese government Beijing Chuck China
"tiananmen square" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"All righty so. They ran this editorial. They said that the They would be checked resolutely if they didn't disperse. And they thought that that would do the job basically, but all that that had the complete opposite effect. Yeah, like literally overnight. People all over China, four hundred cities across China, had people coming out and protesting because they were. invigorated by the students what they saw going on in Beijing. And I think it says Dave had an estimate of one in ten citizens took to the streets in these were people of. All social strata all walks of life in China yeah, yeah one in ten in Beijing, but then tens to hundreds of millions of protesters all pouring out in the streets in cities across China like they had a huge problem overnight on their hands like they people were like that was the that was. The editorial was the exact wrong move. Yes, it was the wrong move and things. Just kind of went on this way for a little while until. I think our mid May when Gorbachev was coming to visit in China. So they said. This is the perfect chance Let's stage a hunger strike in Tenement Square, and this was not a good look for the Chinese Communist, Party. They were not happy that this is going on. What Gorbachev? was going to pay the visit. Yeah, because I mean you WanNa. Do Impress Gorby. He was probably the most popular guy in the world. Right then in nineteen eighty nine Yeah, you you. They lost face and it was pretty well done move on the part of the students who carried out the hunger, strike but that the editorial that kicked off. They're really kind of changed things. There was a huge turn. There is a sea change in the entire thing. When regular people started taking up this protest because they started out as a student protests, and now all of a sudden, it was an everyday Chinese. Person Protests and that apparently changed the entire attitude of the government towards this whole thing there was no longer paternal and kind of head, Patty and patient. It was like wait a minute. I saw on this frontline documentary that somebody said it was like. The workers are the ones who who put the Chinese Communist Party in power, and now suddenly looked like the workers were about to take the power away from them, and this holy Bejesus out of out of them because again. This is a very They had iron stranglehold over their population, and there are also there's a lot of corruption in the government to so the the the whole idea of being removed from power had a lot more at stake in just you know losing power like there was these people had done quite a bit that they might have to answer for after they lost power, you know. Oh. Yeah big time they were, they were officially worried at this point, right e- still had Zao calling for cooler heads to prevail here but and this is before his removal just before, but leaping said you know what the only way to take care of. This is by kind of cracking the whip in a hard hard way. law should be imposed. Students heard about this, and this is when the big big protests at Tiananmen Square I think they estimated like over a million people one point two million people. students there were police involved..

China Gorbachev Beijing Chinese Communist Party Tiananmen Square Tenement Square Dave Party Patty
"tiananmen square" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Basically? Yeah, and so he was kind of holding back Dang Xiaoping's worst impulses in saying like no, we just need to kind of like a purchase peacefully or whatever and he got removed to which I think kind of highlights just how how much crossing or opposing Ping where it would get you get you removed at best and actually Jazzy, saying he spend. When he was removed from office, he spent the rest of his life under house arrest because I mean. That's what happens when you are removed from office there. They just say. Go home and don't leave again. You're under. Political Quarantine. Yes Oh you. They had seen this happening all around them. The Soviet Union was crumbling Countries Communist countries people just like these students kind of rising up and saying that they've had enough, so they were nervous. And Win Zales Yang when he went out of town, basically went on to Korea, on a state visit. This is when leaping said all right now is our time. This guy's out of the country. And he's like. Basically we can. We can start the the first piece to toppling these students, and it wasn't initially a violent piece. It was an ad. It was an April twenty six. It was an ad in the People's Daily. The state newspaper and it was an editorial basically. Just denounce the demonstrations, and that was their first sort of shot fired. Was your friend is out of town while they didn't say that, but because he was out of town, they said we're going to run an editorial denouncing this. Yeah, and they basically said look. These students are being misguided that the whole thing started earnestly as a memorial for for Hugh. but that that it had been taken advantage of by probably outside agitators, maybe even like plants from other governments who are fomenting like a popular uprising out of this genuine sorrow for this guy. who was you know a real real advocate for them but regardless of how it started or what's going on, we can't. We can't abide this any longer and if we did, there's going to be I think they put it. We'll never have another days piece unless we act They didn't say brutally resolutely unless it's checked resolutely, they said within the margin and said see brutally right. Like that's not checked, resolutely is against a popular protesters. This menacing stuff. Should we take a break? More, menacing stuff. All right, we'll take a break and we'll come back and talk about the effect that this editorial had right after this..

Soviet Union Zales Yang Korea Hugh.
"tiananmen square" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"In addition to the president in a communist country. You also have the leaders of the Communist Party. They're not exactly like lateral, but they're pretty high up. You have like a prime minister. You have the leader of the Party general secretary, then you also have the president of the country and Dang was the president of China at the time. But there within the party, and within the leadership of the country, including Hugh, and he was kind of the face of this movement. There was this idea that. The mouse revolution happened. Mao is great, but we. We can't run a country just living by these kind of lofty principles that Mao espoused. We need to kind of get a little more. Loose gripped here at least economically and there was a whole contingent led again by hugh that that basically said. Maybe we should kind of ease up on the government planning a little bit. A little bit of free market go and see what happens. We really think that like there's going to be a lot less starvation lot less poverty if we had a little bit of this stuff into there, so there was this kind of progressive movement, but then when Hugh when the when these protests Kinda started in one, thousand, nine, hundred seven. They basically showed hugh the door like you were saying he was. He was removed from office because he kinda demonstrated. That that level of loosening of the grip on the people would lead to things like protests and demonstrations, but it was too late they had opened the door now and then like you said when he died, that was that was kind of the the lit match. That got thrown onto this powder keg. And I take it. You're on a first name basis now because it's easier to pronounce Hugh Hugh is actually his last name in China. They said the same I. Yeah, so. I'm having my my dumpling and eating it, too. Man That's the best way to have it. So and I learned something new today to. Thanks Chuck. That's basically why I. Wake up in the morning. so what happened is You know. He died on. April fifteenth, Eighty nine bunch of students like thousands of students got together in Tiananmen Square. To mourn his passing. And CNN Square we should say is it's an enormous place. It's the largest public space in the world right in the middle of Beijing It is just it's the town centre unlike any town center in the world. Yeah, there's like no trees anywhere. It's just flat and then edged by enormous public buildings. It makes you feel very small. Yes and it's also a perfect place to get like thousands and thousands and thousands of people together. Yeah, and this is what happened during the funeral celebration Tiananmen Square and it.

Hugh Hugh Communist Party Tiananmen Square president prime minister CNN Square president of China Beijing China general secretary Dang Chuck
"tiananmen square" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"And to stamp it out, the government went to the extreme measures possible, which was commanding the army to murder. Citizens unarmed peacefully. Protesting citizens were gunned down in the streets like. Like. Like they were enemy, combatants bay, basically in the in the their own city in Beijing, and it was just a horrific thing that managed to kind of trickle out indefinitely captured. The world's attention pulled the world's head out of its, but as you would say. Yes, so you know to tell the story, we need to go back in time a little bit and big thanks to. Our PAL, Dave Ruse for helping us out with this one. This is a very good in fact I. It was on a different laptop and I kind of forgot. It was sitting in my folder when I It had been in there for like a month or so right. Yeah, it's been there law and then I saw it and I was like. Wait a minute. We've got cinnamon square on the burner, so yeah, they did a great job and we have to travel back in time to previous to nineteen eighty nine. When the sort of feeling among students in China. Was that you know what this communism isn't working out so great and we WANNA start making a little bit of noise, and we're not saying to topple our government or anything like that. We're saying. Let's get the corruption in check and let's maybe. get some free speech going on SOM free press and free expression, and they thought they could get their They thought they could get there. which is what makes this really really sad among many other things? Yeah, and then even sadder than that to me. Is They almost got there? This is I mean. This was closest like a hair's breadth away where they brought this so so much to the government's doorstep in wave, the set their feet that the government had to at least consider if not openly to one another. At least you know themselves like. Do we just powder? The will of the people and just say okay. We can do things differently like it was a big big deal. It was a big deal and I guess preemptively. We should say we're going to do our best with with some of the pronunciations of the names really tough. they are tough and will as usual. We'll do our best and probably failed and stopped short of being perfect I think we learned our lesson on the underground city. At least we're not going to pronounce X. Like X.. Right. So the students had a little bit of wind in their sails, because they're college students, and that's what college students are like. That's why we love them. And they thought they had an ally who was a pro reform leader in pretty high up in the Communist Party in Hugh Yaobang. Sounds about right. Okay he was forced out of power and eighty seven, though and when he died in April April fifteenth of Nineteen, Eighty, nine, the memorializing in the morning of his death is what really kind of kick started this whole process that led up to June third. Yeah, and in the late eighties. What you call! The president of China is was named Deng Xiaoping. And he was, he had been in charge for awhile..

Deng Xiaoping Dave Ruse China Hugh Yaobang Beijing murder Communist Party president
Hong Kong is in recession after almost 5 months of protests

PRI's The World

08:01 min | 1 year ago

Hong Kong is in recession after almost 5 months of protests

"I'm Marco Werman this is the world Hong Kong is in recession and after nearly five months of street protests the economy in one of China's most important business hubs is slowing down retail sales are plunging also tourism is off fifty percent in October compared with last year and the U. S. China trade war is taking a financial toll the demonstrations in Hong Kong have been led mostly by young people protesting the way China governs a territory. It's easy to make a historical comparison to nineteen eighty nine when young people in Beijing's Tiananmen Square also protested in Beijing so two years ago we were begging for something called freedom that we member taste them by ones were you were smashed and we just gave up that's Han Dongfang. He was a protest leader in Gentleman Square after the bloody crackdown he spent a couple of years in prison and he later fled to Hong Kong now he's a labor organizer base there and he's watching and supporting this young generation protesters Han told me the movement in Hong Kong DOC is different from gentlemen in one crucial way today Hong Kong young people what they are doing is not begging in an Oscar for freedom is they have been living and freedom now someone attempting to take away so that is the fundamental for instance that is what I believe these people will never gave up how much have you been speaking with protesters in Hong Kong in recent weeks and what have you been hearing I am not really speaking to them I am participating in every major protest I am industries I observe them and I learned from on them because if I well remember in nine in two thousand fourteen I saw these young people into the highway and I run into them I said look you've got to get out from the highway you are giving them excuses the two shoe and I came from a nineteen eighty nine Tiananmen Square as what happens at the time they get shoes and these are shooting people and people don't want to listen to me an ICU kind of sad. about saw you know they are really not taking their life Catholic and they are really taking great risk but on fung aren't the protesters today also giving the the authorities plenty of reasons to kind of mistake reprisals I mean subway stations have been a set a a light they've occupied the airport I mean they're giving it seems the police a lot of reasons to to crack down on them yes you can say today even more than two thousand fourteen even more than thirty years ago in Tiananmen Square was they'll protesters are doing but the fundamental differences the protesters the mentality and courage so two years ago we we're fighting for something in or dreams we never know whenever taste it if we don't get it and we don't really lose anything but nowadays these people what from my observation in the street every major protest I can see a determination from their phase their body language and especially this is joined by men women young men and women and women are not following a man and men are on their own so all over in st they in their say's in their body language you can read they are ready to burn together it if it burns so dunk fung what is your advice to the Hong Kong protesters at this moment and where should they steer that courage I'm afraid I don't have a any strategic suggestions because I don't have it I am is a learning from them about the decorative ity of organizing difference activism protests every day during the week and evening date so this is a very new to mate so US Vice President Mike Pence says a America stands with Hong Kong and he criticised China for curtailing the rights is in liberties of Hong Kongers does that help the protesters or does it just add to the Chinese government's claim that this whole protest movement is a Western inspired separatist movement oh it's definitely help the movement the protests in Hong Kong and to make the Chinese government to think twice what to do but I have a very serious question here as Mista pants our Mr trump they taking this decision as a strategic move to make themselves in better position during the trade deal trade talk as a chip or as they are taking it as principal that no matter what even there there's no trade war they will take this human rights and democracy matter seriously what about if the U. S. China trade deal goes well while they oh back there will be no pressure there's no concern at what the Hong Kong people will do with that so help us with this one final question Dongfang despite some of the police crackdown on protesters disrupting business and mass transit in Hong Kong it seems many Hong Kongers have not abandoned or given up on the protesters and their actions why do you think that is what does it tell us you know Hong Kong people have enjoyed the freedom or snow much democracy Z. in a pause up to this point but enjoy the freedom freedom means you don't have to realize that every day morning would you tab use as I'm in freedom no freedom the beauty of freedom you don't realize that every day you don't have to pay attention but once somewhat attempt to AAC it whether your business person big business small business big like Miss the League coaching as more like other corners streets let you open a small restaurant leak catching as a big tycoon in Hong Kong right yeah big tie tongue one of the I didn't know riches Jason and Asia and the world maybe these people they all suddenly few their freedom as maybe a facing to a risk and this is a what make people bring people together you lose the same things that you enjoy didn't really have to feel it every day now you feel the same danger but the same even people were walking in the street protests the same things are fearful of losing freedom and they're not not necessarily show last or right middle or what but they are gathered together on this one same interests and fear which is fearful of losing freedom so that's my explanation about why Hong Kong people even the businesspeople they lose some business they're not but they're still tolerate this because they know that I had them. There will be bigger things to Luke's Han Dongfang a protest leader at Gentlemen Square nineteen eighty nine and currently a Labor activist thank you very much for your perspective I really appreciate it thank you thank you. Ns talking to you

Hong Kong China Han Dongfang Beijing Tiananmen Square Marco Werman Gentlemen Square Gentleman Square Luke Two Years Fifty Percent Thirty Years Five Months
"tiananmen square" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"What I was not prepared for was the odd for me -ality that he imposed on himself and his guests there was no conversation as such one guest had just returned that day from Paris where the imboden talks were going on Nixon asked him to give us a report on the subject which he did at some length while we sat and listened when he was through Nixon gave us his views on the subject during which absolute silence reigned while the Butler freshened up our drinks the three Chinese men who were presumably accustomed to feigning interest at the interminable meetings of the Communist Party gave these disquisitions their full rapt attention while most of the Americans gently slumbered arms crossed in front of them Chin uh-huh resting on their chests what kept my attention focused was not the subject of Cambodia but the fact that Nixon was in the habit of referring to himself in the third person something I had never heard anyone do before not even members of the British Royal Fan family when Nixon was president he'd say his dark eyes flickering over his guests as if he expected one of us to challenge it mm when Nixon was president and leader of the free world as leader of the free world were also an office to which he had been elected.

Paris Nixon Communist Party Cambodia president British Royal Fan
"tiananmen square" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Hello it's Ilya Marritz Co host of Trump Inc Donald trump is the only recent accident to not release his tax returns the only president you can pay directly by booking a room at his hotel he shreds rules sometimes literally he didn't hear acas worth the tour memos or things and just throw them in the trash so took something from White House staff look you can't do that. Trump inc an open investigation into the business of trump from PROPUBLICA and WNYC subscribe wherever you get your podcasts this is the New Yorker radio hour thanks for being with us today I'm David Ramnik for reasons that are pretty obvious Richard Nixon's name has been coming up all the time in the news lately and one of the most acute portraits of the late president was an essay by Michael Korda that ran in the New Yorker in nineteen ninety four quarter I got to know Nixon pretty well during the long years after the ex-president left Washington there is a theory that great men have large heads and prominent features think of Charles de Gaulle and his nose LBJ and his ears FDR and his jaw and by this standard if no other Richard Nixon had reached greatness his head was enormous is jowls and ski jump knows where Justice cartoonist had always portrayed them his is dark in penetrating most striking of all was his voice a deep rumbling Bosso Phunto rather like an avalanche the distance Michael Korda Nixon weren't exactly friends quarter says editor he worked on the books that Nixon published with Simon and Schuster and in nineteen eighty nine he was invited to a dinner at Nixon's home in Saddle River New Jersey and on that night it turned out the former president was conducting a little shout of diplomacy of his own something very much on our minds right now here's Dylan Baker reading from Michael Curtis Account of that night with Gregg Star as Richard Nixon within a mile or so of New Jersey Commercial Strip full of mini malls service stations Nixon's house was tucked away as secretly Shangrila behind high dense growths of trees and hedges it was impossible for any casual and you'd find rather like any number of cul de sacs in Belair but without palm trees Nixon staff had presented with careful instructions on how to reach the house but it seemed a little puzzled that I was driving myself their puzzlement became clear as I pulled up before the entrance a row of limousines to one side made it evident that Nixon's guests tended to be driven by chauffeurs yes I had driven my silver Porsche. The courtyard was a blacktop space big enough for a good sized motel the security people at the door seemed uncertain what to make of the car the weather because it was frivolous or foreign I wasn't sure and inside I found most of my fellow guests milling about the entrance hall looking suitably solemn I recognize Robert Aplin up a large jovial looking man who had been in the limelight as a Nixon backer and personal friend during Watergate there was the CEO of Archer Daniels Midland an assistant secretary of state and a former U S representative to NATO there were also three Chinese gentleman all with the bland inscrutable faces of professional diplomats the senior of them was Hans Shoe China's depart eating ambassador there were no women present it was to be a stag dinner Nixon appeared at the top of the stairs at exactly the moment we had been summoned for he descended halfway stretched out his arms justice he used to do when he was campaigning with a broad smile gentleman the good news is bar is open as I was shortly to discover drinks in the Nixon household were not to be taken or even held lightly they were Sir served in immense heavy tumblers and every time guest took a sip Nixon who had an eagle is a host would attract the Butler attention it better fresh up Mr Cora's drink I ordered one of his famous dockery's made with almost no sugar the recipe for which was said to be one of his more closely guarded secrets the president claim to make the best dachary ever and I can report that it lived up to expectation nations.

Michael Korda Nixon Donald trump Trump inc Michael Korda president White House Ilya Marritz Co WNYC Charles de Gaulle Archer Daniels Midland Saddle River New Jersey New Jersey Commercial Strip Dylan Baker Washington Michael Curtis NATO Bosso Phunto David Ramnik
Houston Rockets gear no longer sold on Chinese sites

Marketplace

11:21 min | 1 year ago

Houston Rockets gear no longer sold on Chinese sites

"So let's talk about China last Friday Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey tweeted quote fight for freedom stand with Hong Kong unquote that might sound anodyne enough in the American political context but a true outrage in China where the NBA and especially the rockets are wildly popular the Chinese reacted to punish the NBA polling rockets merchandise off the markets and taking NBA preseason games off the air China wants an apology and they wanted in the form they usually secret for multinationals the go against the Chinese line by for example presenting Taiwan as a separate country from China Marriott international respects and supports the sovereignty and territorial integrity of China that's a real statement from Marriott last year after employees expressed support for human rights in Tibet at ended up firing that employee the NBA has not been willing to go that far in the face of Chinese demands well more he took down his tweet commissioner Adam silver said league supports his right to free speech that's contrary to the Chinese line which is the free speech does not extend to support for what it considers to be separatist movements but can be is also alienated Americans by expressing regret that Maury support for freedom in Hong Kong and quote deeply offended many of our friends and fans in China unquote and for a league that's prided itself on letting players express themselves on matters of social concern now other players nor coaches nor managers seem to want to talk about the merits of the Hong Kong issue at all this week the NBA's limp response has led to a bipartisan group of lawmakers from Ted Cruz to Alexandria castle Cortez demanding the NBA withdrawal from China until China agrees to stop selectively punishing Houston Rockets for Maurice exercise of free speech on American soil Lynette as we can see with this example with Marriott and many others before the NBA this is been going on for years but this NBA story seems to have a lot of Americans focusing for the first time on the way China treats American multinationals and what that means for American values and free speech around the world and worrying that instead of exporting freedom to China's made we hope to do two decades ago they were importing China's authoritarianism is is that something we should be worried about yeah I think that we are no longer under there the illusion that exporting big macs and basketball to China are going to get the Chinese Communist Party to change values and if you are not exporting values to China you need to worry that China is exporting values to you and that's the case here Hong Kong has become a new third wait rail in Chinese politics when the NBA went into China in the nineties it was not that it was you know they knew that it you know too that was off limits Taiwan was off limits Tiananmen Square is off limits three T. is now Hong Kong has become part of that this is a relatively new development and I can understand that things are changing quickly the kids in Hong Kong who are protesting are getting exactly what they want which is becoming a flashpoint between the west and China and and it's a new reality that we're gonna have to deal with as well as the reality that she's in paying is far more bellicose sees enemies everywhere and is far more aggressive than his predecessors so American companies look at this and they see China really caring about the stuff it's it's not always clear the extent to which that's the Chinese government caring versus the Chinese public caring I think I think people do make an error the way they talk about this is that were solely the Chinese government I think some of this is Jane genuine public opinion and consumer concern in China but basically these US firms see this stuff is really cared about China U. S. consumers don't really care about this stuff and so we should change what's in our movies so that it meets with you know with Chinese expectations about Chinese patriotism and you know we should refrain from commenting on political issues that are flashpoints in China and rich I'm I just look at that I'm not sure what to do about it I mean you see people saying things like all trading with China isn't worth it but a that you know that that would be a big thing to try to change it also I don't even know what that would mean you want to we're gonna prohibit people in China from watching American basketball I think it's I think it's very hard to extricate yourself from the wishes of a large rising country with a lot of middle income people that has you know about a billion and a half residents well it is a real problem and it's just China has managed to this where they have their own dictatorial one party state with a semi market system that's created a huge and lark lucrative customer base for American businesses and as capitalist enterprises they're really responsive to that and ways that because self abasement and the the NBA is just the worst example of it and just the the stocks tarnishing hypocrisy of the NBA you know bowling North Carolina and to changing a bathroom law doesn't like and then render yourself completely mute on on you know heinous human rights abuses are much worse than anything North Carolina could do on bathrooms and by the way China's horrible on gay and transgender issues and no one will say a peep about it is it's just really despicable conduct and it and and just having by the confiscating signs comes getting a sign at a an exhibition game at the arena down a Washington it just has Google Uighurs he can't hold a sign that says learn more about a minority group it's completely insane I think though I will say that the Chinese government in its tabloids seems to be backtracking at first four days ago it was you know screw the NBA were very angry and now they're like okay you can go back to watching basketball again it's eats weird seeing the CCP do this because you know it it for years the Chinese model was kind of by your time be polite and you know don't show China strength until it's fully strong and now you know yeah the CZ P. kind of unleashed the Chinese you know I nationalism on the NBA and then realize we second we have to get this genie back in the bottle because the Americans are mad I mean I don't think China is ever pissed off Americans like this is that why it's not that because I've been wondering about whether this is successfully splitting the Chinese consumer base from the Chinese government which is to say that like American consumers you know Chinese consumers might you know have opinions about Hong Kong that doesn't necessarily mean they care deeply all of them do care deeply about the NBA lesson is are we out of bide your time are we strong enough destroyer strength or are we still invite your time but also kind of the that's the tension that China has right now partly because of the trade war partly because of Hong Kong are we strong enough to show our strength yet or are we still in this period of bide your time and when Americans get really really angry China is China kind of takes a second and take the beaten says wait a second maybe we're still invite your time out you don't think that they're concerned about losing internal public support where people are just gonna say I just want to watch the Houston Rockets when a fan of yeah I mean that's one issue and the other issue is you know what American at what the United States has done to Chinese tech companies and they realize after what happened with while way you know if the Americans get really really mad and cut off you know the US semiconductor industry they can still cripple our our major multinationals they can still cripple our advancement they can still stunned China twenty twenty five so the are you invite your time or are you strong enough to make bellicose statements like this it's a real tension right now and I think that's that's why we're seeing this this putting that genie back in the bottle in Chinese media Chinese tabloids I wonder if there are ways to use the the international trade agreements mechanisms to our advantage here which is to say we talk a lot when when we have trade disputes with China about what we want out of them that we want market access we want US financial firms people sell products there do we want them to respect the intellectual property of our software firms of our pharmaceutical firms what about respecting the intellectual property of our entertainment and sports firms if we said to them you know what we want market access for these firms that means allowing companies in on an even playing field without discriminating against them on the basis of of legal statements their employees might make in other countries now obviously I can imagine the Chinese would both resist roles like that and maybe not comply with them at all times but that's the thing we encounter on farm on software to it feels like this is a thing that we actually could negotiate for and that among other things when China does the these sorts of things punishes companies for saying the wrong things those are trade restrictions it's it's feels clinical to describe them as trade restrictions but they are they are and and we have ways of addressing trade restrictions I think this is shing point it would be a worthy goal just worries a practical matter it may require the Chinese changing their system even more than our current demands on them on trades would be very unlikely to result minor I I don't know I the there's a reason why US corporates were mixed on having this trade war in the first place and it's because they'd gotten along you know kind of quietly doing what the Chinese said without Americans really finding out about it and the trade war is bringing a lot of this to light how much Chinese US corporate have kowtow to the Chinese it's embarrassing for them and part of it is part of why they kept quiet was because of this change because of the shame of getting their intellectual property stolen changing the bad guy out in Hollywood film all this has been very Chaim as shameful and unfortunately now that the aggression between the US and China has has been blown out in the open so to have has the shameful behavior of US corporates I think it's really weird the way the president has handled the story which is why isn't he you're eagerly jumping on it here it's like this political gift to him here is this event that is created organic sentiment against communist China and specifically against the way communist China does does this commerce on at the time that he's waiting this trade warranty has Ted Cruz and A. O. C. N. Tomalin asking people all over the political spectrum Congress complaining about the Chinese why can't he picked us up and say see this is why we need to get tough on China this is why we need the terrorists to squeeze concessions out them so that they out of them so they treat American firms fairly it seems like this would be an opportunity for him to actually win over people who have been skeptical of his China policy and any barely wants to touch it no one he hasn't been big on talking about human rights in Hong Kong himself to he's afraid of offending China because he really wants at least over Chinese trade deal I mean it it's a you know when we talk about the trade deal we talk about what trump wants and what people are expecting now what Wall Street is expecting is nothing more than a pump and dump really something like you know trump doing some minor detail saying a bunch of positive things the stock market going up and then during the next deadline you know things kind of falling off and going off the rails again I mean trump can do no better than that and in his career in the stock market he never did any better than a pump and dump either but so then why are the markets up so much this week because when the president goes out and makes these statements about you know things are you know the tone is completely changed with China things are so much better I'm really excited about this meeting for this vice from here I think the way this is covered in the news is basically as trump B. S. saying trying to move the markets up he is trusting buttons but then why don't the market see through that wire the market's moving up there that you know that should mean that they think that you know the economic outlook is better because this actually reflects a change in the way that our trade relationship with China is going

China Daryl Morey NBA Houston Rockets General Manager Hong Kong Two Decades Four Days
China celebrates 70th anniversary as Xi warns ‘no force can shake great nation’

Morning Edition

04:31 min | 1 year ago

China celebrates 70th anniversary as Xi warns ‘no force can shake great nation’

"What's it like to be in China as it marks the seventy years of communist rule in Tiananmen Square facing the famed red outside wall of Beijing's forbidden city tanks and missiles rolled past in a military parade today. this was one of many ways to China's government celebrated the Republic that was proclaimed after communists one power in nineteen forty nine well outside Beijing in Hong Kong pro democracy protesters mark this anniversary with demonstrations All Things Considered host also Chang is in Beijing today she's been reporting for several days inside China hi there also Hey Steve what have you seen today. well we've been spending most of the day walking around central Beijing we were within a mile of Tiananmen Square where the festivities were happening even though we were credentialed by the Chinese government to cover the event most foreign media were not allowed at the actual site of the celebration in fact we were told by police officers today that are credentials didn't even allow us to interview anyone on the street or take any pictures while walking around the city and I want to say it is worth noting that that lack of access to these huge celebrations went for most of the people in central Beijing I mean there were barricades police everywhere keeping crowds at bay and what we saw were people just sitting around in beach chairs all over the sidewalk as if they were waiting for festivities to pass on by but they were all actually just watching the celebration huddled around these tiny screens on their iPhones participating but also know we totally shut out at the same time all of those rules would imply some tension on the part of the government some anxiety on the part of the government that nothing would disrupt this this anniversary nevertheless it was the anniversary that brought you to China you've been able to move around a bit more freely on other days and what what are you trying to learn. what I wanted to take a look at on this trip were what promises did the Chinese Communist Party makes seventy years ago and what promises have they make good on basically because you know in a lot of ways the CZ P. is a party of contradictions it was once the party of revolution it's now become the establishment here yes communist in name but it is not the party of the proletariat it's a party of state capitalism and it's a party that promise to lift people out of poverty which you know to be true be told it has done a spectacular job of in fact it's lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty but at the same time income inequalities have intensified over the last few decades and part of our reporting here has been trying to understand how those inequalities have played out over different generations within different classes of people who have you been able to talk with well this time of migrant workers who had moved to Beijing thirty years ago from the countryside on these are guys who work seven days a week ten hours a day and yet they still say their lives are hundreds even thousands of times better than their parents lives are their exact words and that gets to one of the party's central promises which is if you work hard and you trust us we will make your life better and we found that that message actually resonates with people from totally different backgrounds here like here's an architect who lives in Beijing her name is grace jeans she's twenty eight so I don't care who is the leader. I'm really not care or you just know you can't choose anyway maybe both. but just selling trial maybe yeah we know the leader what makes Daddy wise choice like his his days unlike the United States so what what she's saying is you know me and also want to stability to focus on her career on success and she says that is exactly what the Chinese government is giving her of course in Hong Kong there are people who don't want that arrangement who want more freedom to choose their own leaders and been protesting get again today what is China's leadership saying about Hong Kong on this particular day of celebration in protest yeah well president she's in pain today mention Hong Kong specifically he reiterated that Hong Kong will always be a part of China it's one country two systems and he vowed that China will always maintain stability in Hong Kong he said specifically no force can shake the status of our great mother land no force can obstruct the advance of the Chinese people and Chinese nation also thanks very much for your impressions really appreciate it you're welcome NPR's

Hong Kong China Chinese Government United States NPR President Trump Seventy Years Thirty Years Seven Days Ten Hours
Hong Kong protests turn violent

Pantsuit Politics

04:29 min | 1 year ago

Hong Kong protests turn violent

"Okay well speaking in a big brother. That's actually a great segue into one of the biggest stories around the globe over the weekend which were the violent protests in Hong Kong so the Hong Kong protests are entering their seventeenth week and they have really dialed up in the past few days because today is the seventieth anniversary of communist Communist rule in China as you can imagine pro democracy protesters in Hong Kong are not exactly excited to celebrate this anniversary but it's a big deal for China which which means. It's a big way for the protesters to send a message. China puts on a big military display in previous years. They've had twelve thousand troops marched through Tiananmen Square where they expect those numbers to be even bigger this year and so with a trade war already giving lots of negative press to China and its economy Hong Kong and in at specifically the pro democracy protesters saw this as their chance to continue to protest and make their messages heard. Unfortunately many of the protests turned turned violent. There are lots of reports of police brutality police fired canister after canister of tear gas and the protesters fought back with blockade aide blocking the streets with throwing stones taken up from the sidewalks and streets and with gasoline bombs thrown back in defense at the police police. We are not helping the situation with our trade war with China. Hong Kong's value to the world has often been as a hub that is kind kind of a bridge between the outside world and mainland China and with the increasing friction between China and the United States there are commentators who think think that Hong Kong's value as that hub is diminishing and it's really jeopardising Hong Kong's place in the world long-term The New York Times quotes Lynette Aung Long a China expert at the University of Toronto is saying after all of this we will see a different Hong Kong the very reason for Hong Kong's existence the rule of law respect for the police for public institutions respect for the judiciary the bureaucracy everything has been eroded. This is a really existential time for Hong Kong and having it come at the same time as this anniversary of Communist role in China when Xi Jinping is engaged in his domestic grab for power in making his term term basically unlimited and his G. political jockeying for power with the United States. It's just there's a lot going on here. I am impressed seventeen weeks to sustain protests. It's amazing and I don't think the protesters and Hong Kong are going anywhere. They are really fighting for their country. We had a listener listener reach out on instagram and say I don't understand the goal of these protests because even if many of their demands hands are met and many have been the original legislation to extradite political prisoners to China or anybody else charged with a crime was withdrawn officially but she asked even if they succeed and having these demands bet we're coming up on the deadline where we have one country two systems that was set up when Hong Kong was released from British rule and turned back over to the Chinese government that that deadline is approaching and so so what do we see happening. What are they. What are the protesters? The PRO democracy protesters who existed before this bill came before the Hong Kong legislator the what's their goal. What is the the long view of how they could exist separate from China if they imagine a scenario when China would ever allow that to happen and and the answer is I don't know I don't know and I don't really feel like it's my place to advocate for one of the other because I don't live in Hong Kong and so the people who do and the the pro democracy protesters particularly the the young ones that people who are going to be living way past just the deadline of this agreement have demands and they do have a vision and it does seem to be if not separate from China fiercely independent and I think as the weeks of the protests continue we'll have a better understanding of where they envisioned all this going but the Chinese government government most certainly envisions a more forceful physical clash with these protesters.

Hong Kong China PRO United States Tiananmen Square Chinese Government Lynette Aung Instagram Xi Jinping University Of Toronto The New York Times Seventeen Weeks
China celebrates 70th anniversary as Xi warns ‘no force can shake great nation’

BBC World Service

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

China celebrates 70th anniversary as Xi warns ‘no force can shake great nation’

"A hundred thousand civilians operating in central Beijing to celebrate the seventieth anniversary of the modern communist Chinese state it follows one of China's biggest ever military displays with thousands of troops goose stepping down the Avenue of eternal peace president xi Jim paying told the crowd in Tiananmen Square that no force could stop China box the nation remains committed to peaceful development in his speech Mr she addressed the recent unrest in the territory of Hong Kong hang time remains committed to its prosperity and

Beijing China Tiananmen Square President Trump Jim Paying Hong Kong
Hong Kong leader pulls extradition bill that sparked massive protests

Washington Today

09:09 min | 1 year ago

Hong Kong leader pulls extradition bill that sparked massive protests

"And now to Hong Kong where the leader Carrie lam today has fully withdrawn a controversial bill that allowed extradition to mainland China sparking three months of often dramatic protest in the financial help of Hong Kong the decision to cave in to the protesters one of five core demands marking a dramatic U. turn for Carrie lam for months she refused to withdraw the bill the refusal to give ground to protesters on four other demands including greater democracy for the city and an independent commission into police conduct though saying all investigations would be carried out by the existing independent police complaints council known as the I. P. C. C. we'll get some background on all of this from The Washington Post Asia editor but first carry lands announcement. of the five two months raised by the public we have in fact responded on various locations. best on withdrawing the bill. on June fifteenth I announced that the bill was expended. and later re iterated that the bill is that. and that all the legislative work had come to a complete halt. second on setting up a commission of enquiring. the government believes that matters relating to police enforcement actions are best handled by the existing and well established independent police complaints council I. P. C. C. which was set up for exactly this purpose. in addition to handling complaints against individual police officers the I. P. C. C. has undertaken a fact finding study under its power. on the handling of large scale public all the events that took place after June nine. one focus will be the UN long incident on July twenty first which attracted Sears public concern. this study aims to ascertain the facts to assess the police handling of protest and to make recommendations to the government. the I. P. C. C. has established a panel of international experts to assist in its work I will make its findings and recommendations public. but on the metal of the protest being a riot. we have explained that in fact there is no legal effect on how such incidents are described all categorized. the department of justice has a show to the public that each and every prosecution decision is based on the evidence collected as in strict accordance with the relevant local and the prosecution cult. full on dropping charges against protesters and riot and shelving prosecutions. I have explained that this is contrary to the rule of law and it's not acceptable. it also goes against the basic law which states that criminal prosecutions must be handled by the department of justice free from any interference those comments by Carrie lam Hong Kong's leader those remarks on local television earlier today but the Washington post is reporting that that today's move was widely seen as falling short on many fronts including a deep concern over the use of force by riot police Brian Murphy is the Asia editor for The Washington Post. well it's been a rather dizzying twenty four hours will begin with very violent and disruptive protest on the weekend today Carrie lam then withdrew a proposal which had been pretty much put on hold anyway but now it's officially withdrawn and this would have allowed extradition to mainland China this is what triggered the protests back in the spring of but the demands of the protesters have gone far beyond this now and they're saying this this isn't close to even being enough to to get them off the streets CSP from some have given the analogy of Tiananmen Square that this is a modern day Tiananmen Square isn't that. I do think that analogy is a little bit flawed in the sense that this is not really a protest to try to change much what this is trying to do is preserve at least in the minds of the protesters the freedoms that political openness and other special status considerations that Hong Kong has had since ninety eight since nineteen ninety seven when it was returned to Chinese control so it's it's different in a fundamental sense it isn't protesters demanding change as much as seeking a kind of assurance that China isn't going to accelerate or rolled back what they already have we're talking with Brian Murphy he is Asia editor for The Washington Post if you could explain the title special status with that is meant for Hong Kong and how China has dealt with Hong Kong. yeah okay the special status is rather broad but in in the the pillars of it would be a pretty much open western style press much less state control on the financial sector certainly much more political openness and all that radiates from most retailers but those are kind of the the mainstays what China has been doing is in small ways but significant ways to the protesters has been exerting its pressure on the former British colony the idea of the extradition bill was was certainly one of these things saying that they would be able to prosecute crimes that happened in in Hong Kong and this special status like I described before is enshrined at least in the deal to hand over from Britain isn't trying for fifty years so that brings us to twenty forty seven the protesters of course fear that that China is impatient to to on that time line and and is and is. in a systematic way trying to a road some of these some of the things that make Kankan different and you mentioned the Hong Kong leader Carrie lam who is she what's her background and how much authority does she ultimately have the ultimate question of of everyone she is a a career politician in the sense that she was hand picked by Beijing she has been very much a vetted by Beijing which would lead many people to think that she takes all her cues from from the Chinese leadership there is some level of autonomy but. this is again one of the pivot points of of all the arrests now the protesters are saying that she is more or less a puppet of Beijing the Hong Kong administration says no we have the ability to to set our own agenda and but the truth probably lies somewhere in between all that and bottom line the protesters message to Hong Kong and to China too little too late exactly in in those exact words as she was announcing the formal withdrawal of the extradition bill social media came alive with it at that exact message the protesters have essentially a five point. list of demands this was just one of them and the other four are are far from being resolved and in fact some members of Carrie lam his own cabinet say this is as far as they can go in concessions so it doesn't really look like it's going to cool down anything we will follow the development into the evening at a Washington post dot com Brian Murphy Asia editor here in Washington thank you for being with us my pleasure.

Carrie Lam Hong Kong Carrie Lam Hong Kong I. P. C. C. China Editor The Washington Post Asia Department Of Justice Asia Washington UN Tiananmen Square Brian Murphy Sears The Washington Post. Twenty Four Hours Five Two Months Three Months Fifty Years
 Hong Kong's divide: Protests for democracy, rally for China

Real Estate Buzz with Mary Ann Cadorna

03:01 min | 1 year ago

Hong Kong's divide: Protests for democracy, rally for China

"Protests in Hong Kong cripple the airport for a couple days as residents in the former British colony reacted to the Chinese government slowly increasing control you you and talk about the volatile situation with house members please change now let's turn our attention to Hong Kong before you joined the Congress you were senior department of state official of course you come from a family that is very well known for their very sober view of the realities of the world China owns Hong Kong they have the two systems one government system Hong Kong for at least another twenty eight years as senator cotton just said is it guaranteed their own an independent judiciary what is your word to president G. and the Chinese government about the protest which are escalating their I I would say yeah the whole world is watching and the world is watching very closely I think that the Chinese have shown their true colors in a number of ways over the past several years at we talked before he'll about the extent to which administrations of both parties I think that China wrong we believe that if they open that economically if we help them open up economically that we see political reform that we didn't see that and instead we've seen China on the March around the globe we've certainly seen China at the forefront the kind of that technology the kind of cultural credit for example imposing on their own status in the treatment the weaker they really are showing their true colors and I think that damn song Kong is going to be the ultimate test for them and that certainly if if we see them at take steps like those they took in Tiananmen Square we see them move to violently put down these protests I think that will give the world that the most serious indication we have yet about China's intentions and it is you know desire not to be part of the community of nations that that rather than to impose that very violent authoritarian system on its own system citizens and and around the globe certainly they have an alternative in firing Carrie lam at present she can dismiss her and if he does that is at least one way of the escalating do you think that is a possibility considering the Chinese have got to be considering data and and all possibilities because I think they they do they recognize the spotlight this on them with respect to what's happening in Hong Kong there they recognized the you know they're somewhat limited I I would hope that that's how they view it in terms of the action that they can take that that you know as I said the world watching so I would imagine that they're looking at that many options that is to try to de escalate that same face that for the government of China and death resolve this in a peaceful way and and certainly you know a peaceful resolution as important but I think that you know the right the people of Hong Kong and the right to to finish this year it's got to be

Hong Kong Twenty Eight Years
Fear Factor for U.S. Consumer Is Rising, Fueling Recession Risk

Politics, Policy, Power and Law

05:53 min | 1 year ago

Fear Factor for U.S. Consumer Is Rising, Fueling Recession Risk

"It's been a tumultuous week the back and forth posturing on trade and tariffs signs of a recession U. S. consumer sentiment plumbed plummeted to a seven month low in August joining us is Carlos to cheer as commerce secretary under president George W. bush and chair of the Albright Stonebridge group thanks for being here Mister secretary a pleasure thank you for having me well it seems like another day another round of bad news and today the consumer sentiment numbers plunged on concerns about the health of the economy our fears of a recession well founded I think they are I mean on one hand you have you know the the longest recovery we've ever had so that right there suggests that were coming to an end but then we're not helping at all a lot of this is so self inflicted the trade wars having a devastating impact it hasn't caught up to the economy yet we saw one point of growth taken off the cute too second quarter results but we will see it and that means some prices are going up it means some companies are laying off workers there'd changing supply chains they're being hesitant about investing this is a very very sensitive time for the markets and frankly it's a bit surprising that that they're ready to move up quickly with any sign of good news end tell me about the effect specifically of president trump's see sawing on tariffs the lack of specificity not knowing from one day to the next whether they're on or off well that's the problem that the Chinese see and the the the Chinese sizes have become very reluctant to strike a deal because they know that that deal can be off in a couple of days or a couple of weeks so that that has become a concern you know we are on one hand we tried to to use tactics and to blow off and to you know make sure people didn't really know with which we we're going as a negotiating tactic well the result of all that has been harder confusion OB and a lack of willingness to enter into an agreement with the U. S. which is concerning the State Council tariff committee said that plans for new tariffs have taken U. S. and China off the track of resolving their dispute but did it ever seem to you that they were even close to a trade agreement you know I I really don't think so I I think from the very beginning the what we saw was escalation of and and specially since president trump Blake's leverage he likes to have something in his back pocket so once he raised tariffs he didn't want to give that up because that was the way that he would bring China to the negotiating table and all of that just builds on itself to the point where now it's a matter of who blinks it's it's it's it's it's become an emotional issue but it is too important to leave it to emotions this is this is the world economy this is the U. S. future the US is future as a reliable trading partner as a leader in trade so there's just a lot of stay here do you think it's because president trump still believes that tariffs work or because he's painted himself into a corner and he doesn't want to back down well that's a that's a great question he talks as if though he believes that the that that China page the tires that we don't and the chairs tires are good thing although they recognize that they're not there and keep the terror of slow we're not going to increase them because Christmas season is coming so that suggests that someone in the administration understands that these terrorists create inflation now that the terrorists were meant to bring China to the table and to reduce the trade deficit is goal number one and that was articulated by the president today after all these tires after all this back and forth our trade deficit with China is up their exports to the U. S. up by viral thirteen fourteen percent our exports to China are down so after all this our trade deficit is actually growing now let's talk just for a moment about Hong Kong because prison time seemed like he was going to stay out of it and but yesterday he wrote China wants to make a trade deal let them work humanely with Hong Kong first about a minute here what happens if he gets involved in that situation well I I don't know if he just threw that out as a way of us saying that Hong Kong could be part of a negotiation I I I I don't know why he got involved in that but the risk of course is that something does happen and it becomes another Tiananmen Square and then we respond will be a lot of pressure to respond the way we did after Tiananmen which was to put export controls in place so China couldn't built sensitive military products if that happens then is just it is another escalation of the war so yes the here we have all these variables in Hong Kong is one of them and no one knows what the president would do there is a pattern here though of trying to avoid a conflict in order to get a trade deal so what we'll have to see and I'm sure the Chinese are reading it as

Carlos One Hand Thirteen Fourteen Percent Seven Month One Day
"tiananmen square" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"And for freedom and who are they fighting against their fighting against the left they're fighting against a regime that that is there the end inheritors of the desert the descendants of the most murderous regime in the history of humankind the Chinese communist regime under Mao Zedong and following mousy dark the most murderous especially under about the most murderous people in the history of humankind bar none they're communists and they murdered millions of people I remember I was working at CNN run Tiananmen Square happened and I recall watching very closely we had live pictures coming out of Canada in square the world did and the CNN dead and the regime sent in I guess several thousand troops to Tiananmen Square to surrounded Tiananmen Square in a single line of troops holding their rifles across their chests in a neat line as the Chinese military well and they stood there for a while and there was an eerie and uncomfortable silence and everyone was on edge and then someone snapped and the Chinese troops mustard and double timed it out of Tiananmen Square and when they did there was a brief side of relief I recall and I sort of chuckled at the sight of relief and I said are you kidding me I said that's a warning these guys are warning them that's that's it it's like your you know your mother is saying one more peep out of you I am but it's Chinese troops and such different in your mom probably like she's a real tiger mom with a bayonet and and I said that's a warning and the next time they come in they're going to kill everybody mark my words and I got a little piece don't be ridiculous and sure enough the next time they came in they killed ever now people are saying at the age of the internet they can't do that again they can't do the same thing over again that fails to recognize that they can shut down the internet they can flip a switch and shut down the internet they can shut down the electricity they can they can shut down whatever they want to shut down don't you know who you're dealing with here these are Chinese communists military dictators with a legacy of mass murder on paralleled in human history not just yet about but the years since nineteen forty nine and the mouse revolution and and if they want to go in and kill everybody and quote unquote restore order they will does the internet change all that might make it harder Meg might make it more complicated but the thing is they don't really care if you see him killing people because they like the message being sent because they're in charge and what are you going to do about it what a Bronco BAMMA do it when they were building islands on coral reefs and militarize in them interfering with with us see traffic can see lines what they do also this Placido Domingo go but it we got to watch the Hong Kong situation very closely and you know what they're fighting against they're they're waving American flags the protestors they're singing god bless America so there's a god bless America that that the American national anthem it is a little bit of broken English sure there but it god bless him because they're fighting for freedom and for democracy and that's what we're all fighting for well that's what some of us are fighting for some of us are fighting to strip away freedom and democracy.

Violent crackdown on Hong Kong protests amid concerns about mass surveillance

Armstrong and Getty

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Violent crackdown on Hong Kong protests amid concerns about mass surveillance

"Bullocks these forces have been massing of the Hong Kong border with White House officials reported to be closely monitoring this build up commentators warning that tanks could be sent in to crush the ongoing protests in a quote Tiananmen Square crackdown take two as the protests continue and have shut down the Hong Kong airport for a

Hong Kong White House
Li Peng, Hong And Communist Party discussed on Hugh Hewitt

Hugh Hewitt

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Li Peng, Hong And Communist Party discussed on Hugh Hewitt

"State media have announced that former Chinese premier Li Peng has died at the age of ninety the official announcement from the Chinese state media praise to leave Hong as an outstanding member of the ruling Communist Party but across China Mr levy had long been known as the butcher of Beijing in the years following the brutal crackdown on pro democracy protests in Tiananmen Square it emerged that Mr lead was the senior official who advocated for force to be used to shut

Li Peng Hong Communist Party Mr Levy Beijing Tiananmen Square Official
 Li Peng, Chinese premier during Tiananmen crackdown, dies

Larry Elder

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Li Peng, Chinese premier during Tiananmen crackdown, dies

"State media have announced that former Chinese premier Li Peng has died at the age of ninety the official announcement from the Chinese state media praise to leave Hong as an outstanding member of the ruling Communist Party but across China Mister Lees had long been known as the butcher of Beijing in the years following the brutal crackdown on pro democracy protests in Tiananmen Square it emerged that Mr lead was the senior official who advocated for force to be used to shut

Li Peng Hong Communist Party Mister Lees Beijing Tiananmen Square Official China
"tiananmen square" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Did you feel that your life wasn't a live with the sort of freedom and an openness that you had desired because Joe funk swell was telling us earlier that prior to nineteen Eighty-nine, there was this reformist movement in the Chinese government. I'm just wondering post, cinnamon as a young person did you did you sense that, there were any freedoms that you desire, that you couldn't have? Yes, you know, when I was in high school, I felt repressed because I felt I couldn't express, my opinion and couldn't do, right. What I wanted to write for school essay. But I didn't have the vocabulary to express. Why something is wrong but I didn't feel comfortable. I didn't like school then, you know, I went to I went to college, you start to learn about stuff, you know, that was because we, we don't have the freedom of expression. Deny was empowered poverty was the language for why I felt depressed when I was younger and where did you go to college in China, Georgia improv, okay? And China's well so, so the discovery of what had happened in June of nineteen Eighty-nine did that change the trajectory of your life? Yes. Because I think, you know, that is part of how I felt about there's a lack of freedom of expression on lack of freedom of in association. So, you know, I just felt that I need to leave the environment as a person I wanted to go to a place that there's freedom of expression that I can't say what I want to say, I can write what I want to write without fear. That's why apply to graduate school in the United States. And I wanted to the US. Well, so, you know, Joe Fong swell, right? Yes. Yes. And met him in the US. Okay. So, so talked me about what that was like meeting of a student demonstrator, who was who was there. One of the organizers of this massive of pro democracy uprising. What did you to talk about? And how, how did that have an impact on? You. I met funk soul much later years after I got to know event. So we didn't really discuss about the event. But, you know, I met him the last time I met him was in last winter, and we had dinner and he was talking about, we're going to organize the commemoration activities and the way he, he talks about the event, it was just very moving how he has persisted in the past thirty years to make people young people like me to remember this event and is just very moving how he has precipitate just it's very inspiring. Well, drew, folks who, when you hear a yacht Wong's story about the sorta transformation, she underwent when she accidentally discovered about what had happened in Tiananmen Square. What does that make you think about all the young people in China today who still either who still actually don't know because we've seen newsra? Reports of, of western reporters recently in tenement square walking around asking young Chinese people about about whether or not, they knew of the of the, the tragedy..

China United States Joe funk Wong Tiananmen Square Joe Fong Georgia thirty years
"tiananmen square" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Who stood still became known as tank man, his fate, still unknown. So what is the legacy of Tiananmen Square thirty years later, both inside of China as the nation has embraced economic reforms but not the political reforms that sparked those protests, thirty years ago. What's its legacy worldwide? I'm joined today by Joe funk, swo-. He is one of the twenty one student leaders of the hundred eighty nine protests. He was arrested on June thirteenth eighty nine imprisoned for a year in China, then moved to the United States in nineteen ninety five Joe FOX will let me just briefly ask you a question. I have some other guests, I want to bring in, but I do want to ask you. What do you think the legacy is of Tiananmen Square inside China for the Chinese people today? Still in China today. This is saying, as a people's call for Justice and democracy. Every year people, there will breathe people res-q everything to commemorate Tim, of course, the government want people to forget, but whenever there's, you know, a protest that touch on this issue, people look back for inspiration from TM and then to unity ni-. There's no doubt about it. But of course, for younger generation, most of them, don't really know history. Right. Oh, they're so afraid to touch on it, even if they are studying here in United States. But when I talk to them directly, and when they knows the full scope, the response comp. Titley positive and strong. Because that's what China needs even today. Well, Joe folks will hold on, for just a moment. Because what you're saying about the government wanting, especially the young people of China to forget is a perfect segue to our next guest, who's joining us now from Culver City, California, and the studios of NPR west Jacci Awang joins us. She's a China researcher at Human Rights Watch who divides her time between Hong Kong and New York. We have a link to her piece, headlined, human rights, activism in PEOs, and posting them square China that link is on point radio dot org. Jacci awang. Welcome to you. Thank you so much for having me. So you were what one year old in one thousand nine hundred nine yes. And but you grew up in China. So how old were you when you first heard about what happened in June of nineteen eighty nine after when I graduate from high school? So at that time there were a lot internet cafe bars. So people just go, there, young people. They like to surf on the internet. So I found it to like by chance. And I saw those pictures of blood..

China Tiananmen Square Jacci Awang Joe funk United States Joe FOX Joe researcher Tim Culver City NPR California high school Hong Kong New York thirty years one year
"tiananmen square" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Maybe followed by shortness of breath, fatigue, and vomiting thirtieth anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre in China being marked outside the capitol today. House speaker Nancy Pelosi help unveil a statue honoring the unidentified man who stood in front of a line of tanks that day today, we remember the horror. Of the massacre in tenement square and heroism of the tenement square protesters. China's never officially reveal the death toll in the bloody crackdown on pro-democracy protesters that took place at said to be in the thousands Pelosi said the United States stands with people fighting for freedom in China and around the world, new stretch of the Empire State trail opens, and Scott Ville. The two mile stretch allows people to walk bike and jog in the wintertime, people can even snowshoe Thomas with the third supervisor of the town of Saratoga. He tells news channel thirteen trade will be great for Scott Ville. It's close proximity to the businesses here in skied of a village. It'll be good for the businesses right next door to the gateway visitor center here and the gateway visitors center is under construction, when completed the seven hundred fifty mile trail will extend from New York City to Canada and New York City to buffalo, the multi use trail allowing people to, to bike walk in jog in all parts of the state. A man from Brooklyn being held in Montgomery County correctional facility after Amsterdam. Police say he was one of two people staged a home invasion on Polaski street on Sunday afternoon. We're weapon was used to hit one of the residents Monday afternoon, Amsterdam. Police observed the suspect Thirty-three-year-old Akeem cords of Brooklyn. They attempted to take them into custody cords got away led. Police on a chase short time after police set up a perimeter. They will they were able to take cords into custody inside a home Hibbard street. He's charged with felony burglary assault and resisting arrest. W G by news time five thirty four. Our next update at six, I'm Jim gag Leoni more Sean Hannity in less than three minutes, a NewsRadio, eight ten and what three one W G Y.

China Scott Ville Nancy Pelosi Amsterdam Brooklyn Tiananmen Square New York City Thomas vomiting Jim gag Leoni Sean Hannity Montgomery County Saratoga supervisor burglary United States Canada buffalo
"tiananmen square" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"From foreign policy. I'm Sarah wild Mun. And this is first person this week an inside account of the TNN square massacre. Thirty years ago this month student protests rutted in Beijing posing one of the most significant threats to the rule of the communist party in China's history. The demonstrations lasted two months and grew to include a range of citizens all demanding reforms in the country. For the first time in huge numbers. The ordinary men and women of Beijing the old and the young professors and taxi drivers have joined the student protests lending, their support to what is now taking on all the appearances of a peaceful popular uprising against the oppressiveness of communist rule campaign for China's renewal in an atmosphere of freedom and democracy, the focal point of the protest was Tiananmen Square. The heart of Beijing within a few weeks the government declared martial law and then in early June the world watched in horror as Chinese military tanks rolled in the streets of Beijing on the way to Chinaman's square. They fired indiscriminately at protesters there were reports of tanks rolling over students. The noise have gun five rose from all over the center of Peking, it was unremitting. On the streets leading down to the main road to ten on men square furious. People stood in disbelief at the glow in the sky listening to the sound of shots in the midst of all this chaos was John Pomfret who covered China for these Tosi press of the time hit an advantage over his fellow foreign correspondents. He had studied in China spoke Mandarin fluently and had many contacts in student movement. He joins us today. John, thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. So we're coming on the thirtieth anniversary of the TNN square massacre. But I want to actually start with how you came to China in the first place. How did you come? So I went to college wanting to study neuro physiology. Okay..

China Beijing John Pomfret Tiananmen Square Sarah wild Mun communist party Tosi Thirty years two months
"tiananmen square" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on KPCC

"Seeing the Chinese throw out gradually or make life hard for Google Facebook other American companies, recently, Microsoft and replace those firms with their Chinese equivalents. Then we saw them begin to spread out with equipment that would not only tied together like-minded countries. But that would lend themselves to the kind of social control that the Chinese have been exercising in Chinese networks. Of course, they're now using artificial intelligence and facial recognition to keep track of dissidence to make sure that there are Social Credit scores that can get transmitted around easily to figure out who's the most loyal citizen. So the Chinese networks may become the favourite of authoritarians round the world. And if that happens, we could end up with a sort of new Berlin Wall, but one that is built around these networks a highly controlled part of the internet that's run by the Chinese and then a western internet. That's more like what were all custom you type into the search engine tell me about Tiananmen Square. You get a real Wikipedia entry that answers it that you wouldn't. Get if you type those same questions in over a Chinese network. So the fight over y you're saying fits into that the US is discouraging kind of our half of the world from leading the way in which may further this division of these two internet's the east and the west, absolutely. The Chinese have been trying to do this for a long time. But we may actually be feeding process by barring wa away and other Chinese companies from building key parts of the western internet. And you know, the oddity about this is if you're going to have a global telecommunications network sooner or later, the United States is going to have to plug in to the Weiwei built five G networks as well. That's not the same as having them build the core of your own network. But it's not as if you're going to be able to say, we're never gonna talk to a five G network built by the Chinese. I wonder is there an argument for letting wall way in a controlled way help develop networks around the world, including. In the United States. So that there is a truly integrated internet. I I understand the risks. You're outlining, and they seem very real. But if everybody goes off into their corner and builds their own internet that would seem like its own giant seven national security risks. It it does seem that way to me. And I think there's one strong argument in favor of lending alway compete in some of these western countries, and maybe even compete in the United States is that if they wanna have their equipment and their software inside the United States. They have to show it to American right? They have to bring that software over let the United States poke through it let it examine that for back doors, and in fact in private you've heard many people in US industry say that the national security agency. Hey, the smart way to go about this is let while we competed will drive the price down and you'll see their work and the NFC as hands for at least. So far has been. We're sorry. The risk is just too great. David. Thank you very much. We appreciate it. Great to be with you. In an.

United States Berlin Wall Google Microsoft Tiananmen Square wa Wikipedia Weiwei David five G
"tiananmen square" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"On mytalk one zero seven one thanks for tuning in. He you know, January can feel like oh my gosh. What are we gonna do? Now. It's freezing cold you feel like you should just hibernate and watch Netflix all the time. I actually went out last night. It's hard to motivate go back out into the world when it's dark. It's dark when you leave in the morning. But it's always freezing cold. But I went to see a new play at the Guthrie that opened last night called the great leap paper. Yeah. It sounded interesting. And so I thought I think maybe my fourteen year old would like this. Because it's it's the premise is basketball. But it's not so much about sports. It's really a story kind of a family story, but also through the lens of history. It's kind of set in historical. If it goes between the seventies and then Tiananmen Square in China. Yeah. And so I thought my my kid likes history. I thought he might be interested. It's really cleverly done. There's only four actors in the whole show, and it was so funny because afterwards I said that we'd really like you have to think about it. Because one. No, they don't they don't they don't. But it's just so clever the way it's it's so simple. But elegant the way it staged and there's a lot of swearing. I have to say that I got a little nervous because heard it before. Well, that's the thing we walked in. And there's a big sign warning you that like the language is strong. And I'm like, oh my God. Have I erred, and then I start looking around and like I'm not seeing any other teenagers. Have I totally judge of this. And to end is everyone looking at me like what kind of mother brings their know. And then literally in the first ten seconds like every word, you could imagine first of all he's grinning ear to ear like, this.

Tiananmen Square Netflix basketball China fourteen year ten seconds
"tiananmen square" Discussed on WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on WHCP Community Radio 101.5 FM

"Defense really look they could it use cameras down wake maybe other this to make countries that defense even vet could replace uh we could tj look warwar at were that for sean latin jones america um what about on the offense nc you know jarvis i remember are very in chilly very widely for example the nonviolent movement against style general hometown fans pinochet drivers lander is predicted when one to go little to the strategy baltimore ravens they use because for example the ravens uh duty wide one receivers night when those that'd be interesting they to knew the on the broncos that though the oppressors slid around the broncos were coming yeah to arrest and probably do worse because the people who were leading that struggle there they had some organiz and this is just a small strategy but everybody in the neighborhood started banging pots and pans it sounds silly even but frightened when they heard this huge rumble it's so frightened these people who had come to take away the leaders of the opposition that they lie last and didn't do damage i don't mean to be simplistic about it because it wasn't just that you know it was many things even when we look at the situation like uh uh you know a 1989 uh tiananmen square in in china you know i think it was not it was not an end but the beginning uh dr king taught that unearned suffering is redemptive and i believe that uh that movement in that dream for freedom is alive and well we have signs of that and you know look at the the dalai lama who still after all these years reminds his follow was that the nonviolent way will in time bring concessions from china that are even unimaginable that present oh hey we have a wonderful example in south africa don't we uh where they were decades of resistance to apart fate and um slowly but surely it war way the stones of oppression and if anyone would read nelson mandela's uh long walk to freedom for example we see that you know you can't put a time limit on.

jarvis broncos china dr king dalai lama nelson mandela pinochet baltimore tiananmen square south africa
"tiananmen square" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"You who have played their companies that are very at the chinese company after again will give a bigger trade who here of the year over the exfar returned here a bob it's been about thirty years since tiananmen square is there any reason when you look at the regime in beijing today is there any reason to think that that this regime today looks at what happened in tiananmen square and he differently than the people were in power at that time in other words could that happen again or has there been changes the top uh i think that people were pressured them to his continuing uh as it always is here for you leave people return to their wanted to be hooked up it could happen though the real question that you raised which is a great what his world people but fiddle with charter go to lower ebit short essay we've heard we're going to thurbers group of duty of at about this very creative uttered were harsh i think is very high but i think upenn happen it will be crush of the rotary hit shortages huge i believe with cricket hortatory it the world olympic go have doors that they should be used for their report here they are through to bring people doubles driven history deal and john is on the line of west chicago cianjur on with bob go ahead great guys awarded a cato coercion the idea that god in college course words demanddriven uh seemed to me that there has been so much money thrown at uh angstrom grab scholar increase color ships and so on that's really allowed college spirit greatest quakers away.

tiananmen square john chicago bob beijing thirty years
"tiananmen square" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

02:22 min | 4 years ago

"tiananmen square" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

"Ethnic remarkable the beer combining academic william am could mid mccurry uh uh own barca bull bigger 1980 when china in terms of fabrics keno reveal in the realm of of criticism on your i'm talking about work tremendously with me and collectibles dakota um girls club and then you can't even square 100plus happened on they would have been very for him to come home of slow on phenomenon which would not cutting correctly in calls no he fell getting height stick him on uh volleys students who on tiananmen square lynching is in mind and try to help the right decision as uh as they face down the communist regime at that point i'm still go in and some other elder sixers uh took up residence in the square and strict guidelines tvs took a dinner and mm great terrible to land people were you know she didn't the troops were shooting in the square and to um no uh steve with um and negotiated with the troops to uh to allow students lisa square and in four that she was a trundled off to a a work tan than it wasn't the first time of course that he would be jailed in his life hugo there was a quote it really struck me as that a friend of ours ilaria maria sala an italian journalist who knew liu xiaobo very well she met him in the late 1980s when she herself was a student in beijing and took one of his classes she recalls this is what he said to her quote i used to be a public intellectual at university and now i am a professional dissident i'd rather be something else but they chose for me and quote.

mccurry china sixers liu xiaobo beijing tiananmen square lisa square