20 Episode results for "Thyroid Cancer"

Gerry Thomas questions our fear of nuclear power

The Science Show

12:53 min | 1 year ago

Gerry Thomas questions our fear of nuclear power

"Meet Professor Gerry Thomas Actually if you live near a coal to nothing say about you know this is the side show mystics ray novel is on fire concrete flash now Chernobyl holds over three trillion you are dealing with something that has never occurred on this planet and quake but it is yet another example like climate denial of old facing climate crisis. Jerry Thomas is professor of molecular pathology and what did you think of it so far I'm afraid to three hours to watch because I kept stopping correct and other things like opening a door with their fire behind it with your bare hand in week to go through the rest I probably will but I'm hopefully I'll get less sensitized as I go through the first that's your opinion well if I quote from the unskilled documentation which is stuff that we've gone we know twenty eight of those died within a few weeks to months after the accident there assist some of those deaths have been related to driving cars are called or cigarette smoking whether doses are much lower and do two types like radio iodine one three one iodine and the older people we don't get thyroid cancer even if we use a higher dose of iodine and that's simply because exposure we've had about fifteen destined fired cancer we think approximately five ages as well during natural life but we think about five thousand excess cancers we've already as we would expect very few to die from their cancer simply because thyroid cancer is very easy to creation so if the sixteen thousand is right we would reckon we'd see a total up to one thousand ninety two I've not actually been the power plant my Ukrainian colleague is going to arrange now it's a lot easier to go and there are some people living in areas which seemed worked there there's not so many young people because obviously there's not so much industry because nobody wants and we know that cesium actually doesn't give you a very high dose of radiation to the body it the same one cat scan so you can see why is the doses are low you're a real mess it was an industrial accident of horrendous proportions and it wasn't managed actually kills more people than the radiation does because of the stress of evacuation inappropriate I think they cut the food chain very quickly so they stopped sources of contaminated. The unlikely as I'm a scientist you can never say never but it's highly unlikely we'll see anything cool how do you keep a watch effectively on that sort of thing whether an health and we are starting to see an awful lot of stress related problems coming out nothing uh-huh medical purposes

thyroid cancer Gerry Thomas professor Jerry Thomas scientist three hours
243: Thyroid Cancer & Endometriosis [SUCCESS]

Beat Infertility

49:34 min | 8 months ago

243: Thyroid Cancer & Endometriosis [SUCCESS]

"Welcome to be infertility a podcast where we get real about infertility empowered you to take back control and provide you with hope for the future ready. Here's your host fellow infertility warrior heather, whom in. Welcome to episode two, forty, three today you'll hear the success story of a woman named Cathy. She is a thirty eight year old transformation specialist who enjoys traveling and going on adventures with her son. Years before the began trying to conceive, she was diagnosed with endometriosis. Once she was ready to build her family. She had three consecutive miscarriages which all required DNC's. At that point, her doctor began to take her more seriously and agreed to a more extensive workup. What they found was completely unexpected thyroid cancer. She underwent cancer treatment and had delay trying to conceive for year after completing. She became pregnant again but unfortunately, that pregnancy also ended in a miscarriage and DNC. She did one more cycle this time with climate and Presto and became pregnant with twins. However due to her thyroid levels her doctor was concerned that her cancer had returned. lets us. Know how Kathy lost one of her twins but went on to give birth to a healthy son. Kathy welcome to the show. Welcome. Thank you for having me. Why don't we start by hearing a little bit about you? How old are you? What do you do for living at? What do you do for fun? I am about to turn thirty nine I am a transformation coach. So I help women, take back their lives step into their power. Get rid of that burnout robotic syndrome that we can sometimes fall victim to just running through life and really step into the confidence and joy that they're absolutely worthy of unlike start loving life. We are such adventurers we love to travel sports. We Are Baseball Junkies in this house we love being outside whether it's bike rides going for walks we have A. Eighteen month old puppy who keeps us. Pretty active on our walks and one thing that surprises a lot of people that I love and have loved for years is I own and ride a Harley and I just to me that's therapeutic mine-clearing clearing activity. Think about your life before infertility back how would you describe yourself as a person I would say this I was so young and I was so. Naive but I was carefree. I thought had all the time in the world to do everything I was just doing whatever I wanted eating whenever I wanted really not thinking twice about future implications of what I was doing to my body or things that were coming up at all. Tell me about the moment when you I knew you wanted to be a mom that goes back probably to my childhood you know as A. Child I always thought I wanted to be a teacher when I grew up that was always in my head that I was going to be a teacher when I was in high school, I was actually at a childcare center so I was around little all day long I got to play and have fun and helped mold them, and so it was always a part of my life in I just loved being around the littles. To me. They've always been a big big piece of my heart a halted longing to be a mom impact other decisions in your life. You know initially because I had this theory in my head that I had all the time in the world. I told myself that I could put off becoming a mom to chase after my career and so I did that for many years I focused on my career and accelerate my career in the back of my head I just kept telling myself okay. Winners a tipping point. When is the point Gonna Tom that we say we're at a point in our career were organised settle in for a family. But point came probably before I was ready but it was a catalyst for the journey but it was always there. It was always in the back of my head. Let's dive into the journey to build your family, take us through your whole infertility timeline. Goodness how much time do you have this? This is years but we'll recap in you know in two thousand and two I was having many problems I was with my cycles nobody could figure out why was having so much pain in sporadic hemorrhaging and all these really unpleasant things for young woman to go through, and then my doctor suggested that I have a laparoscopy because they believed that it was endometriosis. And at the time, there was not a whole lot known about endometriosis. We definitely know more today than we did that. But at the time. The information I was getting from my doctor was Kinda simplistic. You know we'll go in scrape it out. We'll take it out and TATA you're fine. There was no talk about you know long-term effects or this could come back and so I thought well okay great. Let's just fixed us we go in we have the surgery and I'll be magically all better that however was dot the issue things were better for shortwhile after that. Of course, after I recovered from the surgery I started to feel better and so I thought Oh maybe it did work but then I kind of back into the cycle of having all these problems come up again. At that point I just thought. I just have to accept it. This is just how it is. This is just how my body operates and again I put it to the back of my head. So that was two thousand and two I just focused on my career. After that I thought I, this is not a battle I. Could seemingly win. So okay, we're just GONNA but having kids and dealing with this on the back burner and go on forward. What happened in two thousand six was a surprise pregnancy that completely caught me off guard. I had all these mixed emotions about of course, I've always wanted to be pregnant and have a baby but. Wasn't expecting this is this the right time? And going through. This internal battle in my head. Just, about the time that I had started to accept it and go you know what? This is a good time. You have to kind of let go of Control Cathy and say you know what? There's no perfect time I got to go for my first ultrasound in hair that heartbeat. And at that moment I just knew like this this is it. This is what I was waiting for. This is what I was meant for. And then shortly after that two weeks after that, I started having cramping and bleeding, which I'm was no expert on pregnancy but I was like something has dramatically ron here I went into the doctor. Was told that there is no longer a heartbeat. miscarrying. We could let this happen. Naturally, there was no need to rush into any sort of surgery or anything like this. Having only been my first pregnancy. I thought okay. We'll let it happen naturally why go through a surgery if I don't have to however that for me personally was not a good decision what ended up happening was weeks of hemorrhaging my body did not want to have a miscarriage. It kept fighting it. Until the point I was darn near passed out on the bathroom floor at that point I ended up going in for a emergency DNC because I was losing too much blood and it was going to impact my overall health and that really me because I had gotten to the point where I was really excited about this. I really wanted this to be that point in my life where I said Okay I've been a prioritize being a mom over over my career. It just really put me in a bad mental place which I think a lot of women who go through miscarriage and relate to. At that point, I said I'M NOT GONNA go back to focusing on my career. Now I know I need to focus on being a mom. But what happened after that was a roller coaster of emotions shortly after that, I was able to get pregnant again. Only to miscarry again. At about eight week point. I just kept telling my doctor's like something is wrong I feel like something is wrong and at this point, the doctors were saying you're gone. It's only been two miscarriages. This isn't you know completely abnormal and they kind of dismissed would I thought was my intuition telling me something more is wrong here. By the third miscarriage. My doctor started to take me a bit more seriously sent me for some testing. And I never would have guessed. At what they had found. At. A work. Of for, at my OB's office. The. Kind of patted my throat like most doctors do when you go in for an exam and she said, she felt something in my throat. which completely threw me off like here I was at a checkup to work on my fertility. What is she talking about my throat for she wanted me to go have it checked out. And I remember in my head. Being so frustrated that I felt like I was not getting my answer on why I kept having miscarriages. That didn't WANNA. Take any more time or energy or effort to talk about my throat. Why don't we just answer the initial question of why my continuously happiness mathies miscarriages? And I remember thinking I don't want to go to that doctor to talk about my throat because. I JUST WANNA focus. Everything. I'm getting my answer. As to why can't have a baby? I eventually resigned and went to the doctor about my throat. And thank goodness. I. Did because he found a tumor, my throat that we ended up by APP seen five biopsies later. and. About a week later, I got the results and he told me that the biopsies were positive for popularity thyroid cancer something that completely knocked me sideways like I never saw that one comment I was here I was thinking maybe it was why couldn't have a baby was my endometriosis was back or something like that? But now not only did I not have. My Baby. But now I'm also being told the cancer in I remember walking out of that doctor's office. Literally. Sinking to the floor in the hallway in the middle of this medical center like just I had nothing left at this point I was emotionally and physically just train like now what do I do this and what? Does. All this mean like maybe it's not meant to be maybe that vision in my head of being the mom and chasing the kids maybe. Maybe that was just a dream. And I went down this vicious dark hole spiral thinking trying to understand like why is this telling? May What am I supposed to get from this? Like, am am I supposed to be a mom? Maybe I'm all supposed to be a mom maybe I should just accept that. But I didn't want to accept it, and so I told the doctor that did my thyroid surgery that he had one shot in only one shot it all the cancer out. So we were going to do the most aggressive treatment. Because I had to get back to my dream of having my baby so he needed to do whatever we needed to do as fast as we needed to do it so that I could get back on course to have my baby the tricky part of that. Is Because of the type of cancer I had I had to have radiation. And so you have to wait twelve months to ensure all the radiation is out of your body so that it doesn't hinder your baby or your pregnancy, and so there was other berry frustrating point is now they're telling me I have to wait. Another year. And I kept thinking I'm not getting any younger here. How is this going to work I keep having problems in this drags out again went pen down this rabbit will. Also told by the doctor. ADMINISTERED THE RADIATION THAT Women who have this type of radiation typically go into menopause earlier. So again, I felt like the walls were caving in, I'm not getting younger. I'm going to go into menopause earlier and I just felt like I'm running out of time. So we need to make this work quickly. So after the twelve months was up I did not WanNa waste anymore time and so I went to work with an infertility clinic. They initially put me on Coleman to try and expedite this process to a healthy pregnancy. We also found out I had low progesterone levels so I had to take progesterone as well to help maintain the pregnancy. So I got pregnant again right away. So we figured out that getting pregnant was not necessarily the issue it was maintaining that pregnancy and so I went on to have a fourth miscarriage, and again at this point I'm thinking to myself I don't know how much more my body can take this roller coaster of pregnancy DNC cancer surgery radiation. My Body is running out of steam to keep going. But. I wasn't. Ready to stop. My doctor had even suggested. You know, maybe give your body arrests leaded have some time to gain back some strength. But I felt like I didn't have time again. I felt like the walls were caving in right of menopause is coming earlier and I'm not getting younger we need to move and so we tried for a second round again we had Clo- mid the PA- gesture wrong I was giving myself injections. and. Again, we got pregnant. And This time we went in for that I ultra sound not only did we hear one heartbeat, but there were two and so I was extremely elated but extremely terrified. Twins of course is a manageable number but oh, my goodness this is overwhelming way more than I had absolutely anticipated but I, also had that fear in my head you know what if I lose the twins to like I've lost every other pregnancy up until this point. And I. Could not. Let. Go of that anxiety. And then I went in for a checkup and was told that My thyroid levels through the roof. Something was wrong. I needed to understand what was going on. And my doctor actually sent me back to see the cancer specialists thinking one of the things that could be causing this is that my cancer could be back. The fact that he even said, my cancer could be back. Brought just a whole. `nother level of anxiety to me. Because it. Took me so much to get to this point. Took me years to get to this point that now you're telling me that my cancer could be back I. Don't know how to grapple with that. I went up to the cancer specialist he did some testing. Thankfully. My cancer was not back. It was very likely a combination of all the medications. I. Was wrong through my body into a bit of turmoil there for a moment. It did love allow I think anyone who's been on infertility medications can tell you it's quite the roller coaster that your body goes through. So I thought okay were were good here. This is going to stabilize this pregnancy in hopefully maintain this pregnancy, but I held my breath and I told myself I was GONNA hold my breath until I got through that twelve week point because I was too terrified to tell anybody about it. Thinking that miscarriage was just around the corner. And then one day at work I can still remember it even it was so many years ago at this point. I was going up the stairs at work. And I got the shooting pain in my stomach to the point where I was doubled over in the stairwell and all I could think at that point was I'm losing my babies. At call the doctor he said immediately come in. Let's see what's going on. So I literally ran out of work and ran over to the doctor's office. And what he told me was that. We lost one of. The twins. However twin a my little fighter still had a strong heartbeat and was still fighting strong. So it was a mixed message that again brought me on another roller coaster of emotions of course I was. Still, elated to have a baby it again, I had. Thought I was having to Kinda. Got Visions of twins in my head if he will. But I still wasn't ready to tell anyone I was still holding my breath I did not have any morning sickness I did not have any cravings. I didn't have any of that all. I really honestly had was complete and utter exhaustion I just wanted to sleep. I didn't even want eat I just wanted to sleep and I was able to through most of my pregnancy still have a bit of energy to exercise I still kept relatively acted my entire pregnancy up until the point I remember it it was my one kind of what I will call my. Emotional moment as as a pregnant woman, I went to my doctor for a checkup. At this point, I was about seven months pregnant and. She looked she said you need to stop with the exercise you're going to go into. Premature. Labor. And I was like that one thing crush. To kind of comical now, looking back because of all the possible things that I could. End Did face to get to that point I was upset that I on an exercise anymore. But she said, no, you need to do this. Otherwise the baby's baby's GONNA come early. So I did of course followed instructions and then I laughed when my stubborn child did not want to arrive, I had to be induced I just chuckled at my doctor and I was like, Oh, I thought you said he was coming early. But course you know you never know these little babies have their own mind. So you know it was June twenty second twenty eleven that my little angel baby came into this world. And he has just been. What I call a magical spirit ever since. I still think he doesn't know because it's kind of hard to explain to a little humble i. I think he's still hasn't twin intuition but because he's asked them some interesting questions about his brother and I don't know how he would possibly know anything about that. But it gave me chills day he randomly asked. But this little baby has grown into a nine year old. Now, he has just brought so much joy and he teaches me things every day that I have never would have encountered. Had this little soul him into my life and so. It took me five years to have him five years of. Surgeries and tests. And medications but. It was worth all of it. Now honestly, I can't imagine a world without him. How many weeks were you when you lost twin be I was nine. Weeks and what do they do when you lose one baby, but the other is still thriving they do anything. They just kind of let it naturally pass on its own, which to me was kind of weird having gone miscarriages before. Every miscarriage I had I had to have a surgical DNC because my body just did not cooperate for whatever reason and so I thought well, how does that work when I have a thriving baby here and the doctor said now? Watch but the should pass on its own. It actually did which I didn't believe him having gone through the experiences I had had before I was in I was a doubter for sure I can. I can admit that? But it it all worked out where I did not have have any procedures or anything like that. was extremely painful because I've been told that after eight weeks or so a DNC is really the the best way to go. Yeah, it was painful. And I. Don't even know how to say it but it was. After Almost. My my second DNC almost became robotic about it, which is disturbing on a different level, but you know I ended up having five DNC's. Through. All of my years of trying to have children and I think just almost resigned myself to this once they say the word non-viable pregnancy and miscarriage. I just. Was So numb that I resigned myself to it and it it's not a pleasant experience. It's. As you say it's painful. It's not anything fun but I just became numb to it. Can. You clarify does your son know about the baby you lost and if not, do you plan to tell him, I have never spoken to him about it because I up this point he's nine. Now it's a little bit different but I always thought, oh, he's so young it's hard to understand and grasp. I do plan to tell him about it. I think it's important for him to know. Because I, saying that believe it or not we all choices but I think. Some of his. Being old soul that he is in the intuition that he has. These different things I have to believe we're driven by that experience. have. You gone into menopause already lake your doctors suspected you would. I actually went into a medically Hindus menopause. I had a hysterectomy in two thousand fifteen after having a terrible experience with a molar pregnancy that ended up having some very extreme damage to my body. I had to have a I didn't have to chose to because it was so dramatically bad. hysterectomy. So yes, I I have gone it. I know molar pregnancies can be cancerous was yours. They say now based on the testing that they did again it it resulted in an emergency DNC. From testing the they say now. How did your thyroid problems at a complexity to your pregnancy with your son? It definitely added complexity in that I got to see the doctor in the full bottomed way more than I probably ever wanted to see them. So we were constantly tracking my thyroid levels medications and making sure that my thyroid levels were in a safe and healthy range because obviously anything I was taking impacts to my health or being passed to my baby right and so we want to make sure that. I was constantly maintaining this healthy level which. is a combination of so many things every time. There's an adjustment to your health it trips your thyroid levels, right. So if you gain weight to lose weight any of these kind of shifts, it shifts your thyroid levels and so because I was gaining weight in pregnant and there was all this poll on my body. We had to make sure that I was getting enough. Supplementation with medication to keep my thyroid levels up actually had a hard time keeping them up during the pregnancy, we had to keep increasing my medication by. It was. I think in the doctor's office, you know at least once a week, sometimes more especially in the early stages of that pregnancy. What was it like in that moment when you were diagnosed with thyroid cancer to be honest it was how? It was what I thought was serious kick to the gut I thought. I don't know what this means I. Don't know what this means for my future I don't know. If I'm going to live let alone be able to have a baby and I also couldn't wrap my head around why? Because it was type of cancer that nobody in my family had had I didn't fit any of the demographics for cancer was. I was out of the the age range. I wasn't in the typical geographic locations for this cancer like none of it made any sense. A. Tend to be a very logical person. I can deal with even worse news. If there's some sort of logic or some to it and that. It couldn't make sense to me like I actually asked the doctor show me a copy of the path allergy report because. I couldn't believe what he was saying. I had to see the words. Myself on the pathology report and once I read them myself. That's when. The bottom fell out Niger sunk. Were you given any fertility saving options like a creasing? I was offered it and I thought about it and I thought about. What will I do with this? Where will I go with this? I chose not to freeze eggs. I chose not to for few reasons when I was having my son. Back. In Tony Ten. Tony Levin. And we were working with infertility specialist at that time he told me that might quantity and quality was about thirty percent of what it should be that really weighed on my mind now. Yes. I could still freeze eggs of course you can. But what? Is that GonNa Bring in me. If we already now they're a fraction of what it should be, what was it like to go through cancer treatment and what did you support team look like during that time Cancer Treatment was, of course nothing nothing pleasant less than two weeks after I was diagnosed with cancer I went in for my surgery I had my entire thyroid removed. After. I had to go on a very specific low iodine diet so that when I did go in for the radiation, it would have an increased uptake. It was pretty awful. I wish I could say the worst thing was the really bland boring diet I had to eat for two weeks. But the radiation itself is. Such an unpleasant experience. You just get a plethora of symptoms like the rush that goes through your body and after my surgery it was. Very lonely I couldn't drive 'cause. I couldn't turn my head for a few weeks and so I really had to count on you know people to help me groceries and those sorts of things. My Support Team one is. It was great. It was I have friends who? Would come over and have movie night. I would have my family had sent flowers helped cheer me up those little things sometimes mean more than people realize. So you didn't opt for egg freezing, but once you were given the all-clear I imagine you had an additional sense of urgency to get pregnant sooner rather than later. Absolutely I remember walking into the infertility doctor now's like you know. We need to hurry into this now. Now. Because I don't know. I don't know what's going to happen I. Don't Know How long I've got. So were you at a artillery clinic this whole time or with your ob? I was with my OPI- up until I was diagnosed with cancer than because of that urgency about like we need to stop delaying I, need to cut to the chase that is when I went to the infertility clinic and how did you select your clinic and what was your initial impression at the time there were not as many Clinton infertility clinic says there are today not as many infertility specialists as. there. are today I really had a limited number of options in my geographical area. So of course, proximity plays a role right? You don't WanNa be driving two hours multiple times a week if you don't have to. So I looked at proximity I looked at the doctor's reputations looked at the clinics reputations I. looked at you know, do they have any expertise in dealing with these candidate unique or one off situations? Of course looked at success rates. You know how successful they because if they don't have a huge success rate and I'm running out of time, this is not going to work for me. We need to find person that can get us the best success fastest. Hey infertility warrior it's heather. This episode of beat infertility is brought to you by me regular listeners of the show know that I struggled during my infertility with. From, finding the right clinic to advocating for protocol customized to my body to allowing infertility, consume my entire existence and everything in between in other words I've been where you are. Now that I'm on the other side of interviewed hundreds of other warriors and fertility experts I've discovered the fastest way to realize your dream of becoming a parent is to get educated. Regain hope build resiliency learn self advocacy skills and partner with someone who's been there whether you're an infertility Newbie or a seasoned veteran it would be my honor and privilege to provide as one client. Put it unwavering support with fully engulfing and genuine empathy. If you'd like to learn more or schedule a free thirty minute call to discuss how I can support you during your infertility journey. Go to beat infertility dot co slash. Hope now back to the show. How did you manage your mental health through all of those? I can definitely say looking back now that is the one thing that. was. ignored. I never allowed myself the chance to properly feel or he'll grieve always base that I lost. I was a numb robot going through the motions. Even when I lost my son's twin, I just became obsessed with okay. What do I have to do to keep this twin alive? I don't WanNa say ignoring the fact that I lost the twin or acknowledging the fact that I lost all the babies previous. But I pushed it to the back of my mind. which is extremely unhealthy. I don't recommend it to anyone, and at the time blessed infertility clinic I worked with a brought me my son of course, they kept me healthy. So I'm very thankful for that. But at the time I wasn't hearing from those providers on answering the question of how are you you know I go in and we get my labs done I would go get ultra southbound I would go and I. Don't remember hearing the question. How are you? How are you doing? It's as if it wasn't spoken about. which is so sad now when I look at it. And I know we are doing better today we're not exactly where we should be, but we are doing better today about talking about those things. But it it was as if something you just didn't talk about and so I because other people weren't talking about it, people were asking me. Thought I wasn't supposed to. And so I just buried emotions obviously now I know that that was extremely unhealthy coping mechanism. Your thyroid issues are in obvious answer to why you were having so many difficulties, but you're also diagnosed with endo many years earlier as an endo diagnosed myself I'm curious if you think that might have played a role in your doctors thought about that. I personally think it. All was a part of the puzzle course. There's no definitive as you know, definitive way to pinpoint in answer with infertility, it's unfortunately can be very frustrating unexplained things that happen my doctors thought that it could be however, they didn't see any large significant answer large buildup of Ando when I was trying to conceive to see, might Szott have my son? So there was nothing visually. That they could see you know with ultrasounds and whatnot that would be stopping or blocking pregnancy or prevent me from maintaining a pregnancy. There was nothing that they could again scientifically say this is it. They didn't discard it either they. They always allowed it to be the possibility that there could be these things are causing us, and so we just needed to find a way to counteract them. Ando often causes poor. And sometimes, poor ovulation. So I almost wonder if that was the cause of your low progesterone. Yeah Well could have been the the initial. Strike because that was the only way for me to maintain the pregnancy at the end of the day was to supplement progesterone. It were to obviously I have my son but even to this day many. Different point in my life now but even to this day. Had to track my progesterone levels because they to keep my healthy hormone levels because they do drop low. I have a feeling I know the answer to this question but I ask all of my guests. So here we go. Tell me about the lowest point during your journey and how you picked yourself backup. The lowest in my journey was definitely after I had three miscarriages than being told I had cancer the combination of the two. Was Literally a point where I questioned like, why am I living? Because none of this makes sense none of it makes sense because it's not fitting where I thought I would be or go in life I can't have my baby now I have cancer and I don't know what that even means for my life. Let alone this vision of life that I want like what was the point living and yes I I was that low that I questioned like do the why am I even continuing? What about positive moment from your journey? Oh I think you know? Now I can look you know when you're in the midst of what I call the dark days. It's hard to see the the glimmers of hope in the silver linings. But now that I see there, are you know I say this to my son every day I say that he saved me because if it was not that drive and desire to have a baby in good answers. I likely would not have found my cancer for many years later. Because I had no symptoms it was not showing anything in blood work I didn't know I had a tumor in my throat until the doctor pointed out but I would never been at that doctor. Had I not been quote unquote crazy demanding answers as to why couldn't have my baby every day I look at him and I I I thank him because. I truly believe he saved me tell me about the moment when you first learned, you were going to be a mom. I was like a little schoolgirl girl I was so excited babies in little in kids have always been a piece of my heart and so to have my own and that vision of decorating the nursery and all that I was beyond Giddy. What is it like to be a single parent? I'm not gonNA like it has its challenges but at the same time, the rewards are so great. I have an incredible relationship with my son we have this mother son bond that almost unbreakable it. Tells me anything in everything which can become a at time for child But, the fact that he is so comfortable the fact that. We have these ideas of going on adventures in explorations together. is in the kitchen with me helping in. Of, course can get exhausting frustrated. In our knocking not lie hide about that zits always sunshine rainbows. Especially, when he was younger even more so challenging but now seen the person a little person that he's rowing into that, I've moulded through exhaustion and hard work and. Perseverance like he's a really a special child. How did you balance work miscarriages and cancer treatment? How as eloquently as one might think. For Cancer Treatment was out on medical leave for six weeks between the surgery, the radiation. So I was just. Out, there is nothing to balance there. Now with the infertility miscarriages I. Guess the good point was that my. Clinic was close to my office. So I could go before work I could go on my lunch hour. They made it very convenient to go in and get my labs tested my visits done. You know that being said the restore you know we still have I really had to be a bit honest with my boss and say you know I'm going through something I'm going to need some time off I have a lot of doctors visits coming up. Of course I will do as many. Four worker or During my lunch hour as I can. But that might not always be possible and when I had the miscarriages and I had to have the surgical procedures. You know I did I had to go to my boss and say I need forty eight hours off to get my body chance to recuperate I did work in an office. So I was sitting most the time it wasn't physical labor so that made it a bit easier to return to work. But. At the same time, your body doesn't need a chance in an opportunity to heal from any surgical procedure. So there was a time that I felt like I was hardly ever in the office because I was bouncing in and out. Thankfully my my boss have been quite accommodating. I always felt that the physical recovery after miscarriages was shorter than the mental and emotional recovery, I would absolutely agree. The body can heal physically, but that doesn't change the thoughts in your mind, and if you don't address those the longer it will linger on. Right. And in my case because I ignored them, they lingered on for quite a long time. Especially, if you're not getting that mental support, you're not getting that mental outlet where you can talk through those things begin to heal a. thank you know. The bodies healed time to go back. You're you're fine. You're you're normal. Go back again discarding that mental aspect. In. Such a disservice that we're doing to people. How did for till the? You're relationships. While I was going through the process of struggling to have my baby. I got to the point where I was so depressed. that. I was broken that something was wrong with me that I could not. Be there for my friends that were having babies, I could not bring myself to attend a baby shower. I would send a gift, but I could physically not participate. In the baby shower I could not go visit my friends babies at the hospital you know when they were born. Send flowers but physically could not. Put myself to those environments because I would just break down. Like how I thought. Quote Unquote seemingly and I don't know their stories, but it's so easy for them. They're having babies I felt like ed point there I was surrounded by babies. And here I was struggling. And so I couldn't make sense of it, and so I I felt like a terrible friend at the time because I couldn't be happy for crying friends that were having babies but I was in such dark depressed place. I couldn't participate in those events you had to advocate for yourself in order to get a more thorough workup which really changed your journey. What tips do you have for listeners who are still learning hud advocate for themselves I think that's the key right there. Right advocating for yourself in that you know your body. Better than anybody does of course, doctors are incredibly intelligent people. They've got science back in them but you live in know your body more than they do and so if you feel like something is off, if you feel like something is wrong like speak up, don't just say Oh, well, the blood tests came back fine I must be fine because there's so many other things that test don't necessarily show right sometimes we're only testing just such a small piece of your health that there could be other things going on. And ask the question. Like there is no bad question and there's no such thing as too many questions. I remember going instant infertility clinic for the first time after my cancer treatments with literally. A page of questions. And I thought at first as Doctors GonNa think not because here, I haven't had a full page of questions and he took the time to go through every single one of them an answer them. So I didn't feel like a crazy lady. Because he said, no, this is your health. This is your body at the end of the day you have to live with whatever outcome we come up with. So I want you to be as educated as comfortable with this process as possible and I think that's so important right? You aren't a number robot in the system like this is you and your health, your children's health and your future. So it's up to you to ask the questions and be as comfortable as you can don't schoff. You know he's GonNa think I'm crazy euro calling again with another question call him as often as you need to to be comfortable with it. Tell me about the birth of your son and the emotions that came with the birth of my what I call my stubborn little child I had to be induced with him and looking back now. Thank goodness. I chose to be induced because if I had waited in another week or so who knows how how big he would have been he arrived at. Eight pounds, thirteen ounces. It was interesting because I walked into the hospital to be induced, and of course, when you're hooked up to all the the machines monitors whatnot, you don't get to kind of walk the halls in so I was. Essentially confined the bed waiting for Labor to kick in and so I thought well, I'm to sit I'm going to take a nap. I'm exhausted to save hey, exhausted me the whole nine months. I literally turned the lights off in my room and took a nap in the nurses kept coming in and they're like. How can you be sleeping? Aren't you? So excited you know your baby is coming in and like. I. Am excited. But this is probably the last time I'm going to get a nap very long time. And so I've been take advantage of my nap while I. Can I remember Waking Up for my nap and again I just felt like something was wrong. Like I didn't feel good and I didn't know what it was. Nothing was showing on the Monitor's just I felt off. So I paged the nurse and I just said something feels off i. think something is off and she looked at me and she goes We're currently in active Labor I think that's what's making you feel off and I was like Oh. Yeah that's that's. The one. And then to her surprise, Kinda just went back to Kinda dozing off. Until the doctor arrived and she was like again, how can you be so calm when this baby is made, I was like. I need to like reserve my energy while I hang on because this baby is GonNa arrive and he's going to need all of my attention energy and so I'm going to reserve as much of it is I can't. And that when the doctor arrived and she said okay, it's it's time he's on his way from the moment that she told me to start pushing until the moment he was born was less than ten minutes. This little baby was in a hurry. A serious hurry and. I, remember her the nurse whole taking him in holding him in her saying you know I think we have a nine pounder here and I've thought she's crazy. There is no way he was nine pounds. She was pretty darn close. It is eight pounds, thirteen ounces. Finally got to hold him. It was just the most overwhelming Russia emotions. I was so beyond happy to actually hold this baby in my arms. But at the same time, all I could think about as well was is twinned should have been here too and so I felt this mix of. Joy and grief at the same time it was. All the emotions you could possibly feel in that first twenty, four hours at the hospital. I don't know if one emotion weighed over the other, but I remember going through the whole cycle of emotions. The joy in the grief and the what if there was two in there should be to win. Oh my goodness look at him. He's amazing his perfect, and I just had this kind of endless trail of emotions and thoughts rolling through my head. How his infertility changed you, I, think several ways I don't take things for granted anymore. I definitely advocate for myself. Do my own research, ask all the questions as multiple doctors And I also think it's got me to a place where I can really truly appreciate my son at a whole different level knowing what you know. Now, what is one piece of advice that past self? Take care of yourself that first pregnancy. In two, thousand, six when I was that surprised pregnancy I was probably the unhealthiest I could be I was eating all the junk food that was working till two am. I was burning the candle at both ends completely. Care of myself. Not to mention for the years that followed completely ignoring my mental health I disregarded in devalued taking care of myself. And I wish I would have done it center stepping in to change all that. What words of hope would you offer to someone who's just beginning infertility journey right now? There is hope but hope comes in many different packages don't disregard the goal or the hope but sometimes, we have to be flexible in our means to get there and I know that's hard because we all have the vision of how it should be in our head. But if you remember and always go back to the why you're doing this, it will always recenter you if the why you're doing this is because you want this baby to love mold chase around your household than how you get there is not as important as what you get from it. Cathy thank you so much for coming on the show today to share your story I. appreciate it. Thank you so much for having me. Thank you for listening to beat infertility, join our free private support community at beat. Infertility? Dot Com. Forward Slash. APP, if you find yourself meeting additional support visit our paid programs that beat infertility dot co Ford slashed pope you. If you'd like your story to be considered for a future episode, please fill out the form at beat infertility dot co Ford slash contact until next time.

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Choosing cancer

White Coat, Black Art

27:45 min | 1 year ago

Choosing cancer

"How do you take down criminal network hidden in the shadows? I tell him that I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the darkness the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police ace who hunt down online predators dewick right the environment. They're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made it hunting. MOORHEAD subscribe wherever you get. Get Your podcasts. This is a CBC ABC podcast. I'm Dr Brian Goldman. Welcome to white coat. Black art the showboat medicine from all sides of the Gurney. Canadians Indians. Fear Cancer. Like nothing else. So it's not surprising that a blog. I wrote last week about so-called harmless cancers. Got Your attention by harmless. I mean cancers that don't cause symptoms don't metastasized and will never cause you to die. TURNS OUT LOW. RISK PAP Larry Thyroid. Cancer is at the top of that list. The study from Australia published last week. Found that nearly three out of every four of these thyroid cancers are so harmless. You might be better off not knowing the same. I'm is true in Canada. Where rates of thyroid cancer have shot up? Researchers have chalked up the increase to an epidemic of over diagnosis and it turns out an epidemic a couple over treatment that includes surgery that could have been avoided as you'll find out. These findings really hit home with lease Hussein. Leases a CBC producer who has prepared haired an eye opening documentary for white coat. Black Art through the dock project mentorship program. She's with me in the studio. Hi Lease high lease your. Here's a journalist but also as a patient. Tell me about your experience I was diagnosed with popularity thyroid. Cancer back in two thousand and eleven. I had my thyroid. I removed completely. And since then it's been a bit of a roller coaster. Finding the right medication Feeling different symptoms and kind of learning more about what it means to not have a thyroid. And you'RE GONNA have a lot more to say about that in the documentary but I want to know what led you to getting your thyroid. Cancer checked in the first place. My sister was diagnosed with thyroid cancer the year before in two thousand and ten she was symptomatic and she had to have a total thyroid ectomy so my family begged me to get tested. Didn't have any symptoms Adams But I but I gave in and was tested. You certainly peaked. My curiosity listen now to leases documentary. it's January two thousand eleven and I'm sitting in a small room in Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. I'm nervous best. The doctor comes with a student. I've met him before but we haven't established any kind of report to me. He's just a man and he says looking looking at his notes. It looks like cancer. Your thyroid will have to come out. It'll probably happen in the fall. And then he excuses himself in student and leaves leaves the room. I sit quietly. Don't really feel anything. I text one friend. One single word Cancer San going to my best friend. Vanessa's we're going to talk a little bit about. Oh cancer and when I got it she was my best friend during the process during the incident. So we're going going to find out a little bit about what she thought and what she felt. Oh Hi I rang the doorbell. Rebel is looking for Vanessa Gary on tape. She's never away. I guess sorry about that I got you have your gear. All the interviews are kind of nervous to talk about cancer. Yes interested and you and I've been friends for ten years I think so and yeah. Do you remember remember when the first time that you heard the word cancer or some hint that I'm might be be going through that when your friend tells you that they might have cancer is cancer is very scary word and it automatically equates to death. I think that's just where my mind goes so I was very scared and then when I found out what type of cancer you had we did a little bit of research on it and I felt reassured in in Weird Bay. Do you remember when I was like about the possibility of being sick at that time. I remember actually you coming over. I think we had some wine that night. I remember you came over and you told me. View definitely seem seem scared Sarah. demy surgery is pretty routine but there are risks risks. After my operation I ended up with dangerously low levels of calcium that caused something called. Tiffany tenny is a painful series of muscle spasms soms intense cramping and even seizures. In my case my hands actually started changing shape. Contorted you get locked into this weird position. It felt like going into. Rigor mortis while you're awake. My perception was affected. I had trouble understanding what people were saying to me. Tutton made me feel the sensation and deep fear. That was that was awful. I was like you just didn't seem like yourself. While you're your body was lake like pretty much shutting down due to lack of calcium so you you remember. You weren't making any sense than I remember that at that point I was. I was very weird. I I didn't understand. It just seemed like it was a very simple solution to remove the cancer. And that's it. I just didn't think that it would. It would kind of go haywire to fix it. Your body is bombarded with calcium like twenty eight grams. A day by I've e- or drinking calcium seltzer tablets but as he got better your calcium levels can surge creating another round of dramatic and scary symptoms. The doctors call call it bones stones moans and groans and upset. This'll took several months to normalize. Your mood was was fluctuating so drastically I don't want to say I was walking on eggshells but I didn't really know how I was going to fit into your life. What he meant because you seem like he wanted like you wanted to be alone and you didn't want anybody around? You didn't WANNA go out. You didn't want to socialize. They whereas like you had like a sort of paralyzing fear of whatever I remember you one day I came to visit you you and you told me that you had sought on the couch all day and you could not get up I. I don't remember that. Yeah so you said that you had not moved from the coach out of depression or fear and I guess because your mood was so like I think there was just like this battle going on in your body and you didn't really know what we you weren't lease you were a completely different person while it's actually. It's actually kind of hard to here. Yeah I thought it was crazy that that could happen to somebody that they could go from. Just just being this. The happy like funny charismatic person to just having this Oregon removed and then completely he's shutting down as a person. So why am I living this now and dragging my best friend through it. Because I'm trying trying to make sure you understand. Not Having thyroid does make a difference to your life sometimes a big one but that was nine years ago. How do I feel now? Look at me and you'll see a pretty normal person I think I'm a producer at CBC arts behind the scenes. I don't feel so great for instance this week. I've been tired like all the time but I can't sleep. I feel hot a lot. That can be really embarrassing. My weight changes with my fired levels. It goes up and down for me. That's sucks Tux. I'm on camera sometimes. Feel a lot less control than I'd like over the way I look but I'll take that it's way way better than having thyroid levels. That are too low. That is a very very dark place. You feel really tired. Your joints hurt. You can be remarkably depressed on the opposite end. If I go to high the the world gets fuzzy and loud I can feel irritable over caffeinated. I'm nine years out of the thyroid cancer diagnosis that changed my life. And now I'm left wondering did all of this to happen. Labeling of this as a non cancer sir is probably correct and unfortunately many of those patients got diagnosed cancer. They had total fire rejected these they had radiation. That was unnecessary. Sir That was Dr Paul Walsh speaking in two thousand sixteen. He was a world authority on thyroid disease at Mount Sinai Hospital. He passed away in two thousand eighteen. But here he's speaking about a lot of firewood ectomy as maybe being unnecessary hearing. This is really difficult for me. Now the the thing is Dr Paul Walsh was my doctor. The one who diagnosed me in two thousand and eleven and ordered my thyroid ectomy so what changed in those few years diagnosing and treating thyroid cancer. Did I have a needless operation. Should I still have my thyroid. It turns out over the past few years. There has been debate about whether full thyroid activities are always necessary. There are questions about whether popularity carcinoma. The type of thyroid cancer I had and the most common should should be aggressively treated. Dr Anne. Sokha of the university health network is running a study called active of surveillance. The study gives thyroid cancer patients choice. If you have the most common types of thyroid cancer capillary carcinoma and it meets certain criteria Korea as in. It's not too big. It isn't too close to your lymph nodes or other more dangerous areas. You can decide to keep your thyroid and be monitored to be clear here though this means you will also keep the cancer. I wanted to talk to Dr Sockeye to find out whether maybe my story could have been different. Frankly Really I. I wouldn't be able to know we carefully look prospectively at these ultrasounds and we decide about eligibility is really a careful selection process in terms arms of which which patients and specifically the tumor characteristics may qualify. I wouldn't be willing to look at your ultrasounds or have one of my colleagues colleagues look at your ultrasounds and I don't think it would help you. I think it could harm you and I think that what I'm thankful to you for is giving us a platform form to inform other patients that it's okay to ask your doctor. Do I really need this biopsy. Do I really need this operation. How will this benefit me? I mean what is the evidence for this and do I have any other options because all of this is clearly changing in our field. But it can't change anything for you. You can't put back the thyroid. We can't really change the past so a patient who's had third surgery from a practical standpoint. We try to optimize. He's the new normal but we can't really change the fact that they've had that operation. Dr Sokha's right. My thyroid is gone. There was no choice back then but there is. If you're a patient being diagnosed now obviously going about your life with cancer in your body is not going to be everybody's as ideal outcome but this change in thinking about how thyroid cancer is diagnosed and then treated is a huge development. Awhile ago somebody suggested to me that if we didn't call popularity carcinoma cancer. That more people would choose to keep their thyroid. That's a thought I struggle with was what I had cancer or was it not. Does it make more sense to to change the word or change the way we think about the word. If my doctor hadn't said the word cancer to meet might I have asked more questions. Hey Jason come in my sister. Jill had had thyroid cancer the year before me and very recently nine years after her own thyroid to me. She's facing the possibility of recurrence of cancer in one of her lymph nodes when she went to her doctor to talk about it. They had a whole different kind of conversation about cancer. So you into the endocrinologist vice last two week and he was telling you that you know it's possible that that the cancer has back but he he talked about it in kind of Ed. He had an analogy. That was different than cancer. Can you just tell me. I went to the endocrinologist a few days ago and he compared the possibility of having a cancer. Recurrence it to having arthritis in that it's manageable and maybe something that I have to live with for the rest of my life but it would would be similar to arthritis in that. I have a flare up. I go for a Kurdish zone. Shot and two or three years later. I have to go for another so basically saying that. Yeah the cancer cancer could be back but that could be treated. We monitor and treat again as necessary. Do you feel like that's a different conversation than you would have had with your doctor when you were initially diagnosed Absolutely was initially diagnosed. It was yet. You've got cancer. You'll have your thyroid it removed. And that's that nobody ever mentioned the impact of not having thyroid. Nobody even explained to me. What the firearm was? I also found out when I was doing my research and I still didn't even understand the magnitude of not having a firearm until after the surgery and I started realizing that my body was really different. I think nine ten years ago when I was first talking cancer it was cancer and I didn't know you know that this is a cancer that could be something that I'd be living with for the rest of my life so the conversation with the endocrinologist last week was definitely different. It was I opening and felt better than the first time around. I'm glad my sister gets to have a conversation about cancer answer. That's less full of fear. I remember the first time that word was said to me and it was a euphemism for getting sick and dying. I've had nine years of experience. Now Oh and the word just isn't as scary to me but I remember how I felt then and if you get diagnosed tomorrow I'd like to think that you'll have the agency the the resources and the support of your doctor to ask all of your questions and make the decision. That's right for you. The lease Hossain produced that documentary with White Co producer. Jeff goods under the dock project mentorship program and leases with me here in the studio you know I was sitting there when Dr Anna Sokha the endocrinologist. Who's in your documentary and we'll hear more from a bit later? Peter Politely declined to comment on your diagnosis and surgery. How'd you feel about that? I mean I. I think that it was appropriate for her to not look back and I think she she was concerned about how that might make me feel. Has any doctor. Flat out said that she didn't need to have your thyroid gland removed. It's never been flat out said but it certainly been employed you. You asked the doctor. I'm GonNa ask you if you knew back then what you know now. Would you have said No. Thanks to surgery knowing what I know now I would have said no thanks. Wow that's that's pretty powerful and a lot of people are going to be listening to that very carefully. One more thing is well in your documentary. You talked about cancer being a scary word and I I think it is for most Canadians as a radio producer. Who spends some time explaining things to people? How can we make cancer less scary? I I think that the word cancer is a bit of a euphemism for sickness and death and it would be really helpful if we could open up that word a little bit and understand that means very two different things in very different cases so usually we're in the business of trying to simplify things. I guess what you're saying. Is that in this case. Maybe we need to trust the intelligence of people and and make the word cancer more complicated. Because it's not black and white more complicated and less mystifying. Thank you for the documentary documenting and thank you for speaking with us. Thanks so much. Hey it's Annamaria tramonte and I'm excited to tell you about my new podcast fast. It's called more and be talking to people. You may think you already know until you hear them here. We've got a little more time to explore and to probe and even to play a little so get ready for the likes of David. Suzuki Catherine O'Hara Margaret Atwood. And many others. You can find more with Anna Maria tramonte wherever every. Get your favorite podcasts. You're listening to white coat black art this week. A type of thyroid cancer. WHOSE PROGNOSIS IS A lot? Less scary buried in its name. It's called low. RISK PAP Larry Thyroid. Cancer its incidence is increasing faster than any other cancer in Canada until recently that meant more Canadians Indians getting surgery to remove their thyroid glands. That's what happened to lease Hussein. She explained her documentary but it surgery that can in many cases be safely. We avoided a researcher in. Toronto is starting to change the conversation around what to do with these low risk cancers. Hello my name is Anna Sokha and an endocrinologist criminologist and clinician scientists at university health network. And we heard from Dr Sokha in leases documentary. I spoke with her at university health network where she works as an endocrinologists and researcher. I began by asking her about what doctors recommend instead of surgery to remove the thyroid cancer. What do they mean by active surveillance in terms of thyroid cancer? Her essentially refers to strategy. Where a patient is given the option to not treat the thyroid cancer and specifically not have thyroid surgery the patient is closely followed clinically and with tests such as neck ultrasound blood work and the Russian for active surveillance is that for small tumors rumors that may not necessarily grow or progress? In a patient's lifetime patients may have the option to avoid surgery as well as potential complications. which can in include damage to the nerve that recurrent laryngeal nerve which affects the voice damage to the parathyroid glands which affect calcium balance Other surgical surgical complications like bleeding or anaesthetic res- and also the potential for lifelong thyroid hormone treatment. which is always required if we completely remove the thyroid read and sometimes required even with partial removal of the thyroid based on the research? You're conducting the research that you've reviewed. How risky is it to watch and have active surveillance instead of going ahead and having the cancer removed so to date to the in the published literature which is largely based on poplar blurry thyroid cancer less than one centimeter without evidence of spread to other organs were or invasion invasion of other tissues in the neck? There has been no reported deaths due to thyroid cancer under active surveillance so no one has been reported to have died from thyroid. Cancer who has has chosen under those specific circumstances with close follow up not to have an operation. That's pretty powerful. I think it is and that's why we feel this research. Research is important. What we're offering is not necessarily pushing active surveillance versus surgery because some patients may not feel comfortable with active active surveillance and knowing that they're living with the cancer and so this is not the right choice for everyone but what we're promoting is that patients are actively given a choice this and not necessarily told that they must have a thyroid ectomy so it's audible pushing one specific strategy? It's about giving people a choice and having patients more actively involved in that choice based on what you know now. What proportion of those patients who get actor surveillance actually actually end up needing surgery and getting surgery down the road? There was a recent Interest very interesting systematic review and Meta analysis published Russian. Thyroid this summer examining the world outcomes of active surveillance. Approximately one and a half percent of the patients enrolled in active surveillance. Lintz studies had progression of disease into lymph nodes so the vast majority of patients did not have progression of disease. We need to also so remember that these patients are living with the knowledge that they have a cancer. That's been Bhai. Obse proven and so another important factor is to consider sitter that some patients simply do change their minds even if they do not have progression of their cancer. And that's actually more common for patients to crossover silver because of anxiety or preference to just have the surgery or timing of the surgery. Perhaps they didn't want surgery at a certain time point in their life where there was something critical going on. They wanted to delay the surgery. But then it's on their terms If their disease has not progressed and this is something that's available to any active surveillance patient and they changed their mind even if their tumor never grows or if they do not develop progression of disease by their criteria. You see patients who've had surgery is part with your practice. How much do they regret having surgery? First of all when you're talking about decision regret it's almost kind of unfair fair to ask because decision regret. Means you had a choice right so most people did not have a choice. They were told you have cancer so you need to have surgery. So how can you regret doing something that you were told to do. Given the growing evidence for active surveillance silence as a as a safe choice in carefully selected patients. Some have wondered whether we should still be calling this disease. Cancer her in any case well. That's a great question and remember how we define whether it's cancer or not is really on what we see under the microscope. That's the current definition. So if a Vira tumors biopsy and there are certain characteristic features of cancer most commonly poplar cancer and then this is confirmed with surgery. It's called a cancer so it's based on what how we see under the microscope. Not not necessarily based on long term patient outcomes. So that's really kind of a question is should we be defining cancers by the natural history of what what happens to patients particularly if they're not treated or should we be defining it by what's under the microscope or by the genetic profile which is a new thing that's kind of also evolving a new understanding and at present. We are still calling them cancer. But remember if you don't put a needle in it you don't Oh call it cancer because you really don't know so this is where with the smallest tumors. We really need to carefully consider. Do we need to do this biopsy or not because because once we do that biopsy and we get the word cancer we know. This is a life changing experience so I guess some patients might actually be better not to do the biopsy is is. Is that what you're saying that like this is something where you discover. One really should be discussing it with the patient. And whether a biopsy makes sense in the context context of that patient and what the patient wants but absolutely for these micro carcinomas though you've referred to so tumors under one centimeter or even if they're suspicious looking based on their ultrasound criteria but no evidence a lymph node metastasis. It is actually not currently recommended to buy see see them under the current American Heart Association guidelines as well as several radiology guidelines. But it's still happening so that's one of the things that might be worth trying to change. I think you're right but at the same time change in practice can take some time it takes education and I think in this case it also takes educating seeking patients because patients as well. If something is suspicious the first instinct is find out what it is and remove it and we need to fully inform foreign patients of all the consequences of doing that biopsy and whether that may be appropriate and if that's consistent with their their values and what they would want us to pursue. Thank you for speaking with me. Thank you for this opportunity. It's important to emphasize the doctor. Soccer is only talking about avoiding surgery in patients with small tumors that having happens spread beyond the thyroid gland itself. She says it's essential that the ones who don't get surgery be followed closely as part of a research. She's taking things even further by asking whether cancers like these even need to be biopsy D- advising patients that the best course of action is to wait can sometimes be a tough sell. It's tough for some doctors to. That's our show for this week. We'd love to hear from you if you had surgery for thyroid cancer. You're we'd also like to hear from people who've been told they have thyroid cancer and have chosen active surveillance write to us at CBC dot ca slash white coat our email address is white coat at CBC DOT CA. I'm on twitter at night shift. MD and the show is at CBC White Coat. We're also on facebook. Don't forget you can catch up on any episodes achieve missed and get the show every week by subscribing to our podcast if you wanNA listen live or on demand make sure you download the CBC listen APP and if you're looking for the latest health news and analysis subscribed a second opinions the weekly newsletter from CBS's Health Unit and subscriptions got CVC DOT CA. This week show show was produced by Jeff goods and lease sane with help from sogeti Berry digital producer Ruby wease and the rest of our digital team our senior producer. Is Donna Dingwall special. Thanks this week to Joe Johnson at the dock project mentorship program. That's medicine for my side of the Gurney. I'm Brian Goldman. See next week for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts.

thyroid cancer Cancer Larry Thyroid producer Dr Anna Sokha Dr Brian Goldman CBC Canada Toronto researcher CBC MOORHEAD Australia Mount Sinai Hospital Soccer Mount Sinai Hospital depression Oregon American Heart Association
The Profound Gifts of Heartbreak & Illness w/ Adam Piandes (035)

Men, This Way

1:02:47 hr | 1 year ago

The Profound Gifts of Heartbreak & Illness w/ Adam Piandes (035)

"So one of the turning points is i was in school. I stood up in front of the class and i was crying. Being you know just being witnessed one hundred fifty two hundred people that i've become my family and i said you know i went to the doctors and they told me that i have thyroid cancer and the teacher had been teaching that program for forty years looking me straight in the eyes and said you do not have thyroid cancer. You've been diagnosed with thyroid cancer because when you claim that you have this thing every cell in your body here's that and believes it to be true when you are able to step away away from it and say i've been diagnosed with this what you're doing essentially creating separation from this thing that you've been diagnosed with in your actually creating space to heal and i it was in that moment something shifted for me and i said wow you know i really do have an opportunity a hill welcome to men this way podcast for every man who seeks to live his deepest purpose in life who's committed to showing up fully and giving his unique gifts to the world because if not you then who i'm your host of fellow journeyman brian reeves bryan with a y. Reeves men this way <music>. What are your addictions helping you avoid. Do you make an intimate partner. Partner responsible for your pain can illness and heartbreak. Be the best gift for you well in this episode <music> guest adam and i mind these questions and more for useful insights to make a meaningful difference in your life. Adam is a very dear friend of mine. Actually really he and i first met back in two thousand fourteen on a three hour road trip up the pacific coast to a weekend men's retreat in an evergreen forest just just outside of santa barbara. There were four guys in our car that day including one guy. I'll never forget because i immediately felt uncomfortable. The moment we shook hands there was just something about his presence that triggered me into distrust. I'll never forget it another guy in the car. I completely completely do not remember it. All just nice guy didn't leave an impression. I can't even remember him and then there was adam and he and i clicked immediately. You know maybe it's because both of us from the east coast he was from boston still is from boston. <hes> i'm from maryland and both of us have made the big leap to west coast living. We're both big basketball fans as well not just watching but actually playing but i'll tell you what really struck me the most about adam that i would come to i really admire about him and just those first few days was that he was going through an inner hell and excruciating breakup with a woman and he had just just recently been diagnosed with cancer and he was not pretending that everything was all right in fact the opposite. I'd rarely seen a man especially. I think from boston really allow himself to grieve the way that i saw adam grieving that weekend and in the weeks and months after it was really profound example of how a man can go through the grieving process allowing himself to cry allowing himself to feel and how actually that was for him and i believe for all of us men and women to the allowing ourselves selves to feel the experience fully is ironically the quickest way to actually heal from it and that's exactly what happened for atom but we'll talk talk about that in our conversation today. Adam is a wise wise. Dude really like adam a lot. He's a talented and successful leadership coach coach. He works with executives business. Leaders and corporate teams teaching the art of masterful communication among other essential leadership skills over the last few years ataman. I have continued to meet every few months with a small group of brilliant visionary men where we drop in the celebrate our victories together we share our deep struggles with each other and we challenge each other respectfully lovingly firmly to confront and overcome mm-hmm struggles that don't actually serve us so i've been fortunate to watch adams business grow over these last one is a five or six two years now that we've known each other and it's really amazing to see the impact that he's having on clients companies leaders all over the world and and in this conversation ataman i cover profound ground around the distractions of addiction the depths of heartbreak the gifts of illness and more so definitely stay tuned all the way through to adams five key takeaways at the end of this episode of men this way if you wanna share feedback with me or adam or share with this conversation inspired in you. Please email me directly at brian at brian reefs. He's dot com brian with wi- at brian reeves dot com above the hear your thoughts all right. Let's dive. Adam pianists my man. How are you good to have you on then this way. Welcome thanks brother brian. It's a really awesome to be on watching you. Put these together been loveless into into it and <hes> you know excited to dive with you today. So thanks for having me man. You and i met <hes> gosh it's been about five years now the arkansas and and about five years ago two thousand fourteen we actually we waited a road trip together. That was literally are i. I don't know four hours in the car. I i think was our first experience together up to that men's weekend. The mankind project and you know i will never forget you. Were fucking going through through it. Man yeah for sure that's putting putting it lightly and we'll and we're gonna explore that. We're going to explore that before we get there. Out of. I wanna adjust your is our listeners with you just to learn a little bit about you and we'll i let me just check in with you man how you feel right now. I'm doing doing really well yeah. I'm i'm feeling really good. I m <hes> a little busy had not burning man in a couple of days lovely. We're we're having been in seven years so i'm super site to get out there and just <hes> have a good time some. I'm doing well packing. I can get get shit ready in in a good place but i'm doing well. How many times have you been you know i. I think it's been six times but haven't been in seven years years yeah so it should be a little bit of a new experience see. We'll see we'll see well. I mean and just the amount of people that are there. Now i last awesome i went was i think two thousand thirteen i was my third time yeah and i think at that time we were like fifty thousand people on the playa and now it's like seventy thousand tain yet they are you know i was talking to someone the other day. I turned into the guy that was like well. When i was there two thousand it was probably like five thousand and it was still alice still pretty massive so yeah well. I am envious man. I'm so excited to return when maybe next year with with my lady who's never been your <unk>. Dude have a great great time. Thanks brother so tell us a little bit about yourself. Man you grew you grew up in boston. What's it like having you know being from boston and living in california well you know it's <hes> oh you kick the kid out but he still carries a little bit of boston with them or something whatever power that goes but i've been in california since two thousand one so <unk>. I was in san francisco for twelve years. I've been in l._a. For about six or seven in so i think i still hold on a little of that east coast labor if you will i try but but kind of adopted some of these west coast sensibilities. I feel really comfortable in california. I mean it seems to would be when i go back east like visiting and i liked connecting with some of my peeps out there but i i you know california's definitely home. A you know as you can probably attest to. How old were you. When you actually like permanently left the east coast man. I was twenty two. No i'm forty five now. So i made two stops back. There and we'll probably talk about one of them today. But i went back for about three years early on and then <hes> i came out here in just landed here and i just i feel comfortable out here and you play ball in europe you know i i i play basketball in college and i did what they call a cup of coffee offie in finland's and went played with a with a select small college team. Okay i went out there for a summer and played out in the finnish pro leagues. That's that's pretty fascinating. Dude was that five nine bro yeah right. It was awesome. Basketball is a huge part of my life. What college did you go to did you play dates college in maine so small <unk> division three school but i ended up you know had had a solid career in college and then i ended up coaching for about eight years after that played in men's leagues a huge huge part of my life yeah yeah yeah i can totally relate. I play intramural basketball in college. There was a year just for whatever reason i lived in miami not a year. There were a number of years a stretch of of years in my late twenties into my late. Thirties right didn't really ever get to pick up a basketball or it just didn't happen. The are various reasons and i remember the first first time i got back on the court like in my late thirties. I was giddy yeah. I was fucking giddy. I've felt like i was eight years old again christmas. I just felt so good to pick up a ball again. Yeah i hear ya. One of my challenges has been that when i take time off and i go doc in play. I'm so terrible that i have to let go the expectations you wanna get. Did i get very frustrated <unk>. I don't play that much anymore once in a while de well. I'd like to ask you this question again to kind of bring us more into into the formative experiences of your life and again helping us learn more about you. That's the question. I ask a lot of my guests. Tell us about a significant event event or experience in your early. Life played a fundamental role in shaping u._s. Man man i you know a lot of experiences probably come to the the surface in terms of you know. If i look at hunting my late twenties in a lotta my thirties pretty lost and i was a a pretty big partyer and i really i leaned into partying pretty significantly to get me through life if you will. Let's see what about the mid to late thirties when i just to clarify partying woody mean exactly oh man i mean i would. I was drinking pretty regularly. You know i guess you could call it a binge drinking over the weekends and it would start on wednesday nights and on sundays and that was <hes> nor predominant part in my life for many many years you know and and where i didn't see it as being excessive because a lot of my friends around me were doing the same shit right you know looking back in retrospect it was you know it's pretty excess and you know in the next coupled with dabbling in other things as well that would keep me in the club's laid in early. Mornings and i have no regrets at a great tyne. I i think that and you know i'll occasionally originally had out from time to time. I still enjoy having a good time but it isn't part of the formula if you will these days and i think that you know that experience in many respects if you talk about what shaped me as a man i mean you know that was sort of the foundation built in terms of different forms of escapism matter nearly age and i think if i think about what shaped me i mean i was kind of a big part of it because that inevitably open the door for me to hit rock the bottom yeah and to to whether willingly or unwillingly really explore things a little bit further so from the perspective of where you're at now looking back. What are you aware that you were even escaping during that time yeah good question i was. You're pretty sensitive emotional dude and still am one and i think we all right. I mean we're all but i think all men yeah in our core sensitive resentenced beings and and i think for me i perhaps him mm somewhat hypersensitive and <hes> i guess somewhat empathic and can feel into things on a pretty deep level and i was often overwhelmed i think by i just life and very simple terms you know and so that was my way of coping yeah definitely and so what did rock bottom look like for you. Well you know i think i had a few and i think when i think back on when i recognized that underneath underneath all of the partying was a pretty sad individual you know there were a few times where i would hit really low levels of of sadness in hindsight out therapy and i would seek out help end at the same time i really struggled for a long time truly connecting to that element of self i love and self forgiveness and accepting who i am and loving boy at the time where you i'm assuming you were but you know were you in relationships asian ships with intimate relationships at the time i mean in in how those goes you were late fleeting. You know i mean i think i had i had dated you. You know i was sort of a serial dater for a long time and i had gotten involved in in a few different relationships. I think when you met me brian i was coming out of a our relationship that was in and out for about three or four years and that was a pretty significant relationship in my life for many reasons it it taught me that i didn't really know how to be in relationship on the end just and you say coming out of relationship just to be clear. What i experienced was a man who was just utterly. You know really like this word but i'll just use it just broken. Yeah now say broken open. You're fucking gain cracked man. I've never i won't say it's rare that i've seen a man allow himself to cry with the depth <unk> and the the fullness that you allowed yourself to cry and just in this you first days that i got to spend time with you and and it was it was amazing mm-hmm and heart-wrenching and beautiful all at the same time so you know and i didn't really know i just met you so i didn't really know the depths of your experience experience with this woman but i could tell that this just rocked you to your core. Yeah and i and i appreciate that brian. I mean acknowledging me for that. Thanks you know so. We went up to this weekend together. Call the mankind project in a it's a men's retreat in you know i was unraveling at the time and you know we we speak about this relationship with this woman in you know at the time my sadness i attached to her hummer associated with her but she was actually just a trigger that was unraveling a lot of suppressed energies and emotions that it just started to come out and and that weekend was a big one because they <hes> being surrounded by men and they really got up my core. I <hes> it was one of the more profound weekends against my life in retrospect but it was it was well. I can relate to that when i got out of the military. Twenty six years old couldn't feel will anything really gonna laugh couldn't cry and i traveled all around the world. I lived in france for a year and a half married a woman in france. It's i married her dude. I'm married her. I married her five weeks after i met her because i couldn't. I couldn't feel myself. I could feel what a bad idea. This was my head was like oh yeah. She's a doctor. She's cute cheese french. She's the bishops like she has direction. I was lost in aimless in the world ended with they'll do with myself and and she took a liking diesel yeah. Why not i'm in and we'll get married. Might as well get papers. You know kind of paperwork exercise but i one of the things i learned is you never marry your girlfriend for papers that idea yeah and i was gonna say. I think you know there's probably people out there that have gone on a five week little bender with somebody <hes> you know love bender and get married and it works out. You know as you said like do <unk>. Well sure humbert down. It doesn't always work sure look for me the would yeah it can totally work people who eight five years to get married and it doesn't work so there's no formula to that but what was meaningful in this for me. Was that eight months into this unfolding catastrophe. I had my i. We're really really really good cry because of just what we were experiencing what i was experiencing and it's like you pointed it out so beautifully. I wasn't crying over her. I mean in retrospect. We were so not right for each other. We didn't even get each <unk> jokes. Don't ever marry someone we don't we'll get each other's jokes yesica. That's a tough road. Yeah it broke. The experience broke is like the beginning of the cracking of my armor and and you know women have really played that role for me perfectly over the years. I just wanted you know i think what you said is really really meaningful for any of our listeners that are going going through breakup or kind of having that experience of placing so much importance on a person that they pine for longing for in. I think what you just said the same. My experience like it's really had this multiple times where i realized it wasn't the person that i missed it. Was there was a lot of repressed sadness that i'd never felt there was on certainly a longing for connection that i that i missed but i never felt connected with that person to begin with yeah so anyway just wanted to emphasize <unk> says really they really really important. I had a mentor at the time and he's still a mentor and friend that when i would call him up and i'm going to leave the woman's name of it but i would call up and say you know i just i need to talk to her. Tell her that blah blah blah and need to fix whatever always respond to me in in his texas texas slang he would say you know. This has nothing to do with her. My friend hit me what daddy i'm and i'd be like i what it does right you know and now your fast forward ten years or whatever it is gone through some experiences in between that. It's very very clear to me that it had nothing to do with her in some respects everything because she just helped me unravel you know i think you'd like it's very it is very paradoxical. It's not about her and yet without her wouldn't have happened that way so i think that's that's a theme that comes up these conversations a allotted. This podcast lot which i love is that it is very paradoxical. Now you know very paradoxical. It's like a lot of the relationship work that i do do in my own damn relationship. It's like the more than i embrace. What doesn't make sense. That's unfolding between us the better it goes often yeah. It's very possible. It is often times. It's about loosening that grow because the grip is oftentimes. We grip onto the symptoms of the religion right because we are i will. I don't want to speak on behalf everybody but i will often grab onto the symptoms yeah because that's what i believe to be true. However you can paradoxically. It's typically what's going on way underneath that yes absolutely i'd love to talk more really more dive into what you've been through with your health church sure because i know that when i met you that was another thing that just had been rocking your world for some time and and i know this has been a really long journey for you so we'll share with us. Take back to the beginning of what happened for you. Sure sure i mean i think where we just left off with this. Retreat is probably a good place to start darn in many respects. I mean swing. Was that retreat brian. That was two thousand thousand fourteen. I think in the fall i could be wrong might have been spring on remember to the yeah so maybe yeah i'll go back another year prior so i had moved down to los angeles in two thousand twelve and after being san francisco as i mentioned for about twelve years i was working for a company human beach and i came down here. They hired me to come on full-time and then <hes>. I was an independent contractor in then. I got down here in about out a month later. They fired me for reasons. We don't necessarily need to get into at the time. It was really difficult but you know again in retrospect one of the biggest gifts i had <hes> so i was down here and i just moved down here and i was doing this sort of dance with this woman that i was referring to and down in l._a. <hes> <hes> now not sure what i was gonna do not feeling well just really unfeeling unsettled anxious i would go through bouts of depression in in i just felt completely lost right and so the symptoms i talked about before where like i lost my job. I'm not sure what's going on with this woman of a new city city lots of changes what can be difficult but not necessarily the reason for my emotional unrest but i was pretty emotionally shook up. I would go into these bouts of depression. <hes> have these bouts of severe anxiety to the point where i was going on sixty mile bike rides just to try in ground myself or just to be able to together myself and be able to function in my day to day with things got really really bad for me where i didn't feel safe you know being by myself and so it was in that moment where i called my my parents and you know i'm pushing forty years old at the time so i wasn't a young guy and i'm not necessarily sure that matters but you know it had some life experiences in i- i hit rock bottom you know and i called my parents and i look. I don't think i can stay out here. I think i need to come back to boston and regroup and be around family and get some support so i moved back to boston and i was there for for eight or nine months in in while i was there either sleep for thirteen fourteen fifteen hours or just be the incredibly anxious and unable to just reside in my own skin. You know i sought out different support groups. I actually i was attending a meeting meetings for while while i was there. They didn't really resonate for me but in many respects there was a reason for me being there. I found community while i was there and i had a lot of work. I think you know facets of it. Were really good for me. At the time it just was in my i it wasn't really necessarily my calling for full-time sort of full-blown effort but i got involved with that and <hes> i was seeing therapists and really searching seeking for some support for some help it was during that time that i enrolled in the master's in spiritual psychology program at the university of santa monica here so that was up for your program in i was able a to the they meet one one weekend per month so i was. I was commuting back and forth from boston for about four or five months attending classes in that that was incredibly supportive community for me. I think you know as speaking out loud here. What i was really seeking was community as really speaking for folks that i could. I'd say i don't feel right in i. I want people to know this yeah because i really need help so eventually moved back to l._a. After about four or five months of of commuting back and forth when i moved back to l._a. My struggles continued. I was struck with insomnia for about six months. I was still <unk> seeking support from therapists and i put on medication for a while and that was real tricky. I did that for about two you weeks. In depressant medication like precedence you know anxiety meds and what have you and it just wasn't working for me so i offer at that i started working with shaman one on one and we were doing a lot of sort of like shamanic healing journey work with each other and i was meeting with her on a weekly basis so i was diving deep on many levels are surrounding myself with community and i was feeling better and making progress and i still just didn't feel well after about three years bouncing around and seeing all sorts of people and specialists i decided added to finally get some blood work which i look back and go why. Why wouldn't you do that from the onset but for whatever reason it wasn't meant to be. I think i had to go through all that stuff to say we get down to the fundamentals gambler. Any algorithm blood were in found that my <hes> my blood levels were were significantly off in certain areas areas. It was at that time that i was. I was diagnosed after some other results with thyroid cancer so you know the thyroid controls our hormone komo levels. It's sort of like the conductor an orchestra right so you know in many respects it gave me an opportunity to point out and okay okay see this is what has been going on for me like. This is the reason why i've been a wreck for the last three or four years. In part of it is true through from a physical perspective. I guess from an anatomical perspective however the spiritual psychology program that i was in they didn't let me off that he's they weren't encouraging me to just lean into the thyroid cancer diagnosis but there are actually asking me to look at what does a thyroid cancer diagnosis. What does that represent <unk> rise rather than just okay. My body has thyroid cancer. It's a biological thing while i guess we gotta fix it right chemo. <unk> thyroid at whatever you do rather than that it was through schooling. It was okay. There's a deeper wisdom available here yeah yeah. Let's tap into that. I mean if you can buy into the premise in the belief that underneath all disease is some sort of unresolved issue or some sort of emotional disturbance right. There's an opportunity retune ity to dive in on a deeper level and so that's what they were encouraging me to do. I remember reading a book by a heart surge in many many years ago <hes> fascinating book i don't remember the name of it things talking about heart transplants in different things but anyway the thing that stands out to me right now is is he shared a stories of how he would walk through the the ward where all the heart attack patients were <hes> he would ask them. Why do you think oh you had a heart attack. Not one of them had a biological explanation wrapped up in well. You know plaque in my his heart artery thing here in this fibrillation on the new makeup weird words belated <unk> not one of them who said that no that it was always well you know my i haven't talked to my son in five years <hes> and the stress that that's caused me and i'm sure that drove me you too. You know as my heart's been hurting or you know i lost child or been stressed around. You know money's been such an issue and i haven't been able to provide family family or whatever it is. It was all sort of you know stress on the heart yeah all of the stories no one pointed to a biological reason as why they had a heart attack in that never left me. I've always remembered that. I was profound for me to hear so what you're saying. I'm curious so them from where did that. Where did that questioning. Take you yeah yeah and i love that example that you gave with heart. 'cause that's the real deal right. I mean we're talking about my my heart is broken. You know the thing is crumbling and so i really can really appreciate that because there's a lot of parallels else there to kind of what i discovered when i started a little bit deeper so from a spiritual perspective you know a blockage or tumor or the diagnosis of thyroid cancer answer because your thyroid resign your throat right which is or whatever shocker that is fifth third shocker yeah opposes. This is the third time road is where you you access your voice ridings man and so you know thyroid cancers answers representative of not speaking my truth being really hard on myself not utilizing my voice living in secrecy and not being completely earnest and honest in all of those things to some degree rang very true for me at the time and so when when i was encouraged to face those things it was really really difficult on some levels in in another levels. It was a huge relief. They gave me permission not only to explore those parts me that have been suppressed in hidden but what was great about that school is they told me it's okay like it doesn't make you wrong doesn't make me wrong for those things. It just is what it is now. I have an opportunity to explore further and you know when i got question well i just want to be mindful because i we get into this kind of conversation in and i can hear people objecting rightfully so that you'll be okay so because i had a disease and you're pointing at it right now because i had a disease that means it's my fault right and that's not at all what i i'm standing for it now or i'm suggesting i i think that's a maybe a conversation more philosophical expiration for another full i. I think that that was probably a judgment that i was holding against myself at the time and so that's that's why i speak to it in that way. Yeah you know. I don't want to generalize but you know. I've worked with enough. People were oftentimes. That is the case where these things happen. We we make ourselves wrong for it and i think what i think i'm hearing you say is it's not that we have sagana sort of paradox was not that we have no role in in in whatever our body is going through but it's also not our fault right kind of a paradoxical. It's like a co creation of sorts yeah and it doesn't make us bad person. Listen right right like you know when i went through this and i've been an athlete my whole life and so when i was struck with feeling horrible physically physically emotionally spiritually for number of years i mean i can't tell you how many times i ask myself what the fuck is wrong with me right and so being at the school they sort of guided me to say in. Many respects like nothing's wrong with you. That's the whole point here. Nothing's wrong with you. This is opportunity for you. Yeah i really like that. I think that's really i'm reminded of <hes> <hes> another guest that i had john winelands you know his daughter claire winelands. She was a public figure. She had cystic fibrosis. She died a year ago at twenty one on twenty two years old and she was just a light in the world and she didn't have healthy lungs. I think is what really ultimately caused her to die and you know who was such a heartbreaking you know i'm on the outside kind of watching this unfold and and it's such a heartbreaking experience in she made the most of from that experience from what i saw and she really inspired so many people in winter so many examples of people who died well with an illness or disease nino. There's that spiritual sort of tit faller bypass that were sort of we're talking to hear that. I think is really good that we're just calling it out. It's because every time i have an ache in my body. Any sylvia always pulls out her phone and goes google. What's the spiritual meaning of a work on your pinkie toe right every time and it's always interesting. I don't know it's fun to play with. You know i'm. I'm glad the word on your pinky. Yeah yeah you go with that. Yeah yeah yeah. That's another another conversation so it's always what's the spiritual meaning of this particular pain or illness or thing that you're going through and it's you know i i've cultivated a practice life always looking for the guest in whatever happens yeah. I tend to think that there's a fine line to you. You know i mean so i try to bring some levity into my life these days you know because i think that you know where it's really really important to do the work mark into to dive deeper into emotional and spiritual realms in terms of what's happening and what's manifesting in a physical form. I also think that got at times. It can be really just comforting to say you know whatever ward unlike dr and like just kind of leave it at that right like yeah yeah 'cause where air it it is important to take that spiritual journey. It can be really exhausted. Chew some time and counter productive. Let's just say hersher. Just give more energy than it deserves exactly as even helpful yeah and so. I think that you know we have to be really selective where we put that energy and so you know. There's no right or wrong way. There's no right or wrong way. What changed for you so you get this diagnosis. Now you're on this journey of healing of so when you got at the diagnosis. Was it like oh god. I could die or was it just no. I'm gonna live. I'm gonna survive through. This is gonna suck like what was the prognosis at that time well so one of the turning points as i was in school. I stood up in front of the class and i was crying. You know just being witnessed by one hundred and fifty two hundred people that become on my family and i said you know i went to the doctors and they told me that i have thyroid cancer and the teacher who'd been teaching program for forty years looking amy straight in the eyes and said you do not have thyroid cancer. You've been diagnosed with thyroid cancer because when you claim that you have this thing every cell in your body here's that and believe to be true when you are able to step away from it and say i've been diagnosed with this what you doing essentially recreating separation from this thing that you've been diagnosed with your actually creating space to heal right and i think it was in that moment something something shifted for me and i said wow you know i really do have an opportunity to heal now on the spectrum of cancer diagnosis caesar his thyroid is the most manageable if you will somebody you know one of the doctor said you know if you're going to get a cancer this is when you wanna get okay so feelings about that yeah yeah so you know i had a very clear path to recovery. I had some choices to make and one of them was to have my thyroid removed. I ended up having to surgeries to do that but i really believe that. The starting point join of my healing journey truly was in that moment at school when the teacher looked at me and said you know you've been diagnosed with cancer and not allowed me to create separation from it and i take that that message i use it pretty frequently where you know i feel like i'm constantly creating separation from these sorts of things. You said that i don't take it on to believe that whether it's an illness or whatever it is that that's part of who i am right right. It's not part of your identity as being right right and you know again like i think there's a really strong message in there that it's you know this. I don't know if you've ever heard the saying results start at the tip of the tongue mm-hmm right so when when i start to say i have thyroid cancer and it rolls off my tongue while the results are that cells are going to take that in and they're going to believe that to be true and i'm gonna feed into that as the end result so really cool yay yay at a a friend when i was managing music artists we connected with the touring guitarist for carole king he was the touring guitarist for carole king and we got to know him well and he he was a really great great friends of ours and he had had throat cancer and he had survived it overcome the but he he <hes> actually built a website for him. I don't think he ever did anything with it but it was a loving cancer sir dot com. I don't know what's there now. I'm just giving advertisements whatever's there hope. It's not some pharmaceutical company that spot lending cancer. I don't think they would do that but anyway. Ah i wouldn't put anything past anyone the but remember that like his whole you know he came through the byron katie school of work in questioning or stressful stressful thoughts and in doing that similar kind of work around language and again. I've always you know our our whole. There's this whole the fight on drugs the war war on poverty the like we love going to war with shit and we never fix the problem really when we're at war it's like it just gets bigger bigger and bigger and bigger and and so what you're pointing at here and some of the lessons i've learned along the way thank god not for my own illness experiences but from people that have been close to who've adopted that kind of embracing attitude and you know i've s i've practiced it in when broken up with somebody that's wherever been devastated aided in really disciplined myself as hard as it was to get the gift from this like how is this serving the how can i. How can i love this experience. Even i've a fucking hate it now. How can i really embrace it and be willing for it so that i can just get the lesson that it's here to to give me yeah <hes>. I'm really glad you brought that up. I'm really glad you brought that up. The whole perspective of going to war against these things you know i <hes> you know a couple. Things happened to me. After that i started writing and i i wrote an article. I think it was for the huffington post and it was titled cancer. I love you and part of it was is telling the story of you know oftentimes the response that would get from people and it was coming from a very loving place you know was you got tissue could beat this one of the guys. We know you can fight this. You know at the time i'm fucking sick of fighting <music> or long asked yeah. I've been bath the against myself and i'm fucking tired of it. Yeah you know absolutely so. I'm really glad you and that was the underlying message from the school which was now is an opportunity for you to dive deeper into the emotional body in really connect to that and give yourself a ton of love in the process which for me was pretty unfamiliar right you know. I don't teach that in boston. You know we didn't run through that in between it's weird yeah yeah. It's not a not a beantown enormous part of that culture her but you know it was really a beautiful time for me was a major transition life. I mean in the now so you're now in the midst of this journey with thyroid cancer also going through this break up with the relationship and so i mean i guess the question is kind of all my tongue. Here is is a one and you've been talking to in many ways but i wanted to sort of really drill into what would you say are the biggest lessons like the biggest one or two lessons. You learned from this period. Give your life illness break-up. Yeah i mean i think there's three big ones that stick out from me. One is that the physical emotional on spiritual truly have to be in sync with one another in for me. I have to put energy towards all of them. In when i do and i feel like i do today i feel great <hes> so say the against the physical spiritual and emotional yeah yeah. I was misaligned on all of them. I was lucky to be introduced to a gentleman in beverly hills. Who does sequel hospital chiropractic work which is aligning a person's sacred when your sacred is in alignment and your pelvic areas in alignment and you're a sip will join us here is alignment. The fluid in your spine is able to run freely and talk to one another in my sacred had been out probably for years. I was sleeping and so on and so forth so when my sacred gotta lines i was able to stabilize much easier on both emotional national unspiritual level where i was doing a lot of emotional and spiritual work. I was still misaligned physically and it was just a struggle right because i i my body was out of sort so i i would say that. The relationship between those three is one of the big lessons. The second one is is humor in playing in having fun in not taking myself too seriously because for years. I was taking my cellphone very very seriously. I had i was sick. It was all about me. I was self absorbed and these are things i still have to be cognizant outerwear but play and having fun and joking around in bringing levity into situations for me is another big lesson because it keeps me feeling lighthearted in young at heart and i think the last one the third one is really the big one which is practicing self compassionate self love and that to this day still remains. You know where i have to really stay diligent. You know is <hes> giving myself that compassion. Gosh love so those are probably the three big lessons that came out of this for me. That's beautiful man. I'm so with you. You know that practice is third one that you just spoke to the you know having compassionate self love and i really i tied that up into also that that goes along with giving up the fight was an entrepreneur man dan. It's been a fucking fight. I've been feel like insane like just just making my way in the world is a man brian to i survived and then hopefully awfully somehow thrive. It's been like a fight like a dog fight for so much of my life. Even as i've done what i loved i am so done. Fighting it is exhausting and i'm usually arguably always only fighting myself anyway. You know my my mental projections my stressful beliefs chiefs about myself in the world and money and love and comfort what i deserve and don't do all that shit and is one of my just most important practices these days and i've stayed diligent and keep doing my work every day because i will beat the shit out of myself internally. If i don't give you're probably pretty good at it. You probably had a lot of practice you know and then practice and still and still have i and you know and being an entrepreneur and being a self starter and in finding that motivation comes with those pressures of succeeding in being a man in providing and rising to the top and all of these storylines that contributed butte into can often be you know turning yourself into a punching bag and i've actually found that my most sort of successful moments where really big beautiful things happened professionally speaking were in moments where i was really being kind to myself yeah in really caught up in my joy and mine's souza's awesome for whatever i was doing regardless of whether or not it was gonna make money yeah and i think expectations of the root of disappointment so when we place expectations nations ourselves we're setting ourselves up for a lot of disappointments. The more that we d- people can drop these expectations in as as you said like the compassionate with yourself and bring joy into the fold good shit's going to happen tippin yeah well adam atom. I've really enjoyed this and we're not done yet. I want to ask you the million dollar question that i finished. This segment of the interviews is conversations with the finish up with the five key. Takeaways goeman the million dollar question. What do you think is the biggest challenge facing racing men today. And what wisdom would you offer in the face of it. Oh i would say the biggest challenge is is self. Love compassion what i just mentioned before i mean you know as we collectively shift paradigms sear into kind of a new era if you will the old paradigm of put your head down and get it done right and regardless. If you feel like shit or you're sad or you're angry a don't admit it right i to be don't go deal with it right like it's a suppressive avoid it out. This isn't to say that the old paradigm generations before us were bad people will or were just living avoidance. Got it all wrong or got it all wrong. There just wasn't any sort of the heightened sense of awareness around the opportunity community for men these days to actually take ownership for their emotions. It's okay to be angry. It's okay to be sad and yet. I've worked with a lot of men. An having men give themselves compassion at still shows up. Pretty frequently is one of those things that is just uncomfortable difficult. There isn't a playbook for it right like we're so solution driven. It's like what do i do next and it's it's <hes> you know in many cases i find to be somewhat of an epidemic and <hes> you know i think that <hes> when men can stop in those moments and give themselves forgiveness nisa compassion not only are they gonna show up for themselves better but they're gonna show up for for the women in their lives from a much different place as well so it it really is about being responsible for one's own emotions believe it often starts with the ability give yourself compassion for the women in our lives is for other men in our lives for gathering in our lives for our communities. You know silly said to me early. In our relationship because it's too has been giving myself compassion making space for my own emotions as it remains it remains a process for me and she said something to me. That was just brilliant. You're never going to be able to embrace my emotions ocean's until you can embrace your own yeah if you can't love yourself. How the hell you're gonna love somebody else. That's awesome man. Let's finish up with the five key. Takeaways anneli go so you ready for this your arm else to number one key insight. What's the one key insight that you would offer our listeners listeners. You believe can make a meaningful impact on their lives because it has in yours. I'll go back to what i talked about before which is the physical emotional spiritual connection right right. If you're feeling off physically there's an opportunity to to get aligns right and and whatever that is for you seek out the support i take responsibility for so that you can show up from a different place emotionally and spiritually and vice versa if there's something going on emotionally and spiritually and you feel off dive into it you know be willing to explore in state curious so i think that it's all an extension of curiosity but i would say that that's probably the biggest thing for me is the connection between those three. Things and i'd like to add also be willing to get help. Get support buoy. It's hard to figure this shit out by ourselves. If not downright impossible yeah it isn't and you and i have worked together in that capacity as well and like men's groups and stuff you know that's so tortoise and supportive to to keep those things working in sync with one another number two key mentor name another man that you've been inspired tired by living or dead that you'd recommend our listeners learn more about. I want to speak to my mentor that i mentioned before where i don't know if there's yeah. I don't know if everyone has access the dave thomas in i don't believe they do but i i just he made such a huge impact in my life so yeah i guess what i would say to that is that there's always an opportunity for men to seek out a mentor right and i think that there are some great men that are doing really really cool things in the world right now and they may not be as accessible you know so my work with male mentors has been instrumental in the sense that <hes> they just called me out of my shit. Yeah you know so. I just gotta speak today but i don't know how accessible he is. Dave thomason was a huge influence for me. He really came at a really opportune time and i appreciate what you're pointing to work with. Two men a therapist and a coach that you know i chose oh specifically especially my therapist an older man yeah because i wanted that influence in that role and i'm happy to pay him for it as well got you know for that president in what he helps me on work through again from the perspective and older man has been married for forty five years you know and it's like it's just so helpful. Oh you're to <hes> to get that perspective. Get that perspective and also to have it. You know 'cause. I don't have that kind of relationship with either my father ormeau stepfather. There's just there's some trust issues there. Let's say i love both those men but i. I don't really look to them for wisdom. That really will serve me in my life shirt like that. That's fair in any way because they've agenda my dad. Let's just say they're both to the my dad's. They have agendas. They have certain it's nice actually to interact with an older man and a regular ongoing basis who doesn't have an agenda. There's an objective lens lean into that actually number three key. He resource your most impactful inspiring book. Move your podcasts at the last year. You know i'm a huge huge basketball guy as we talked about a little bit brian. You know what i mentioned before is oftentimes when i dive into podcasts. I listened to a lot of basketball podcasts. You know bill. Simmons is probably my favorite ripon caster and i think that <hes> you know i've listened to him a lot over the last year and again what it does for me is it keeps me connected eighteen to the element of play joy in my life and where i study for my work that i do you know philosophy and and coaching and all of those things i think when i think about what's had the most influence on me. I think it is that thing that continues to bring me back to the elements of play enjoy in my life yeah. It's all say the bill simmons podcasts. I really appreciate what you're saying there because i know i think among a lot of women in some manner even there's a part of me needed as i've grown over the years has become could be a little judgy around sports. You know it doesn't matter the amazon is on fire and it's raining plastic in the rockies shows like who cares wins the superbowl this year but i think what you're pointing at longing for more play in my life a unit you know you and i are in a men's group that we me occasionally. You've seen man when i don't have klay. I'm i'm fucking miserable. I've seen have seen it. Yes you've seen it. It's horrible. It feels horrible. Rable in sports is one of the only domains that for a lot of men we feel safe to play to just play yeah yeah and i speak speak to this podcast in particular because a lot of the things that he talks about is the business of basketball as well from an entrepreneur really supports me in that way as well but to you're pointing it. Does it keeps me connected to this guy thing that i love and brings a lot of joy and it can be really really superficial. I guess in a lot of ways we can take it too seriously yet. Fall like to go back to your earlier point. Let's not take us so goddamn seriously because who who fucking does care who is a super bowl. It doesn't fucking matter but let's enjoy the drama of it because it is fascinating in fund sort of play it all out yeah yeah yeah and and and i think for me it's like i like to dip my toes in it. Listen to a podcast and then move on idea who i am are <unk> are at number four <unk> investment in the last year. What's the best thing you spent money on under ten grand. This is an easy one for me. There's no doubt it sir ford you know. I've been living near the water for quite some time and i think you know we're not with sick and what have you i would it often go out to the water and watch people surf in feel like that looks cool but i just was disconnected not feeling well and when i was able to get my body back in order and and really get aligned. I'd say about a year a little yes in a year ago. I fully committed to it and now i go every day and i am fully fully fully huts so i would save like unequivocally. It was purchasing a surfboard lovely again. Come back to play yup so important. It's it's so important. Even if it's for i've got a friend that's having a baby who i go surfing wet and we walked out the other day. He literally went in. He caught one way and he left because that's the amount of time he had that. One way. That five minutes to play in the water is critical for his wellbeing yeah. I wonder if i can create waves on the pool in my backyard <unk>. I believe in you. Thanks last one the key practice please offer one practice spiritual creative personal relational that has served you well and that you challenged our listeners to take on for the next seven seven days well. I think a practice of mine has been completely dedicating myself to doing work that i love to do and i think that that has become a daily practice for me so you know if there's a listener out there that's not necessarily in love with the work that they're doing doing at the time or they're in transition or whatever it is i would say it's find something within your work for the next seven days that you can tap into that will bring you that sense of joy or bring you that sense of pride or will in some respects. Perhaps give a little bit of glimpse into possibilities. I like that so if you you hate your job but let's you love doing t._p._s. Reports we haven't who doesn't move here who doesn't love t._b._s. Reports i mean i know it's do or that she. I don't even know t._p._s. Reports the movie reference office space ace guy and it's always about the t._p._s. report. No one knows what the hell t._p._s. Reports it's it's it's a funny movie so by like that's a great suggestion. I think also i'm also reminded i have a friend who <hes> he's incredibly incredibly talented artists here in los angeles actor painter. It'll probably listen to this podcast and i know that he drives for uber in in not a big fan of it can't imagine why but one of the things that i know he he. We really works hard to do consistently his craft. Whether it's young he's acting in a play now. He's committing to painting for one hour a day consistently and he i mean it's even as he's hustled in l._a. And trying to figure it out and put it all together and make his life you know financially work in and all of those things and pursuing his dreams yes to spend a lot of time just figuring out how to pay the bills but he still works really hard to commit to finding the time to do what he loves and so. I think what you're pointing out. There is another. There's a lot of listeners that are not doing it but you know fucking five minutes find. It figured figure it out. Even if it's just researching google may be something that you would love like spend some time every day tapping into that part of you yeah i couldn't agree more and i think the analogy that i just gave before of my buddy who go catches that one way for five years is applicable here right. It's like throughout your day find that one way you know it's going to connect give you that rush or have you feel connected or whatever may be ataman no we we haven't talked about your work at all and that's you know i didn't it's not wasn't the point of our conversation but i'd love just before we finish up just to share with our listeners as you know. Where can they learn about what you're up to in and just give a quick snapshot into the work that you do yeah so i <hes> i about at five or six years ago. Amidst the turmoil that i was immersed in i started coaching business and i <hes> you know it's grown to the point where i predominantly do <hes> you know leadership in business coaching with a lot of business owners and senior level executives on a one on one basis and we launched a group coaching program within organizations call the art of masterful communication which is eight week group coaching program and is very much an extension of me opening up you know in my throat and really accessing equalizing my voice and perhaps the irony of it is that i have from that whole experience created a course in a program that is based on communication so so we run an eight week group coaching program called the artem ashville communication and we're starting to work with companies on a global scale and have a lot of wonderful momentum. I'm with that program so my website adam p._n._d. Dot com is a place where you can find me and i put a wednesday newsletter. Our i talk about a lot of the stuff we talked about today and how to communicate more effectively and <hes> within the workplace in both your personal life and you know people want to join me in the newsletter. That's probably a great great spot to find me and we're going to be watching some programs for individuals here as well on the horizon so <hes> i'm just loving it. Buzzing the work that i'm doing and and to your point brian like it hasn't been an easy road. It's been you know it's meandered and it's been pretty you know do doing some rough spots but you know it's we're doing some cool stuff and loving awesome my brother well. It's been a pleasure to have you ever really early enjoyed this conversation. I know people are going to get a lot out of it. So thank you for saying yes to this. You got a man and thank you for the work. You're doing and i love you brother. You know you're you're. You're a key member of my tribe. So thank you yeah. That's an honor brother. Trickling from one east coast or permanently residing on the west coast to another got got it. Thanks brian. Thank you so much for listening and thank you again to my dear friend and guest adam p._m. Indus find them at adam. P._&_l.'s dot com. It's adam eighty a. m. a. n. d. dot com of course that link and adams five key takeaways will be in the show notes at brian reeves dot com slash men this way podcast if you were served by this and other should hear it to please share this episode with them or just write a review so that you too can lead more for men this way and that is no joke people will often decide whether to listen to a podcast based on the reviews of fleas lieber review view and invite more men and many women into this experience and of course. Don't forget to subscribe yourself while you're at it. I'm your thriving living life and relationship. Coach brian reeves bryan with a y. Reeves until soon keep your head up your breath relaxed and your thoughts thoughts inspired <music> uh.

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Chernobyl disaster - April 26, 1986

This Day in History Class

08:00 min | 2 years ago

Chernobyl disaster - April 26, 1986

"Are you scared about the possibility of a second American civil war? I'm Robert Evans. I'm the host of the podcast behind the bastards. And I've worked as a conflict journalist in a couple of actual civil wars in Iraq and in Ukraine, and I'm here to tell you I am scared of that possibility. If you wanna know, what might be awaiting your friends and your family, listen to it could happen here. You can listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts this day in history. Class is a production of iheartradio. Hey, guys. Welcome to this day in history class where we bring you a new tidbit from history every day. Today is April twenty-sixth twenty nineteen. the day was able to any six nineteen eighty six. At the turn noble nuclear power station in Soviet Ukraine. A chemical explosion caused an enormous fire large quantities of radioactive material were released into the atmosphere for nearly two weeks because of the accident, even though people in the nearby area were evacuated the wind spread the radiation, which contaminated land and caused thousands of people to get radiation related illnesses. The turnover power station was in the town of trippy. I'd just north west of the city of turnover. The station was built in the late nineteen seventies. It had four reactors or devices were nuclear fission is initiated and controlled in a self sustaining chain reaction to create energy or radiation. Each of the reactors could produce one thousand megawatts of electric power on the evening of April twenty fifth nineteen eighty six engineers began a test on. Reactor unit four they want it to figure out whether the reactor's turbine could run emergency water pumps during a power loss with the test and reactor were not designed well, the engineers shut down the reactors power regulating system and emergency safety systems. Then they let the reactor run at a low power and removed most of the control rods from its core control rods maintain the vision rate in a nuclear reactor, the reactor's output went up to two hundred megawatts and at one twenty three AM on April twenty six the engineers shut down the turbine engine to see if inertial spinning would power the reactors water pumps. It did not because there was no cooling water the reactor's power level surged. So the engineers put all the control rods back into the reactor at once that was the post to prevent a meltdown. The problem was the control rods had. Graphite tips. Those graphite tips made the chain reaction in the court. Go out of control in steamed building up in the reactor blasted the steel and concrete lid off of it. Radioactive debris went fine everywhere. And there was a partial meltdown in the reactor core. Another explosion went off seconds later and a fire went off at reactor number three because engineers shutdown emergency systems safeties were not triggered though. This was not a violation of regulations. The explosion released four hundred times more radiation than the atomic bomb. The US dropped on Harris Shema about thirty one people died in the first few months after the explosion from the blast acute radiation sickness and cardiac arrest. Firefighters arrived minutes after the fire started. But they were not wearing any gear that would protect them from the radiation and many of them soon died from exposure at five in the morning. The next day. Reactor three was shut down the day after that reactors one and two were shut down. The fire was put out with thin lead in nitrogen, which took about two weeks. But the accident had released extremely dangerous levels of radioactive substances. Like iodine went thirty one plutonium and cesium one thirty seven the plumes of radioactive material released into the air were carried for miles by currents of air, lethal, rain fail throughout Ukraine, Russia, Belarus, Scandinavia and other parts of Europe. Many more people were exposed to high doses of radiation. On the twenty seventh of April the Soviet government began evacuating Pripyat tens of thousands of residents at the time. Evacuees did not know how serious to accident have been at first the Soviet Union tried to keep the accident. A secret not announcing the scale of the disaster. But a few days after the explosion Swedish officials realized that high radiation levels in Europe where the result of a nuclear accident in the Soviet Union. So on April twenty eighth the Soviet Union announced that there was an accident at turnover in may hundreds of thousands of people called liquidators were sent Sicher noble to help clean up. They worked in short shifts as they did not have adequate protective gear over several months. A huge steel and cement sarcophagus was built to encase reactor four and prevent the further spread of radiation. Still the houses of people remained in contaminate. Areas. People got sick from the radiation would increase. The incidence of thyroid cancer animals in forest were also affected the turnover. Power station wasn't decommissioned until two thousand in two thousand sixteen a new confinement was placed over the old sarcophagus which have been deemed unsound today. There is a turn noble exclusion zone. That's about one thousand square miles where people cannot live in agriculture is not allowed. But there are animals like wolves and bison living at the site. There are plans for a solar power plant to be constructed at the site and people can visit the abandoned territory as tourists, but the radio activity is still affecting people and likely will for decades, for example, cows of mouse away from the site still produce milk with high levels of radiation. The number of deaths caused by the radio activity is controversial as the long term health effects of radiation, our hearts pinpoint and statistics can be unreliable, many fears of radiation, induced health issues are unsubstantiated. But estimates of the death toll have ranged from a few thousand to an improbable million. I'm Jeff coat, and hopefully, you know, a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If there's something that I missed an episode. You can share it with everybody else on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook at t d I h z podcast. We'll see you here in the same place tomorrow. For more podcasts from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Well, this hard. But I was so afraid I could lose everything love is wonderful and confusing and magical an infuriated everything about life that we had thought and planned and hoped for was just in that moment gone. I was so so so lucky to have that join the millions of listeners who've made committed possible, I promise you it's cheaper than therapy. Listen to committed on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Soviet Union Soviet Ukraine apple iheartradio Europe iheartradio Power station Soviet government Robert Evans Iraq thyroid cancer US Ukraine Pripyat Twitter Jeff coat
Katie Sackhoff: ON How to Speak to Yourself

On Purpose with Jay Shetty

1:03:40 hr | 1 year ago

Katie Sackhoff: ON How to Speak to Yourself

"She was like let's just get out of the house like she so sad right now and so I went down and they had said you're too tall. You're too big to be cursing. Don's body double but do you want to audition for this part. Do you know how to act and of course I was like absolutely and I was terrified and I went home and my mom helped me memories that and I booked the job and sort of never looked back who everyone welcome back to on purpose. Thank you so much for making a commitment into your growth your personal development and transforming your love your work and your life by continuing to be a part of this community and that's exactly what we're building here. We're building a community where you can connect with other like-minded people where we can start spreading powerful messages all across the world through this incredible online world that we all have access to and today's guests is someone that I learned about recently but the way she's using her platform the way she's using the influence she has and the message spreading a so aligned with our community. It's absolutely incredible to see what she's doing and I can't wait for you to learn about her story and her journey which is nothing short of inspirational. She's an American actress and producer <hes> and she's best known for starring in battle. GALACTICA and Netflix is new series called another life. Her name is Katie sack off Katie. Thank you for being here. Thank you so much for having me. I am so excited to beer. I'm so grateful to have have you here. I think you're as I truly believe everything I just shed to introduce. You and I feel like we want the audience today to get to know you and the depths of you which you've never been asked about before maybe and you still use your instagram profile beautifully to share all these messages. If any of you don't follow Kate you already go ahead and follow her because your just so effortlessly and honestly an through vulnerability just bringing all of these incredible topics to the four so thank you for doing the Oh thank you so much. I like I said I'm such a huge fan. I I love the community that you are forming. It's I'm in it. I follow you. I have been for quite a while now and I just it's such a safe place for people to be honest and talk about the things that are on their mind and the things that plague them and their worries and their fears and and and that is such a powerful thing and it's just inspiring so thank you thank you. I'm so glad you're part of the community. I'm glad to meet you. I I always love it. Whenever someone's a part of the community I I love them? Come up and tell me that yeah because I just want to give them a big hug and your energy since you walked in today's just been so welcoming and so beautiful that I want everyone to experience that through the camera and through there is why I I hope so I wish they could if everyone just hug you. It was when she walked in politely going to shake Katie's hand and then and then two seconds to I feel like it's the quickest way to feel somebody's energy the end their warmth and to let them know that it's a safe place and so I I try to give really meaningful loving hugs. I love that numb scared what you could read through my hugs. Oh my God this is about you this interview this is such a wonderful opportunity for me and the audience to get to learn more about you your story Oh background and we almost wouldn't be having this conversation if you ended up becoming a swimmer true right true. I thought that that's what I was supposed to do. You know I think so many times when we're little and you find something that you gravitate towards because you're good at it <hes> it's not really necessarily something you enjoy doing and I think there is a very big difference between where you find your joy and what you're good at and sometimes there there is a it's. They're not the same thing you know and for me I was I was a very good swimmer and I hated it <hes> so when I got hurt it was like this weird crazy blessing in disguise where it finally gave me the courage to say to my parents. I don't really want to do this anymore. And it was my path you know that was sort of where I saw myself going and <hes> it took me while to figure out what I wanted to after that but my mom was very instrumental in getting me out of the House and getting me to to try new things and cheap found this this ad in the paper to go be Kirsten dunst his body devil and she was like let's just out of the house like she's so sad right now and and so I went down and they had it said you're you're too tall. You're too big to be cursing nuns body double but <hes> do you want to audition for this part. Do you know how to act and of course I was like absolutely I act and I was terrified and I went home and my mom helped me memorize that and booked the job and sort of like never looked back. Yeah love and I love how it sometimes something negative that happens to US actually awakens us to what we're meant to do. Yeah and we're also different. I was beginning because he's swimming. Oh speaking at a conference last week and Michael Phelps spoke spoke often me and he was talking about mental health which is he's such a big proponent which is incredible but he was talking about how old he wanted to do to swim and only knows how to do is swimming here. We have someone you're saying that I could do that but it was good at it but I in love it wasn't passionate about it didn't give me any joy. I hated going to practice. I just I really didn't enjoy it but I didn't have. I didn't grow up in a family where we talked about emotions and so for me to go home and say to my mom and dad bad you know I don't enjoy. I don't get joy out of this. I don't I don't think that they would have understood that. I think they would have just been like but you're good at it. I don't understand <hes> and so it took that injury for me to be be able to pursue something. I actually something where I could actually experience joy while I love this actually and I know you said that you did one of my courses recently but what you're saying right now is resonating so closely with me because I've got a new cost coming out and in that I talk about this quadrant of potential yeah talk about how we waste. Most of our lives in this box called what we're good at but don't love yes and where we really want to be spending. Most of our time is things that we're not good at the do love or things that were good out and I do love and now you've found that well that's the thing is that I think a lot of times this thing that you're good at you have to struggle to love and when you love something becoming good at it as easy. It's because you love it so I think that that's that's one of the main things that I my dad. I always say to me that find what you love doing and then figure out how to make that your career that was his his best advice to me that he'd ever give me because in it so many people say very similar things about like you know <hes> you'll never work day in your life. If you find something you enjoy things like that but he really hammered that home for me and and that's I think what led me to to acting Janney start then from being a body double to now being in the industry for two decades yeah and like working to improve your art your skill that Moscow read that you're speaking about like obviously acting came upon you and it became a thing but then how did you go through that process of really developing new skills in your you know it's i. I like to say that I'm overpaid compulsive liar and I think that acting all about conveying emotion and getting someone to believe it <hes> and so for me I never studied I just <hes> I learned how to fake it for a very long time and because that's all I knew how to do do and then I was on battle star Galactica and I wasn't taking it very seriously and Eddie almost actually pulled me aside and he gave me the lecture of all lectures and said to me that if you actually tried I think he would actually be really good talk. Like what do you mean. I'm already here and he he was very serious. He was like you have an opportunity that so many people wish they had and you've got to take it seriously and I wasn't at that point I was twenty one years old and I was just having fun and I realized that you can you can have fun while still taking responsibility and taking something seriously <hes> and but it was a weird road for me. It was very strange I I <hes> I did fall all sort of right into a job which was great <hes> but I fought a lot against the the norm and what people wanted me to be. They saw me as this little blonde girl and they wanted me to play a very specific role and I wasn't wasn't drawn those roles. I didn't have the courage to say no. I don't want to do that. I want to do something else until battle. Star came up my morning routines are normally really busy and includes includes working out and then going straight into meetings. One of my close friends introduced me to the superfood blends by four sigmatic and it has changed my mornings. 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Justice weeks created the competition for my listeners specifically to create your own website and it starting today all you need to do is go to wicks dot com forward slash. Go Forward Slash J. after you've created your website Emmanuel submission in two weeks loves J. AT GMAIL DOT com you can also click on the description linked below for more information. We'll be judging entries based on your creativity and innovation. The best submissions will be showcased in the next episode. You can also get started with your very own site today. It's so easy for twenty percent off your best ever wick site go to W._W._w.. Dot wicks dot com forward slash. Go forward slash J. to start your site for free on purpose listeners can also use the Promo Promo Code Jade twenty two upgrade to a yearly premium plan and get twenty percents off and it was this role that was this tough take-no-prisoners honest woman who wasn't scared of anything and it's that's who I wanted to be. I was not that person but I was so drawn to her as a role model for myself that I was desperate to play her and I wouldn't take no for an answer <hes> and I I think I auditioned for it like six or seven times. James and I just wouldn't go BA- like just wouldn't quit. I just kept going back. <hes> and I don't know how I got it but rather grace but it was. It was one of those weird things where I never. I never took no for an answer in this business if somebody told me no I never took it personally. I just went okay great. Let's move on to the next one. <hes> and I didn't have a plan B.. I didn't think failure was an option and I think that that was just the blissful ignorance of a child but but I just didn't think that failure was going to happen in so I I pushed through <hes> and my parents allowed me to do that. You know they sort of saw how driven I was and just went okay. I guess she's going to do this. I love that so you're saying actually really you audition six seven times <hes> and so you had that no <hes> that many times yeah. What do you think it was for you? That's helped you push through a no every time you hear it and I love the way you said that you didn't take it personally. <hes> tell me me about how you were able to because I think today when we hear the word no we will take you personally. It's very common and I know a lot of people listening right now. We're watching right now. We'll think when I hit no I just think like home no good enough for what it takes like. How did you take that uh-huh yeah? I you know I think one of one of the best things we can teach our children. Is that not everybody's going to like. You and that's okay you know my mom was like you're not you're not going to be everyone's cup of tea and that doesn't mean there's something wrong with you. It just means is that you know there are different person going in a different direction and so when people told me no I just it it it. It lit this fire inside of me that wanted to keep going but I didn't take it personally because I've always thought that acting was art and it's subjective and I can look at Picasso and not get it. You know I mean and so people can have an opinion about me and not get it and that's okay it has no bearing on my self worth and who I am and what I have to give to the the industry of of acting or life in general you know and I think that <hes> that is is one one of the things that my mom and dad stolen me from very young age was was that that you know who you are is not what you do and who you are so much more important than anything else you're ever going to do me and my dad said at the end of your life. You don't want to drop the Mike and go. Oh that was fun. I lived a great life for myself. You know he's like at the end of your life you you you question whether you loved greatly whether people knew that you loved greatly and that's your contribution and so it was it never to live for yourself but to live for others was a big thing and when you live for others you don't take it personally if one person says that you know you're not good enough. Yeah I love that your parents sound like incredible people. They're incredible people that have screwed up a lot. I think that you learn from mistakes and my parents never hit those mistakes. They they made mistakes went. Wow that was a great mistake. Let's sit down and talk about it and so that's sort of how I attack attack it with other people whereas I make a ton of mistakes I made five today <hes> but that's the only way you learn you know you can learn by watching other people's mistakes but you can also learn from your own and I've made some pretty big doozy's <hes> when we say did you make today. Hey today. Let's see said you made five today. You can come. You don't have to tell me we'll fight. You'd have to tell me I drank a way too much coffee today. There's a little mistake today I am I do. I make little mistakes every day but it's it's how we learn. It's how are we grow and I loved what you said about failure that you never accepted failure as possible and what I'm gaining from that I'd love favorite is listening in watching right now to recognize. This is failure is when you stop trying of course right and so that you kept going. That's why you didn't accept failure whereas what we do is we take that event as failure when actually failures when you stop trying so the fact that you pushing meant you were saying hey I'm not going to fail core whereas when you take that no as a failure and lots of us do we take got no as equivalent to failure and that feels a lot harder to take so I love that point. We don't really know what our destiny isn't. What our journey is until the end of our life? You know that is the perspective that hindsight gives you but you don't know what it is until the end so you don't. You can't possibly know if you failed until you're at the end so so why should we say oh gosh. This didn't go the way that I wanted so I failed. Yes you know it didn't go the way you wanted so something else. I is GONNA happen absorb. It doesn't mean fail. It just means this. One thing didn't go the way you wanted but in a it'll become very evident as you go along why it didn't work the way you wanted it to absolutely I'm so aligned with the I don't know anything in my life. That's happened the way I wanted yeah I. I couldn't think of one thing yeah that's happening my life the way I wanted it to and so I've often said to people you get to where you want in life just not in the way you imagined it yeah and the journeys are so different different from what you imagine become detached role. Now you want that journey to look. It's GonNa surprise you delight you confuse. You and I feel that you have to be open to that path. Yes and that's we'll get and that's what adults trained. Tell us. When we're a children turn right? They tried to tell you this is such a small part of your life like it. It doesn't matter and when you're young. You don't believe that you know it's only as you get older. You start to realize that nothing happens the way you want it to happen and that what is the beauty of life like we are in control of our own destiny and we we can we are a series of our choices but but the choices you make you are also WanNa ride and you don't know where you're going to be tomorrow. <hes> and it's sort of like choose your own adventure story you you have the choice to go right but the story is GonNa keep going and then you're going to have to choose again and so you have no idea what's going to happen. 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I wanted to talk about this because I believe it must have been one of the most challenging things to go through and at twenty seven you we went through thyroid cans yeah right which is I I can't fathom how tough that is and how much effects so much of you walk us through that experience of finding out and how that started to affect because you already had battle star Galactica Galactica you'd already had the breakthrough etcetera. Tell me about how that affected everything from your mind your body your career and how you started to push through. When I got thyroid cancer it was I knew something was wrong with me and and I just couldn't put my finger on it and I kept going to the doctor and I kept you know saying there's something wrong or something wrong? <hes> they attributed everything to my lack of sleep and then I worked too hard and all of these things and and then they eventually found out that it was thyroid cancer and I call it my baby cancer because there I knew from the very beginning that there is a very small very small minute chance that it could be life threatening. I didn't know that but what I didn't. I didn't realize I guess at that. Time was how life changing it would be. It was the first time in my life where I felt completely out of control. <hes> I was scared I was depressed. I was I was terrified. Actually <hes> because it felt I was all of a sudden reminded of how fragile life was and so I went through this time and I had this deal you'll with with my my boyfriend at the time my axe who still very good friend of mine that I gave myself ten minutes a day to feel very very sorry for myself and to cry and to scream and to yell and do whatever I wanted to do and then I wouldn't do it again for the rest of the day and and that became a very very important thing because I think that we can feel sorry for ourselves. Sometimes we lose perspective in that sorrow of how lucky we still are with the thing that is considered our shit. Excuse me but what I did was I realized like how Lucky I was in that moment and so we came up with this thing called the three things and my three things is that in any situation in your life. Where are you find yourself angrier frustrated or sad or anything come up with three ways little ways? They don't need to be massive three things that could make this situation much worse and it can be very if you're in traffic and you're going to be late for a meeting and this things it feels like the worst thing that could be happening at this moment in your life Kumble with three things that can make it worse. You could have a flat tire right now. <hes> it could be raining and you could have a migraine headache three things three little things that could make this one moment so much watch worse and all of a sudden. You're you feel lucky and blessed that it's only that you're sitting in traffic and you can do that with so many big things in your life so many little things but I find that if you sit back at it gives you perspective and I learned that because I call him my baby cancer because I reminded myself constantly that it could be so much worse and so it allowed me to feel grateful that it was only just that <hes> but it changed my life. I'm on medication the rest of my life I I still have three tumors in my body <hes> that they have chosen just to watch and one's in my head and tour in my throat stole <hes> and those are life changing every six months onsite to go to the doctor and have what's called a contrast emory and so the tumor in the Patou itary gland which is a little gland that sits like inbetween your is like above your nose like right in front of your brain it it produces a hormone called prophylactic and reluctant is the hormone you produce when you're pregnant and so because I have a tumor there it is made it very very difficult to have children and then the thyroid's taken out so that's another reason and so all of these things things that I didn't think about when I was twenty seven that you think are just givens <hes> were were changed so much by just that diagnosis of thyroid cancer but it made me so you're happy that I'm still alive and at twenty seven which seems late so many people are faced with this so much younger and so much more more of of life changing way but I realized that twenty-seven that every single day we get is a gift and I I became in that moment not afraid to age aging aging is a gift I at that moment not afraid of what people thought about my body not afraid of all these things that had that had plagued me in my career for so long at that moment I was like I am going to live the rest of my life with complete utter true honesty you to myself everyone around me because I'm so lucky I'm here and so it gave me that that was such a beautiful gift talking about not knowing what's going to happen in life like I wouldn't have chosen that but it became the thing that that formed who I am. I'm now wow that's amazing. I love that because it sounds like when I'm listening to you you've taken this and you said in your gift and you've let it be such driving force in your mindset towards life yeah rather than seeing it as uh as an issue or something negative yeah. You really transformed it. It's it's yes I think so I H I I I see it's so easy to get caught up in our own lives. I still do it but if we stopped long enough and find find that perspective of how blessed we Oughta just have a roof over our head so many people don't you know I think that that is the thing that I focus on the most in my life and in my practices and meditation is just how blessed I am and to just be here and so but that was thyroid cancer thyroid cancer was a doozy life-changing absolutely yeah course and do you find that that ten minutes you'd set aside <hes> Kinda then cry. It's a drought told me about that. Process roses like did that work. was that a useful habit and practice during that time it was really useful and I actually found that usually didn't go ten minutes you know and if if I I would usually was crying and it was usually screaming screaming into a pillow and I would yell ally call my mom and I would get very down on myself and but it usually wouldn't last more than ten minutes usually I usually got sick of hearing myself complain and and then if outside of that ten minutes it's I came up with something that bothered me. I would remember it for tomorrow and then I would forget it. That's amazing because it it's it every argument in every complaint and everything that seemed so big in that moment the next day wasn't it was is trivial <hes> and and so the ten minute thing. I still if anything big comes up in. I think everyone should try. If you're having a bad day. Give yourself ten minutes today to just go for it whatever you WanNa do if you want to go hit a punching bag hit a punching bag. If you WANNA cry cry scream scream do whatever you wanna get it out of your system in ten minutes. Go to your car. Your car is the best place to do it because no one can hear your while you're driving yeah. Exactly it's such a great place 'cause you can scream so loud and sometimes what I found was. When I was screaming so loud I actually would start laughing because the sheer absurdity of it just screaming at the top of your lungs? We don't do that enough as as adults. We don't scream as children we scream so much when we're upset and as adults we learned to keep it all in so it's it's sometimes I found that ten minutes. It's really great. Yes agree. We forget that when you you're such a beautiful way of looking at it that when we were children children we were just let it all out. Get it all out but when we become adults we hold it in and when you're holding in all its doing his brewing. Yeah it needs to go somewhere so it's either causing a block physically mentally for the future and so I love that 'cause you imagine Agean adults on the ground having a temper tantrum it would probably actually really great. I mean maybe in the privacy your own home. Don't drop down the street Manhattan instruments. You're caller is because it soundproof but I have Xavier People. When you repeat your complaints out yourself you start to laugh at them? Yeah or you start to recognize them with perspective. Even if you don't laugh at less so often I have coaching clients or people that I work with either right-out their pain in and they're trouble and read it out to themselves and so often on the second or third reading. I can't believe I'm complaining about this. Yeah or I have people recorded on a voice no and play it themselves yeah and then you hear it as if someone else's saying yeah and you know whatever we hear other people's challenges they sound bad but is always sounds so much worse. When you hear your own from the perspective of someone else sharing them with you again they get put into perspective and you're like Oh actually it's I know what we can do about this? You know and you start approaching it as an observer yeah as opposed the feeling like you're the victim well. It's a great thing to do for body image to go. I learned this. I'm body image for me has always been very hard. You know I was told from from the moment I came to California to be an actress that I was too big. I was called Chubby Chubby. I was called the big girl I was called. Everything's and crazy. I was just they called me. The girl from the show with Richard Dreyfuss like I was called all of these things that were used to explain who I was that we're just physical and and also so so mean like number one. You're you're insinuating that was the big girl that something would be wrong with me but then you're also using that to describe who I am as a person which was so heartbreaking and so I had a therapist one time say to me that the next time I am you're going to say got him. Ugly got him fat or whatever it is to actually do it in the mirror and so I started doing this many years ago where if I had a day rose cut you know my ass looks terrible. I would say it in the mirror. Are and you laugh because you realize you would never say that your worst enemies face. Why are you saying to yourself? You know you are like you're the one person you have to spend the rest of your life with. Why are you being so cruel and so that to me was so important so even now when I'm I'm like have a you know anything that I wanNA say negative about myself? I walked to Amir and I say it's my face and you just go God. I would never say this to someone. Don't say to yourself. Wow what have you started saying to yourself. In addition or substitution should Roy that what it is when you hear something negative go to the Murray said yourself and then you laugh there because yeah just like you said You'd never say even imagine God you would never say that to anyone day. You know the thing that I started doing if I found something theme where I wanted to say my three things rule. I guess I just put this with everything in my life. Everything's in threes but but it's point out something you love about yourself went up three things that you love about yourself. It could be as simple as like you know. Oh I love my cheek bone or I love you know oh I have great hands or whatever they are. Just give yourself a compliment. You know like we can. We can always find something in ourselves that we appreciate absolutely. I always said if you're not you'd never say that you're younger brother or younger sister. No you'd never go up to them. You'd never go up to anyone your family anyone you know in say that and if they said that about themselves you'd say no. That's not true like worse. You need to work on this or maybe we should try this but you wouldn't say yes. That's exactly what you are no because again like what you said earlier that doesn't define line who that personnel is no. I did something that's always influx and you said also thyroid cancer changed your relationship with food. It did in a big way. It did very much so so I you know I used to binge eat as as a young adult constantly gently. It was one of those things that they think they industry brought it out in me. I also think I'd probably had it bit of this. When I was a child but I would go and I'd sneak food? I wouldn't work. I wouldn't eat all day long and then I would go and I would just eat a ton of food <hes> and then I would go to the gym mm for hours the next day to counteract what I had just eaten and it was just this vicious cycle <hes> where I had to when I had the thyroid cancer had to sit down and figure out what healthy meant to me which which was very very different than for somebody else but what it meant to me and my relationship with food and I had to slow down and actually start to question what what I was hiding and that's when I started going therapy a lot was was when I was actually hiding this sort of in relation to the thyroid I had this survivor's guilt. Almost that my cancer I felt so guilty that mine was such a small cancer because they would still have to go to the the doctor's office and see patients that that had these terrible forms of cancer <hes> that they were really really fighting through and I always walked in there and felt so guilty <hes> and I I had to work through that and that was not easy at took many years to sort of <hes> let go of that. They're shame in it too. I felt so bad and didn't know how to articulate that. Tell us about that process of giving up guilt and shame because I think in so many different ways we all experienced may not be in the same way as you but I think guilt and shame those types of feelings I._T.. Never get let out. It's the ones we hold onto the most talk as we think are ugly not exactly just the hardest to explain to someone yeah an express to someone and expect empathy bat. Tell us a bit about how you kind of broke those down and dissolve them in your life for me was forgiving myself and having compassion for myself you know I I didn't have any control over what other people were going through. I only had control over myself and how it affected me on the inside and I had to forgive myself for for for <hes> taking for granted ahead of time I felt like I you know was was taking my life for granted in that moment and I forgave myself all of that but that was just it was just having compassion for myself and realizing you may not have an answer for this. You may not be able to deal with that guilt. You may not that that may not be something you can figure out but that's okay and it has no bearing on who you are as how if you're good person or not like that was I kept thinking God. I can't be a good person if if I feel shame and I feel guilt and there's nothing I can do about it and <hes> that was the biggest thing is that we practice so many of these beautiful loving techniques towards board strangers and other people and are you know like you said are younger siblings and things like that but we are. We never do that for ourselves and I think that if we if we did that and so for me really had to be about learning how to love myself <hes> and learning that I had no control over anything around me only that yes and not my health for for a lot of you know I didn't have control over that part of my health at that point <hes> I just had to to love myself and then I tried to every time I would go to get treatment I would look around me and I would try and send as much positive energy energy I could to people <hes> and <hes> that's what led me then to meditation and a form of <hes>. I believe it's called Glen when you actually you you you breathe in a negative negative and you breathe out positive and and so I tried to do that a lot why was in there and then I've the only thing I could do for those people is live my life so to the best of my ability and that's that's what therapist taught me. That's awesome. I love the so powerful especially that point you were making about this distinction of what we're experiencing. Whether it's guilt shame more ego pride or anger or end the I always tell me blitz like wearing a bad outfit fit yeah we just putting on all these layers but we're not that layer logistic. We're not all close where not our envy. We're not guilt when our shame and as soon as you realize it's not you and you can take it off and put it away right right. You start recognizing rising. Actually it's just about taking off these layers and I'm not die Gill others we just want to Oh. I'm so guilty or I'm embarrassed or we keep saying I am to stuff that we're not yeah and then we get lost in that belief system. Yes I am this emotion Shen yeah no I that was one of the main things is that I had to just let it go <hes> and I had to write down a lot of the things that I felt guilty about and I felt shame about <hes> and in order to sort of let it go and realize that it didn't define me and then I became see more honest about it as well and I started talking more about <hes> if I make a mistake and I realize it I will immediately try it and say Oh my God. What did I just do and I find that that you know people are much more receptive captive to the mistakes that you make you identify that Oh crap? I just did that absolutely yeah and I and I love how that brings us to. One of these things that I absolutely love about you is how you're so vulnerable and open on social media and you're just able oh to share who you truly our page. You're able to share all medical challenges that you have physical challenges that you have <hes> just reality to not even islands just as it is and I love the fact that you're using your platform to speak by these messages. Tell me about what you were sharing sharing Elio and we were just speaking yeah and you talked about the responsibility you had love you. Expand on your belief around why you think you ever responsibility around this yeah when I was on the show here in New York I it was on show with Richard Dreyfuss in twenty years old and I had pink hair and people recognize me everywhere I went just because this pink hair and it was right after nine eleven and this woman I was eating with my family and this woman got very angry at me because I didn't have pen to give her an autograph and it was a very weird surreal moment for me but what she said to me as she was leaving what she said that you have a responsibility you gave up your right to privacy because you chose this and and that to me at the time felt like how dare you say that to me. Of course I have a right to privacy everybody does but there was it stuck with me for so many years because she was right. You know I chose does this. I chose this life. There have been moments in my career where I sense to shift where I could tell that that I was becoming more recognizable and I kept going so I could have stopped but I didn't you know and so therefore because because the platform I have I do have a responsibility for the things that I put out there into the world because it's it has the ability to reach so many people <hes> and that to me. I take very seriously I life life to me is all about connection and what a great opportunity I have to connect with all of these people that may have followed me because they watched a show that I did but we can connect on something that is so much more important and Dan and I want them to know who I am in to see me at my worst. I don't want them to have to sift through my highlight reel of my life. You know I want them to see the the days where I don't have makeup honor. The days that I have a headache or the days where I feel insecure about myself or the days where I'm depressed or I'm sad or I'm healing from a broken heart or I'm doing. I want them to see those things because it gives them a voice voice by me using my voice because so many people feel like they they don't matter they don't belong to community and and so I I really I have a career because of these people and so if they want to be a part of my life and if they want to to learn from my mistakes by God I'm GonNa give them that you know because because a I don't know just there's something Berry spiritual to me that when I connect with someone on something that's so much deeper and so much more important than everything else you know I mean these people come to they. Send me direct messages about so many things that were all struggling with and for some reason they have felt comfortable to express this with me and that is an honor that somebody would let me see a piece of them that that they're scared to show other people <hes> and so I want them to see that part of me. <hes> tell we bought some of the examples that you've seen of messages you think most important for you to share right now you mentioned a few there but tell us about some of the bigger themes and also just about some of the things people open up to you about and what your responses on and how you've been kind of nurturing that community immunity to the thing that most most people come to me about is so many women are struggling with body image so many women are struggling with that they're struggling with self love <hes> they are struggling in with mental health <hes> and I'm not an expert on these things you know. All I have is the experiences that I have gone through in my life and then I also have the ability to potentially potentially go seek more answers for them because I have the ability to find these people in there at my fingertips but but that body image thing was that's one that you know because I've played these characters that are synonymous strength and self love and sort of like you know people think that that is Mi <hes> it is but I learned how to be me by playing these women. Were you know I was not on the girl that said whatever she wanted. When I was twenty one years I learned how to do that by these women in these words that were given to me by people that are that were so much more evolved than me at the time and still are but I I <hes> that's who they were for me and so that's these characters? I don't know so people come to me with that. That is one that just destroys me. It is one of the hardest things to see <hes> girls and boys and women struggling in with with this body image that is so pushed upon us by an industry that is selling perfection <hes> and perfection doesn't it doesn't exist. You know it doesn't exist or it doesn't exist it the way we think of it. No no and there's no one like you in the world totally like that already is so special. I said this to someone woman that reached out to me the other day there is nobody like you in the world. You are the only person out there that is you and she said well. What if you're a twin and I was like still your d._n._a.? Changing every single second it's like even if you're an identical twin your D._n._a.. Is your cells are different because they're constantly shifting so there's nobody like you like that is the most special gift that you could possibly be given that you're a one of a kind so there's nobody that's perfect. There's nobody that's better than yours. There is just the one that you have and that that is that's impo. That's and I say that because I still struggle with that. These are things that I say to myself every day <hes> so when I say them to myself Alf I then go say them to them because it it seems I'm inspired to do so at that moment you know yes absolutely and I think we all are in charge of what we believe. Were aspiring for yeah. We have a responsibility to ourselves ourselves for what we're holding up as perfection right like what is that pitcher. We're deciding that yeah whether you've consciously built that or it's been unconsciously built by your background experience parenting education. Whatever you've been exposed is too? It's so important that we reconstruct that for ourselves because I find like that picture if that's not removed and if that's not deconstructed in reconstructed in redefined based on what you really value and believe in right then you're you're still going to have another version because we all need something to aspire for do yeah and that usually should just be a more aligned version of ourselves right. Yeah we make this external picture picture face body job role criteria right and if you don't deconstruct and I think that requires some time is that you have to spend some time to deconstruct the picture of perfection you currently have and reconstruct you because you're right what you said that was not defined by you more often than nights. No you know we are we are raised a certain way with a certain set of values in a certain set of ideals by everyone around us that is in us by the moment that you get to a certain. In your life where you realize that you are now responsible for your own wellbeing and who you WanNa be was not defined by you absolutely and that is is a really interesting thing to sort of focus on that you then have to go back and almost flake print out like a collage of what you want your life to be like based on you know who you are at that moment exactly again I grew up over way when I was younger and to my Indian family family that was considered healthy right and then when I lost weight and then I'd go back to my family they'd say Oh my God you you look like completely malnourished and you haven't eaten and because that's the value of body image in that community set in and this is what I mean by just everyone's going to have their own definition of beauty as well perfection is and if you've let all those definitions become yours then now you're living for subjective definitions of other people so so no I think that's such a volleyball point that you've raised and I'm so glad that your not only using your platform where we were speaking about earlier and p show whatever you can just how you really believe that you're responsible to shift the way things are done even in the industry which would gets me really excited because I I just feel like powerful influence you one of the most five iconic people in the whole Sifi space which is so exciting cool and I'm just like when you see icons shifting the way they do things that have been done the same way for decades. That's that's when I believe things start to shift right. It's like when a CEO says I'm not sleeping eight hours a day right like that makes us simple simple like oh right yeah yeah but we're hoping was do do things and say things like that because then the teams do and then when we see actresses and I was like yourself will come out and be like what actually I want to use this platform for a voice not just for the art right and tell me about how you've been using that and some of your activism what you've been doing. Why realized that I couldn't change the industry? The thing that I had control over was that I could add to it and so you know like four another life where you know having a Premier Party Oh of course everyone knows that a premier party is <hes> but why not add a philanthropic arm to it why not give back at the same time because we know they're gonna WanNa do this so why not just add something to it that makes a difference <hes> and so that's what I've been trying to do is that just not change add to and shift <hes> and so that sort of I think that we do have a responsibility to sort of like just just is to change ourselves and then others will change with us yeah. I think that's such a bullet for everyone. WHO's listening watching? There are so many gems in this conversation right now coming from K._T.. They're they're incredible and this one's really powerful that I think we wasted a lot of energy trying to change stuff right and don't realize that we can just add another layer so often people would say to me. I don't want to change the education system was like no. I'm just going to create an alternative education that is such a hefty goal changing. Something seems so impossible. SELENA can literally lose all your energy get completely drained trying to change this big piece. Don't have any rim oval or maybe you're not even qualified to like. I don't feel qualified to change the education system whole like I don't. I don't think so eh but I do know that there are parts of it that I can add an haunt. Yes and I think that's the beauty also liberates you of this crazy pressure. We put on ourselves like I'm going to change Hollywood or I'm going to change the education world. I'm going to change the industry or I'm GONNA Change Technology. It's like that's such a heavy burden and liberated new like actually this is the part that I really believe I'm going to impact and I'm GonNa Start here. Well I think that so many people think so so grand and in which is a beautiful thing <hes> <hes> but they think in in such massive ideas and you're right if you I I can't change the entertainment industry but I can add to it. You know there is a piece that I can. There's a crumb that I can leave behind that is changing that is changing it <hes> and that is that is you know I think if we think smaller sometimes that it it it becomes much more manageable and less pressure yeah. Absolutely I love what you said earlier about how the roles you've played have actually inspired your strength and and I love that earlier and I I didn't pick I picked up on it then. I didn't say I'm saying now is just how you saying that you were so committed to getting this role because you were so excited to play this role right and and I wanted to find out so now in new show another life yeah which is very exciting. What is that role inspiring in you as a person in your own life? Oh my gosh this woman. Is You know with selling about the character yeah. No the character is is so now. I've you know I'm older now. So now I'm sort of I. I started in this industry as the youngest person on a movie set now. I'm the oldest which is amazing. I think it's such a beautiful thing <hes> but it's it's this this woman is the commander of ship <hes> and she's been given a very young crew <hes> to go out and save the world basically and she's given a young crew because they're disposable <hes> and <hes> it is is L- very very fun role for me but it's heavy. It's very heavy you know she is the the leader of the crew and I I took responsibility very seriously because I on Longmire <hes> I'm Robert. Taylor was a phenomenal number one the lead of the show he was a phenomenal leader because he showed up every single day he did his job he was happy the crew loved him and that with such a great role model for me <hes> and so I took put a lot of pressure on myself probably too much pressure actually thinking back on it now but I put a lot of pressure on myself to be a role model for some of these younger actors who a lot of them. This is I big role and I wanted them to sort of learn how to be in the industry and how to be on set and and <hes> you know what things not to do what things to do and so I you know it's one of my biggest pet peeves in this industry that they let actors cut in front of the crew in the lunch line eight to me is completely rude and I don't think that it is it is responsible as an actor who who is me no probably not as tired as the crew member who's been working justice hard if not harder than you and doesn't get to go back to a cushy little trailer and have their lunch you know so. Why don't you let him go first so he can eat his lunch and then like go? You know have some time little things like that that I wanted. I was A it's a gift to be able to sort of like impart that two younger people because things that matter to me and and <hes> <hes> because a lot of people do what they're told they can do <hes> and so ah it's a fun roll so the way that acting on set as Katie is very similar to my character Nico <hes> which is the commander and she sort of teaching them how to be astronauts. That's also they take into it some of them better than others. No I mean it's it's really well. I mean this is a it's a fun show. It's a really great cast and we were really lucky to their some some beautiful diamonds on this show that are we're lucky to have that's awesome. No I love that and I think those of the experiences that you value maybe not even in that moment but many years along I know whenever I've been mentor coached by someone even when I first met them and I didn't really want them to do that for me and then in ten fifteen twenty years I look back and I'm like I'm really glad they told me that you know and it's I think that's the beauty of anyone who's a teacher coach mentor in any sense like in any field. Oh you're showing that in any field our example right is contagious and move spread yeah right you know that coach or they guide now spreading and I just really feel that when you're playing that role in any sort of way our responsibilities to facilitate growth and give opportunity but not expected yeah is that person may take five ten fifteen twenty years to actually realize how powerful lesson that was no. I was just going to say it's we. It was a role that I'd never had a being when this sort of like mentor in a way and I didn't do it right in every way and you know I had you know my boyfriend looked at me at one point and he said you know you need to understand that sometimes when you're listening to someone someone and you then impart wisdom on them based on an experience that you had very similar what you're saying to them is that I did it. I was fine your fine and you're not validating how they feel. In this moment and you said you you need you need to stop doing and it was it was great advice but it was really hard. I got sort of frustrated. I walked away for five minutes. I was like is this going to be a fight and I walked away for like five minutes and then came back and I was like you are so right. Thank you so much for telling me that because I I did that part of this very wrong and God God forbid that I've made someone feel like what they're experiencing and feeling is invalid <hes> or that it's not important because I did it. <hes> that's that was that was a good lesson. That was a very good lesson for me to learn not to here but to learn lessons exact but I love that that's awesome okay. Do this has been such a fun compensation for me. I feel like everyone is listening watching genuine if you've been listening attentively like I have I've learned so much from you today. I feel like I talked to my daughter to keep talking. Remember when you said that I had made mistakes eh coffee no no. This is what happened. You didn't go through. This is amazing Ramana principles and amount of practices that you've given us. I think are going to be so valuable for everyone listening so anything that I didn't ask you that you wish I did now this opportunities for if there's anything the J. I really want to address this or talk about. Please this free. You know no quickfire around. I WanNa give you the opportunities anything that we didn't touch on that. You really want to shed we. Didn't you know I'm the one thing we didn't touch on is that I starting to Youtube. I'm channel. Yes there's talk. Let's talk about for me instagram. I do find that there's so much there and so much of sifting through to find <hes> the content that that touches on a deeper level and I wanted to to reach more of my the fans that are reaching out to me but on like a longer platform <hes> instagram seemed a little <hes> <hes> it didn't seem intimate enough for me <hes> and it didn't seem like the right place to talk about some of the things that I wanNA talk about with people and show what motivates me what inspires me with scares me and do it in a fun way and so that that is new for me. I'm really excited for people go to see more of of that aspect of my life and sort of go along that journey with me and we're GONNA format. Can we expect like following you around. The insides is any Sifi twist where where's that there might be there might be. We're GONNA break it down into seasons actually so we can actually do different seasons with different themes and talk about even more different things but for the most part it's sort of like I wanted it to be the Anti Hollywood and I wanted to be wellness wellness and lifestyle and what motivates me and you know what I said what scares me and things that move me <hes> and wrapped up in a fun little box you know it's it's <hes> stress relieving techniques which you know but under the guise of baby goat yoga but like things like that that are fun to watch because I think that sometimes when something is fun to watch and it's palatable. It's much easier to change. Somebody's perception of some things they the name of the companies actually blood sweating coffee. That's the name of the channel. It's sort of made for subscribe. I we end every interview with the final five which is a rapid five quickfire around. This is what you can't talk too much. I digress points golfing much the number one question is what's your dream role or what would have been your dream Roy past present. Anything could be anything. I always say my dream rolls the one I have right now. Love it amazing beautiful onset question question to what's the one thing you never leave your house without my God. I don't know if there's anything it's US poop bags. Oh I know that always have a Doggy Poo peg in my pocket. Okay not whether I mean to her not another three. If you had to describe your new show in one way to one sentence what would it be. It's a wild ride. It's very fast okay awesome. What's is one thing that one practice that you have on a daily basis that you don't think people know about that? You'd want them to know about daily. Habit daily practice meditation I meditate every day and then I I talk about. I do have a gratitude list which ah becoming very mainstream which I love <hes> and then I pick one thing that day that I need to work on Nice. I love their number five. If you could have dinner with one person that airline who to be my grandmother I I really miss her Strawberry Rhubarb Pie all and no one wrote it down. She was really great woman. no-one wrote it down. It was just all in her head. Yeah well. Thank you. Thank you so much for doing this. I think I'm so grateful to have you honestly you shed some amazing insides today. Call Favor and emphasized for having me. This is the first time anyone's ever asked me any of these questions. I love that these follow the on Instagram to though because I do feel like it for anyone you want who doesn't know you'll ready. They can find out so much about you which I think we'll be such an incredible way and of course going check out another life on Netflix as well releasing Netflix won't let me tell you okay go for and okay look out for another life on that lakes this summer Katie. You're amazing. Thank you love meeting you today as well and we hope we're GONNA stand. I can't wait to take more of your courses can't wait to lend more from you to I'm going to be a subscriber for the Youtube Channel for show you the Youtube Channel when it comes out to and it'll be it'll be really good. Thanks so much you make you go. Check out. Thank you so much for listening and watching today to on purpose remember. There were so many great insights. It's from Katie in this episode. Go ahead shed on Instagram facebook youtube twitter tag both of us in there we would love to see what you took away what you learned and as always be sharing and posting some of the best ones that I do see thank you again for being part of this community so grateful to you so great for for today and keep tuned in there is so much more to come. Thank you thank you so much for listening through to the end of of that episode. I hope you're going to share this all across social media. Let people now that you subscribed to on purpose. Let me know posted. Tell me what a difference. It's making in your life. I would love to see your thoughts. I can't wait.

thyroid cancer WanNa cancer Richard Dreyfuss Katie sack instagram J. US Kirsten dunst Don producer Kate Michael Phelps Xavier People Matic Wicks VENTURA GALACTICA
It Happened in Florida Round 2 07-27-2020

Woody & Wilcox

07:40 min | 9 months ago

It Happened in Florida Round 2 07-27-2020

"Doc. Woody and Wilcox show, so we've got three stories. This is what we do on. It happened in Florida. What do you share these stories real quick? They're all true. Taken out of the headlines of the day could happened anywhere though all over the world. You've got a spot. The one that happened in the state of Florida eight four four ww show is the way to get through what he has story number one we get add this to the list of I didn't even know that was a crime as a dude was fined and given a ticket for pretending to be a ghost in a cemetery. Did you know that that's illegal? Twenty four year old was spotted in a cemetery quote, flapping his arms, throwing himself backwards and making ghost noses. His lawyer said he was pretending to be a ghost. And he was fined one hundred dollars. For pretending to be a ghost into cemetery, I'll believe it end quote, other rowdy behaviour and quotes. They don't list exactly. What the other rowdy behaviour that the twenty four year old had had done. He did admit that he was out drinking with his friends when he ended up in the cemetery. Is it in Florida where that's against the law? You'RE GONNA get a ticket starting for two. We've heard a story like this before, but it always amazes me. Is the story about a woman who's a reporter at television station here in the United States and she received an anonymous email after one of her reports. Quote Hey. I just saw your news report. What concerns me is the lump on your neck. Have your thyroid checked? That was the email essentially. What this reporter for this NBC News Station got after doing a piece one day that happened to the guy on one of those HDTV SHOWS! So this woman after talking to her boyfriend is like an maybe I should go to the doctor I. Don't know turns out. She has thyroid cancer. And because of this viewer, who just happened to see it in her neck while she was doing a report on the news, she caught it early enough and they think that she's going to beat this thing entirely. Anonymous email by the way she says she is now I. Don't know how you doing anonymous I. Guess You just didn't. They didn't say their name. She sent an email back to thank them and hasn't heard back yet. That's awesome. How many how many anonymous emails do you get there? They're like. Go check your national right. It's a little bit creepy. Yeah, but it's also amazing that there'd be something that was visible. To. Somebody watching you on TV, but somehow it doesn't say like you have to imagine that. She noticed it the reporter right, but just didn't think anything of how or that. There's more information in the email that we just don't know about like. Hey, have a background medicine X. The person who sent it said that they had had cancer as well, but they're not a doctor. They they had had it themselves. Yeah, we need to know more about what to look for on the neck then. Sets right yeah sure. Against the lesson to be learned is watch the news and watch their necks. Feel that's not accurate Somehow there's a testicular cancer joking there though to figure that out all the pieces of their what he's got the third and final story has to do with a sheriff that is coming under investigation. After he directed his detectives to investigate a facebook message that called him fat. You've been there before right online. Somebody got your fat. But you're a sheriff this time and you're like I'm going to get to. Detectives to go to this person's house and investigate them after you leave a facebook message calling me fat. Some people think that that may be. Using the police department in an incorrect manner. Although. It needs to be done so while no crime occurred. The report shows that the sheriff's detectives not deputies to talk to the man accused of putting that facebook out there, calling the sheriff fat maybe just has cancer. I don't think it was like Hey, coach, your Nash Oh. You're. Wolford firmly called and was like diabetes. The Sheriff said that he took the message as threatening in nature and wanted to have the police speak to the man about not posting more messages like this on the sheriff's facebook page. Is it in Florida where he's like I got called me fat online. That's IT, says the cops out. Mike is up I, to try and solve our quiz. Mike all three stores actually happened. Which one do you think went down in the plywood state? I'M GONNA. Get a happy one, but I've more obviously the bird. So young listening upper. Number three number three. Not In Florida. Actually Kalamazoo Michigan is where the West Michigan Sheriff sent detectives out two of them to speak to the guy over one facebook message calling the sheriff fat. Flow mind blanked out again. Eight hundred four four ww show is the way that you can get through. It looks like we had a some sort of malfunction so phone lines wide open for you So the by the way, the woman who had the cancer and her neck twenty eight. So we're not talking about you know somebody who's up there in age. With the guy from the flipper flop show he's was pretty young and was just doing his show with his ex wife, and some some bills watching and reached out and said Hey I think you need to get your neck check, but at least you're in the medical profession, right? You're a nurse and you notice something an anonymous email that just goes I had thyroid cancer? You probably do to, but I feel like if you've been through thyroid cancer. Maybe you've learned a couple of things and you're just looking to help out your local person. It's possible. A four four four. WW looks like John has got a fifty fifty shot. What do you think John? It got to be the ghost. It's got to be the ghost, and I'm sorry. It is not the ghost, not even this country in the UK is. The dude was fined in the Portsmouth cemetery for pretending to be a ghost. There's only one left for Nathaniel. Hey Hey I didn't hear the last guy. I'm doing. Story Number One so sorry, that's. that's the ghost, so nathaniel try on that one who's up next. Waiting on Kuvina's is grab one. You're able to say hi. Who's this George what's going on? Can you solve our quiz? Number two. Woman worked at. The NBC affiliate in Tampa Florida when she received the anonymous email that said hey, check your neck. You probably have cancer at that point I'd feel like this person gave me cancer somehow like this was some sort of threat and pay off right right because it just seems so ominous, but obviously it all works out for the best.

facebook cancer Florida thyroid cancer reporter testicular cancer Nathaniel Portsmouth cemetery Mike Doc. Woody NBC Florida NBC News John United States Kuvina Wilcox Wolford Tampa Kalamazoo
049 - Never Put Your Tacos in the Toaster Oven

#GoodMuslimBadMuslim

50:05 min | 2 years ago

049 - Never Put Your Tacos in the Toaster Oven

"Welcome to the some bad Muslim happy. Valentine's Day episode. Bossa little early good, Muslim, the Valentine's. As all the time. Love is always in the air. Welcome to our fifth year of doing this podcast. This is we're starting your five we have been doing this for four years we are embarking on our sank anniversary. I don't think that's the thing is the thing. Would you give on fifty inversion is a paper is it silver is it? Copper copper gold. Or is it like tree? I don't know. It's tree. It's never tree. That's not. How are you doing? I'm good. Yeah. I'm hanging in there. Yeah. I guess I'm still going on guys. Yeah. You have a lot of stuff going on. I'm good to say for this new year. Even though it like, honestly, I've been so busy with so much stuff. I haven't got a chance to vision board for the new year. I finally finished a deadline last weekend and feel like now I can start vision morning for twenty nineteen good for weeks after the new year started. Okay. For four years, we have discussed vision boards. Yeah. Have you actually ever done one? Yeah. I did one last year on my wall. Very pretty always seen it. Yeah. I was really annoyed with vision boards having to use magazine clippings because I have not very attractive magazines. I guess so I just painted it. So my vision board is actually just like painting. I remember this episode. Actually, if you listen to our last podcasts January of last year, and you will hear he'll hear this exact same conversation. Yeah. World welcome in for people who have been donating to us to keep us going. Thank you so much that sounded really insincere. Thank you so much, actually. No, really, we're like hugely grateful you keep us capable of doing our DIY effort that we're doing here are revolutionary podcast because we're outside of the context of the capitalistic system. Boom, also really nice to be able to pay our producer for that. Thank you. And we still need a little bit more money to get to that three thousand dollars goal. So if you haven't donated yet, please donate so that we don't have to do bad things. Well, what would you do know? What would I do for this podcast? Or maybe the question is what wouldn't you do? I wouldn't collect cans and sell them to recycle. That's one thing. I didn't go that route. What were you thinking and banks armed robbery? Oh. Make money off of recycling again pockets it's going for, you know, a one stop efficient and in that you understand the difference. Between means are. Yeah. It's okay to be bad. If it's official if it's visit how're you doing post lunar, eclipse and privilege anti-noise day is that what's going on. Is it the lunar eclipse, I was reading Channy Nichols. Because you all are supposed to she's an amazing astrologer, and she was saying not to steer the lunar eclipse for too long because it's like shadows in it's like bad shadowy energies. And I was like, oh, maybe that's what's going on in this world right now. I feel like I just want to jump into it. I may have thyroid cancer. Maybe. And. When he said, the lunar eclipse, I just got really emotional because I've lost some people to cancer. And then I've also had family members go through it and survive, my brother, namely, the he was diagnosed terminal and seventy years remission knock on all the wood. He's now radiologist, and it's helping me out with my sich. But I remember a before his diagnosis. We were looking up at the winter moon at the harvest moon. And then before our neighbor our next door. Neighbors diagnosis we were looking at the winter moon, and then before my biopsy, my husband, and I were looking at the lunar eclipse. So what did you find out what's going on? So here's the thing. And this is why I'm talking about it is that I don't know anything. Yes. You spend a lot of time on with them because you try no something you're married to a soon to be Dr. I'm married to a soon to be you probably have all those medical books all around you. You're assuming that I read no just read web MD the actual medical books around. You has really convenient terrifying. Bullet points and photos, and the really speaks to my inclination. Of course, like my mom is an ultrasound Sinaga for my brothers. Radiologists. My uncle is like chief of radiology my husband's in medical school. Like, I just got. Yeah. You you have them all we have them all and a growth in hospitals like my mom drop us off at the hospital for like daycare and shit. And we would like put stickers on people's files and be like look at us. So anyway, like, there's all this uncertainty that comes with a cancer diagnosis or non Diagne. Haussas and it takes a really long fucking time. Yeah. It's a hideous amount of time to walk around with what if information, and then meanwhile, you know, I've got all these symptoms. I feel like I should back up for our listeners a little bit. And give some context I've been experiencing for and I talk about this all the time for like the last couple years severe, depression, anxiety and mood swings and brain fog and just like stiffness and fatigue. And I kept thinking it's because Matt shape. It's 'cause I'm not managing my depression. It's because I didn't get enough sleep. It's because I'm not taking care of my body. Right. Yeah. And I just like made the assumption that all of it was because of my lacking. Yeah. When potentially this whole time, it was a tumor. That's in my thyroid. That's three centimeters by two centimeters. It's huge. Yeah. It's pretty big. So that means it's been grow. Going for like awhile. Yeah. Like more than a year, potentially potentially. Well, you're saying potentially also because when you talk to the doctor this week, they said, they didn't give you the firm diagnosis they said suspicious yet, which actually this is why I also wanted to talk about this on this podcast cuts. Apparently, I have the good kind of cancer. If I have it says like Muslim, bad Muslim. Yes. Good cancer bed. Yeah. Which is a good kind even mean, and it's highly treatable like is it confirmed that you it's not confirmed yet. No. So like there's all this like hospital code. Yeah. Which I actually really appreciate their protocol around. This is number one. Is you get the ultrasound? And for me it like very clearly was a tumor. It was like very solid and then number two is like all science favorable like it's got a nice halo around it. It's not a me looking. And it's short rather than tall. Go figure the thing. Then after that, they do a fine needle analysis where they jab your throat with a bunch of needles. There are so many phases of uncertainty, and there's this like actually great sort of process and protocol for determining what's up. Yeah. I there's the the ultrasound. Then there's the biopsy and then the biopsy for me came back suspicious and the doctor explained that that happens often, and it can be nothing. But the one good thing about it. Is that suspicious means early stages? That's awesome. Yeah. And then even be cancer might just be pre-cancer. Exactly. And then the next step is that they actually have to remove the whole thing. Yeah. Because they can't do a CAT scan because throat will no actually because the CD's can requires IEA den- for contrast. And if it is thyroid cancer the treatment plan is radioactive iodine. Oh, girl, I would be a nuclear Iranian. I think this is this is basically what's happening is turning you into the Spiderman of the world, I feel so privileged. Yeah. Basically Spiderwoman bone. But you Ron in. Muslim feminist bisexual radioactive spider woman. Don't. Yeah. So they do the if they do the there's I dine there. And then that would mean that you can't get treatment for six weeks. Like, the whole protocol is that you have to do the surgery to see what's what and one of the risks. Is that you lose your voice forever. So how are you feeling about all this right now? In this like space of uncertainty right now. I just feel like I'm not being sound by the NF talking about it. I actually feel really grateful, and I feel really good because number one I have so many adopted friends who don't have access to information about their relatives to be able to tell the doctor thyroid cancer runs in my family. Yeah, I've got relatives with she motos. And you know, be able to give a full history feel so privileged that. I have a radiologist in my family. Yeah. And I've got a husband going to medical school. Like, I have so much support. Yeah. My mom, you know, being able to check on me and having gone through the cancer process with my brother, you know, they know like all the questions to ask the person that I'm seeing at UCLA is like the best in his field. That's great. Because he knows that my voice is my vocation. Yeah. And I I'm really well taking care of aunt for like two years. I thought that like I was a depressed ask, but you know, and now I just realized after I got the diagnosis. I felt like a weight lifted off me, and it's like you don't sometimes you don't realize how hard you've been on yourself. Yeah. So it's like, I I appreciate it that so that we don't scare our listeners. What is the next step? The next step is to remove my thyroid. And. Just find out what's going on. It's just a treatment plan. It's a process. I think it's important to talk about because I think for me one of the things I appreciate it was understanding this like protocol because a lot of people just think of like, oh my God. What if I have cancer, and they expect to go to the doctor and just find out, but you don't it's like a year long this process to figure out like to to narrow down the symptoms. So if you have stuff going on don't be afraid to go get it checked. Yeah. It's all a process. There's a protocol. It's gonna take a while. And just because the doctor says, you know, check back in when you're feeling symptoms. Doesn't mean you're going to get that appointment. Yeah. It takes three months to nail that appointment. I know I know go to the doctor just get your regular annual exam, everyone and don't wait until things get really dire. Before you go to the doctors. Yes. And don't assume that you suck. Yeah. Like, you suck your body. Does a lot take care of it and donate to the. Podcast guys. I might have cancer donate. I also somewhat blame my ridiculous foam. Oh, I just wanna be an all the clubs. What you got going on? I wanna hear about your red vacation felt like it wasn't a vacation. If you like, I'm also dealing with aging stuff. But it's not like my aging body. It's my dad's aging body. That's old. No. Yeah. Like like, it takes spending a week with your family intensely to realize how old people are. Oh. You know? No, actually, I know exactly what you're meant to fan. You went on a family vacation, recently and lose like all the places like we would have to hike. We hiked to I may have falls in hiking in my dad. Just couldn't like he's like, where's their why isn't there Shuttleworth? We're like that. There's no shuttle. Do you want us to get your shuttle? He's like, no, no, I can walk. And then he's like man, I really wish there was shut on just like do you want to he tried really hard to keep up with us because I don't think he's come to terms that he's also aging, but by the end of it, we're like what what's happening to him. I know he's old. I like at I eight Doritos for breakfast, which he never would have done when you're little. But the the way he like aknowledged it was he was like, well, I usually eat biscuits with my team in the morning and since I don't have biscuits does our biscuits. Mealy sisters just looked at each other. Like what how is this? Why did you buy biscuits at the grocery store Torino's for breakfast society youth? I don't know like my best summer vacation nineteen Ninety-one Doritos and hot dogs the explanation that Doritos were like biscuits. I think we were just like this is like this is how seven-year-olds like justify eating chips in the morning. It was just like a series of things like that. Like, he wouldn't put on his seat belt in the vacc- and the car started beeping, but he had put on his like halfway like all of a sudden he just decided he no longer wanted to this team. Really put his people then I'm not driving until you put that seat bolt on. Oh, my God, the stubbornness, I know like is this a toddler lupus setting? What happened to all those things? There is there is some serious regression being observed on our vacation at first when you mentioned it. I was thinking like my dad has always seemed ole to me. Yeah. But then as soon as he said like when you go on a family vacation. I remembered when we went to Italy together, we did a cruise and my dad was so happy that it was catered towards your citizens. Yeah. Yeah. And I was like what? Yeah. How old are you dead weight? Well, I know that's what we were thinking we're like can he get the senior citizen discounts. Nope. 'cause everyone's a senior citizen in who. Damn it damn it. Yeah. So I felt like it wasn't a vacation. I mean, it was fun to be with family. But I think you know, real vacation is when for me is when I don't have to be responsible. Yeah. No one anytime. Somebody says the words family vacation, everyone knows it's not an actual vacation. No, it was a lot of being responsible. But this was our first family vacation and thirty years, maybe since I was like that's a long time teen. Yeah. Because we could never afford it growing up. And then they'll like whenever my parents had enough loose money. It was always to go back to Bangladesh. So this whole concept of going on vacation that wasn't Mongla dish was foreign. And the only reason why we book this family trip was because you and I went to Shangrila, then my dad's pictures, then he got jealous. And then he was like when are you taking me to this trip? And that's like man, and then we found flights for two hundred fifty dollars baller from LAX. And then I was like, okay. So we found the flights on whatever Scott. Cheap flight deals or whatever that sites called and I contacted Shangrila. And I was like, hey, I'm coming to town because my dad wants to see Shangri LA because of he got jealous of the pictures, and because you never stop working, and yeah, ever stop working really did want to take my dad there. They booked poach performance for me at Changle, which was gorgeous in the tapestry room. And they were just Conrad in the sod, which is so generous with their time. And it was it was just like a really. So good. They miss you to in. It was the second time. I'd ads ever seen me performed poetry remind us when the first time was was that the way how. In Conrad gave this amazing introduction to me, which made me get all weepy. But he like talks to my dad, and it's like, this is your first time singer or second time senior daughter perform, and I want you to know how powerful her words are in you need it understand who your daughter is. And I just like oh my God. Like, I can't believe you did that Conrad cause for folks who do not have Muslim aggressive dad's. It's like my dad needed a male person to tell him how great I was. And I swear I was like so emotional after that it was so beautiful. And my dad cried he saw me performing cried. I'm crying right now. I know Conrad was so sweet for that. And then like, of course, like after the performance my dad's like busy talking to someone else. He's like, I'm telling her how your mom die. That was like wiz. Where's my? I just performed I made you cry. Where's my hub? I have to tell her how your mom. Oh, dad class. I was so classic. I just like, okay. I'm just breeze through breathe through its okay. I need to take the good. You know, what my dad said when he saw him we do comedy like my long farm comedy for the special. Yeah. He said, well, people will listen to you talk for a long time. It's like. Okay. Genuinely shocked like once like a put down. He was like. Wow. You know, what you need to do? Is you need to get Conrad to talk to your dad. Yes. All my God. I was just listening to Michelle Obama's book, and she was talking about how Conrad and my were there or husband. I missed like. Yeah. He's it was a great you need to go back to who. Make it happen. When we were in Shangri, LA we got to hang out with page as person they they knew page and his name's Assad in. So he's he's a z sponge page patriot is as fun as page. He's Muslim and my dad was was asking for where to pray in Assad took him to like the mogul room or something to pray in I guess Assad also prayed with my dad, and it was just really funny because my dad when you're going to the museum my dad's like, oh which direction should I pray? I'm going to in the car in Assad was just like do you want to come inside to the the? Goal room to the mogul to pray. And does like, yeah, I want to come and sit like my dad didn't know, it was acceptable. Like, this is the Slavic center for. So I think you should be able to find a room here to pray. And you wonder stand the goodness oh glider points that you're like scoring right now and get this. He Assad afterwards told me that my dad because they did the whole door stoop tour. He he said to side I can't pray for doors Duke because she's not Muslim, but I will pray for her forgiveness. It was. Yes. Yes. All snaps. Your dad is a radical ball. It was so funny. He's like, I'm sorry benevolent white woman. Yeah. He's like, I can't pray for you. But I really like how you like make displays. Slumming art. So I will pray for your forgiveness. Mazing? No, dad. Oh, wow. I know I'm still like reeling off the number of good Muslim daughter points here, man. I know I know right. Didn't get any on the trip. Dacian? No, this is like, I I don't get validation for my family on like what I did this. You know, it's like so wrong. I need it from my peers, you know, what you have it from nuclear reactive, Muslim Spiderwoman. Yes. Yes. That was that was that I feel I could got points. Like also Duca forgiveness points, but my dad's prayer everybody's getting points. Here's Cam heaven. What's up eat all the pork? No. No, no. What I my points. No, no. But seriously, everyone go to Shangrila we've talked about it before. But it's a great place. It's a gorgeous museum. Yes. I have Valentine's Day cards again this year's era. Are they hilarious? I think so, but they were actually really hard to rate. Can we officially credit you as the first person to come up with the line? I have a hard on for you. I'm gonna say, yes. Right. But I feel like you were the first Ashley kind of coat that with the guy. I was dating at that time. But you broke up with him. Yes. So he doesn't make this any more. He's mentioning him. So yes. But also, no don't give him credit. He's getting credit. I'm just saying I killed him. Czar don't kill my ex's pine what's your favorite one this year? What's your favorite line? I like is it Ramadan. 'cause I'm caught on your thirst trap. Although so good mainly because there's trap is similar. And keeps me young. But it's not really like politicaly like like my cards because I usually try to have some sort of political relevance to it. But that one has no political elephants is just you know, there's trap the so good though. I like it. Do you feel like you're like satire has shifted changed like since you started four what four years ago, this is year seven of making the card, Sarah? I knew that. I totally new you're around since you're seven ago. I know. Yeah. Has it shifted? I think shifted has been actually started these eight years ago. This is set seven I think what's shifted just how hard it is to make the cards like it's really easy to come up with a first few like you're the bomb like that. That's so basic and easy. So that was obviously your one but seven seven rounds that has to be it's hard. I don't know. How comedians do joke rating is hard? Well, especially when you have like, I mean, this is a niche, right? Like so tines day Muslim humor. Yeah. And to make it politically relevant like, I could easily just do Muslim pick up lines. I'm trying to be political about it. So I can give a nod to the guy that got cut up by the Saudi in the sea with God. So there's one that says there there isn't a bone saw that can hack away at my love for you. So good. But so wrong, you know. And then like there's some people who are like emailing at they're like only want one of the car. Not all of them, Mike, nobody this is like when you're in elementary school, and you have to buy the blocks you'd get them. All right away. The only sets when do you think I can quit them? Never. I feel like it's never at this point. Right. Yeah. You have to do them for forever. It's so hard doesn't matter so hard. I want everyone to go buy them. Because I I have a lot I need to get through my inventory. So you can go to at sea TASR star shop, you can buy the cards come in sets of six they're all signed and numbered lot of people treat them as art pieces. So he can frame them and put them on your wall. That's what I do like the art from this year because it can make it look a little watercolor gorgeous painted them on with this here. They're also very collectible. Yeah. Like, I when I become super famous you'll be able to say you have signed coffee. What do you mean when miss White House, but you know, more famous because it needs to be like sellable on. That Patriot Act episode where Hasan's talking about the brain supreme needs to be that famous. You want supreme level fame? Yeah. Where it gets like sold on the black market for like a gazillion times the market rate test. Do I hear you leaning toward capitalistic consumer consumption. Yep. For fame though, because that money doesn't that gonna come back to me? But I just want that fame. I like that you're getting bit by a little corruption bug. Yeah. Also, I wanna buy a house all we have to do is where a ski mask, and rob a Bank or sell a lot of bottles of plastic and aluminum donate to the podcast guys. Keeps going so there's a couple of news pieces, though, I'm talking about before we move on. There's a have you heard of this them are Zia Hashemi case. Yes, tell us about it. Because it is layered is it's wild lake. I can't wait to watch the movie about this. She's a black American Muslim who I think she was a convert, and then she went to Iran, and she got married to an Iranian in Iran in his a newscaster over there. And so she has her imagine they're black Muslim American kids living in the US. And she comes in visit them once a year in on one of her visits to the US to visit them she got swept up by the FBI known find her so scary, so scary. And no one was talking about in the news in because she has this dual citizenship with Iran. I think that's how the government okayed it. But you know, at the same time it's an American citizen getting locked up by the FBI with no one knowing what was happening. That's. Terrifying. That that was the reasoning because every Iranian with an Iranian father. Whether or not you're born in this country is considered any running citizen. Yeah. There's a lot of countries have dual citizenship. I actually don't know what ended up happening. But the reason that they were giving was that she had she was going to be a witness to some sort of a grand jury hearing or something and they had to keep her in witness protection. Or something was the excuse that we were given. Oh, now, we know what a, but then we didn't know what the trial was. And I still don't know what the trial was this is so suspicious is hoping you had read it. Well, I mean, here's what happens for Iranian reading the story is all of your conspiracy brain fires. And you say interesting the Iranian government was colluding with the American BI and they did each other a couple of favors yet. I mean obvious. She is obviously she's a huge proponent of the green movement overly and the green movement is very much against the administration anyone. Yeah. Thanks. She hasn't been charged with a crime. They just locked up without charge. I by the way, have no politics as an Iranian. I just wanna put that out there yet rate. I'm very American. I'm just like you like me. I'm just like you F B I, man. Oh, not not me. Man to be associated with me, not at all like tasks. Non-radical safe non-threatening amiable, affable likable. The reason why I wanted to make sure that we talked about this because the mainstream news wasn't talking about this. They totally put it under the rug, and I feel like that happens when it comes to black Muslims in our society. They're always putting under the rug. So if you want to learn more about this, Google it. There's a lot of news articles coming out about it. But she has been released. Yes. And one of the other reasons I heard as like a justification is that she was a speaking in a black lives matter documentary. No, she was going to make a black lives matter documentary when she came to the US as though that's reason enough to be swept up by the FBI. I'm that's like every reason its way all the Ferguson protesters are slowly dying one by one. That's terrifying. Terrifying. Yeah. I didn't know that. Wow. All right. This one has night. We disagree Ritchie. The he'll love her. She was on our show. Listen to pass episodes. I also love and adore her categorically period. Yes. But don't say mother fucker me. I think it's amazing. She said motherfucker in congress. I mean, we're she just entered congress rate is the January. She said we're going to impeach the motherfucker in reference to Trump, and it feels good to have a Muslim woman in congress saying the things that I usually say, okay. But I just feel all the way to the consequences. Like was it worth it? Do you know what I mean? Like how worth it? Here's what happens as soon as you say, the F word you throw down the F bomb all the respectability politics of every person that I know who is like the Persian mom generation that I have. Yeah. Is like, you know, but pussy grabbing is okay. We'll, but this is my point is in the argument that they're going to make. And this is totally me like assuming reacting to put that out there. The argument that I am. Imagining. They're gonna make is why are we stooping to his level? We're supposed to take the high road. Like, I feel everyone's respectability politics activating and reacting to it. And I'm like was that worth it? Do we need to do that? Well, yes accomplished so excited by the freshman class. I am loving Alexandria Cortez in congress and loving. How outspoken she is. I'm living all these young women of color who are going into the government and just speaking their mind, and they're doing it in a way, which is rallying the crowd. I'm loving Nancy Pelosi pushing back on Trump, I am here for all of this. I am ready to put Trump in his place, which is not the way house. Yes, I agree. Also, I know that one way to immediately get dismissed by customer service is by throwing out the bump only if you're a woman of color white people say, yes, F word. No. We can't also have the same double standards. You know, like we have to change the culture, and we have the change. System, but how many battles are we gonna fight at one time? I'm willing to let Rashida fight this battle for the rest of US Congress. I mean, you know, I agree. I'm just speaking for those people who hear my head, whatever get the motherfucker outta office. Yeah. Do that. Also, get the motherfuckers you are always attacking Muslims reneging spend a lot of time on it. But there was another foils temp against Islam Berg what that one city in. I think Pennsylvania that was established by black Muslims. We've talked about this on podcast. But no, this is Rochester, New York, Rochester. I love the fact that there's a place called this lumbergh, it's red. It's so red but three teenagers were going to attack, and it was defeated. Also something else. That's not getting a lot of news coverage. So go Google that go look that up. I'm going to go to the slumber of my house Islamov Ania Slama Bod. Well, that is a place Slama, STAN. Some Muslim stand Muslim Berg. Oh, yeah. I wanna Muslim Berg I wanna Muslim Burke, California, some big, well, there's a mecca California sounds like places. We should be doing life shows. All right. You guys have a special treat for you for all of my running homeys that have been complaining that I don't talk about Iranian soccer on the show enough. I'm bringing to you czars. One minute of sports for the first time in fifteen years, the Irani and team is in the semi finals doing something amazing in a sport. That's amazing. That's amazing. And everyone's like, whoa. What's happening? And everyone's like, yeah. This is the first seven fifteen years. What does that mean? Why is that relevant Washington? No about this. It seems very important and to rent that was less than a minute yet. That's all I know about sports, but what up Iran in in soccer and now for our break. Zara. Yes, I had a box of food come to my house this week. And it was delicious. It was from green. Chef oh my God. Green. Chef is a USDA certified organic company that makes eating well, easy and affordable with plans to fit every kind of lifestyle meal. Plans include paleo begin vegetarian Qatar, Ian, Mediterranean, heart smart, lean and clean Kito free in omnivore that the plan that I got was the vegetarian. Ooh. What did you have? I had some kale Phero salad with honeyed beats. And it was pretty delicious. Was it easy to follow? It was super easy to follow the directions. We're very clear-cut, and they were step by step in Picton delivered right to my door. And I'm always burning stuff. I did not burn this food L or something for everyone. Is sounds like. Yeah. It it felt like that. When we were looking through the options of what we wanted. So I'm pretty happy with this. I get a lot of food boxes. But this one was definitely one which made it. Easy to switch up whenever you wanted. It was delicious. And there was all these new recipes. So there's a diverse array of meal plan with plenty of options to choose from. Did you pick a meal plan or just like one night's box? I that the vegetarian meal plan, and it was delicious. Three chaff makes achieving your twenty nineteen goals easy with dinner options that work around your lifestyle. Not the other way around. I like letting green chef do the meal planning grocery shopping and most of the prep work for me. We after week for fifty dollars off your first box of green chef go do green chef that US slash good. Once again, that's green shafts dot US slash G. O O D. Okay. We're back from our break. Are do you have a keeping Syria? Yes. I do. What is it? All right. There is a memoir by Iranian American author. Sarah sadie. Yeah. So to say d that's being made into a television show. What channel I don't know. I hope it's. But listen it's called Americanized rebel without a green card. She talks about everything from Sally field's not without my daughter to sex and prom to being labeled on the legal immigrant for her undocumented status. I can't wait till she's undocumented. Oh, this is gonna be good. She talks about politics. She talks about like, it's the first time that I'm like really seeing any Ronnie and woman of my generation like diving in to all of it. You know, what I mean, I'm I'm so stoked. I can't wait so much it. I feel like there's been this upsurge of Muslim people on TV, movies, and whatever. And finally, we get to have the fun conversation of dissecting how the characters are being portrayed versus like just a simple representation conversation. So I'm excited to have these more complex narratives. Yes. And what I've been getting a lot of people telling me. Oh, I'm so sorry. There's already a young Iranian woman. Who's writing a memoir looks like you can't anymore? What are you talking about? And they don't understand what this means is. I don't have to touch on every single topic in the world as the only Iran woman eating. Yeah. It's exactly should be freeing, my creeping sharia is that we have just put to Muslim women in congress in the beginning of this month, beginning of January. They swore on the Koran which I was really looking forward to. There was all this controversy amongst different types of Muslims about how should they use Thomas Jefferson Krahn or not is it anti-black to be using the Thomas Jefferson Kron, which was a lot of what I read and one of the things that I remember seeing for at least for Shida was she actually brought her own crime that was gifted to her by her best friend. She so red, and she said, this has more meaning and she didn't put down the times Jefferson corron, but she was just like, you know, my friend gave me this crime. And it was like that was so smooth. And when Ilhan was doing her swearing in ceremony. She was also holding onto a set of prayer of set of those while she was doing her swearing, so I just love it. I love how like they brought their own little flavor. Their own little thing to their swearing in ceremony. Oh, my author so bad ass, and they're so mazing, so amazing so much fun to follow them on Twitter. Yes. And instagram. Yeah. Love it and insa stories. All right. It's time. Okay. Our toaster ovens. What? Yeah. Just out with toaster ovens. Because did you know when you put corden Tra ta hard shells, toaster ovens, they catch on fire. Oh, no. Because even though it said on the package to put in the oven at three hundred fifty degrees when you put in the toaster oven caught on fire. He caught on fire. And I was on this writing retreat out in the middle of nowhere. Not even Josh retreat. Like we were like twenty minutes north of Joshua tree. So we were off of a dirt road. We had like no phone service. We were next to the big rock, which is where aliens come and Integra Thanh. And so there's like all this area. Like, really weird energy. What is the time this and this was like the day where I was completely by myself, and I was supposed to spend the night by myself. And so I knew it was going to come back for me on my God. And I'm cooking in all of a sudden look over and the whole toaster oven is inflame the plug for the toaster oven is behind the toy. Oester oven. So I can't even unplug it and I had brought Garland's because I was trying to make it festive because it was Christmas the garlands over. It was starting to melt in. Luckily, because I had just seen transformer exploded earlier in the day off the electric line in the electric had gone out in the place after that had happened. I was like I wonder where the fire extinguisher is. So you're the fire extinguisher was so I like had do spray the whole place fire extinguisher it. And then I'm mmediately took it outside my heart was racing. Just like, oh my gosh. Buried a flaming toaster oven outside carried it out after the virus anguish her. Oh, that's right. You put out the fire put out the fire. And then you know, that I did have to reach over the fire to unplug it immediately. Because I I wasn't sure if. Yeah, that was scary. Good lord. Don't ever put your tacos in the toaster oven. Yeah. Well, also weird energy in that space. Yes. That's my takeaway. I staged it. I said this meal everywhere. You know what I'm saying? My friend is a fire woman that is a classic scenario. Yeah. I googled it afterwards and everyone's catching their toaster oven on fire by putting their corner. Tears in their never put your corn tortillas in the toaster of what else I learned. You can use these hard corner ta shells when you're starting a bonfire. You can just like the shell. It'll start your it's a good fire starter who knew now, y'all know Phya start to with horn tortilla. Yeah. So like a food. I'm never gonna eat again. Wow. I'm gonna put corn tortillas in my emergency kit. Yeah. It's kindling kindling. Right. Damn. Well, I have a fatwa. Oh, you do there be oh what's going on with? I'm not talking about it. Oh, that's what they want. You to do therapy is talk about it. I'm not gonna talk about it. I'm just going to TWA therapy. It's been tough my therapist when I explained about how I have something Zaidi about doing my show on behalf of all Muslims, the comedy special nervous. And I said, but at the same time like, you know, come out bell went to visit the KKK, you know, like in being visible person comes with, you know, scary threats, and you're putting yourself out there. And that's just like a part of the thing. And then he said, yeah. But Muslim culture, though is a bit extreme. And then you cancelled him, right? So how's the search for a new therapist going? No. I fought therapy. I'm done after that, I'm done. I know that there are like therapists of color out there that like are working on changing the field at the same time. Also, really over this like constant reiterating of negative thought patterns and how I feel bad. And why I'm said, I don't actually think it's their -peutic. I think it makes things worse. What's Muslim culture? Well, I would like to say I'm a Representative of what is extreme in the Muslim. Like, what is who? Right. Nice. I had to like I had to school them. I had to like pause therapy. Yeah. Pay me right now. Yeah. What about pro-life people who like are killing folks all the things they saving lives like, I don't think extremism, and I had to do the whole thing that I learned to do. Because that's how old this argument is that's terrible. You got that recommended? There are good therapists out there. There are a lot of Muslim therapists out there. I still thought with Opie Zayas following their Pat me at me bring it bring it. I'm ready. I can hold my own in this conversation. There'd be a decade. I'm so ready. I just really wish we could find you a better person though. I mean, there's that Abe, but also be like we need to find our therapist friends to cancel the sky. This is true. He should not be allowed to practise. Speaking of awkward. Yeah. Awkward ask muscle. So we're in a who. Okay. And one of those Muslims that don't pray all the time. And every maybe like five times a day. My dad was coming up to me say hang know what direction. Oh, I was gonna say how come you're not praying. No, it was which direction. Do I pray in? Now's like that. We got the app on your phone just use the app and like old now. So he's like, I don't understand how this app works. And then we looked at it. When like he hadn't like new location up and we're on an island. So we're like he's just completely lost. Because we're going from one side of the island to the other side of the island. All of a sudden the sun's rising over the water and is setting over the water because it's an island. We're just going everywhere. And he keeps asking him like which way is the sunset where is. It was so funny. I just like this is this is our life right now is just trying to talk to our parents about just follow the sun. The sun sets in the east where do you think you should be praying if the sensitive the I feel like I've heard you use this tone when explaining things to me, actually. It is don't jump into quickly to answer that there. And there was one point. I was just like that just say this meal. Just pray. Just pray in any direction. He's like, oh, yeah. You of course, you can do that. But I just wanted to. I also heard you saying things to me in this. I for me. It was the funniest which is that like like, of course, my dad's gonna be confused because we're going from one side of an island. If you're only used to being in LA, you always know the mountains are to the north. So let's like your good orientation. But my dad was just so lost. Also, all it's beautiful, Saul beautiful. I mean, you look at the sunset, and it's like my looking at the sunset looking at the sunrise, what time is it? We're six hours or what's happening. If you're looking at the sunset, you're not looking at the sunrise now, you're just getting into the weeds. What's your awkward s? Okay. I have a lot of fun with doctors. Tess your member the doctor in Hawaii. Yeah. Y'all should go. Listen to Hawaii episode because I have a amazing awkward eskimos lem in Hawaii episode in this one similar kind of situation had some swelling in my neck after the biopsy and as really scared, and I went to the doctor and had a substitute editor chronology because my ladies on leave and. Heikal in say, I have some swelling in my neck, and he goes, a you know, what you have. Right. Are you a doctor? I said you mean, and he goes you have can't Najah Hyumal said who have cancer without any any thing. Like without an x-ray Ray or anything. No. It was like he was given the notes on my case. Oh, and he was like oh shit. Do they not break the news to this? I'm going to have to do it. That was his face. Oh, that's terrible. And he was like a I mean Najrah any accidentally said cancer instead of Nacho three times. Oh my gosh. Like, dude, you are so lucky that this is hilarious to me right now. Also, I don't know that it's cancer. But. Doctors talking about you behind your back like that. And then I asked my mom about it. And she was like, yeah. Well, they're just so used to it that like they all refer to it shorthand like that goodness. Doctors y'all the bedside manner, but he did win points with me because afterward he said that he was really stoked that. I was a stand up comedian. And he's come into my show go there you go. Yeah. That's how you win them fixes it for me. Who do you wanna give your good Muslim to nor to gory noise? Awesome. She's bad ass, nor was again misidentified this time in vogue magazine, nor has an awesome podcast too. By the way, you should listen to it. It's about human trafficking. She was misidentified by vogue magazine. And she was so stoked to be invoke magazine. And she said in response what the fuck vogue. Yeah. They named someone else. Who's like spunky sunny actress in it was so bad. Also what the fuck vogue? What the fuck folk? Terrible. So I guess. Yeah. More and more. I'm digging are influencers out there thrown down the bomb. Yeah. I mean, look at that you just change over the course of this episode while my good Muslim award is to saieed on superstore. Yeah. A superstar. I mean, this really not to say, but it's maybe it's to the superstore writers. Sorry. I got a chance to hang out with the writers for lunch, and we talked about Muslims. Thanks to the folks that define American, and I talked about how my dad worked in a story that was kinda like super storing how he would wear. These weird awkward sweaters. It was just like always looking for places to pray as did happen in Hawaii. And what do you know? There is an old awkward sweater wearing old man on superstore now, and the funniest scene is when he's praying in the back room and American Ferrara's character is breastfeeding at the same time. He's praying just like oh my gosh. They totally listen to us, which was awesome. Did you watch it with your dad? I think that would have been a little bit awkward to watch a scene about prayer next. Breastfeeding. I was thinking about playing it for my dad. But yeah. More people's need to invite us into the writer's room for this to happen. We're excellent concert. We're amazing amazing and secular shooting. That's our show. Yeah. That was fun. What you got going on tests? What do people need to know about to Oetzi look up most slim vide cars and make some purchases 'cause I have a lot of inventory to get through what Ellie want one card now you have to buy the whole set. It's like when you were a little kid. What do you have going on? I am buying Muslim vide cards from TASR star answer. Good answer. I'm also going to something called the Frank conference. It's like a woke Ted talk. Yeah. It's being held in Florida. I'm also going to be featured in a stand up comedy showcase with Liz Winston. And I can't believe I haven't met her all these years. It's my first time getting eight or came at her. I'm so excited. I also did an interview keep an eye out for an interview with me in bustle magazine about cels fun. And I am headed to Yale with my co host in a month. We're going to do that we're going to get a Yale. We're also going to go to USC to do the vision invoices podcasting show at the end of this month. And we're going to Toronto to con to keep an eye out for all of that one request. Hopefully, I will have an N Y T up out soon. Hopefully, and if you see me on social media, and then t up it hasn't come out yet. Tell me to get off social media rights era. Thank you. By donate to the. Thanks for listening to the good Muslim bad Muslim podcast hosted by Taza med ins are no rush. He and follow TASR on Twitter at Taza star. That's T as E Y S T A R in Zara at Zara comedy. That's the A H R a comedy the shows produced an edited by Quincy Smith and you find this on the web at good Muslim, bad Muslim dot com. To follow the conversation, hashtag, good Muslim, bad Muslim, good Muslim ban. Muslims recorded. The potluck podcast studio. Located at visual communications communications, the supports the voices of Asian American Pacific. Islander media artists who empower communities and perspectives of their annual programs include the cadmium ward. Qualifying Los Angeles Asians film festival. Armed with hammer. Fellowship and see three the conference for creative content doing more at BC online dot org. Good Muslim badness, proud member of potluck. Collective features stories and voices from the Asian American community. Car. I'm just like you FBI, man. Oh, not not me. Man to be associated with me, not at all like tasks. Non-radical safe non-threatening amiable, affable likable.

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215. Native Alaskan in Anchorage

Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

1:13:53 hr | 11 months ago

215. Native Alaskan in Anchorage

"Right now on. E Ralph unspoiled covers. Martin Scorsese's Goodfellas and a high stakes debate. That will make you choose team Paul. Or team amy for more follow at. Your Wolf on social media. Happy listening so happy right now. I'm meant to talk to you about a product that has legitimately been such a positive thing in my life. It's the ARA digital frame. You've heard me talk about these before Mother's Day's coming up father's Day a couple of months down the line and I really think it's something that you might like because it's my whole family loves it or a digital frames. They're beautifully designed WIFI frames. They connect people around the world. Three delightfully simple photo sharing experience. They are free. Unlimited storage can send photos from your phone to the frame never runs out of space. You invite your family to join. And that's because that's the whole thing. I got a kid. My brother's got a kid. Well guess what my parents have an aura digital from sitting in their kitchen and me and my brother we can chose from our phones in New York and Philadelphia. All of a sudden. My parents in Florida are looking at photos of our of their grandkids. They're a great gift for any occasion or no occasion at all. Very easy to set up in us with Mother's Day just around the corner. What better way to show your mom you care. Then giving her the gift of Memories Year Round for a limited time or is offering our listeners. Twenty percents off their purchase with the code stories. That's twenty percent off with code stories. Visit ARA FRAMES DOT COM to learn more. That's a you are a frames dot com. When you're busy like we all are the first thing that falls to the bottom of the list tends to be taking care of yourself. People tend to say all right time or money for that but talk space online therapy. It's the most convenient and affordable way to get the support of a licensed therapist. And I wanNA say especially right. Now you're cooped up you're worried about how your life's going to change a lot of people out there losing their jobs. A lot of people out there losing their routines. A lot of people can't get to their loved ones. I'm feeling all of that myself. It is crushing. It is confusing taking care of your mental health. Right now. It's more important than it's ever been. I mean that from the bottom of my heart now talk space matches you with a licensed therapist based on your needs preferences with thousands of licensed therapist. Trained in over forty specialties available. Send your licensed therapist texts audio picture or video messages from your phone or computer. Whenever you need to know needs to make appointments everything happens within talks basis secure platform all on your schedule talks. Space has been a major supporter of the show for years. I really thank them from the bottom of my heart for that and I think we all agree that right now a progressive way that you can be getting help at home. When you're feeling stresses it's really something worth thinking about so pay attention to this one even more than you usually do for this longtime supporter of beautiful animus bottom line. Look life can be hard talks. Base wants to give us the support. We need at a price. We can afford now as a listener of this podcast. You can get dollars off your first month on talks space to match with your perfect therapist. Go to talk space dot com or download the APP. Make sure to use the code beautiful to get one hundred dollars off your first month and show your support for the show. That's beautiful at talks based DOT COM KOI ANA to everybody who knows what that means. It's beautiful and honest one hour. One phone call donets holds on on. I think it will be more. Chris gathered here. Welcome to another episode of beautiful ominous. I tell you if there's ever been a time in my life where I'm lucky to have a creative project which talking to other human beings. It is now love that I get to talk to people rare these days. Last week's episode was Corentin. Break-up rose really proud of it I still am. There's a couple of comments that came in the facebook community. Want to call him out. Every time I mentioned the facebook community I also WanNa take the moderators that community. They do a great job that community. It's so laid back till you it's place and there's thirty three thousand people in that we are an army individuals like talking to each other on the phone. Now I had mentioned a game I played growing up called King of the hill and the episode. Sid In the group said in Connecticut. We had large random boulders in our apartment projects we played king of the hill on them kicking pushing and throwing each other off these eight foot tall rocks. Oh to be young again. Happy to hear that. I'm not the only one who played these dangerous games growing up now more importantly I gotta thank Nico in the Group Nico called me out on something and I want to thank them for it. Niko said I love this episode so hard but I'd love it if Chris didn't say the F. Word so casually it's vile keyword that deserves to be dropped from our communal cabbie Larry. I don't know if it's necessary to say quote the F. Word instead of the word but maybe it shouldn't be used by US like it isn't a word that people have been beaten to death hearing yell at them over and over. I know Chris is doing his best. Maybe I'm wrong but just something to think about the. Niko made clear. I'm not talking about the F word that you know. We know as we're talking about the homophobic F word and I. I realize I did in the episode. Say I believe what I said was some version of men. We used to say the word blank grown up and didn't even think about what it actually meant we just threw it around so casually and when Nico posted their comment. Initially I got very scared anxiety of like. Oh my God did I say something? Did I say something horrible? And then I get defensive right well I only bring it up to talk about how awful I think that situation is and then I realize no nichols right in the course of talking about it and how awful. I think it is that it was so casual growing up. I'm throwing it around casualty now and it makes me think all. Why is this different than some other sensitive language? And I'm like man. They used to say that in movies growing up ice to hear people in my life say music use to hear that word and it's like man even now when I'm calling out how pervasive that word was the pervasiveness of it still. Has this lifelong effect on me. Run the thinking about it was I opening and I'm humble enough to know when I'm wrong and I'm really happy to be taught that lesson and I feel a little bit burned But I should so thank you Nico in the facebook community beautiful anonymous community for a for pointed out. It's good to remember. Now this week's episode we talked to someone from a very fascinating place. Alaska I talk in the episode about how for most of us Americans Alaska seems like a very sort of a mythical place. We don't know much about it. That was certainly true for me. Not only do we talk to a native Alaskan about Alaska. They are chewed native Alaskan. They have native blood running through their veins. They tell us what like that? Experience tells about the remoteness of the village that they Have Roots in that. They have often spent time in and we just get into it. It's a nice laidback chat about all things being Alaska. It was really pleasant. I thank you. Call him for having it and hope you listeners enjoy Thank you for calling beautiful anonymous. A beeping noise will indicate when you're on the show with the host. Hello Hello Hey how's it going? I'm really good how are you? I'm good I'm good. I'm having a good day. You know right now. You have your your bad days. This is one of the good ones. Yeah for sure I I know how that goes Although for for me it's been like on good bad. Yeah right okay I had shared with your producer that I just Got Over thyroid cancer a few months ago so that was kinda crazy like diagnosis I had been feeling fine. I had gone in for like a second opinion. I had gall bladder issues And so I got a second opinion and during that second opinion exam they found the lump Need to get a biopsy biopsy was followed with the diagnosis and then surgery so it was all pretty quick. Yeah when you say pretty quick. From from the first time you went in to that surgery. What's the timeframe here? It was like I want to say a month so I found now that I had thyroid cancer on Veterans Day And then I had my surgery on December sixteen so. It was like a month from the diagnosis Until my surgery. And so you know I have two little boys And so it was really Just kinda nervous talking to know that like I'd have to go into surgery and you don't really know like whether or not the the cancer has spread. I didn't know what stage it was so I found out that it was staged to which is know really lucky. And they say like if you're GONNA get some type of cancer Thyroid cancers the one to get because it's so easily operable And so yeah I got the diagnosis and got it. Taken care of At the same surgery I was able to get my gallbladder out so I thought I didn't mind sharing A couple of details. Of course I wouldn't ever tell you my name but I am from Alaska And I am Alaskan native so Alaskan native people are more likely to have like gallstones so I've been having a lot of pain and So yeah now you got the surgery and I think when you when you first brought it up you had phrased it as saying that you got over the cancer. Does this mean. You're you're cancer free. You're in the clear. Yeah so currently I did. I didn't have to go through chemo. Luckily kind of the the treatment for cancer is you're on a higher level of like thyroid medication to suppress any thyroid cells is called thyroid suppression. You know the only problem is like I. You know you've talked about your mental issues and I. I think that's really brave of you. I also kind of struggle with anxiety and one of the side effects of depression like you can have more anxiety so I'm just like great. I feel like I feel like having cancer will give you a lot of anxiety even before the medications come into play. Let's not forget that that little recipe. The variety cocktail having cancer. That'll do it yeah. It's a big word you know to hear I'm thirty six so You know I'm I have. My oldest son is Eight my youngest is or he's nine. I'm sorry he just turned nine My youngest is seven And so you know you kind of go through the mental gymnastics like going to be around for them. You know I'm a non traditional student. You know I go to school for criminal justice and so like I want to finish up some of the things in my life and it was just kind of like it was out of the blue you know like. You're just kind of like surprised by the diagnosis. So yeah I I feel like You know since since you're now cancer free. I feel a little more comfortable asking since you brought it up. That's that's that's one of the things that you spend your whole life hoping you never hear it. What's the experience I was? Someone sits you down and goes. I'm so sorry to tell you you have cancer. I mean yeah. And it's really routes I've been pretty with my kids about ten of my diagnosis and I don't want them. You know I have a pretty gnarly like star on my neck because I did have to get it. Surgically removed And so the thing is like I'm not like a huge doctor person like I'm not like hey let's go to the doctor It just it. I have the white coat syndrome really badly but I took that step to go get a second opinion and so in that step of taking care of myself you know I was able to find. You know the cancer and so it's kind of a good example to set to my kids like hey you know like be healthy you know. Go to the Doctor. Get your checkups. Yeah and his White Coat Syndrome. I've never heard that phrase. I would imagine that means you don't like the doctor you don't like the people in the white coat white coat syndrome. Put it lightly you know. I think I so being Alaskan native. There are kind of some perks that you get. We of negotiated as made people to get free medical care. And so it's free but my opinion is that the quality is not great And so you kind of a lot of people will really distrust the medical. I guess communities Until the thing is like I just. I wasn't really happy with where I was hearing about my goal. Don't surgery so my gallbladder surgery and so I I had opted to on my husband's doctor who by the way is from New Jersey so Why Pretty Awesome. Yeah so he moved here when he was like nine so I just decided you know having a go. Check out His doctor and he was just a really thorough. He's really knowledgeable. I feel like more knowledgeable than Some of the doctors That I've seen in a lot of the the medical staff that I see. I really respect them and everything but they're like physician aides or like nurses and so it can be really hard to kind of get the quality you might need for something serious so I ask You. Okay tension when When you talk about this medical care does that make you go like when you hear about people want You like socialized medicine. Medicare for all. Are you sitting here going? I have I have the prototype. Version is not that good guys or are you going. They sat the natives. The natives with the it it is it is all right. Yea IT for sure. It's a concern because the thing is they don't cover anything really expensive so you're kind of getting like the bare bones of you know like medical care so like if. I need dental care. Bill they'll give me a feeling but they're not gonna pay her like crowns or you know anything fancy and so even for me to go and get an appointment it. It's like months out like a couple of months out so if I have to get something like if there's an emergency and I'm having pain you know it. It might have to show up. I think like seven. Am Wait for someone to possibly cancel their appointment and then seen so. It's it's overwhelmed you know. And we're we're in Alaska where there's only seven hundred and thirty thousand people and you know. It's it's rough I I don't mind sharing. I live in Anchorage Which is the biggest city It's a really you know. Small town compared to Other parts of the US. Obviously there's like a little over three hundred thousand that living in grinch alone so the cynical part of me also has to wonder when you said like the native community was able to negotiate free healthcare. There is a cynical part of me. That's going well. Did the government walkaway going like fine. We'll give you a free healthcare but it's GonNa be shitty like there's a part of me that has to be yeah And it's really hard because I feel like in that deal. The there's a little thing called Inca and I mean it's where we negotiated kind of like our land. You know their rights just some of our land and things in exchange for free medical care the ability to make corporations And there's thirteen regions. One is kind of now defunct It was like a catchall for like folks that lived in what we call lower. Forty Eight And so it was for folks that lived outside of Alaska Until certain regions of Alaska have a corporation and so we are able to operate business and the revenue and earnings are spread among shareholders. So if you're going to be a shareholder you had to be born after nineteen eighty or excuse me before nineteen eighty two and I was born after I was born in eighty four so I am not the firm I regional corporation. I don't say oh well you know we're GonNa put you into a corporation that corporation has to allow new members and basically And so there's dividends that are paid to those shareholders and so there are perks to being what's called a defendant and so for me my college. Scholarship is paid for I have to apply for it and I have to get good grades which you know. I'm doing it That kind of one per I guess The the shares in those corporations they can be passed down but they have to be passed down to someone who is Alaskan native They can't they can't be sold at least from what. I can remember Until I do have like a few shares one of the largest corporations But it literally like most people have like a hundred or so very. It's pretty well. It's very complicated. Scenario very well it is. It is when You're not kind of born and raised around it. I think Right but you know when you're alive. You Alaskan native you pay attention to what you know What concerns you right? So Yeah It's just something that you learn about. And a lot of people Alaska native people they work for either the corporation or the native hospital And so it's something you'll learn about. That's there's so much to talk about your thyroid. Cancer interesting background. Raising two kids going to school so many things I want to get to. I WanNA follow this track. So here's okay being a native in Alaska in particular now. I have some questions about this. I know that yeah lose the native communities in the lower forty eight Some of them are sort of doing their own things. Some of them are working in conjunction with the larger community is the is the Alaskan native community connected to any other native communities is are closer. Maybe the Canadian natives so Not so much like we kind of consider ourselves like just different So I'M IN NEW BACK. Which is we're from like the Bering Straits area Or from the Barrow Area. Which is like you can kind of make your hand into the shape of Alaska. You're right hand. And if you have your your index finger and year Out But your other three fingers tucked in that that looks like Alaska right so trying to do it myself right now. I have have try. I ever weird thing with my knuckles joint things. I'm trying to pass. It's a very strange of Alaska to join finished anyway. Okay so I'm listening so my thumb and my son and my forefinger extended my. The three fingers are down in folded in. Yep Yes when you're looking at your hand you're you're looking at Alaska and so your second finger up to your Pinky area that's all going to be like in a back territory kind of so we're like a coastal people you know we subsisted on. Whales Seals Ammon More inland. You ate a lot of Caribou reindeer. Sausage is fucking amazing You know smoked salmon. Is The bomb seal oil. That is a native food It's amazing And birds a lot of birds ferries of course And you've got to understand like up in the top of the state there's not a lot of trees It's all Tundra. So it's just a very different way of life out there I don't think people realize that you know Alaskan native people you know are still alive and thriving Some of the youngest people demographically in the country and you know global warring huge thing My family my GRANDPA's family was from unilkely Shaq took area and they're affected by a Russian And so if I've traveled outside of the state quite a bit it's hard to travel expensive but it's very different life and It's something that I you know. I'm hoping that culturally. We can continue. And it's something. I'm trying to teach kids as well and did you have. You always lives in anchorage or did you. Have you lived in the more remote area? You're talking about so I have lived in the village of Shack Tulich My grandfather was hardest Was He's he's passed on now But I lived in two with my grandfather and my grandmother They were both in our back And I lived there. I was five so a lot of the Memories are just very distant but I do remember it. Quite fondly I I always tell a story. I was walking along the beach on what's called the old site Because they moved some of the houses back to The new site which is further away from the shore and My GRANDPA was like look and I looked out and there was a whale that was like breaching and just splashed onto kind of the bay. There you know and It was it was beautiful. And you're so close with nature and it the ocean is right there The problem with the ocean being right though is that when the storms hit and when It gets really rough. The houses that were on that old site the surf comes all the way up to those houses because the erosion you know because of the activity in the ocean. That's very different. So they've had to move a lot of the houses to What's called the new site until it's just further away from the from the beach there now. That sucks that's my basic response to that. That sucks site sounded pretty beautiful. Cool new site. Sounds like I mean. I'm sure the new site has its charms of a bummer. That you can't be in the old site anymore. That's my basic reaction that's it does It's really hard now. I think there's a lot of the folks that hunt because there are still traditional. You know people that hunt you know. It's hard to get food in the villages that I don't know if people could google. How much milk costs I mean. It's like ten bucks a gallon there And so they subsist on the native animals. You know And so with the changing weather. It's harder to get that whale or it's harder to get those seals or Walrus you know and it's something that you know. I grew up in anchorage but I have lived outside of Ingrid a couple of times I lived in California a couple of times My husband is a sales person so he kind of Has dragged me along to some like working assignments outside of Anchorage. But you know Living there is really tough It takes US turn sturdy personal. Tell you that for sure and even in Anchorage it's it's it's it's hard. It's an isolated police You know you're so far away from the lower forty eight and it's expensive. There's really high crime here Which is rough. Because you know I think people come up here they they hear about the PF she. I don't know if you've heard of that before no Basic screen we get a thousand around a thousand dollars from oil revenue. That's spread among all the people in Alaska and so that comes in October. And I think people here like Oh free money. Sometimes they'll come up to Alaska and think that just easy up here. It is not easy to live here. I feel that way about New Jersey to to be fair so we got that in common. They will be right back. Are you always taking care of your family? You always taking care of everybody else and not yourself. I bet it feels more extreme right now. I hear you well. 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I think people here like Oh free money sometimes and they'll come up to Alaska and think that you know it's just easy up. Here is not easy to live here. I feel like if I moved to anchorage I'd be very complaining. Pain in the ASS. And if and if and we can tell you can tell when it's a lower forty right out of the you'd be like this guy to grow up here. Listen if you're bitching about negative and weather in the wintertime it's kind of a new place. That's normal I would be able to. Maybe gut it out in anchorage knowing that they have the trappings of a city. And I would complain all the time and I would annoy everybody if I tried to ever live in in in in the in the old spot or the new spot in in the village that you've said the name a few times but I don't even WanNa try to pronounce it because all mess it up. I would maybe eight minutes I'd be like when's the next by plane that gets. When's the next by plane coming is right away. It's GONNA be a tiny plane. Those are scary. It is the type of place you have to fly in a tiny planer. Can you drive there or is it? No no no no. Yeah there's no that's I mean that's the other thing is like when you go to the villages. It's you have to fly in In the wintertime there are. There's like a highway. That's what that whole ice truckers shows about being that one You once that road is frozen you can drive some of the villages but mostly like a fly in only and then they barge a lot of stuff too. But that's rough. I think he can only do that. Like the summertime. So it's actually its own world. It's actually I think those of us in the lower forties we think of Alaska as disconnected world unto itself. And then you're describing area that I bet most Alaskans are like yeah. They're doing their own thing there. Yeah you have no idea like it's so different Like I lived in California and like when we first got there. People were driving like ninety miles an hour and I'm like in such culture shock I was just like our speed limit. Here is like sixty five and you gotta be careful like a big Old Moose. Could like jump out in front of your car you know. We don't have deer but we do like CITCO which is more like southeast But here in Anchorage you know like we have moved like where I live. We have black bears. That like you better watch yourself. 'cause they'll come out. You know. I mean loose are really tough to like grazer terrifying terrifying huge animals even before you said even before you said like yeah. You know milk's ten dollars a gallon. So you know a lot of people go. I'm sitting here in hunting. I'm from New Jersey. I'm thinking all right. Yeah you hunt for deer and then you follow it up you go. Yeah but global warming. It's making it hard to track down walruses to hunt which to me. Sounds like that that that people don't say yeah and I think it's very off putting a lot of people who are like a walrus like you eat a walraven. You know you eat field. I'm like yeah like does it taste. That was that was that was like you know you use the resources around you. You know we don't waste that's another thing that's like a huge thing like you don't waste at all. That's beautiful and I like that. Yeah me too and so you know. I'm I'm fairly liberal and really conservative state And so for me you know. This whole reduce reuse recycle is just second nature. You know what risk tastes like you know. I don't know Not had walrus. I have had the only I'm city native is what you call me okay. I'm actually actually not full. I'm actually have a new back and then I'm half German my dad. My Dad was in the air force and he got stationed up here which is very common A lot of dudes come up in the air force or the army There's an Air Force Base here in Anchorage. And then there's a Air Force Base in fairbanks which is kind of like the middle of the state but Yeah back to feel me yeah. It's It's really good It's kind of like a mixture of like fish and beef if I had to explain what it tastes like. And so what they do with the Seal Oil. Is They ferment? The Meat Now. You gotta understand backing the day. There wasn't ways to keep food unless you salted it or unless you like fermented at right so I know it sounds gusting but bear. Win The They would ferment. The me and the fat and the only would render from that. And you dip that with like carrots if it with oil Potatoes boiled state me. That's what our family cabbage You know whatever veggies. If a lot of root veggies whatever veggies you wanna eat you know with it And I I'm kind of weird about it. I liked to put a little voice off in that. Feel oil data right. That's that's when people look at city native. They might actually know like I'm like where's the when Eskimo dinner goes down. Dude I'm like where's the sauce And then you know you eat together you boil or bake a little salmon that that in there some cares we meet. It's so good and the way that I think. Seal oil tastes is. It's very similar to like all of oil And when I if I don't have I do have a little in my freezer. You gotTa keep it frozen If I if I have if I don't have any than all on bread in some olive oil you know and it just gives you that at just that taste store but have you ever had an Italian hot dog which is a New Jersey delicacy. Just Cocco count. No this is deep. Fry A hotdog deep price of potatoes onions peppers. You put it on a slice of pizza bread. It's delicious you get it at Jimmy bumps. It's the best. Now you said a phrase in there. You said a phrase. I was nervous to ask question about but you did say use the phrase eskimo dinner. You're like eskimo dinner. Goes DOWN. Say something about that. I wasn't sure if that was an offensive word at this point. I- weird because like I'd I still use the word Eskimo and I know that some people they find it offensive and I totally like respect that and I guess I think a of the PC stuff is like. Sometimes you gotta figure out what is offensive to someone and so for me. It's not offensive because growing up you really wanted to like differentiate yourself from being eskimo or Indian and so you know I was like I'm eskimo Bros. Like I'm not Indian. You know. I don't have a tribe you know. We have a village so it's not offensive to me but to some to some people it is it is offensive. And I you know once you kind of say like if it comes up you just okay cool will your Alaska native even whatever. Yeah I I would have to imagine the issue is that you get like the cartoon depiction of like a grinning person and fur-lined hood rubbing their nose with another person and that must get old Komo kissed dude. That's eskimo kisses real family. Yeah I mean it's like A. It's like something silly that will you know we Kinda do. It's it's not like a O'Hagan me and ask him okay. You know. It's just kind of a tongue in cheek. I guess thing so right. Yeah but I do want to venture out to New Jersey. My husband And I have been together for eighteen years and so We've been together since high school We were I guess. Technically high school sweetheart And so we WANNA make it out to New Jersey. I'd never been I've Been Virginia. That's about as far east as I've been. How did a guy from New Jersey wind up in Alaska at the age of nine? Oh God my husband So my mother-in-law obviously was from New Jersey and we make fun of her. Because she says you know Abou- and she says Lauren. Yeah I'm from West. Rra You just 'cause I'm from West Orange People No. I'm sorry I have to correct you. He's from South Jersey where he's from. So yes there. If I remember correctly until I don't like the boroughs and stuff and all the counties but he always get this wrong. He's from Pitman. That's that's South Jersey. Alright yeah He's lost a lot of whatever accent he came up here with. But I'll be like what we're going to go. You know what color colors that that orange over there you know. And he'll say it's orange and so it's just the funniest thing like the one thing. I make a lot of move out. Yeah that's where I'm from West Orange. Don't correct me on baby. Does his mom say that? They're down near Philly. Does she say would he know she says how how though you know she has a little? Yeah they have a little little accent. They're huge Eagle Fan. My husband is a huge like diehard eagles fan so it goes by marriage now. I'm I'm a huge fan and I keep distracting. So how do they so? He came with his mother-in-law. How do they wind up out there? My mother-in-law you know her dad had always talked about wanting to come to Alaska and My my husband's parents were not married when they had him so She decided that it was time for her to move on. And they sold everything they had and they move up to Alaska and like. I'm always curious why people say they come here because I wanNA know like what the Hell's wrong with you and you know that that that that was just her dream. She just wanted to come up here and they made their life here and luckily for me they did. You know yeah. I'm glad it worked out here. I mean look moving to a new school at the age of nine is always gonNA be tough. Even if you move across town those first few years your husband had he must have been like what is going on right now. Yeah and it's something that we've talked about. You know my husband. He was really mad at his mom when they moved. Because you know he's a it's kind of cruel to me. It seems sometimes 'cause that's just ripping your kid right out of their community you know and their safety net and taking them someplace like this kid has no clue about now does not have a clue but it's so damn different and you know it just always was really odd to me and so it's something we've talked about. I think his mom I you know. I love her to death. But I think it kind of felt vindictive to me to a dad And there's some issues there you know his dad Maybe it wasn't around as much as he could have been But at the same time it's like I just could never imagine taking up and moving all the way across the country. If if for some reason my husband and I are cows. You're not moving to New Jersey. If that goes down hell no like L. Maybe below with you know forty five minutes away. But you know that's where Palin land over there so now when come up from the Lord Forty and I it sounds like maybe your mother-in-law had some elements of this when people come up from the lower forty-eight because they want to hang out in Alaska and find themselves and do this soul-searching is that a very annoying thing that the lower forty-eight people do It's not I mean no 'cause I I get it. It's it's absolutely beautiful here. You know It's just it's so different been to Colorado or something but the mountains are such a grounding thing where I live in anchorage the mountains are like I can look out my window and see them And so I get it. You know you WANNA come someplace beautiful I think what's more annoying is? There's a certain understanding when you live here And that is to be giving to be courteous to be nice to everybody. Alaskans or like some of the nicest people that you'll ever meet When you when you get people that come up here. That are assholes or they. They have That privilege you know it. You can tell like you're not from here I can. I can look at you like you're not from here if you're down to earth and you're just giving you know and you're just concerned about your neighbors It's it's pretty obvious you're either like born and raised or damn near close you know You gotta be able to share with your neighbors. I mean especially now like with this whole Kobe. Bullshit going on You GotTa look out for one another the elements here like nature does not care and you gotta make sure that everybody's okay. Yeah I remember when I saw the movie into the wild it presents it as this very romantic vision and then I read the book and the book has a much more pointed edge of like this kid. God bless them kind of a dumb ass going into the Alaskan wilderness himself and not really knowing how it works. Yeah Yeah I mean you gotta be really careful You know. Native people know what plants to eat And what you can eat what you can't eat. I don't know I'm not seeing the movie and I just know briefly about what the story is about But you gotta be really careful because a lot of that shit's And my understanding anything. That's how he died right. He ate like some berries or something poisonous. Yes I've read up on it and I think in the book they say this and I've read further that. Apparently they think now they think that kid thought he was eating one type of plant and he had another that is similar that will actually cause paralysis in humans Brutal judge the Guy I'm just trying to point out the difference in the book in the movie. I'm not judging it. That's that's really brutal and scary. But yeah he ate a plant that apparently paralyzes humans. That's what I what I recall Yeah you gotta be really careful like you. Can't you can't just go be like. Oh you know this is chill to eat like you can and I. I kinda know what theories but I really relied on like my grandma for that to be like. You know you can eat this. You can eat that My now I she's past. She passed in twenty seventeen Not was incredibly hard. Whenever a native elder dies you know all of that knowledge goes with them and whether it's knowledge of the plants or cultural knowledge or knowledge of you know art My grandmother made dolls her whole life and My grandfather cars. He made Soapstone artwork And so it's just. It's really hard when they go But yeah I'd I rely on her to tell you can eat that. Don't touch that And so now I have my my my mom My mom is still around. But it's you know she was raised here in the sixties and seventies so she wasn't raised in the village. And so you really lose a lot of that when you moved to Anchorage. wasn't really their choice Anchorage was really touched by the TV outbreak. Which you know the iditarod is all about Diptheria. We've had a lot of illness here. and so for a lot of those folks you know. A lot of kids who are orphaned A lot of parents died. Which was the circumstance I think in both my grandparents Until they moved to anchorage to get a better chance so now you say you're you're half native. This means your kids are accord a quarter native. Yeah do you feel like that connection is still very strong with them or do you see it as you say like. It's harder with each generation especially with movement to cities to retain stuff you. Is it a priority for you to make sure they stay in touch with it or do you see it kind of a with their generation as much as we all got to pass along to our kids right? I just became apparent. Eir already think about that every game. I don't even have the responsibility of maintaining traditions. Native Culture. Tonko wanted to go ahead. And tell you a thing I've been doing my quarantine project Every Wednesday night I've gone on twitch and I get a few other comedians together and we just take calls we pick a topic we take calls all it goes for however long it goes. Sometimes they've gone for two and a half hours in it's silly in its dominance fun and I don't always plug the comedy stuff On beautiful anonymous. I feel like I this thing. This shows very sacred to me. I don't always like to Just relentlessly plug stuff. But this one's phone call based so if you ever want to call in thought maybe you'd enjoy it. You know who calls in is all SAM. J Hodge who Is One of the architects of the beautiful anonymous facebook community? So you call up. Maybe Sam j Hodge called to thank you Sam and all our mods who will run that facebook group buddy rates over was finished this off. Is it a priority for you to make sure they stay in touch with it or do you see it kind of with their generation as well as much like? Yeah yeah no like I try to get them to experience the culture as much as I can You know it's hard 'cause I don't have all that knowledge But I really try to spend time with my family and you know teach them you know our native culture whether that's through little things like food part Just spending time with my elders. If something that I try to get them to do they. They had the benefit of going to a head start. That was culturally focused on Alaska. Native Culture So you learned some of that and that's another free service that I will say was very good But they got to spend time with people who were elders people who really knew the culture and could translate to them you know. In their little their little words you know how culture worked for US And there's you bic there's Yupik Eskimos They're Kinda from Bethel area which is Kind of on the Middle Finger. You're looking on your hands there Kind of at the tip of the Middle Finger kind of in that area and there's clink it people that you know. He went to school with their Indian. Folks that are from the southeast And then of course In Iraq people so they have salmon for lunch and you know they learn. Little natives dances and it was really. I think enriching As a parent to have them go there. That's really cool. I am not familiar with headstart. Start is but it sounds like a pretty great thing. You don't know what it headstart is. That's like a big thing. They wanted to get headstarts all around the country. What's ahead start it just like you know. Preschool go Just called that preschool. Yeah Okay See my husband. He calls things differently so he'll say you know the tennis shoes or I'll say shoes or tennis shoes. He says sneakers. I yeah all right. Show me and your husband quite similar quite similar in New Jersey. We we don't really like it makes me sad when I hear you say that like you make a point to check in with elders for the old traditions makes me realize that like we we move a little too fast here for that and I had Nintendo and shit grown up and that was my priority and my my grandparents to. Yeah no I mean of course people have Nintendo but to me. The especially the northeast. We don't slow down is my point. We don't go down and he's as me. We give ourselves anxiety. I would freak you out hanging out with you. I would stress you out. I'm sure but I'd ever. I've heard both my grandparents passed away and I never sat down with either them and ask them what Ireland was like. I just never did it and now I don't get what a Bummer I. I miss that. Opportunity with my grandmother. you know. There's a lot of controversy with my grandmother I'm pretty sure that I'm not fully half and in fact. I'm pretty sure part Japanese so if you look at my grandma. She's lighter skinned which back people are. Just because I think we're so you know far the top of the state that's like just how we came out But if you look at her you know she just looks a little different and so I wanted. I've after had after a couple of time. 'cause her maiden name sounded very Japanese as well so like grandma. I'm pretty sure your name is not needed. You know. I tried to say respectfully as I could and she had said to me. You know there was talk that my grandmother was Japanese or something like that and I just you know I you have to be. We're very respectful with our elders And so I I don't I didn't ever want to push her And you kind of have to be very respectful with native people. It's just how we operate. And so I kind of had questioned or about certain things and but I I wanted to get her on video and just talk to her about life and just talk to her about how things were for her You know my my mom was an alcoholic for all of life and unfortunately that's kind of a a problem that some native people struggle with And so I spend a lot of time with her So I didn't you know. Get that chance to record her. Get that conversation. I did get a lot of time with her. She was almost like a second mom to me. And I'm I'm incredibly grateful for that. She was so like loving. She choose just an amazing teacher. She was patient. And Gosh if they're you know they always you always get that question like when you're meeting New People like you know if there was one person dead or alive you know that you would spend time with. It would be her and my grandfather. Of course they just or amazing people. That's so cool. That's so cool. Yeah cool thing to be able to say. I have another thing that you brought up earlier. We have less than fifteen minutes left. This one's flying. I do want to ask. What are your plans with your criminal justice schooling? Because I'm hoping you're going to become a bad ass native Alaskan private detective with a cool scar on your neck. That's a man. You and me both You know I when I was younger like just out of high school. I thought you know maybe I'll be like a CSI or like. I'll be a cop or I was really interested in both but I think what I lost. Interest in was the way that the justice system worked. So it was. It's retribution of justice. Which is you know. Kind of lock them up. Throw away the key And what I really have loved warning about is more restorative justice And so that's really helping people. You know to reduce recidivism to reduce crime and really helping them get back on their feet and kind of more focused on fixing the problem rather than okay cool. This person's mentally. Ill Lock them up. You know this person didn't have the money to pay for their groceries. Here in Alaska because milk is ten dollars in the village and We're GONNA throw them in jail like that doesn't do anything and We're not see. This person has addiction issue. So they stole from their family. And you know We're GONNA just lock them up they that doesn't do anything and it continues recidivism. It's not fixing the problem you know. I think what I would really like to do with that. Degree is focused on. That is just restorative justice. there's so much more that can be done and it saves money. You Know People Bitch about crime you know just doing the same old thing in the status quo. It's not. It's not doing anything so my my dad Actually went to prison And he had a drug problem and it took. I've visited him while pregnant with my oldest and I had to drive to keanae which is a couple of hours away from anchorage and you know I I i. I had been disinterested in the criminal justice field and I went to go visit him and I said you know we can do better. My Dad was a veteran. You know And I just decided cre- much shortly after I'm GonNa pursue getting the degree. I think we can do better. So that's just I wanNa do you know your real cool. Thank you have everything you talk about. You talk about in this very measured calm tone of voice but then the things. You're like the coolest things we're you're telling me about what it's like to to spend time in your home village where people hunt seals and know how to live off the land in this sort of very harsh life that but it's also kind of beautiful in the way that humans are meant to be or you talk to me about you. Want to dedicate your time to restorative justice because your own but you just say it also calmly. But then I'm listening to it and I'm like this is bad ass everything about this as bad as I've been told a lot that I have a very calming vibe Felt this relaxed. I mean that's something with my Diet. I try to Keep that calm. You know It's not it's not great feeling to be stressed out and Not Take your time So it's just something I try to be in life. You know just calm. I feel like there's probably a lot of people listening going. Yeah I keep taking these satisfying deep breaths. That are chilling me out because you gotTa Comfort Vacation to Alaska dudes like I tell you I counted. I counted it up. And there's only I think it was six of the United States. I haven't been to. And my agent organizers my touring dates whenever we're allowed to go out in public again. I told him I said look. I don't need to make much money and I don't need them to be like Rockstar gigs. But I I wanNA visit these six states one of these states in Alaska's wiler your ABS. Anchorage my not a lot. There's one venue It's called couture come up in performing coots. Yeah Yeah. It's called chul-keun Charlie's but if you're from anchorage you know as just coup Actually saw Chris Catan there not too long ago and I was so stoked She was so funny and he had such control. The audience It was great so that might be a good venue. You there's other little like convention centers. I guess might is what we would call them. What you gotta call him a Ho. But there's some there's some venues you know. You're telling me the most likely if I come to anchorage I got reach out to a place called Chill Kuch. Charlie's say God. It's just the funniest thing to hear you. It's called Chris. It's Cou I'm doing. Two shows coots seven thirty and ten. Those who I haven't been to Alaska either of the dakotas Montana Wyoming and then very strangely enough Wisconsin. Those are the only ones I missed. Yeah like literally. Those are like some of the least populated states. Five makes sense but Wisconsin has like Madison and Milwaukee. However I never perform there. How yeah I guess. That's true. Of course never been to Wyoming that no offense to our listeners. Out there but of course. That's that's one that most people don't pass through no offense but yeah Alaska is. It's separated from me by another country of course but Wisconsin. It's somebody get me medicine comedy on states. What are the best comedy clubs? It's so funny because we don't get a lot of people here that either come up or perform so like the last really cool concert I did see diplo. He came up I think a couple years back And I was a really big fan until he put on like a head dress and I was like yeah. That's not cool disrespectful to Quebec. Yeah I was not happy about that like you. Just don't do that And then right before that was the chili peppers and that was amazing and it was funny because they were supposed to come up in the nineties and they never did like. They cancelled their shows. I don't think they got enough sale. But yeah they came up and And my husband and I caught the show. We are pretty close to like the Front We weren't you know we could see them really well. It was really good. I'm going to be the next step in that lineage of I also heard a story. Did you hear that one that I think it was Walmart? Once did a contest pit bull was going to do a show at a Walmart. Go vote on the Internet. Go to the most remote and one in the world which is in Alaska. It was so hilarious. He had to go to Kodiak batch show or no now hell no number one. I'm not a big pit bull fan But number two Kodiak is oh my gosh like it's so far away. That's where the coastguard basis. And he did it to his credit. I listen yes I will give them. Credit like that was hilarious and it was funny because they were really trying to get people to vote for the Miami one I think it was what it was And everybody was like nope. You're going to Kodiak I have to say. This is the first time we have less than five. Minutes is the laugh that came out with that. Incident reflected a sort of a dark sense of humor almost cruelty in it that very briefly a different side of you. I think the thing is is like Alaska is always like the last the last for anything. It's just it's it was just so funny to have someone come up here. That is fairly well-known with like it just was really funny. I guess and I don't know if you saw Taco Bell. They had done the thing where they went to a village and they gave people Taco. If you've seen that It's it's a pretty funny thing to Google It's just for us. We know we know. We're not getting anybody you know really famous we just know you know and so for for people with just really funny because it was because he wanted to come here. I mean he was bitching and complaining. You know I was because he had to come up here. Nobody wants to come up air. It's expensive there's not a lot of people here it makes then you have not sound. It's more excited or talked at a faster pace than you have during this ball road. We've gone too well out the pit bull. Yeah like it was it. I will say for him to live up to his word. That was pretty Rad. I will I gotta say something because we got three minutes left and we went down so many really fascinating roads and thank you for all of them but I do want to just say. I'm very very glad that that that diagnosis terrifying. I'm glad that it's conway. I'm glad that it was relatively quickly. Because Yeah I mean you. You have so many interesting things to talk about. And you're aiming to do so much good and yes so so happy that you got past that one. Well maybe I'll call back and I'll give you an update Before we go I do want to teach you one word It is Co Yana Yana. Yes that mean coy on. That means thank you so I just WanNa say coy on for having me on the show. I've tried to call it a few times Do More late night. 'cause Alaska only noon here too okay oh by Yeah so I'm glad that I was able to get through. And Hey congrats on being a dad. I know I'm a little late But it's the best stroke or coaster ride and they're so amazing and so forth just being a parent for And it's something that has given me like the most things to be grateful for his as my boys they're amazing. My husband's read too. Don't get me wrong. It's a different follow X. Now I'll tell you I'm no longer in the studio. I'm recording this in the house where I'm hiding out during the covert stuff and when I looked to my right right now. I'm looking out a window. Wife has our one year old in a giant old rusty wheelbarrow and is sprinting wheelbarrow. It's very cute. Not particularly safe but really cute. Keep up on them shot. Oh Yeah Oh yeah. Oh yeah we got one minute left for calling in Koya for sharing your stories. Koya for open and honest and for it. Yeah Same Kwena buckets like the the thank you very much and is now when I come up and do coots. Is that something like everyone in. Alaska says that like Aloha or is that just people the native people will have your back to all the natives coy on. Yeah Yeah word if I get on stage at coots and on my all my lovely native people for coming out tonight. I got him where I WANNA admit that we're going to be like yes yes very. I guess I'll I'll see ya at coot someday. I hope so I hope so. Thank you so much for talking to me. Yeah thanks Chris I it. Thank you so much more. Should I say Koya. So much is really pushing talk to you. I'm so happy that you're healthy. And I hope that remains the case and I think you were really cool. I said it during the call but I'll reiterate that was cool. You're cool CNN coupes. Thank you jared. O'connell thank you do need a Florida's thank you to. Shell shock for the music. If you like the show go to apple podcasts rate review subscribe and if you want to check out the entire beautiful anonymous back catalogue go to Stitcher. Premium said stitcher premium dot com slash stories. All the details. Are there so much for next time? Beautiful anonymous our caller has an ailment. And what are they using to deal with? That pain weed. Marijuana Medicinal sometimes what am I? Biggest Koby mcnichols for the stomach issues biggest coping mechanisms for me all the time because it helps you know it helps with the stomach so but then my doctor just decided to tell me that it's possible the we might be somehow contributing like stopping me from healing the fact that it's been something that I've been relying on so much where no actual medications have been helping and now. I'm being told that I might have to stop and now like it could be. The solution like never stops. We'd maybe I'll get better. That's next time on ominous.

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NEJM This Week  August 27, 2020

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

25:56 min | 8 months ago

NEJM This Week August 27, 2020

"Welcome, this is the New England Journal of Medicine I'm Dr Lisa Johnson this week August twenty, seventh twenty twenty, we feature articles on sulphur cabinet in red fusion positive lung cancer cell for Catnip for measure Larry Thyroid cancer a closed loop system in children with type one diabetes sticky findings in breast cancer and reconsidering the use of race correction in clinical. Algorithms or review article on atherosclerotic plaque healing a case report of a woman with headache and gate imbalance and perspective articles on improving the quality of US healthcare on Covid nineteen and immunity in aging populations and on. Efforts to curb antibiotic resistance. visit any J. M. Dot org or open your print issue to view the new graphic perspective titled My Blue Sky. This graphic perspective tells the story of a pregnant nurse who goes into Labor in the midst of the covid nineteen pandemic wanting to minimize her inpatient time her husband and Otolaryngology delays their departure for the hospital until it's a bit too late. Efficacy. Of. Sulphur CATNIP in red fusion positive non small cell lung cancer by Alexander. Drill on from Memorial Sloan Kettering. Cancer Center new. York. Red fusions are genyk drivers in one to two percent of non small cell lung cancers, and CLC's in this study patients with advanced red fusion positive. Ns. CLC WHO had previously received platinum based chemotherapy, and those who were previously untreated were enrolled separately in a phase. One two trial of the selective read inhibitor separa- catnip in the first one, hundred, five consecutively enrolled patients who had previously. received at least platinum based therapy, the percentage with an objective response was sixty four percent. The median duration of response was seventeen point, five months, and sixty. Three percent of the responses were ongoing at a median follow up of twelve point one months among thirty nine previously untreated patients. The percentage with an objective response was eighty, five percent and ninety percent of the responses were ongoing at six months. Among eleven patients with measurable central nervous system metastasis at enrollment. The percentage with an objective intra cranial response was ninety one percent the most common adverse events of grade three or higher hypertension and increased Alan aminotransferase level and increased aspartame aminotransferase level HYPO NUTRI MIA and l'info Pina two percent of patients discontinued sell catnip because of drug related adverse event. Self or CATNIP had durable kissy including intra cranial activity with mainly low grade toxic effects in these patients with red fusion positive NFC LC. EFFICACY OF SULPHUR CATNIP in red altered thyroid cancers by Laurie worth from Massachusetts General Hospital Boston. Red Mutations occur in seventy percent of men, Larry, thyroid cancers and red fusions occur rarely in other thyroid cancers in this study patients with red. Mutant Maja Larry thyroid cancer with or without previous VENDETTA NIB or Cabos Santa NIB treatment as well as those with previously treated Rhett fusion positive thyroid cancer were enrolled in phase one, two trial of sulfur catnip in the I fifty five consecutively enrolled patients with Red Mutant measure thyroid cancer who had previously received vendetta. NIB. Kabo Xanten or both the percentage who had a response was sixty nine percent and one year progression free survival was eighty two percent in eighty eight patients with Rhett mutant. Thyroid cancer who had not previously received vendetta NIB or Cabo Santa Nip the percentage who had a response with seventy three percent and one year progression free survival was ninety, two percent. In nineteen patients with previously treated red fusion positive thyroid cancer the percentage who had a response was seventy, nine percent and one year progression free survival was sixty four percent the most common adverse events of grade three or higher were hypertension increased Alan aminotransferase level increased aspertain aminotransferase level hypo tree. And diarrhea two percent discontinued self or CATNIP oing drug related adverse events in this phase one, two trial seller cat NIB showed durable efficacy with mainly low grade toxic effects in patients with. Thyroid cancer with and without previous treatment. Roselle Kerr's rock from the University of California. San Diego writes in an editorial that taken together these results show that sulphur catnip had marked and durable anti tumor activity in most patients with red altered thyroid cancer or non small cell lung cancer read abnormalities. Now join other genomic alterations such as Ntr K. Fusions, tumor mutational burden, and efficient mismatch repair genes across cancers and ALC- be Raff Egfr met and Roz one alterations in nfl see that warrant molecular screening strategies. Next Steps may include introducing these agents earlier in the course of the disease addressing genome co alterations with customized combination therapy strategies, and using additional techniques such as transcript. Dome analysis in order to fully understand the molecular landscape of cancer. A. randomized trial of closed loop control in children with type one diabetes by Mark Bretton, from the University of Virginia Center for Diabetes Technology Charlottesville. A closed loop system of insulin delivery also called an artificial pancreas may improve glycemic outcomes in children with type one diabetes in this sixteen week trial one, hundred, one children six to thirteen years of age who had type one diabetes were assigned to receive treatment with the use of either a closed loop system of insulin delivery or a sensor augmented insulin pump control group. The gleich hated hemoglobin levels at baseline ranged from five point. Seven to ten point one percent. The mean percentage of time that the glucose level was in the target range of seventy to one hundred, eighty milligrams per deciliter increased from fifty three percent at baseline to sixty seven percent the mean over sixteen weeks of treatment in the closed loop group and from fifty one percent to fifty five percent in the control group mean adjusted difference eleven percentage points equivalent to two point, six hours per day. In both groups, the median percentage of time that the glucose level was below seventy milligrams per deciliter was low one point, six percent in the closed loop group and one point eight percent in the control group in the closed loop group. The median percentage of time that the system was in the closed loop mode was ninety three percent, no episodes of diabetic Kito acidosis or severe hypoglycaemia occurred in either group. In this Sixteen Week Trial, the glucose level was in the target range for a greater percentage of time with the use of a closed loop system then with the use of a sensor augmented insulin pump. ATHEROSCLEROTIC plaque healing a review article by Rocco Virgo from fun doubts. Yoni Polyclinic. Otouna versus Tarot a Meli IRCS Rome. ATHEROSCLEROTIC, plaques typically develop over a period of years or decades in contrast the thromboembolic complications of atherosclerotic disease occur suddenly often without warning the notion that acute coronary syndromes developed from the rupture or superficial erosion of an atherosclerotic plaque is an over simplification of a process involving plaque activity, blood, thrombosis necessity, and healing. Pathological studies have shown that many if not most atherosclerotic plaques destabilize without resulting in a clinical syndrome, the occurrence of an acute coronary syndrome probably depends on the disruption of a balance between instability activation and healing pacification of an atherosclerotic plaque during the past thirty. Years, research efforts have mostly been focused on the mechanisms of plaque instability yet the risk of acute myocardial infarction or sudden death from coronary causes remains difficult to predict suggesting that other pathogenic mechanisms should also be investigated. Recently, the notion that plaque healing may play a key role in the natural history of atherosclerotic disease has been gaining attention in part because of the development of new imaging techniques allowing in Vivo Study of the morphological features of unauthorized sclerotic plaque. This review examines the mechanisms and Pheno typic- features of plaque healing its role in clinical events and therapeutic implications. A fifty three year old woman with headache and gate imbalance a case record of the Massachusetts General Hospital by Jeffrey Gottlieb and colleagues. A fifty, three year old woman originally from West Africa presented with progressive headache. Gait instability and weight loss two months earlier, vertigo developed and resolved spontaneously one day before the current evaluation sheets care at another hospital for recurrent dizziness and difficulty walking on examination. The patient was alert and oriented with slow speech bilateral endpoint point Horizontal Nasdag Mus and mild dismay Tria on the right side on finger to nose to finger testing MRI. Showed in enhancing interact axial lesion two centimeters by one point eight. Centimeters by one point, seven centimeters in the right cerebellar hemisphere, she was transferred to this hospital for a specialized neurosurgical consultation. Review of systems was notable from a lesbian lethargy, as well as unintentional weight loss of fifteen kilograms. During the past year, the patients reported that thirteen years earlier, she had received a diagnosis of HIV and was treated with an unknown Aarp Regiment and then several years. Later, testing revealed an error and a RT was discontinued on the current admission, a screening essay for antibodies to. And HIV two and HIV ONE P twenty four antigen was reactive and the CD four t cell count was quite low at thirty nine per micro leader. However, the plasma HIV ONE RN A lot was undetectable the patients, neurologic symptoms, and the findings were considered it in the context of a likely diagnosis. Of V., two associated AIDS. Several features of this case favored the diagnosis of Taco Plasma Gandhi in Litis. When E had herein becomes unstuck in cancer a clinical implications of basic research article by Lorraine o'driscoll from Trinity College? Dublin. Loss of E had hearing mediated adhesion between cells in cancer has often been associated with increases in their local invasion and assumptions have been made that this loss is routinely followed by increased numbers of tumor cells progressing through the extra cellular. Matrix in Travis aiding into the bloodstream surviving as circulating tumor cells and extravasated at a secondary site where they established metastasis. However, a recent study involving mouse models of metastatic breast cancer showed that although loss of Eke had hearing is indeed associated with increased local invasion. It is also associated with decreased metastasis. A finding that supports Eke had hearing as. An experimental target to prevent metastasis in another preclinical study, the investigators obtained data supporting the idea that we had here in becomes inactivated by factors in the tumor pro environment, and that adhesion can be restored by a monoclonal antibody that activates e had hearing intern preventing metastases chemical antibodies targeting Eke had herein and end cut here and have been developed through the use of a synthetic form of peptide of the kid hear an echo domain as template. These synthetic antibodies also known as molecular really imprinted polymer nanoparticles have been used to successfully block can't hear mediated adhesion of cells in. Vitro. Hidden in plain sight reconsidering the use of race correction in Clinical Algorithms, a medicine and society article by Dr Shefali visas from Massachusetts. General Hospital Boston. One subtle insertion of race into medicine involves diagnostic algorithms and practice guidelines that adjust or correct their outputs on the basis of patients. Race or ethnicity physicians use these algorithms to individualize risk assessment and guide clinical decisions by embedding race into the basic data and decisions of healthcare. These algorithms propagate race based medicine, many of these race adjusted algorithms, guide decisions in ways that May. Direct more attention or resources to white patients than to members of Rachel and minorities to illustrate the potential dangers of such practices. These authors compiled a partial list of race adjusted algorithms and explore several of them in detail in this article, given their potential to perpetuate or even amplify race-based health inequities. They merit thorough scrutiny to be clear. The authors do not believe that physicians. Race doing so would blind us to the ways in which race and racism structure our society however, when clinicians insert race into their tools, they risk interpreting racial disparities as immutable facts rather than as injustices that require intervention researchers and clinicians must distinguish between the use of race in descriptive statistics where it plays a vital role in epidemiologic analyses and in prescriptive clinical guidelines where can exacerbate inequities? Improving the quality of US healthcare. What will it take a perspective article by Elizabeth maclennan from Kaiser Permanente? Research Pasadena California Despite nearly two decades of experimentation with standardized measurement, public reporting and reward in penalty programs. Average quality performance in US healthcare remains about the same. So what will it take to improve the quality of care? Recently, the attention of health care leaders has returned to the structure and Organisation of Health Services Delivery, and it's operation within the larger social and economic context of the United States these social factors or social determinants such as housing food, income education, and safety may have a greater effect on health outcomes than the number of hospital beds or doctors per capita or the proportion of institutions and providers that have implemented electronic health records. Given the limited progress to date the path to higher quality care in the United. States requires reconsidering approaches to measurement financing and organizational structures and a new emphasis on social needs. We need to redesign for success, spread what works and stop doing what does not work. This author believes we should start by creating the financial and organisational conditions for changing care delivery from a reactive fragmented enterprise to one at that is coordinated and longitudinal reflecting the need for systems that can effectively manage chronic disease. We need to modernize measurement systems and use them more effectively. covid nineteen and immunity in aging populations. A new research agenda A perspective article by Wayne Cough from the Human Vaccines Project New York. covid nineteen has highlighted the vulnerability of aging populations to emerging diseases. This susceptibility to disease and death is also a major challenge for the development of vaccines and Immuno therapeutic agents. Numerous studies have shown that vaccine efficacy decreases significantly with age a reduction that is thought to be driven by the progressive age related decline of innate and adaptive immune responses. Yet, we know that some older people are protected by generally poorly performing vaccines and some vaccines work very well in elderly populations. The shingle vaccine for shingles for example, is ninety percent effective in people over seventy. What counts for the variability in immune responses from one elderly person to another? How can we use our understanding of this variability in developing new and improved vaccines and therapies far from being mere academic exercises the answers to these questions are critical to the future of global health. The covid nineteen experience in aging populations offers a window into the profound long-term global demographic challenges the world is facing. US EFFORTS TO CURB ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE ARE WE SAVING LIVES A perspective article by Samir Qadri from the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Bethesda Maryland. Antibiotic Resistance represents a major crisis that limits the care of many patients demonstrating that large scale efforts to control this problem have saved lives would help secure the ongoing and expanded funding and support needed to sustain. However data causally linking national and global efforts to the burden of Antibiotic Resistance and two outcomes are lacking. The centers, for disease, control and Prevention estimated in two thousand, thirteen that there were two million infections and twenty three thousand deaths attributable to antibiotic resistant pathogens in the United. States each year the CDC acknowledges that its estimates were limited by a lack of certain types and sources of contemporaneous data in November twenty nineteen. The CDC released an updated version of its antibiotic resistance report that overcomes some previous limitations. The report revealed an eighteen percent reduction in deaths attributable to antibiotic resistance since twenty thirteen with a current rate of thirty, five, thousand, nine, hundred deaths per year, which suggests that some efforts are working. The CDC findings offer a conservative best available estimate and represent an important step forward deaths associated with antibiotic resistance are unlikely to fall to zero in the united. States. But we can strive to optimize efforts that we know are effective and continue our quest to better understand what is unknown. Are Images in clinical medicine features of fifty nine year old man who presented to the primary care clinic with a three month history of abdominal pain after eating he had a history of immune thrombosis opinion and acute myeloid leukemia and had undergone allogeneic kamata poetic stem cell transplantation two years before presentation analysis of a bone marrow biopsy sample performed four months before presentation had revealed one hundred. PERCENT, donor chimerism physical examination of the abdomen showed diffuse tenderness on deep palpitation findings from laboratory studies included a white cell count of three, thousand, six, hundred, forty per cubic millimetre, a hemoglobin level of ten point, six grams per deciliter, a platelet count of sixteen thousand per cubic millimetre esophagus gastro do at Nas copy was performed and multiple poliploid masses were observed in the stomach and duodenal them. A biopsy specimen was obtained and histo-pathological findings were consistent with myeloid Sarcoma. The diagnosis was confirmed by flow Saitama Trie and Immuno, history chemical staining, which showed evidence of disease relapse. Additional. Genetic testing revealed T P fifty three variants which were detected in a previous bone marrow sample anu somatic mutations with nf one and s excel one variants. myeloid sarcoma is a solid tumor manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia and can occur without blood or bone marrow disease. The patient started treatment with as aside a dean and Vanita. At a local cancer, center. In another image a thirty year old pregnant woman presented to the Emergency Department at Thirty four weeks of just station with a five day history of an itchy rash. The rash had erupted across the abdomen and had spread to the thorax and to the arms and legs. Physical examination revealed fluent papier and blisters on the arm and across the abdomen. A blood test indicated an anti bullets pen full void one, eighty antibody level of greater than two hundred units per milliliter the upper limit of detection. A skin biopsy specimen showed modest inter PAPPA, Larry Spongy Oasis that extended to the skin at Nexia and a mild Luc Acidic infiltrate with a few ES cinefils around superficial vessels I. G. M I G G and C three were detected by Immuno fluorescence testing on the Sub Dermal Basil Membrane a diagnosis of Pentagon just stay Shenice formerly herpes justice. was made pence just station is an uncommon autoimmune skin disorder that is characterized by blistering and typically manifests in mid to late pregnancy. The patient was treated with systemic Google corticoids and the rash resolved within three months. She had a spontaneous vaginal delivery at thirty eight weeks of just station. The infant was healthy and had no rash. This concludes our summary Let. US know what you think about our audio summaries. Any comments or suggestions maybe sent to audio at any J. M. Dot Org. Thank you for listening.

thyroid cancer US J. M. Dot Org headache Alan aminotransferase Cancer Center New England Journal of Medicin acute coronary syndrome CLC York PERCENT Larry Thyroid leukemia Covid Memorial Sloan Kettering acute myocardial infarction CDC Eke Maja Larry
The Iodine Crisis with Lynne Farrow

The Dr. Hedberg Show

42:53 min | 2 years ago

The Iodine Crisis with Lynne Farrow

"Old fan. Welcome to the doctor Hedberg show for cutting edge. Practical health information for the latest articles, videos and podcasts. Visit Dr Hedberg dot com. That's D R H E B E R G dot com. The information in this show is intended for educational purposes only always consult your healthcare professional before attempting anything recommended in this program. And now, here's doctor Hedberg. Well, welcome everyone to the doctor had Brucke show. This is Dr Hedberg and I'm excited today to have Lynn Farrow on the show. So Lynn is a journalist researcher. Former college professor and a speaker and her own experience with breast cancer led to the discovery that someone had stolen a medicine with proven benefits reaching back. Fifteen thousand years a medicine that not only helped her but has helped millions. She currently serves as the director of breast cancer choices Inc. A nonprofit organization dedicated to the scrutinizing the evidence for breast cancer procedures and treatments. So Lynn, welcome to the show. Thank you. It's wonderful to be here. So I heard about you when I recently started doing some deep research into iodine and your book came up and your book is. Called what you don't know about iodine can wreck your life, and it's an excellent book. So why don't we kind of jump in there and and talk about the iodine crisis? So what what exactly is that? And and what can we do about it? Well, when I started doing research on iodine, it took me in a long and winding road back into history. But a came up into nineteen seventy when I was able to really comfortably say that. There was an iodine crisis because in nineteen seventy. I Don fortification with removed from bread or and flower now that might have been okay, but they replaced it with bromide, which is for purposes of this discussion is an anti Don. So that was the first thing that happened. And then the Hanes which is a government group decide discovered that we were now consuming fifty percent less iodine say in in in the year two thousand then we were in the nineteen seventies. And that's a huge drop. Now. That's just one thing. But it's sort of a perfect storm because at the same time in the nineteen seventies. You have robot pesticides by retarded all these bromide products are being introduced into the culture, and a sort of ubiquitous way. I mean, your car seat has fire retardant on it. Your rugs. Your. Children's pajamas had it at that time. It's now removed, but upholstery everywhere you go. If you go in airports, it's hard to to look at anything that doesn't have a bromide in it. So this is kind of bromides storm you you could characterize it came after the nineteen seventies. When I die. It was removed. So that's what at and what happened at this time. When you have this perfect storm of by a dime being reduced in the diet and consumption of being reduced and bromide being added. The there's a kind of since I compete with each other, but there's a bromide dominance effects. It's the way of characterizing it. And at this time, if you go back and look at this detested, all sorts of especially endocrine disruptor diseases, thyroid cancer, we're not one hundred and eighty two percents different. It's a different breakdown for men and women, but that one hash as went up just a lot of different endocrine problems seem to happen as the bromide storm came along. When I Don was reduced in our diet and bromide began to just suffocate us on a daily basis. So bromide was added to the food supply. And also, it's it's I believe found in herbicides and pesticides and also bromide is also used to to purify hot tubs, and and pools and things like that. Correct. Gets into your skin. If you have to have a hot tub, you're sitting on it in your car. You're breathing it in all the time. So they even I it's used as a pesticide in this country. The US is notorious for not paying attention to the rest of the world with respect bromide, but they pre plant the ground with that. We're strawberries grow with a bromide pesticide to keep Bunga and things off the strawberry. So it just can't get away from it. Right. So so bromide competes with iodine in the body and have you in your research? Just as an aside. Have you looked in so Floride having any type of similar effects as bromide on the thyroid? Well, they're both in the same elemental family. So bromide will affect I Don for sure because it also competes a Floride is is we just don't get enough Floride to the in terms of there's not enough impact. I found with law. Right. Even though it's bad for you. As there is bromide. Because even if your water is flora dated, you can get around that in some ways are some places. Just don't have it. You're still in public spaces all the time or around fire retardant? So in answer to your question. Yes. Florida's a problem. But I in competition with I Don, but not as much as bromide. So what should people be thinking about with an iodine deficiency, so more specifically are there any particular conditions that people should be worried about or aware of in any particular signs or symptoms that they might have if they're if they're deficient in either. I. Well, the main thing that I found was the thyroid because that's how I discovered it. I I was told it was good for the breast, and I didn't quite believe this. And so I started doing research, and I thought I'd take. The iodine loading tests. And I took the fifty milligrams that comes with the. The with the package, which you take it some provocative test. You take fifty milligrams of I dine. And then you collect your urine for twenty four hours well within an hour and a half of taking that fifty milligrams. My brain just like woke up and not an assistant violent way not in a caffeine way. But it woke up, but I also realized in subsequent days that I wasn't cold anymore. All the kind of things we associate with hypothyroidism, just gradually went away. I lost some way. On the dry skin. All all the kind of things that we associate with with with I ride that was the main thing that it addressed for me. And I didn't realize that there were other things. But for other people, of course, get system Najah lls in the breasts or the ovaries does even there's even o one of the people. I follow had some stones that his testicles that he got rid of with taking iodine. But psoriasis is an interesting thing that the breast cancer patients that are taking it or the people with the women with Barbara cystic breasts disease are taking it. So they get the breast pain and swelling down. And they'll say, oh, what happened to my psoriasis? I've had it since fewer d. So hard to rid me. A, you know gets rid of age pylori people that have reflux and things like that we found it. It helps. There's a whole list of things that that I could go through. But we we'd be on all day. Sure. Sure. So so when we consume dine it gets into the body and a no it's really prioritized to the thyroid gland. What happens to the rest of the iodine? Once you take it in and the fire Royd uses what it needs are there other body tissues that it migrates towards. They thyroid takes the lion's share of what we get in our diet or what we supplement endured pregnancy. There is some fighting. The fetus is gonna fight for for that. I Don from mothers thyroid, but the thyroid is the main place that. I dine is needed. But there's also other places in the body to stomach and the breast and the sex organs, the take a huge amount of iodine up. Even the, you know, the the stomach criti-, particularly you can see on radioactive scans where they inject people with radioactive iodine, and you can see where lights up the places. I Don goes I and Leeds last of. But I Don is in every selling your body is just some cells need it much more than others. Reddin? So you went through breast cancer and the breast that's really one of the main tissues that that takes iodine and you to utilizes it is correct. Yes, it very uses it very efficiently it. I mean, if you look at from an evolutionary perspective, there's some connection between the breast being a second thyroid and all these sort of combination. But for sure this is why women need more. I Don than men is. Because you have all those I dine Oregon real estate essentially p places in the body that just more require more. I don. In DC, we the exact mechanisms as to why I can help with breast cancer or prevented as that related to estrogen or are there other mechanisms now it there there are Carmody Estevez the day in her. Her crew have done a lot of studying and exactly what the mechanism of action is on the breast, and it's too technical for this conversation. But it seems to have they the zurve five different methods of action. On on the breast and it can happen. You know fairly quickly. So I had I was added to salt too. You know, mainly get rid of goitres and provide ISDN sufficiency at least in the US. So is that enough from iodised salts or you know, what are some of the best foods that that have iodine and should should people be relying on on the iodized salt? Well, I I did an article on. I thought an based on research I had done leave the salt berry very quickly. If you have Saham Morton carton, you bring it home from the supermarket in open it, you know, within two weeks. Most of the iodine has drifted out into your cupboard and. Very little left. So that's a problem. And I it's not as we call bioavailable as taking actual I'd on. I mean, I I sold as a different kind of iodine added to it. It's sort of complicated. But you can't rely on that because it's only they're only trying to achieve with Ida salt. They minimum daily requirement which is in the micrograms like one eighty to twenty micrograms. And when we talk about supplementing I Don we we talk about milligram dosing. So it's way over what would people have assumed was correct since nine hundred twenty four when I Don was put into salt, and that was the goiter standard to when they added that and saw it was very effective to the point of like out in Michigan in goiter built the army recruits. They in Michigan. There was. So much greater that they had to make larger shirts around the neck to fit around the goitres. And as soon as salt was dis. The sizes of the the the soldiers shirts didn't need to be as large around the neck. Now goiter, you know, people think of goitre is a disease and disorder and a problem. But when you think about it, Gordon, or is brilliant mechanism for having the firearm swell and trap more iodine. I think people are in more trouble. If say, you were you lived in the goiter belt or Michigan. And you didn't have a goiter, you know, to trap on you weren't able to for whatever reason to degenerate that sort of compensation mechanism not I'm not encouraging people to grow goitres. But I'm just saying it at that particular time, the body adjusts to scarcity and just like the breast will swell and they'll adjust scarcity, but you know, you better not it's given the two options. It's better to go on the side of not having scarcity and wonderful compensation mechanisms. You're really like how you put that. I trying to explain to patients that when we have these symptoms and illnesses and things like that. It's almost always the body just attempting to to heal itself, and and balance things and make things better. So that's that's a really interesting way of looking at it with the goiter. The other interesting thing the other day, I was actually reading a paper on iodine and iron. And I in this paper, they said that I Don is not as effective for greater if the patient is deficient. And so there are a lot of women out there, especially with iron deficiency, and they have very low fares and levels, and as particular paper found that restoring proper, you know, iron and Fairton levels resulted in much better results when that was combined with iodine supplementation. Have you looked at all into iron and iodine that connection? There is a connection. I think I have to do more work on that one of the things we found early on is that people taking I dine with often they're directed. Muddles would drop. Can we couldn't quite explain that other than maybe the if your body is in a compensation mechanism condition, and it's making do with very with a certain amount of Farakhan? Once you start revving up your engine, you're gonna need more ferret. And it does go away the low ferrets and level. But a lot of people supplement with Florida X or something like that on a temporary basis. So I don't know how that fits in with your observations Brighton. Right. But we know that hypothyroidism leads to lower fares and levels and hyperthyroidism will increase them. But that that's a road. I'm going to go down look into a little bit further. That's interesting that you've seen that in your research that the the fair ten will go down one someone starts supplementing with iodine. Yeah. So not everyone. But enough people that I mentioned it in my book because I it just come up an enough time, right? So what about food sources other than the salts? What are what are some of the main food sources out there that that people should be main the main food source that I've studied going back fifteen thousand years, you an archaeological capacity where they actually had huts medicine huts full of different seaweed products. And they use it as a medicine in a food. But. A seaweed. I mean, traditionally that's been. That's been the main source that that people use medicinally even the middle ages. They used it. And I burn sea sponges, which I guess is a form of seaweed burn. And and give it to people that had goiter in and it would reduce the goiter, but the see are so contaminated at this point. You know, don't forget they used seaweed to absorb oil spills or chemical spills and rivers and the ocean and things like that. So C C has some great to pass for just absorbing things. It's very good at absorbing iodine, which is wonderful from seawater because there's not that much. I Don seawater, but seaweed is very proficient and being able to absorb it. So up until the chemicals started hitting the ocean seaweed was, you know, the the main source it was put into different pills and. People would go to emergency room, sometimes because the pills are contaminated, the, you know, the tablets or the capsules the people. But so I don't recommend seaweed. I hate to say this and people hate to hear it because they want to try to find a natural form. A clean form of seaweed. But it's just not available. You can't category. Unless you have a lab in your house, and you wanna bring home seaweed like I live right near to the the ocean and bay so I could just walk and pick up a bushel basket of seaweed every day. But I would have to have a test to see if I wasn't making myself worse. Because they really see we'd really does like to absorb chemicals. Right. And they're they're just really is. No, no, clean water anymore. Especially in the oceans. So I can see how that that could be a problem. Now, don't they put they don't put it in dairy? There's just a fair amount of iron or not iron. But I had I mean in cow's milk, Zach correct, whatever the cows are eating must. You know, retain, the I Don, and they and of course, going to the milk. It makes sense that they. The the cows. I Don would go to the milk because I supposed to be going to the offspring. Of of the the animal in also in people. Right. Right. So are there any other causes of iodine depletion that that you can think of other than the bromide and the toxins at our environment? I know we sweat a lot out with intense exercise. Anything else? Well, the anti. I Don thing is the main way that they the chemical reason, but also doctors encouraged people to avoid salt. It's salt was considered a toxin by many and not necessary. And so would little I dine they would get in. I dice will. Now is not there. Of course, you know, everybody uses unprocessed not everybody a lot of people use some process and not doesn't really have any significant amount of iodine in it. Either going to inhale it a rub into it absorb it from fire retardant or you're going to eat it and the only clean way of taking it is to use the pure. You know lab grade Lou goals formulation. I don. So I I do get a lot of questions from patients about I dine. And obviously most of that information comes from what's being read on the internet. So what are some of the common myths out there on the internet about iodine? And can you clear some of those up for us? Well. I remember I I had a doctor wants asked me how much iodine I was taking. And I think I said twenty five milligrams at that particular point. And he said, no, no, you must be micrograms. If you were taking over a milligram, you'd be dead. So. They're taught this in medical school. So you know, you hate to say someone was taught amid the medical school. But most doctors probably only think that the thyroid is the only place that needs iodine, and that's probably covered by salt. I think that's probably what they were taught. And maybe most nutritionists were taught that so the medical world is going to be propagating that myth first off. But then you get like the urban legends that start on the internet that. I Don will make you, hyper or or cause Hashi motos or at and that, you know, it's not in context. I have to understand that there's a whole protocol for taking on you. Just don't rush out to health food store and picked up the first thing you see, you gotta really learn about it. And not as simple as it. Sounds. Exactly. Yeah. And that I think a lot of the problems of people have with iodine are individuals who will read about it. It's it's health benefits and things like that. And then they started supplementing with without really doing the other things that they need to do to ensure that there's supplementing safely, and you know, one of the important things to know just for the listeners out there. And because a lot of my listeners have Hashi motos disease, and hypothyroidism, if you have a hot knowledgeable on your thyroid that is not a scenario where you wanna go out and starts supplementing with extremely high doses of iodine. So this for all the listeners make sure you have a thyroid ultrasound. If if you have any kind of history of of any kind of thyroid issue before supplementing with iodine, so that would be the absolute first thing to learn about our. Understand is you don't take. I if you have a hot or Thomas module, there have been some people that have had them surgically removed, and then started taking I Don. But, you know, just as a general safety rule like take a step back. Do not go to the health and store and start medicating yourself. Exactly. Yeah. So what about allergies to Iowa? Dine is that is that a real thing. And and what should people know about that? But that's a great question. People have hockey, even I was that was put on my chart at one point when I was having some tests for headaches years ago, and they. Some kind of scandal. So long ago. I can't remember, but I got a reaction to the dye to contrast dye that they use to evaluate the test. And because of that I was told I was allergic to iodine. Now, there's all over the internet. Radiologists are trying to say, no, if you have a bed cat scan or you're allergic to seafood that doesn't mean. You're you know, you you're allergic to iodine. So that's been straightened out. Some you really can't be allergic to Aydin if it's in every cell of your body and you needed to live. So the two things are the contrast. I is not considered. I done an iodine allergy and seafood is not considered an iodine allergy or shellfish. It doesn't specific protein in shellfish that they know what they've identified that causes the allergy. The so. That's just it's it's good to know. And this is all you can verify this you can just Google. Can you have an iodine allergy? But people play I'm not taking any chances. You know, they put it on my chart. Right. Right. So let's say so someone you know, they have the twenty four hour urine tests, and they're deficient in iodine, and they have a condition or signs and symptoms that they think could could be helped with iodine, and they get checked out by their doctor. What do you think is is the best way to supplement with I dine and where can people get the best iodine supplements that you'd recommend? Well, I I would have people do the test. So they get some sort of baseline, even though that baseline may be wrong. If you take a second test, but that's a whole other thing that I explained in my book, you might test normal on the first test and then test lower on the second best, which means the iodine that you took during the urine test is just running right through your body into your urine. Because you have no simple. There's developed because of scarcity they have no similar is absorbing the iodine. So of course, it's going to go through you. But that doesn't happen to everybody. But the, you know, the first thing to do is is to find, you know, if you can find an iodine literate practitioner who knows there's a protocol and those to start slowly with the continued nutrients of selene for sure, but there's there's several others that we recommend because it's proved very helpful. Right. If you supplement with cellini in your iodine deficient, you can cause hypothyroidism and cellini is is obviously very important in preventing Hashi motos and minimizing those reaction. So so, you know, like, the multivitamins that I recommend and a lot of people ask should they be worried about the the micro gram doses. In those most Maltese have usually around one hundred sixty two two two hundred micrograms. And that's just I explain to patients that's just too small dose to worry about even if you have a Hashimoto's disease. That's that's a relatively safe dose. Would you agree with that? Yeah. If I would agree with that. Yeah. But you don't want people as we've said we can't stress that enough do not start, especially if you have any proclivities to going into the huskies range in your tests. Do not start matter of fact, some people have even suggested star a couple of weeks. You know before you start your I Don, I don't think that's necessary. But some people have suggested as a sort of safety issue because so many people are alone Salim road road. Exactly. So are you? So you are a breast cancer survivor. And are you still currently supplementing with iodine? Yes, yes. I started in. Fifteen years ago. And I didn't know what I was doing when I first started because there were no books out on it. There were no guidelines the eye movement had been created at that point my, but I, but I've I've built up and then gone down. Again, I started with you know, the fifty milligrams the first day, which was of course, wonderful. And then of course, I took too much. You know, fifty milligrams is good one hundred must be great. But you know, the bromide detox from that which we didn't understand that time. We'll we'll if you take too much too fast, you'll get bromide detox. You had all the symptoms of Brome ISM. And so you have to know one tobacco off. But also to take what we call the salt loading protocol and the salt water, which has been used for a hundred years to get rid of bromide, including by the army, this salt water will trap the bromide and excreted through the kidneys and urine. So. That's really important to know if there's two things to know, it's one be sure to takes lenient and the companion nutrients, but also be very aware to take the salt water protocol. And then you don't have to do that forever. But just so you get the significant amount of bromide that's been floating around on your receptors, then your tissues for years. You're in the soul. That's is that is it still recommended. It's about a quarter to a half a teaspoon of unrefined. Celtic sea salt in large glass of water in the morning. Yes. Yes. You can take it. If you have symptoms. You can take it twice a day. So you get a headache? I mean, they can get rid of the headache and twenty minutes if you have a bromide headache or something like that. But I bought it gets new Stu it. You you probably won't need it though. Some people say, no, I'm taking the salt water from late for life because it makes me feel good. Oh. And then you can add lemon juice to that Alkalis. You know, the the kidneys a little bit of blood gets a little acid with all this going on, and sometimes lemon juice will also help if you add that to the salt water. So once someone has been supplementing with iodine based on your research, how long do people usually need to supplement with iodine to restore their levels back to a healthy level. Well, that's a hard question to answer because some people are much sicker than others. Some people just have, you know, minimal issues and other people have which seems to be kind of atrophied symposium. Or is it just like I Don takes a long time to get into their bodies. So it may take a while. But usually people get results fairly quickly if you that deficient, and you take something that corrects it it it it can work very quickly. And then, but but now in terms site for the breath because a lot of your listeners. I'm sure have fiber cystic residencies, which is a fancy word umbrella term for just swelling or Nadia lls or pain and. The you you could get rid of those symptoms. You probably in a month or three or something like that for the most part the pain, for example, but the architecture of the breast it's gonna take two or three years to get back to it would be a normal breast tissue some. But at that point, you don't stop taking Eitan, you take it for the rest of your life because we're in an environment where we're getting too little I'd on and too much anti Don in the form of bromide. So that's why you don't stop. And I over Christmas. I went to my relatives house in Rhode Island. And you know, I forgot my I for some reason. So I was there five or six days, and but the last days, I was so cold. And so I had you know, I think this is stored Aydin for fifteen years, but. It just went away. I mean, I must've used it up. And you know, people were giving me sweaters. So it it sort of, you know, made me realize, you know, so now, I even keep a tablet in my my handbag because I'm afraid I'll get somewhere and all forgotten again to to take it. But other people have reported that to that they find mentally. They're just not as sharp if they skipped their iodine for a few days. And don't forget that the leading cause of mental retardation in the world is is I Don division city, and it really helps other things too. I mean in terms of children growing, I tell a story in my book about some American public health. Doctors went to a licensed, China one of the provinces in China where all the children were very small women were having miscarriages goats were having miscarriages. And so, you know, if you're if you're livestock is miscarrying all the time, and you have very small children who can't work in farming five areas. You know, if you've productivity is is essentially starving. So what they did is in this place. They didn't like I I saw because they thought the Americans were trying to the west was trying to keep them from having children. So what they did is they put potassium iodate. In a barrel. Poked a hole in the barrel, and then drifted into the irrigation. Ditch. So what happened is all the plants got I'd on and then they animals the plants the people at the plant and the children grew the goats stopped having miscarriages women's stop having miscarriages. So there's a huge way of measuring the progress from just as very small low tech intervention and one of the things that has been so rewarding to me as as an activist. As a help activist is just I Don and conception if you're just slightly low an iodine just slightly low. You don't even have to be like moderate you the chances of your conceiving on any menstrual cycle. We'll go down forty nine percent. And so if you get that up, you know, raise your your eyes on level, you're raising your your ability to concede, and that's probably an evolutionary thing where you don't want people to conceive if they're not healthy. But we have. There's an Facebook quote Aydin workshop, and we have a lot of women on their who posted pictures of their. I Don babies because they started taking I Don either before they conceived or as soon as they conceived, and while they were nursing, and they they show the pictures of them and the kids are real, bright and smart. So that that's one of the most important things. I think the your listeners could hear about is how important it is for conception. Did have a case I think it was about twelve years ago. A woman that came to see me with infertility, and that was really the only intervention we did because she was severely deficient in iodine. And after supplementing with iodine for think it was pretty quick like six to eight weeks. Pregnant, and and delivered the baby full term. So definitely a a strong connection there at very fighting. We we've had people that were. On the verge of the next month. They were going to go to the fertility clinic and try with in vitro or whatever procedure they were gonna try and they got pregnant before the appointment. So. It really is rewarding. And to see this kind of thing. Now with pregnant women if he just happened to be pregnant now, Dr fleshes recommend not taking more than twelve and a half milligrams of you know, lugos iodine or one of the tablet forms, I owed a role. Because you don't want the if you get any detox. You don't want the baby to be to get experience any of the detoxification. Roy, right. So the the form of iodine, I think a lot of people are confused about this. They'll take Israeli really there's there's mainly two forms the potassium iodide. And then and then I dine Salou goal solution has both of those. And is that the form that you're taking one that has both iodide and iodine? Yes. We'll go lugos isn't a brand. It's a formulation. That was you know, was in the eighteen hundreds they Dr Liu goal and Ben to mostly at that time for lung disease and your but his formulation, which is iodine. An iodide is is the one would get the most success with. There are a few other mung we will manga rely on out there that are basically two week. They have a kind of feel good effect. But they're really too weak to am I experience to get any meaningful results long term. Well, this has been really excellently is is there anything else you can think of or anything else you'd like to listeners to know about. I don. Well, I just want people to know that there was a reason I Don sort of stolen from us. And this is not a conspiracy theory because the history bears this out, and, but it's you can't get it from vegetables or seaweed that cleaned anymore. So the best thing to do is to to reinstate it. Ideally, we should be able to get like our grandparents got it. But that's just not where we are now or just like in an post. Poisoning world opposed environmental toxin world, and we just have to adjust to that situation by have seen miracles like some from the smallest to the largest from people getting their hearing back to people getting rid of rashes that they've had for you know, years so but mostly and different things. So that's an Bayreuth things, which is you know, the engine of the body. So that's that really affects everything. So your book is what you don't know about iodine can wreck your life, and that's available on Amazon. Correct. Yes. If the full title is the iodine crisis subtitle is what you don't know about. I Don can wreck your life. But you can get it on. I Don light on Amazon or any any other bookstore chain. So they can get the iodine crisis on Amazon, and what is your your website? And where else can people find you? You mentioned the Facebook group. Facebook group is I dine workshop and that the very scientific evidence based group, my website is Lynn Farrow dot net. That's Lynn with an eight L Y N E pharaoh F FA R R O W dot net. So people can visit me their contact me or whatever they wanna do. I do respond to emails like yard. Obviously. I don't practice medicine. I'm not a licensed professional at some don't call me. And don't Email me and ask for advice, but I can direct people to literature, our physicians are or or resources excellent. This has been really a great thanks for coming on. And appreciate it. Well, I appreciate the. Invitation Dr bargain, I'm I'm in your work. So this is very synergistic. I hope we can. Get even more information out there, especially the vitamin d connection. And and now you're interested in iron. So that would be good to explore. Yes. Yes. I'll be I'll be delving into Iowa and more over the next few months. So I'll be really releasing some more information on that. So to all the listeners go to Dr Hedberg dot com, and I'll be posting a transcript of this there as well as links to Lynn's book and her website and the Facebook group, so take care everyone. Thanks for tuning in. And I will talk to you next time. If you enjoy the doctor Hedberg show, you can support it by sharing each episode on your social media channels like Facebook and by leaving your review on I tunes, please visit Dr Hedberg dot com. That's D R H E D E R G dot com to access the show notes and resources for today's episode.

Don iodine deficiency hypothyroidism goiter Lynn Farrow Facebook Dr Hedberg US thyroid cancer Hedberg doctor Hedberg Florida Iowa psoriasis army D R H E B E R G professor director Amazon
The Great Cranberry Scare Of 1959

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:57 min | 1 year ago

The Great Cranberry Scare Of 1959

"N. P. R. It was early November Nineteen fifty-nine when Arthur. Fleming got some distressing news. He was the secretary of Health Education and Welfare under president Eisenhower and he just learned that samples of cranberries collected in Oregon and Washington contained traces of an herbicide called Amino triazole tries. All was known to cause thyroid cancer in rats. This is Robert Cox author of the Book Massachusetts. cranberry culture carcinogens had been banned for agricultural literal. Use The previous year nineteen fifty eight and so he said we have a problem. Problem was Thanksgiving was less than three weeks away and on top of Turkey key millions of Americans would soon be eating cranberry sauce. Yeah the the the the solid thing in the can the cranberry Gel. That's how I know I know it too. So on November ninth almost exactly sixty years ago Fleming issued a statement warning the public of the contamination and and the potential cancer risk and when reporters asked Fleming. Well would you recommend people not by cranberries and he said something to the effect. If I was a mother mother and feeding of a little child at home I would pass on cranberry sauce this year. Don't buy this stuff if you have any questions about Yikes Q.. Nationwide freakout within hours grocery stores around the country pulled cranberry products from their shelves. Sales were banned in Chicago and San Francisco Enciso and leader the feds seized shipments of cranberry sauce from Wisconsin and Massachusetts. Everybody was talking about this. There was a band Robert Williams. And the Gruber's that even wrote a song to capture the moment I mean. I know we're just song about a terrifying panic but also it's Kinda the catch undeniably catchy brand early. In the minds of millions of consumers cranberries aries went from being the classic holiday condiment to cancer causing contraband. This is the indicator for planet money. I'm Adrienne MOM REPORTER WITH WB. You are in Boston and I'm Stephen. Smith the cranberry scare of nineteen fifty. Nine it threatened to crush the fifty million dollar cranberry business today on the show. How aalto business adapted and the new crisis facing cranberries today support for? NPR comes from national car rental. Who wants you to know that with a membership shipping are complementary Emerald Club you can skip the counselor and choose any car in the aisle at participating national locations you can even select an upgrade without paying paying extra learn more at national car dot com slash? NPR as news about the contaminated cranberries swept the nation the market for them mm-hmm basically ground to a halt. We had forty trailer. Loads of cranberries cancelled within one hour after that announcement Jon deak is co owner owner of deepest cranberry products in Carver Massachusetts. At the time of the cranberry scare he was in his mid twenties and had just started working in the family. Business reaction at the beginning was. Oh my God it's over. You know this cannot be my career. It's not going to exist. John says the rest of that year they did not sell a single berry and it didn't help that. The White House for its Thanksgiving dinner replaced cranberry sauce with applesauce. And those another punch in the gut later lab tests only he found traces of Amino triazole in about one or two percent of the fruit. They inspected an congress would pay the growers about eight and a half million dollars to compensate them for LAS sales sales. Still The damage was pretty much done for the next few years it was really hard to move cranberries and now that you put cancer in the minds kinds of consumer. How long did it take the T to deal with that and to get back to normal part of what made the cranberry scare so hard on producers? Like John was was the timing. Just days before Thanksgiving and back then Thanksgiving was the cranberry industry. But in people's mind cranberries associate Thanksgiving thing that it just doesn't occur to them to eat out of that season. It's almost like like trying to imagine the Christmas tree industry being like. How can we sell Christmas trees all year round it is in your going against the cultural default? The cranberry scare was a wake up. Call for the industry if it was going to survive another a crisis and needed to spread out it's risk in other words. The cranberry industry had to figure out how to get people to eat cranberries. Not just on Thanksgiving but but this is an incredibly hard sell you know Kramer is unlike almost any other fruits you can buy are not sweet. They're incredibly tart yet. In fact I've actually never had addi plane ran berry of always had the juice. Or The you know Thanksgiving Gel or whatever But our sound engineer Isaac Rodriguez is from cranberry country and he brought. Let me some cranberries to try. So I'M GONNA try my first. cranberry see what the industry was up against. Okay try it. Oh it's grassy. Isaac eats these like as a snack. he was sort of hoping that I would be converted to eating for snack. Oh there's not a it's very stringent S- like it's it is so tight that it's almost like you know nature designed this fruit not to be eaten. This is not necessarily tailored to the American Palate. Oh no and you know. This was the challenge right. They've got a a fruit route. So tart that it's almost inevitable but in the early nineteen sixty s ocean spray. Had this idea. They thought if we want people to consume more cranberries. We need to think beyond sauce in an old documentary about cranberries called Crimson Harvest former ocean spray. CEO Edward Gal Store Explains Lanes held. The company started tinkering with one of its more niche products for some time ocean spray had been selling a product called cranberry juice cocktail but vitamin selling it. Only in New England and it actually been formulated to meet the taste of cranberry growers. And so we did the not so brilliant thing of putting more more water and more sugar in it and then became a very palatable. Drink what does it take to convince you. You're missing out tomorrow. Drink different drink ocean spray. cranberry juice cocktail. The new formulation took off quickly. Followed by juice blends like Cran Apple. And before long cranberries went from being once a year fruit to something you could have in any season or as the AD suggested why not have daily Ellie. cranberry juice cocktail for breakfast. I find it infinitely more stimulating than ours. Use as a really great case and of course the industry did not just stop it. Use Over the years it developed other cranberry products. Including dried sweetened. cranberries the craisins. They were big hits and they also tried out a cranberry based meat glaze called called dip and bake which was not a big hit. And these days you can find cranberry in all kinds of things cereals and Muffins Thousand Granola J.. And even beer there is cranberry beer. And so- cranberries are now a global commodity last year the US exported almost half a billion dollars worth of cranberry products and US farmers produced almost nine million barrels. That's about seven times the size it was during the cranberry scare in Adrian. You could. I'd say that much like a Ripe Berry floating to the surface of a flooded cranberry bog. After the scare of Nineteen fifty-nine. CRANBERRY industry came out on top. Well Real Betis until last summer the White House is planning to release the list of products from China that trump has approved tariffs for around fifty fifty fifty billion dollars worth of goods from China will in a trade war trade war. What else I now? The trade war with China which was the biggest buyer of US cranberries last year. Belcher may be by Shimon. We've looked fogleman. A part of its retaliation. China imposed a twenty five percent. Tariff on dried cranberries and soon sales sales to China fell by nearly half on top of that cranberry growers are now facing a massive surplus for years. The fruits popularity drove increase production in the US. Canada and Chile and now there is a global glut of cranberries so the industry is taking a page from the cranberry crisis playbook back from nineteen fifty fifty nine companies are doubling down and trying to find a new hit product the next cranberry juice cocktail or the next dried cranberry. Yeah in fact this year ocean spray. It opens new research and Development Lab here in Boston tasked with turning out new concoctions like cranberry infuse. T- tonic anyone. Or how about a cranberry Amesbury oat milk elixir crowed. Milk Croton Milk Cran milk. Yes I I don't know maybe these products we'll catch on over time. Maybe they won't. Maybe this episode of the indicator was produced by Lena Sense Kyrie. Our intern is not Louis. Our editor is Paddy Hirsch and the indicator is a production of N._p._R..

cancer US China triazole Fleming Boston Isaac Rodriguez thyroid cancer White House secretary of Health Education NPR Robert Cox NPR Jon deak Washington N. P. Emerald Club John
Drink Me! Bye Cancer| Episode 34

An American Conversation Podcast

45:21 min | 1 year ago

Drink Me! Bye Cancer| Episode 34

"Welcome to American conversation. Podcast a podcast about a comedian. A feminist and to Republicans meeting in different bars every week to discuss what the hell is happening in America Today. Each week we deliver gripping news and information with the understanding that as Americans we can agree to disagree and laugh while doing it. Revelation Leland Rose David and Jeff are not experts. Although rose thinks she is listening every week be that fly on the wall. Our rate rose so I just want to introduce you to my friend. Christine Christine or Christina. I've Seen Okay Christina and then showing the podcast by the way my daughter's middle name is Christine. I just wanted to say that house in named after Jesus go named after Jesus Curse works best. Christopher Christina is the female of Christ I wanted to name my dog God. I decided that it would be a little offensive to too many people but anyhow so Christina is from Canada and she just went home to visit and couldn't get back in trump building a wall to keep you guys out with non from them I was. I went there to get my. Us Visa renewed. So you have to go back every three months six months or years. Now Oh okay. That's not too bad. Don't forget it in your calendar. What something happens. You went back there to renew your visa. And then you didn't come right back. There was some delays in processing visa. Us Consulate so there's a US consulate in Toronto. So there's actually. Us people that represent the government in Canada and so I was just held up in the processing but normally they let you right back. It's normal Mata a huge deal. No they give you lots of. I mean I was lucky. People get held up for three months. Eighteen months My friend Linda went there to go pack up her mom stuff after her mom passed away and she's Canadian with her husband so she got stuck there and she couldn't get her paperwork to come back and was a huge ordeal well. They're lucky that they weren't coming from Mexico because then they'd being cages yet. Enter kids cages. Exactly exactly this. You didn't get put in a cage. No that's a good thing. That's a good. That's a good thing. She's a good immigrant. What'd happen when it's it's funny because you get information on how to send your cashier's check but they tell you to get it from a major bank and then we send cashier's check in and they said this wasn't from one of the five major banks. Here's the list. Oh so they wonder they refuse choke. They gave me the list of banks approved. Oh my God. Are THEY CANADIAN BANKS OR AMERICAN CANADIAN BANKS? But you have to put it in. It's very specific but they could have just outlined that in the first place so you need to pay to become to come over here the whole thing. This renew cost around twenty five thousand. Us Twenty five thousand just to come visit us and then you also have to pay our taxes and Canadian tax it. Yeah even though. There's a Nafta you it's your double taxed. Wow all right so tell us about you. Who are you Stena Canadian? Yes so I'm Canadian. I'm hanging out in the America I've been here for seven years so I developed a product beverage and whole foods markets from Texas. Called me one day and said we'd like you to come to America and they called you in Canada. Yes it's Long Distance. Yes it is so. Is there no whole foods in Canada there is? That's how I got the lead in. Oh so you started in Canada. You tell us why you started this product. Well it's been fifteen years but I had stage four cancer and MS at the same time. That is amazing. And you're all clear right now. Well I don't know if you ever get clear what your remission. Is that what it was thyroid? Cancer lungs. So it's not lung cancer but it's it's basically fired cancer that's moved into the lungs. Yes so when it moves in the lungs at stage four. Why do they not call it lung cancer? Then because it probably metastasized right yes it metastasized to the lungs. I think it I mean I. I don't know what the differences but it's a slow moving slow growing so the diagnosis was. It shouldn't kill you for the next ten years. My sister has it. She had thyroid cancer. It's the same but it didn't Matassa. Metastasized Michelle Sir. Like she said. What's all clear? It's a common thing but I was I. It had been growing Mason's I was a teenager by the time. They founded ingrowing for fourteen thirteen fourteen years. They thought well how. And how did you even discovery? Well I kind of felt like there is something I couldn't swallow a pill or something stuck And then I went to a doctor. They said maybe it's Bayreuth so let's send you a chronology and then the endocrinologist monitored it for two years while it was growing intimately how fine just letting you get worse. I was five months pregnant. She called me and she said we need to give you an ultrasound routine okay. And then she called me back the next day and she said we need to do a biopsy with the ultrasound and I thought this is strange and pregnant. Now you're going to go picking partying. And then I went in for the biopsy and then she called me the third day and she says you have to come into my office and then that's when she said it's cancer and we need to do the surgery right now so sad to wait until I was in second trimester and then because I was pregnant. They couldn't do any type of scans to see what they were dealing with. So the the obstetrician oncologist. Sorry I had so many specialists crazy. The oncologist had to go in blind so a three hour surgery which was supposed to be outpatient and the little one inch incision became eighteen staples. It wraps around my neck. Oh my thirty lymph nodes six and a half hour surgery and I was in the hospital for seven days. Wow this is all in Canada right. Yes then I had to go first. Speech pathology and physiotherapy. 'cause I couldn't lift my arm. I couldn't talk so it was. It was extensive and then when the baby came out they had to wait for me. I couldn't breastfeed him. They had to wait for me to dry up and then I had to wait two months after because it's hormonal I had to wait after the baby was born about two months. And then I had radiation and then on the radiation. My lungs lit up on the scan which meant it was stage four so it was moved to stage for six months later. I was radiated again in hopes of China. Stop the growth and there was no change from one to the next so at that point there was nowhere medical treatments so they go home and pack up. Kinda thing Goldman Pack Up. You've got about ten years. Well ten years seems like a longtime talk right. Yeah she's got a kid. What were your symptoms? Nothing nothing does you. Every once in a while but So every once in a while I'll still feel that but the endocrinologist now tells me that is well that's a it's a lymph node. And they can. They're constantly moving depending on environmental toxins. If you have a cold how you're feeling lots of things can exacerbate the lymph nodes so everyone's feeling she says it's just normal in in Canada. Do you have any bills to pay for the health? No it's free. That's Oh she's ever. Oh you when I was diagnosed with Ms. It was so new like this was six months before I was diagnosed six months from each other in twenty. Two Thousand Three. Can you explain to our listeners would ms's versus and what is that exactly? It's a degenerative nerve disease I didn't. It's not common here but in in where I come from in Canada. It's like every second person has no way. So what did you think it's an environmental? They think it's an environmental thing. What are you have there besides our pollution? We have lots of hydro hydro. I don't know what that what is. I know. High water only like well. We have water and we have hydro the water. That's making electric city. Right hundred one bill so hydro-electricity so what we do is it's it's an abundance there but we pay huge price for hydro and it's it's exported to America. Oh thank you so we're killing off all of you guys just to get us trysofi. Possibly of course. That's what we do so now that you're in America. Do you have a huge bills to pay you? Do you still have all this medical care. Or You Not I haven't seen a doctor in fifteen years. Yeah is that because you're in America and IT'S SAUK CENTRE. No because you've just you're so healthy that they turn my back on the also. The story gets even longer so I did end up having to pay for the drug for the MS and it was an injection in my legs and it looks like a pen and you had to so. The nurse came to my house but it was a drug that was made on the moon. So you had to. I had to pay for it so once. It was twenty thousand dollars so once you hit your you know you have to call him out so the small amount was two thousand five hundred dollars so I had to pay that and then you could get the rest of it covered at that was every year. That's what it's called. You remember the name of the drug avonex elements and that would be cheaper. Well here in America they probably charge you more. I think this was sixteen years ago. There have been some advances now but and I see the commercials on TV. I don't know if it's the same company or not but there was only four drugs and each one was depending on what type of MSU had. There's different types lobster Mitt degenerative but the neurologists there is just a couple when he diagnosed me he said garden variety. Ms You'll be wheelchair. Jesus I thought Canadians were supposed to be nice. Yeah it sounds like a very impressive so that was the neurologist and then what ended up happening was after. The second radiation. I started eating raw fruits and vegetables because there is no more. There was no more medical treatments. Were you a meat eater before I was? I just ate everything but I started looking ever background in Chemistry Right Chemistry and art. Yes so I. I couldn't figure I had seven high risk specialists in every department but none of them would talk to each other and they don't talk to each other here in America either and. I think it's absolutely ridiculous ridiculous because I was like I needed a whole business plan on my health. Yeah exactly so kept asking the wire you not talking to the neurologist. Because now the drug company discontinued my use. 'cause I had cancer so then I said well. How does these two case? So there's a there's a connection I'm GonNa find it and so then I started looking into everything on a cellular level and found out you break. Your arm heals. The body has the ability to heal itself so then I started looking into. How does it happen and there is all there was a lot of? There's a lot of the well. There wasn't as much information as there is now but there is a lot of information about people that would do water fasting for forty days and be grow liver score of ride. I hear about that with cancer. So the campus. I read up on stage all near death and then started taking and probiotics and basically could cure themselves no matter what age so then. I thought why don't have anything to lose. I had a little baby. I couldn't even be near him because he was radioactive for six months. Are you serious? You could even be near your baby to on the radiation detector off at the. Us border slow so so they thought you were like sneaking a nuclear bomb. Well they ask. Anybody had any medical procedures and my husband said no just in the car. And then so. They're like we need to take you out those radiation detecting carton. I said Oh that's me. Wow so I was radioactive for. Because they had given me the highest dose. They've ever given anybody. And you must have felt very sick. I was I was so sick and I had just come off of pregnancy. I had injected drugs. I had steroids. I had immune suppressant. I had pregnancy so no thyroid so not only pregnancy but no thyroid thyroid drugs and then they were playing with a thyroid drug because I had to have radiation so I had all these drugs my body and then I thought okay. I'm not gonNA eat so then. I just stopped and they would only yeah only raw fruits and vegetables but it wasn't accessible so bananas almonds. I had to soak them for twelve hours so if I forgot to soak them the night before I had nothing eat. Why did you have to soak your almonds because you have to activate you WANNA maximize the enzymes so you WanNa make it? You WanNa you WanNa make it so your body has a digestion disease state like that. Your body doesn't shuts down so you're trying to trigger the all the enzymatic activity in your body and so then rather than eating something cooked which requires enzymes to break it down. You're trying to preserve enzymes. Why with enzymes and eight rough fruit food? But if I didn't activate the enzymes in the almonds I couldn't eat them because they weren't rock goddess. I'm talking about super super high level. I'm not talking about raw peanut balls because you know those are not raw foods those have been cooked. I'm talking about Microscopically measured with a with a scale. Everything that went into my body and a eight every hour. I got up in the middle of the night took ten enzymes every hour on the hour and in Canada Do they get as much training as we do here? In America with our nutrition with a day or an hour just figured this all out of myself nobody would believe me but then I started healing and then everybody believe me because I was looking great and then I got pregnant again which was the end of the world. Everybody was going crazy and then my doctor said it's unethical to tell you what to do with this. But you're radioactive. Wow and that's your daughter now. Daughter birth defects well if you think about Chernobyl radioactive cheese and then he was pregnant. Did you see that show? That was amazing. Journal the movie or the show the show. It's it's TV. Show while I'm talking about what really happened. Tv shows amazing. No it's very scary. Because show the radiation and they force each like Russian to go pick up this lump of radiation and throw it into the middle of the. Wasn't that based on. What actually happened. Yeah it actually happened. So I grew up. Ukrainian went to Ukrainian immersion school. I didn't know that. So when turnover happened it's Ukrainians Not Russians Ukrainians the troubles in Ukraine. So I was very familiar with this situation and that when people were born they were born with birth defects Omega. Chernobyl is in Ukraine. Eah I thought Oh Leland American. We don't know know that didn't think it was part of Russia now Ukraine so ninety. Nine point nine hundred. The last day that was the last day I went to a doctor when they told me not to. Actually I went back to have the baby but that was truly an outpatient. I was sitting crosslegged right after because I was so healthy and you kept the nutrition exactly the same raw and yes well through my pregnancy. Oh this is how I developed my product. I started getting really hungry so then I started trying to find a way to put more nutrition and a cop until I could couldn't fit anymore in right and then I put on the market. Wow do drink me. Which is every single. One of them has Kale. They'll have Kale and by nutrition. Probably the highest product for nutrition on the market has five and a half servings of fruits and vegetables in a bottle row and those are claims that I got approved by both. Cf I in FDA because you can't a liquid beverage only contains two by volume but because we don't were were fibrous drink. Were not drink. We're not we're not juice so we're juicing it then you get the claim for juice right during. It's not chugging drink it's a chewy drink. Yeah but I mean. I don't know if you've tradition. Yes I have no I have not as to. I mean you can as soon as I met you and I was told what you did. I went down a whole foods in God it. It was a little hard for me to do but drink because we're so used to the standard American Diet Sad. I'm sad wake so when you're when you're dealing with that kind of extreme health so it was a product founded out of this experience. Yeah that I had this need for. I was going to die if I didn't do something. Are you still that healthy? Yes but not every hour no. I don't I mean I eat everything now. Bud a eighty percent of my diet has to usually usually my drinks. You're not back on meat are you? you are back on me. Wow and what about sugars? No sugars no. I don't I don't eat sugar and your husband. Is he following your diet when I when I yeah what have you make him the food and right in front of him right otherwise. My husband's like wine and steak. So the reason why I chose to go back to this number one while I was going through. I was tortured. I cry every day because I didn't want to be labeled as Freak show because it was I. I had to bring my own food to a wedding. I mean it was crazy. You know you're at this five-star Ri wedding plates or seventy five dollars in here in munching cauliflower. So I knew that I didn't want that but I wanted to find a way to balance and I knew little kids. I mean we live at we left. We lived out of town. And if you it was like a twenty five minute drive to the nearest city. And if I didn't pack everything I needed for the whole day then I had nothing to eat because you couldn't walk into store to find. All I could do is find a banana. Won't eat like an apple offer shelf and yes so basically there was. Yeah so I would. I would eat whatever I could find. But it wasn't like you could have a meal so now you can go into a store and find prepared salad or a beverage. You can go to the juice bar. You can do all these things but you couldn't do it before right. Sixteen years ago right not available. No wasn't available. Maybe a little bit here because it's kind of the Mecca this industry so when when I develop this was immediately. Can you come to America and help us found the juice the juice revolution so there is back it years years years ago when seventies there was this whole push towards green juice green star users and we grass and then it kind of went away for a while and then this whole generation of super premium nutrition came in and so whole foods put coolers in two hundred stores. There was a pilot project and so we one of the companies that they had put in those coolers win over. Well more yes I mean. It's still I think that they've converted it now. When Amazon came in everything changed But it was basically started the this whole super premium juice green juices. I mean people before would save put. Put it in a frosty bottle. I don't WanNa see what I'm drinking tasteless green or I don't really know now. Green has a different connotation to it. what's the science behind it mine? Yes you're juice and and your results. So the reason why keep fiber in there is because you need fiber declines so a juice is not going to cleanse you. It's GonNa pull toxins out of your liver. It's GonNa work on your Dream Knowles. It's GonNa work flushing toxins out but all that you're doing is a rotating those toxins through body unless you have a mechanism to bring bring it out then it just gets. What about water? That doesn't pull it out. No water is kind of like a benefit and water makes everything work but waters knock. I mean yes the more water you have the systems work so it it's kind of a catalyst to making everything work in your body. You need water to hydrate. Charcoal charcoal is you had to be careful charcoal So yes struggles a good one but as long as you have a detox mechanism than than it's okay but it depends on what format is so. There's a difference between absorption and digestion and detox. Those are all different things so the industry just muddies them altogether because nobody knows the difference right. But if you're drinking juice if you don't have something in there that can pull the toxins out so there's different types of detox as well. So some of it is flush your fat cells. Okay I'm I'm going to the Oscars so for three days. All I'm GONNA do is drink juice. And you're going to fabulous because it can pull the water out and it's going to flash your cells and probably give you a good complexion is not going to cancel. We're talking about deep toxins. I'm talking about ones that. Take a hundred and twenty days to remove doesn't a water. I do that you can yet because so I talked to you about water fast. It you absolutely can A big proponent. I did a water fast for thirty one days while you less thirty. Seven the preface. The premise is that your body has the ability to heal itself. So as long as you're not creating an issue as long as you're not giving it something to digest you're basically giving it nothing to do but he'll is so. The enzymes are actually working on systems in the body rather than digesting food. So the same concept with eating rough food. You're gonNA eat the almonds. But as long as they come with their own enzymes theirself digesting. If you're using from the body to digest then you're pulling from from your bodily functions so the more you can add So you can also supplement with enzyme so if you eat you can supplement. There's this argument that even an apple if you ate an apple in one thousand nine hundred sixty four nine thousand nine hundred twenty. They had different nutritional values than eating an apple now right. There's like nothing no nutritional value so even with an apple I supplemented with enzymes. Do you know the author Upton Sinclair to be ever heard of him. No Yeah Slaughterhouse Blues. Yeah right yeah. It was very timid. He's yeah that is him. He he went through the same experience. That's how I picked up his book and he talked about water fasting and his experience. He was dying same thing and he did. He just stopped eating and he got better and better and the the medical community was telling him. You're going to die and I think this is in the nine eighteen hundreds and he wrote a book. I'm reading it and it sounds like your experience but now you can get. What is it called? You know fasting benefits or something like that. I don't love his book. I have every book ever written on fasting. Nice friend of mine is actually get stage. Four cancer right now. I should tell them I will. I told her about that. If you do the water fast. Seen after three days it starts to attack. The cancern starts to starve off the cancer. Three days is one level three weeks. Another level hundred. Twenty days is complete. Wow I don't think she can go one hundred twenty days without water without food but yeah you can not my friend. Yeah you can tell me in American only in this world. Would you have eight soccer players beyond a plane crash and then the Oh my God? I'm so hungry I need to eat my friends right now. Do Look at all the muscle and fat. You have their. Don't eat for awhile. Wait for people to save you the eight their friends and they're like I was starving by three hours. Yes I was like. Oh my God yeah. You could go thirty days without the Food I would. I would think I would starved before I already to their you look I am. Puerto Ricans are very tasteful. Actually Christina would probably be the better choice to eat. Because she's Italian no because she's so healthy you're not you're Ukrainian married Ukrainian and Lebanese Italian eye combination fever either but yeah no. I think the longest fast that I know of which was done in true north which is up near San Francisco. It's a fasting. Medical facility was for three hundred sixty five days in crazy. It was like seven hundred pounds. And all them yeah. My niece actually went up there and studied at that. School really Yeah I think it sounds great. I would love to fast. I can go maybe twelve hours. That's not fasting for me. It is. That's like taking then. I need more coffee. Yeah that's not. What creamer sugar. Everybody on the planet should fast a minimum of twice a year before teen days. Why don't you think I would probably think more do you fast sill? I don't but were just by after it came off this diet. I didn't eat till two PM so this is interesting topic. That's happening now. People are saying almost so. Don't eat between seven PM and then don't eat till the next day at eleven and then you have the sixteen hour. I think that's works out. Intermittent fasting right fasting and so then the celebrities gone. So now everybody's on it but it there is some truth to it and so what I would do was which science right what I naturally would do was. I didn't eat till about two PM. And then sometimes I was to the point where I was starving. And I'm like okay ninety to eat because I'm hungry But coming off of raw was a lot so a lot of it is just has to do with the mind but I I do a lot of yoga but one of the to meditate lied. Take Kunda leany. Which is it's A. I've never seen it. I've never seen anything like this before. But it's used in Training military people to to Get through torture. So is it and the breathing one. It is but it's more like you hold your hands in the air for eleven actually is supposed to be for thirty three minutes and your hands up in the air and so then eventually the push past the pain mechanism. Oh my shoulders would be in so much pain. I well actually once once you get past the pain. Your hurts to put them down. So there's guys in India go around with one arm up to get themselves into heaven. Is that what it is or his life? Yes similar is to reach some. We're always trying to reach enlightenment right But it's I just I really like it because it it works on the mind and I think there's so much there's so much there's so much separation that needs to be really done. I mean look between the mind and the body and if you're healing so you just mentioned your friend has stage four cancer. Can I talk to that for a second please do? You can't tell somebody just do this. And it'll work so this is what I've learned over time is that my story is my story and it people aren't going to pick up my product and say well. This is the Elixir Safai. Drink one of these and I'm fixed. It's not like it's not like that. There's no miracle cure out there. First of all you have to. You have to answer two questions one. Do I want to heal and to? Why do I WANNA hill? So there's two questions you have to answer really in the healing and then you you can do anything if you've got your mind in the right place and so then food becomes water becomes tools. But if you don't have your mind in the right place it's not GonNa work and I've seen people I've seen people. I had a guy that came to me and he drink sixty four ounces of my drinks every day and he had he was dying. He had a tennis ball so it was a different type of cancer thyroid cancer. It was one. There's four different types. But it was the one where he had a tennis ball. And it was there was a there was an ulcer Open wound and he was. He couldn't talk already so he was. It was just going to choke him basically and so he started he could. He couldn't eat anyway so he started drinking drinks. And then the tumor came out all Sir and he went took it to his doctor and it was like the whole thing was gone and then so he he went on. He was just doing this. He kept doing it and doing it and he went back to work and they're like well we just retired. Because you're GONNA die now you're back to work and then boom he'd Turkey. Dinner Boom died Mikhail. If you if you start healing and then you switch it to cook food at the cancer comes back twice as fast as you tell your body. It doesn't need to heal anymore. You shut down the healing. So there's there's so many so you think somebody like Steve. Jobs who literally did everything still died. It was because his mindset wasn't really there. I mean there could be a lot of factors but there are lots of factors. That's what I'm trying to say. Yeah but we. We also need to balance out kind of thing like a lot of cancers aggressive right It could kill you regardless of what you do right but I like your message. I think being positive and looking forward is fantastic but also not to blame someone of doesn't work or to feel bad. I know people that have done everything and have still have died and right are still sick unless they're cheating and lying. Do you know what I mean. It's there's so many different factors so there's there really isn't one thing out there that can do all of it or okay. Let's water fast. You may do a water fast and it may not work after that it. There's there's so many different things but it's not. Your fault is not your call. It could be your genetics. Your blood type. It could be you know everything so it is a balance of everything and this is why when I went back to eating food. I wanted to make sure that I wasn't going to live a life just because I wasn't one hundred percent sure that rod did anything for me. I saw the healing and as I saw healing then it was about maintaining so once I did my cleanse. I thought now what am I gonNa do and actually went through a little bit of a almost like an eating disorder. Because I had that experience where I was trying to introduce some food back into my life and I would cry if I eat cooked food. I thought I'm I'm going to shut down the healing right now. This is this is not scientifically what I should be doing but I was pregnant and I needed to eat and I thought how my I can't live in the world like this. I can't live in a world where I'm eating this bobble food and everyone else is eating everything else you know but everybody else is eating like crap as a human being in American. No that I feed myself horribly and nobody should be eating the way I ate and especially unhealthy Sick person should ever eat the way. I think it sounds fabulous that you carry around your own little bubble world each your own food. We all should agree disgusting. Nobody should be drinking coffee. Creamer that I do so until you go to the beach and there's there's somebody lathering your kid up with Sunscreen so I'm just gonNA. Yeah so that part is hard to live in a bubble world when you have all these outside all of these influences. How are your kids? How old are they know? How are they? Are they super healthy? They are an active rearms nine active when you were pregnant. So how? How is their health? So honest thera therapeutic psychological level. I was pregnant with my son when the head the trauma and so he's never gotten over that trauma Right so it'll it'll be. I understand that I had a lot of trauma is pregnant with my daughter and she has major issues so just issues on on so many levels of just fear fear and then when he was young used to be the bed right now but him but Fear that's all related and he's never even by soccer now. He plays soccer with fear. Your daughter my son. Now I'm saying put your daughter radiation. She's the complete opposite of him. She's a complete. I was wrong when I was carrying her So but I had known that I had done enough to push that radiation out so interest on late in the reason why I made the decision medically was one thing but what I had been doing all this work that I've been doing at home on. I had been as soon as I had. The second radiation. They told me that there was no change. I started looking into. What am I going to do here because they they they sit? There is nothing. We can't give you any more radiation period you've added not you've had the most you've ever have can have so you need to find a maintenance I was. I was sent home with that. Find MAINTENANCE PRODUCT. Find a maintenance for yourself finding finding a comfortable lifestyle. Were you afraid to come to America though and realize that if you were gonNA have some more medical issues the amount of cost would just well this? I'm still a resident of Canada. I'm a nonresident here circuit. So I'm a non non. I'm not an immigrant. I'm a nonimmigrant. What does that make you? Are you a visitor a visitor but if you if you were going to have more medical issues come up would you go back to Campbell? Nonresident alien is yet. They call it. Yeah immigrant alien so you're an alien to. Melania trump just wanted to make no. Melania trump is married and she's now Leeann yes along with her parents and anybody else happens. Trained migration is great for them but nobody else but no. I'm I maintain a house with food in it and in Canada. Oh really yes okay. So you can't eat great great but because there's a substantial presence test right and it depends on how many days you're physically in whatever country but then in a different section it depends on while you have the home. Okay so people can have property in a lot of snowbirds have property here but live there and then they'll come here three months of the year six or whatever it is but you have to maintain a residence a principal residence so my principal residence is in. Canada and huge refrigerator. Yes there's you know they they go right down to this if your friendship pulls in your closet is your. I maintain my dwelling. You can't rent it out. I don't want to because I'll lose my residents. Oh and so. That's the Canadian. Saying can't I says any Canadian that has had I can't I don't qualify for any type of insurance. I mean I probably do. My husband has insurance now but if I was to go in to have major medical they would. They would pull my records. I'm pretty sure somebody would find out somewhere. And then declined. Yeah that's how insurance pre existing condition right. I have already. I have so many on the pre existing conditions. Everyone does box. Yeah and trump would throw her out so quickly to Mexico to Canada. Not but he doesn't he doesn't care and so now that you're super healthy three do you. Did you vaccinate your kids and Stafford like how do you feel about the American way of the way we treat our children and pumping bullet drugs not caught cure the actual cause? So you want me to be honest. Yeah Yeah please do so. My children never lied to a doctor. Wow I love that but now how do you get them to the school? Because I know she behaves like an emigrant because immigrants can't afford to go to the doctor and the kids. Some of them are very healthy. Why don't we go to one here to get the because I have a pre existing condition that so if your mom has with the neurologist Neurological issue I have My brother's child had reaction to vaccinations so He was he ended up having to take president he he was. I don't exactly know what happened to him but he had. This happened after he got some shots. And so I have never. I have never done that. And how do you go past that with the schools though because like I know that yeah they had to go to Dr to get this done but because I was because I have to admit in? There's a whole thing that you have to go through for medical exemptions and so and you got it because we have other yes no no no because a me so if your immediate family has anything neurological any type of Neurological issue but even would happen to your nephew. Yeah that's a pretty good and he lives in Canada No he lives here in America. Oh so both. Parents are doctors but So he was. I don't know what happened to him but I I think I wrote that down on the medical clearance but it was it mainly relates to your immediate family. So if there's a reason for your immediate family to to not directly for me I mean. There's a whole checklist of things from heart this to that but it was the immune issue that I had with Neurological the multiple schools. It's like top on the list. Do you have any symptoms of the Multiple Sclerosis? No but so when I I had a relapsing remitting line so it was a bad one but my eyes were pointing one left one right so they stayed like that. I had to put patches because I couldn't see that for. Did they get a picture of that? I'm gonNA take a picture. I I remember my sister taking a picture. Because she called the googly eyes. She's not the picture and then my mom took a picture of the eighteen staples in my neck. I would look in the mirror so she took a picture but I don't. I haven't seen those pictures. Those would be fantasy. They would be fun to see. Yeah we're both very sick people now. I am mentally. Yeah Wow Christine you've been you've been through so much it's just amazing so now that you're in America. Are you embarrassed to be here knowing that you should be in Canada and it should be a better government in that? It sucks here right now. That sounded like a statement. Not a question. Well I both contingency plan. Yes I love to hear that. Well I have a dog that bites people. I've met your German shepherd very scary. He's very scary. So think about it. Okay so I have this envision of the apocalypse happening and I have to walk back to Canada. You'RE GONNA walk back to how we're going to sleep is my dog is. I'M GONNA have my dog. We're going to sleep and the dog will guard you. He's got a sixth sense. Well let let's hope nobody has a gun to shoot your door. America is over. It's also he's yeah. I call him apocalypse dog but he he's ready to go. I've met him. Yeah he's he's a scary dawn so in conclusion. What you WanNa tell our listeners that there is hope and you can cure yourself and your juices phenomenal. Go buy it. Well you know what right now? It's on the market because that's a whole other story with Amazon coming in and all the businesses scattering and the whole industry falling apart and organic. Nobody knows this but the whole organic industries in trouble. Why because Amazon a sick Walmart come in a small town fucking Amazon with the HAL? What are they doing their shopping? Everything will they turn whole foods? I mean it was super. Pm Story they just turned it into COSCO. I don't know if I can agree with that. I'm still shopping there. It doesn't seem at all like Moscow. I walk at your manufacture manufacture. Basically make nothing so the only prophet that's being made as is on them. Oh I get it. I get so the Walmart kind of thing. Yeah so if you're trying to sell products into their first of all they used to a local program where they would Really take some businesses and then help them grow right. I remember now if you want to get in there. You're opening up your books and showing them twenty. Three percent of your sale at seventy six percent of your sales are coming from other retailers. Now does the same thing as Costco. You have to. You have to open up your financial so that they before you could. You could go in there and support it. Eighty percent of we were in who two hundred stores but it it as a small business that was that was the way to get in right and you can't you can't do it anymore. So you are your dreams. Not being sold their right now can you? Are you sewing them over line? Oh we're going to. We're going to start up operations again but the whole four manufacturers ahead my putting went bankrupt with Mike wittment production so it's been four years of chasing equipment so the whole industry crippled when this happened. So that's why you have this dog. Is it possible for you? Adopt Leland denies that we can go with you to Canada. Yeah let's chew as you're GONNA go stay there. I have an empty house. There's food there. Oh Yeah we should be near skiing her. Well it's the Tundra so you can see the polar bears are you serious. There's polar bears in Canada. I had no clue the biggest issue. I had no idea when I think in Canada. I think of like Niagara Falls and that's about it or like the mountains. The police. I think my husband was one of them. I remember I met him. He's a big burly guy. Okay so Christina. Thank you for all the information you've given us. Welcome to America and I will write trump a letter not to deport. You know he can't. I have five years now. Yeah I mean they can pull it back. They can pull back anytime time or whatever he wants and get away with it secrecy again. Good luck with everything. Thank you thank you so much. All right bye. Join US every week for entertaining informational time. And if you WANNA suggested topic for our show or just want to know more about us go to our website. Www DOT an American conversation podcast DOT COM and common to way. We will try to respond as soon as possible. And don't forget to follow us on twitter facebook and Instagram. And subscribe to our podcast.

America Canada cancer Christopher Christina Us cancer apple Leland Rose David thyroid cancer soccer Chemistry Right Chemistry Amazon Mexico Texas Christine Christine Toronto Ukraine Mata
Tim Keller's cancer update: Hopeful lessons in hard places

The Daily Article

08:52 min | Last month

Tim Keller's cancer update: Hopeful lessons in hard places

"This is the daily article podcast published by denison forum or culture changing christians to receive the daily article directly to your email inbox. Week day morning. Visit the daily article dot com. Now here's today's news. Discerned differently in romans. Twelve to the apostle paul road do not be conformed to this world but be transformed by the renewal of your mind that by testing you may discern what is the will of god what is good and acceptable and perfect. One way to renew. Your mind is to dive into what the bible says about certain topics. That's why we've just released our latest volume of our perennially popular series biblical insight to tough questions which you may request right now at daily article dot org within its pages we'll seek biblical answers to ten relevant questions. Such as is lent relevant for all christians if my church shifts an unbuilt direction what should i do. Is it ever okay for christian to gamble. May the insights in volume seven. Encourage you in your walk with the lord and inspire you to change the culture around you for his glory. Please request your copy of volume seven today at daily article dot org Bestselling author and pastor. Tim keller recently shared an update on his battle with pancreatic cancer as result of the prayers of many and his chemotherapy treatments. He has seen a significant decrease in the size and number of tumors he stated. I still have cancer but this is excellent news and added what the future holds. I do not know but we will continue to trust his plan and allow him to shepherd us his chosen path keller especially learned to trust god and hard places when he was battling thyroid cancer. A few years ago he explained it was both an intellectual and emotional experience. You're facing death. You were not sure. You're going to get over the cancer and the rigorous intellectual process of going through all the alternative explanations for how the christian church started except the resurrection. None of them are even tenable. It was quite an experience that experience inspired his bestseller. The reason for god belief in an age of skepticism enabling millions of people to profit from his pain and make his hope their own. We can learn from the pain of others or we can ignore it to our loss. Vowing former president trump's impeachment by the house and acquittal by the senate fifty eight percent of americans say he should have been convicted. This number reflects the sharp partisan divide in our nation. Eighty eight percent of democrats agreed as did only fourteen percent of republicans people in other countries. Probably watch news of the proceedings with the same detachment watched the political travails other countries. Brexit for instance was of passing interest to me but compellingly. Urgent to the british. By contrast the below zero temperatures. We are battling in. Taxes are undoubtedly more urgent for me than for those in the uk. It is human nature to care less about problems that don't affect us than those that do in reading through the book of job. I recently found this remarkable observation in job. Twelve five in the thought of one who is at ease. Their is contempt for misfortune. This is true of us all however if we failed to learn from the challenges of others we are far more likely to fail when we meet similar challenges ourselves the verse. We just cited continues to warn us that misfortune is ready for those whose feet slip. No exceptions or qualifications are noted. This fact is especially relevant in light of the unfolding scandal involving ravi zacharias and the ministry. He founded yesterday. We identified three ways. We should respond personally to disclosures that. The world famous apologised engaged in horrific acts of sexual abuse. Today let's focus. On a key lesson we need to learn for the sake of our churches ministries and cultural influence. We must respond immediately and objectively to claims of impropriety. David french is article at french. Press dot the dispatch dot com on ravi zacharias international ministries and its response to allegations against their founder is heartbreaking it. It describes a pattern of denial on the part of the board and other ministry leaders. At times those who sought to investigate charges against zachariah were reportedly sized and marginalized tragically. Such a response is rising zachariah said built an international reputation for brilliant sent integrity. Those who felt they knew him best deceive themselves into believing that they knew him. Better than those who brought allegations against him. We have seen the same pattern repeated in churches and ministries across denominational lines and around the world. This is why jesus four stage prescription for resolving conflict is so vital. The following verses are from matthew eighteen fifteen through seventeen. I if your brother's sins against you go and tell him his fault between you and him alone. We are not permitted to speak about people before we speak to them. When we become aware of an issue we are to go directly to the person second if he does not listen. Take one or two others along with you. That every charge may be established by the evidence of two or three witnesses. The step requires investigation by objective. Parties and must be thorough third. If he refuses to listen to them tell it to the church. This step requires public exposure of the issue and to call for repentance and resolution for if he refuses to listen even to the church let him be to you as a gentile and a tax collector. This step requires excluding the person from the church or ministry. Let's apply jesus's prescription by asking some practical questions. Does your church or ministry have assistant whereby employees and others can safely report allegations of abuse or other. Improprieties are the electronic devices of your leaders and employees opened a screening. At any time. This was a major problem with our z. I m i recommend covenant is accountability. It is important that your church our ministry utilize the system for transparency. What commitments to personal integrity do you require of your leaders. For example are they permitted to be alone with a person who is not their spouse or family are their calendars accountable to others. Is someone in your church ministry holding leaders accountable for personal integrity as the great howard hendricks warned sin thrives in isolation mark termine. Our senior fellow for leadership recommends giving the leaders of your church permission to interview the pastor's spouse two or three times a year regarding the pastors health these and other regular steps are vital for leaders and those they lead are your leaders accountable and transparent with regard to their use of ministry funds. Travel personal finances are your church. Our ministry members praying regularly for the spiritual health of their leaders. I often note that. God redeems all. He allows one way he wants to redeem the ravi. Zacharias scandal is by using it to lead churches and ministries around the world to greater accountability and integrity. But the time to act is now wants a scandal rhop's it will be too late to prevent it. Let's close with this declaration by the psalmist to the king of his day from psalm. Forty five seven you have loved righteousness and hated wickedness. Therefore god your god has anointed you with the oil of gladness beyond your companions may christians everywhere be able to say the same of their leaders to the glory of god. If you like what you heard please leave a rating and review for the podcast. Thank you for listening to the daily podcast today.

denison forum ravi zacharias Tim keller zachariah cancer thyroid cancer pancreatic cancer tumors keller David french trump senate uk howard hendricks mark termine matthew jesus
Nuclear and renewables or nuclear or renewables?

The Science Show

20:23 min | 2 years ago

Nuclear and renewables or nuclear or renewables?

"One of the few politicians calling at nuclear power in strata is now in the New South Wales upheld around the clock by slide pal is our best insurance policy against blackouts two ways of treating this through nuclear power and or called fire stations across the country nuclear is ban while call is being run out of the market through the subsidies targets and special deals being offered during you will energy Mark Latham, giving his maiden speech in the New South Wales parliament, but there are problems. The sound of change the lives of people in fish EBA forever on the eleventh of March. Twenty eleven earthquake struck northeastern Japan. The full was circ-, right? The country's largest island on shoe. Was it self forced two point four meters to the east? And so in this shaky and violence on show, we show, visit earthquakes assists, the present state of nuclear fission for power and meet vice chancellor, who wants was brave germ weapons inspector. And so to the nuclear option hardly mentioned during the election campaign accepted. Dismiss it in the case of the prime minister Scott Morrison, a couple of weeks ago. So where are we now? The sound the change the lives of people in Finnish EBA forever on the eleventh of March. Twenty eleven earthquake struck northeastern Japan. The full was so great. The country's largest island on shoe was at self forced two point four meters to the east. The joke triggered a series of powerful Sonam e waves that batter Japan's eastern coastlines seawater cert- despire as ten kilometers inland, and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, shutdown, causing the reactor to go into meltdown. Coming on hundreds day, as Japan is rocked officials in Japan, say up to three hundred bodies have been found after Sonam e caused by massive earthquake hit the northern coastal. Pan is used to earthquakes, but never before has seen one like this. The news just kept getting worse. The Fukushima nuclear power plant was unable to cool down. One of its reactors without power. It's water pumps now, radioactive steam may have to be released to relieve. The pressure building up inside part of a report from the BBC World Service. So what are the negatives? I asked famed anti nuclear campaigner Helen carte to look at a book by leading environmental writer, Fred Pierce, and these are some of her conclusions in his book fallout. Fred Pearce, details, visit Stitcher noble Fukushima and Cilla field. All of which experienced nuclear, reactor accidents, resulting in huge numbers of people being radiated peers notes that the exclusion zone around, and I will team with wildlife reassuring himself that intense radiation exposure has done little harm. He then questions, the ground. Breaking work of notion. Evolutionary, biologist, Tim Musso, who's spent years. Examining, the wildlife around Fukushima inch noble bond, swallows have smaller than normal brains. Forty percent of males or sterile, mutational EDNA melodies abound, and many have tumors and cataracts, Fukushima, piss, once again, downplays any medical ramifications of this, dreadful, extant, claiming quotes, nobody seems to have died as a direct result of the accident in quotes, the Ernie malignancy being Emond is thyroid cancer in people under the age of eighteen at the time of the accident. Currently one hundred ninety six of the disease and some have metastasized, however all cancers can be induced by radiation, Japanese doctors have been warned not to inform patients at the onus is could be radiation, related or they risk losing government funding, Pierce devotes, a whole chapter questioning the gnomes establish. By the biological effects of radiation report commissioned by the American Academy sciences, which states that no radiation is safe. Instead, he courts from well known pro-nuclear people an ends by rushing. I've come to believe that the threshold argument makes little seats. He's a good journalist, but doesn't understand the internationally accepted tenants of radio biology, nor does he seem to understand the pathogenic affixed internal images nor the latest period of carcinogenesis, which reigns of four to eight years post exposures, then Pierce deals with a legacy of nuclear waste in two thousand seventeen hundred sixty commercial reactors were closed while four hundred forty nine was still operating decommissioning or dismembering, a single reactor building produces, sixty thousand tons of radioactive waste and cost two point six billion dollars. Britain's Sellafield site alone contains. Two hundred forty highly radioactive buildings. Huge leaking pools full of dangerous sludge, in high level waste giant tanks full of hot liquid radioactive waste requiring constant cooling, and one hundred thirty tonnes of turning dioxide, currently increasing by four tons yielding, the US owns over one hundred tons of plutonium, and ninety thousand tonnes of spent reactor fuel Pierce described similar punish situations, Germany, France. And of course, Japan, according to the US, EPA high-level waste must be stored. Isolated from the ecosphere for one million years. The human and physical impossibility. Radioactive elements will inevitably leak and concentrate in the buzz over time. Thereby inducing epidemics of cancer, leukemia and fetal deformities in all living species, yet, the nuclear industry persists making more ways while claiming nuclear power. Z answer, the global warming, small modular, reactors of a latest wit dream, as typical design is prison, which consists of three blocks of three small reactors connected to a single turbine generator buried underground the nine reactor modules will be upgraded from only one control room to be fully automated, stuffed with only three operators. Experienced nuclear engineers have noted that one operator could similar Tiny's be faced by Kessous trophic situation. Triggered by an offside powerless in a unit at full power in another shutdown for refueling and one in start up mode, these reactors will require. No containment Vissel, fire alums, or radiation monitoring few attorney, and cool by liquid sodium, which is highly reactive, if the liquid sodium boils leaks, and explosion could be treated in the petroleum fuel spreading casting. Degen's foreign wide. The fuel will be fashioned using Tony from decommissioned, bombs, or reprocessed fuel, of course, these so-called fast reactors will produce high level waste themselves the nuclear industry claims that this variety of reactors us into be cheap because they turn key. Reactors prefabricated of site, however, to be commercially viable affecting must initially have forty seventy orders and few so far have been ordered in this day and age of unrestrained global warming with renewable energy, far surpassing, Colin nucle- in cost reliability and safety. Why does the nuclear priesthood persist in its dedication to all things nuclear, I wonder case, the opposition Helen code trained Metson in Adelaide university taught at Harvard and now lives on the use. Well, south coast back to the BBC, hundreds of thousands of buildings were destroy. Droid and reconstruction is still ongoing the World Bank estimates, the total economic cost of the disaster could reach two hundred thirty five billion dollars making it the costliest, natural disaster in human history. The Sonam e disabled the power supply to three of Fukushima nuclear reactors stopping the vital cooling process and causing a meltdown more than one hundred thousand people were evacuated from the surrounding towns and villages. And where does that leave nuclear energy in Japan because a lotta people looked at his accident, and soared as a reason not to pursue nuclear energy and are the reactors in Japan have mostly been switched off to people want to leave it behind now given what happened in twenty eleven anybody in Fukushima prefecture wants the country to go back to nuclear energy? Again, there are definitely a lot of investments being made into using renewable energy sources to produce energy and forgive him. I think that's definitely the mindset. I think Japan is a whole definitely also realizes that it may be too soon to completely switch to non-nuclear sources for energy, so they do have to be some of the nuclear power plants when I am McMichael bear. So where does the Fukushima disaster leave us when it comes to the use of nuclear energy? He is how the technology was viewed when it was introduced back in nineteen fifty six. History is made at the first lunch Gail nuclear power station in the world. It knocks the birth of a new industrial revolution in which Britain is taking leave. Fast forward to today, and their currently four hundred forty seven nuclear reactors operating across the world in some countries in western Europe, nuclear power is being phased out while in other parts of the world, like China, nuclear energy is being rapidly expanded. In fact, fifty five new plants under construction weld wide. Let's hear from one country where nuclear power is being switched off forever in twenty twenty two. Joe line is a member of the European parliament for Germany, the initiative limb to go up to sixty five percent. Renewable energies in the over all energy consumption by twenty thirty Riano thirty eight percent of renewables. So there's a long way to go to the end of next Kate, and in between it's true that we use coal and Gus suggestion is phasing nuclear power out. But in other parts of Europe, it's very much. Static isn't it? Some countries are not increasing the number of reactors. They have but they're not decommissioning them either. Of course, there's a huge capital investment in a nuclear politician, and nobody wants to give up easily investment. And of course, the profits made by nuclear stations. But you're right is a stagnation is hardly countries that still invest. It's in Britain, one power station in Finland and Francis more or less replacing old ones against the one or the other new one so you could see nuclear power. It's not really increasing. Where is the renewable here by year? Increasing a lot investments in renewables are much higher than in any other energy source, try line. And he's a member of the European parliament with the BBC's, Vivian Lewis, professor berry brook, the university of Tasmania in Hobart has long supported the nuclear option. But even he says. It's a long way off. I think there's a good chance at nuclear is an option in the long term, but not in short ministry. Leah simply because time taken to prepare the ground, not just physically for the infrastructure. But it of getting public support and political support is a long term goal and probably more than a decade away, at least, but you think in terms of climate change and doing its bit. There was part of a number of different sorts of responses, it has a place that definitely because it provides a zero Carbonell tentative to call and what the renewable energy sources like solar and wind offer is that by slowed literacy, which is sometimes dismissed as being relevant. But it is really important and provides a stable on the pinning to the grid. So I think that's nuclear role, whether it can do more than that, or not is really a matter of politics economics. It certainly could do the whole job. But it could also work as part of an energy meets quite effectively to sorts of nuclear power station now off. After charitable terro fashion weird and for Shema and Sellafield, which, again was pretty ancient reactors. You mentioned actually quite diverse tonight, but was very different reacted to fish. For example, the ones that are built today or even nine hundred seventies in western countries court lightwater, reactors heavy-water, actors at popular in places like India and Canada. I think the more useful distinction today is between lodge monolithic, reactors, and small modular reactors, the land of being an alternative that could be much cheaper, certainly power plant, because they much smaller, and therefore potentially faster to deploy and could be more convenient, because instead of requiring agreed load of many Kiko, what's your name, a few hundred megawatts even less? And so the Facebook much wider range of circumstances. Wouldn't you need a lot of them in a big country like, stralia ESP could also argue you need an awful lot of winter winds us all the penalty. So the smaller the output of a single generating unit the more, you're obviously going to Nate, but you can quite reasonably concentrate, the modules nine in power pox. So, for example, you could develop the infrastructure to house a dozen or even fifty of these modules at a single powerpack to produce large amounts of electricity from his single side, if that tweet desired key advantage, over them over lodge plan teas that as soon as you start to install modules. They can generate electricity. Whereas you've got to build the whole plant for lodge before anything comes out of it. So that delay can be a decade or more until even literacy where at least in theory this modular actors could be built in dropped into site taken from factory through Araya system to the site extremely rapidly. And what do they cost them? Well, they probably cost competitive with coal, however, that tasted small modular. Reactors have been used for many decades in the military where cost wasn't a particular consideration. But developing a commercial one that could be built in a factory enrolled out to customers as something number vendors a pursuing, but no one's yet. The closest is accompanied new scale in US, which are going through licensing with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and we speak, and should they complete that, then it will be the first market and the goal is to have it cheaper than coal. And that remains to be saying, but if that was the case, then that would become a very attractive option for country like dry the important, and what if you're Vilamoura, if you're terrorist, and you wanna blow them up, what would be the effect. Well, it would be very difficult to not only penetrate the perimeter of one of these power plants and get to their actor, but also to overcome the inherent safety systems that are built into them. An advantage of small modular directive is there are a lot of principles of physics that you can bring the bed to make them inherently Saif rather than Saif Judah engineered systems so they can be very. Difficult to disrupt and other advantage of small rectors on that can be buried on the grounds. I've imagine almost like a concrete bunker terrorists having the penetrate, though, would have an extremely difficult job terrorists have never been able to penetrate, any old nuclear reactor nuclear power plant to blow it up. And as would be much more difficult than that. So it seems unlikely probation as we said, you said, in the beginning that the interest is just at the moment in a stroll in politics and society, not very great. We've got Mark Latham wanting them Scott Morrison has said is not part of liberal policy. So do you wish it were acceptable, mole in a political sense? I do wish it was more acceptable. I think there any way nuclear will end up getting built in is if you have bipartisan support now that doesn't mean decided you'll get support of all parties, but really all you need is labor in the coalition to join the agree that this is a reasonable investment industry. These few trinity infrastructure and then it can. Happen. But I think that decision would have to be catalyzed by a number of other events haven't yet occurred, and the because of those will be if you can't build new co five power stations, because of public outcry, and that same probable if the cost of gas goes up such that they are in Faizabad for providing by slowed trinity. And if the combination of large-scale renewable principally wind and solar along ways some form of affective, energy storage proves to be economically or socially or environmentally unacceptable, coupled with an increasing threat of climate change, and potentially more impacts, more extreme events that combination could lead and political landscape change enough to support, I think some joint venture maybe between government and industry to build a future generation of nuclear power plants here. But again, in net framing, it's more likely to be attained on twenty prospect for his any excavation or concrete. Poured and such a project berry brook is. Professor at the university of Tasmania in Hobart, and finally back to the BBC don't often, what do you say the legacy of Kashima bang, nuclear power is quintessentially Elat twentieth, century technology, and it'll struggle to compete with the technological, economic and security advantages advances of the coming renewable. Evolution, let's not nuclear and renew its nuclear or renewables. Any economic professor weather so will tell you that the renewable evolution is here. Nuclear investment is falling fast, dropping by forty five percent in twenty seventeen. Don't what are the arguments for nuclear, then in a landscape where technology providing renewable energy sources is becoming cheaper and Milwaukee available for a starter would disagree when I think it is nuclear and renewables, if you look at countries have successfully decarbonised in the past Sweden Finland. France, the province Ontario, and Canada. They've done it by having a mix of nuclear and renewables, and in a time where we desperately need to reduce. Missions fast. I think you have to look at what is being proven what works and nuclear pounding with renewables, does work, if you want to do short term, he certainly not going to do nuclear. I mean nuclear ten years in the planning another ten plus potentially coming online, a nucleus, one of the slowest technology isn't coming online. You look at countries that do have an ongoing build program of nuclear power plants, then the average time for construction of those plants is just five years. It's not decades. Dr dove men, why do you think countries are increasingly spending on nuclear in some parts of the world? India, China if there are better alternatives that shape are already out there, even in China itself. Maneuvers enormously more cost competitive and are being built at phenomenally much greater rate than nuclear even in China itself, duct aqap, even if there's great success, the renewables in China. That's great. That's fabulous. But they are looking at including knickers well for. Their energy strategy. They haven't chosen one or the other they have gone for them all, I think that's a sensible proposition things the way we should be going worldwide nuclear influx in two thousand nineteen an option for the future. Perhaps, if there's time the side show on our N.

Japan Nuclear Regulatory Commission Britain Fukushima BBC China Fred Pierce Sonam Professor US Mark Latham Helen carte European parliament Scott Morrison thyroid cancer
Rebecca Esparza campaigns for Ovarian Cancer

Powerful Patient

30:37 min | 2 years ago

Rebecca Esparza campaigns for Ovarian Cancer

"Hello Dear France. It's time for another episode of the powerful patient on blog talk radio. I'm privileged today to be sitting in the control room by Myself Joyce, and Robin are both out on projects and involved in advocacy work. So they've kind of left me holding the microphone and. So, we're trying to do justice to to our guest today. About ten years ago. At the annual report that was issued by. Mb Anderson in Houston Texas. They said of guest. That she is a natural networker. Just give her cows that significantly touches her life, and she's there to volunteer her time and knowledge. I had a chance to meet my friend that The American, association. For Cancer Research Health Disparities Conference in New Orleans and two, thousand eighteen. And I'm totally impressed with what Rebecca is. In the field of ovarian cancer. So folks I would like for you to welcome Rebecca Esparza. From Texas Hello Rebecca thank you for being with us. Thank you for having me on your show and I know that you're involved with the most lethal form of cancer that affects a lot of ladies. it's it's really quite Quite profound because of of all the gynecologic cancers, it's it's more than wasteful than Than cervical. Or vaginal or over. And you're a survivor, a lot of people. Are Not, in condition to advocate for themselves, once they're diagnosed with ovarian cancer. So why don't you give us an overview of what the cancer is and how you got involved in it so much rebecca. Sure well, like you mentioned ovarian cancer is. extremely aggressive form of cancer and The the problem with ovarian cancer is that we don't have an early detection tool There is no one test like for instance, some people think PAP smear, we'll detect ovarian cancer and that's untrue. We don't have an early detection tool. So by the time, women start feeling symptoms and there are symptoms. by the time, we piece things together, and by the time some doctors put two and two together It's way too late and wants to catch this disease at such a late stage. It's much more difficult to treat. And That's why of the twenty thousand women that will be diagnosed every year about sixteen thousand dial very encounter every year. So our statistics are pretty grim. When you're when you're talking about the symptoms? Their their symptoms that can also be associated with other types of cancers, can't they and other type of CIO issues. There can be. Can Be so innocuous that You know sometimes you you. You want woman is not tired You know you there's lower back pain. There's irregular periods there's bloating after meals problem is that. Very few times do we put all of those symptoms together it's putting. Three or more of those types of symptoms together for a long period of time like six months if you have a female has three or more of those symptoms over six months period than it definitely something to alert your doctor about. Okay at the centre of Disease Control, website on ovarian cancer they actually have a diary to tracking you symptoms you notice, but they only do it for a two week time span. So that does really give you enough time to to accurately say, Hey, this is something I really need to be concerned with us it exactly exactly because like we mentioned earlier I mean what he knows not tired. So you put all those symptoms together for you know at even six weeks even for a six week period six to eight week period. If you've got all those symptoms all at one time it's definitely something to alert a doctor and let them know what's going on. The thing that I remind ladies and and then your your best advocate you know what is normal for your body you know what is not normal for your body if something is out of whack of something is different and what's happened in the past then you are the only person that can tell a doctor. Hey, this is different for me. This is not normal I have not experienced this before. So we need to check this out. Okay. So it's it's like with your personal case when you woke up and two, thousand one. And, you had a painting, your side, and it was serious. You went to the emergency room and when they discharged you, they gave you a diagnosis of depression and had a bottle of painkillers. That's how I treated you. And Accepted because you. Did it I went to my regular gynecologist that my my Gyn that had performed several. Surgeries on me before for for uterus fibroid tumors. And I went to him and I said, Hey, look I went to the ER. They said it was the. And they even did a ca when twenty five, which is is a tumor marker for Overall ovarian but it has lots of false negatives, false positives. It's not a very reliable marker for ovarian cancer but mine was normal in the ER. So I took all my records from the Er to my Gyn and he said. Well. I thought you in April and you'll look fine and now I'm seeing you and looks as if your. Three or four months pregnant. You're very big and concerned. The only thing I know of that goes this bath. Is Ovarian cancer and I. Just looked and I thought you're nuts I'm thirty years old there's no way I can have ovarian cancer. So we scheduled my surgery and You know I was under the impression that this is going to be a routine surgery to remove fiber tumors just like I'd had two other ones before. and. It was nothing like that. It was obviously not just fibroid tumors. But it was tumors on my ovary. One on one in particular and because it's spread to the air but local area, my doctor told the that he made a lifesaving decision to perform a radical hysterectomy despite the fact that I was only thirty years old and I had not had a chance to have children yet. So. Had you not taken that step? You wouldn't be with us today probably. I don't think so no. If I had just ignored the symptoms and thought well Oh, you know you know the difference but. I'm just GONNA keep trudging along if I had done nothing then yes. Absolutely. I would not have because if I had waited any longer then it would have been really really as it is when I was diagnosed had no health insurance. So, because I had no health insurance I had to wait about an extra forty days to start my chemo while I tried to navigate the social services system and figure out how to someone that doesn't have insurance get treated for cancer. And it says that it's a lot tougher than I had ever imagined and finally finally figured out how to do how to get done. But by the time I started my chemo. A good two months after the surgery knitted already spread. Liver lining up my stomach. So all of a sudden were stage for and it was much more grim than you know previously thought. and. You not only have a significant stage four cancer You had a very rare subtype of it too. Didn't you? Exactly I'm I had a form of ovarian cancer called germ cell and it's akin to to stickler cancer in men. And It's treated the same way as far as chemo we get the same chemo women that get germ cell ovarian get the same type, of Chemo, as men that get to stick your cancer and we're usually treated with Leo my skin eight Topa side insists Klatten, a caught BP. And, of all ovarian cancer ovarian cancer itself is rare like we had said earlier twenty thousand women a year. So of those twenty thousand, only three to five percent of all cancer is my specific type of ovarian cancer called germ. So so you have a rare cancer already and then you have a rare subtype. And at age of thirty at diagnosed US and. Yeah I'm sitting here wondering why didn't I play the lottery because that those are pretty astronomical. It happened and their their showroom areas in the country. Hoyer ovarian cancer is more pronounced than others such as the northeast in Texas is not as it is not as common per one hundred thousand cases as it is in the northeast is or their risk factors in that area of the country that make it more prominent or the you know reason wanted would have it more up there. You know I'm not sure I have not had a particular statistic. The only thing I can think of is that there is People of Oshkosh nause Jewish descent. Have A genetic predisposition to get ovarian cancer in particular. So I don't know if that might be the tie in there but I I do not know anything environmental or anything like that. That's linked to ovarian cancer. Okay. Now. With with all this you and your family still hand to have a little bit of a sense of humor about Thanksgiving you sided something that your dad said one day on the chemotherapy treatment could could you relate that to us? Sure Fair. Well. I had chemo in the wintertime and even though we're in Texas, we still had our a rare cold they. It must have been in the thirties outside and that was ball. and I was freezing cold already already cold the church I didn't want to go to chemo and I was in bed and I was comfortable in warm and toasty and my dad said Ono you're going to chemo and I said. I don't want to go to Chemo today and he said Oh no, you're going. Fall an hour later here I am in the car on the way to the hospital. My Dad's driving me. I've this bald head I'm sick I'm Cole I just shaving my just shaved my head. and I was kind of still embarrassed about it and you know I didn't want people to see me and I hadn't gotten away yet and All those factors I'm crying I'm bawling my eyes out in the passenger seat next to my dad and I told my dad, I'm going to be late in the nurse. She gets upset when we're late and I I just don't go to can't. We just go tomorrow one, one chemo's GonNa make that much difference in my dad's like. Oh, just tell her you couldn't do anything with your hair. And I I that made it worse sounds like dad. Crying and falling and being dramatic, and so we get into the the hospital and I check in I see the nurse and kind of looks grumpily at me like you're an hour late. And and I I looked at her I looked at my dad and I said I'm just GonNa go ahead and tell her what he told me to tell her and I said I'm sorry emily I just couldn't do anything with my hair and then she looked at me. She looked at my dad looked at me and was like. Oh. You just laughed and laughed and I was like it actually worked I cannot believe it worked. So Dad. That always newbath. God bless him. God blessing that is so good and I think we I think we've got a pitcher someplace of you with that beautiful smile of yours in that shining. That shining hair. So we'll we'll see if we can put that on the website. I'll make sure I know it's your pitcher I ran across it someplace in doing some research. So if we've got it, we'll we'll get that put up. A minute and then my favorite picture and the whole world. It has my dad in it too and my fiance Robert that they both shave their heads for me. That is so good. So we'll make sure we identified properly I don't want I don't want anybody to misunderstand you for Robert or anything. You. have. You have certainly done a lot of things I know you mentioned the healthcare issue you have become an advocate for insurance and and for making sure that underinsured people can get coverage. You've done a lot of things you WanNa talk about some of the things you've done. In that area, as well as the congressionally directed medical research program just feel free because we've got to. We've got about looks like. How much time we got live we got enough time to talk about that. Sure absolutely. well. Basically. I think it's a travesty that today you know what? Eighteen years later after my diagnosis in two thousand one that we have the same issues even if not even worse, maybe it's worse now as far as insurance coverage about people that are uninsured or underinsured people that are working class people that have fulltime jobs sometimes. A fulltime job and side jobs. And they still are uninsured. I. I know Small Business Owners that are uninsured but do not have health insurance because they can simply cannot afford a thousand dollars a month for health insurance. And to me that's. That's beyond the travesty. We're the richest nation in the entire world and our people are dying. Our people are dying at home thinking that there's nothing else to do because they can't afford the treatment. And they can't afford medicines. they sometimes, they have to do oral chemotherapy and There's disparity on health insurance are some health insurance companies don't WANNA cover oral because they want the intervene. Yes. They want you to go into the hospital. So some oral chemotherapies aren't covered. And we're having three thousand dollars out of pocket payments that are have to be met or out of pocket deductibles or you know as far as because the prescription versus intravenous and all these health disparities that people have to overcome and it. It's unfair and unjust. In I want to make sure that whatever I could do to talk to our legislators about these disparities that exist especially in my hometown of Corpus, Christi? Texas, which is predominantly Hispanic, and as a Culture Hispanic has historically not wanted to rock the boat not wanted to speak out about these types of injustices They feel like I you know doctors always know best and if the doctor says, he's not going to cover this because my insurance and well, he knows what? He has my best interests at heart. And it shouldn't always be because of money everything shouldn't always hinge on money. And I willing to make the effort and take the time out of my personal schedule to make sure that our legislators Little Hill in Washington DC as well as our state legislators Austin know that there are people in my hometown that are dying because they don't have access to care. And they may not be able to get on a plane to go to DC. But as long as I'm able to I, will make that extra effort because it's important to me to be their advocate as well as continuing to be my own best advocate because I'm not out of the woods yet I may be any survivor over encounter, but it could always come back my days are promised. I've learned that early on every day. I wake up. I'm very blessed to be able to you know be able to open my eyes and get out of bed and on my own and be able to drive myself around and do things for my own but I. I'm not naive enough to think that tomorrow it won't be completely different and I may not have that ability. So I'm doing this just as much as for myself as my family, my sister, my sons who will someday have children of their own and It's something that it's extremely important to me to make sure that we continue to have access to care because unfortunately again, people people are still. Staying at home and when they're told, no, they accept it and then. then. They've gone. That's that is a real tragedy. Isn't it and we have a lot of people that are diagnosed with cancer and the doctor says, we've got it all and they walk out of the the exam room and they just go on with their life and and just try to just put all this behind him not realizing their risk for some other recurrence. and and so they they miss the opportunities to. Not. Necessarily love the diagnosis they have but two invoices situation and try to be proactive about it. Don't they. Exactly exactly, and especially when you think about my situation, I've got a second cancer in two thousand, eight of the thyroid, some two time cancer survivor both diagnosed under the age of forty which I've been told my doctor at MD Anderson that. I'm at higher risk forgetting other cancers in my future. So at this point, I'm forty seven years old and I'm thankful of how to third cancer but again. I'm not you know I'm not naive enough to think. I'm never get cancer again and and you know cancer out of my life and I don't have to think about it again. Even if I wasn't doing all this advocacy you know cancer advocacy awareness and legislative advocacy and DC. I I have some friends that tell me. Well, you think about cancer too much and if you think about it too much going to come back. And I'm thinking guess what if I wasn't doing all this cancer advocacy stuff I would think about cancer. So. Might as well. Do something positive with that. You know and. Try to help other people and in that same vein. That's a great point and and you know it's like me personally I'm a twenty two year survivor long long term just like you are and even though I think about it. And I realized that that my situation you know next year, I might not be here because this thing could erupt in take me out of here just almost. In a hurry but. Just, because we talk about it and we work in, it doesn't mean that we're possessed with a fear that something is. Going to go on because. When you're when you're involved in advocacy it, it takes some of the fear and the unknowns out of it doesn't it? Next at yes to a certain extent. Yeah, and like I like I mentioned just because I'm talking about it all the time doesn't mean I'm encouraging it to grow in my body or I'm thinking about it so. Therefore it's going to happen, and if I wasn't talking about it or I wasn't involved in all this cancer advocacy stuff and then that would make it they away or Guess what. If I was not doing anything cancer advocacy I would still be thinking about it. I'd be still wondering off that. In my back. I wonder if that something or my head hurts weird way today I wonder if that something. I always be thinking in the back of my mind. So why not switch to something positive. That that is so good. We're talking with Rebecca. From Texas she doesn't ovarian cancer survivor as well as a thyroid cancer survivor and the American cancer. Society tells us that about twenty, two, thousand, five, hundred women will receive a new diagnosis of ovarian cancer in two thousand nineteen. About thirteen thousand, nine, hundred eighty women will die from ovarian cancer. There's no early detection for this particular type of aggressive cancer and. There there are some things that's this happening in this and I know that Rebecca's not really really up on this This topic I'm about to introduce just a minute and I'm not even but the article appeared yesterday in the New England Journal of Medicine. This was February, the twenty eight that they're they're talking about this article that appeared a in the February twenty seventh article. that says limp deck to me doesn't up the survival in advanced ovarian cancer and so. They're going to start to reduce the number of lymph nodes as they remove that that don't appear to have any kind of malignancy or involvement in the cancer, and it's going to make the surgery a little easier to tolerate. Hopefully, it'll. It'll have less complications. And? That's a good thing. Isn't it? Rebecca? That's an amazing stride and Let me say it all goes back to cancer research and this all goes back to why we continue to go hill and lobby our legislators for an increase to cancer research because cancer research save lives bottom line it's phase lies not only the newly diagnosed but long-term cancer survivors like you and I cancer research is my only hope basically. you know MB Anderson. By you know for my doctors back home they said you will probably get cancer again. So you know cancer research will end up probably saving my life again. So research studies like this that basically address. This particular study that you mentioned is addressing survivorship issues too because by losing a lot of lymph nodes and I just happened to me during the surgery and my thyroid cancer surgery. Lost a lot of lymph nodes in my thyroid cancer surgery and my neck, and it causes swelling. It causes it's very uncomfortable. Lymph nodes are there to protect your body and when you lose them, you lose a certain amount of protection and your immunity is weekend you know you see you might have seen some breast cancer survivors wearing sleeves on their arms because they lost a lot of lymph nodes. you when you lose a lot of lymph nodes, it causes dramatic swelling and it's painful and it's it's very, very, very hurtful and if we could avoid some of that on some of our cancer survivors, then we're GONNA increase people surviving longer with cancer. We've already seen that, but we can't have any of this without cancer research. That is so true and you're a reviewer for the congressionally directed cancer research for the MARCI. Exactly, exactly. I review research studies for different cancer facilities across the country about different studies that they want to undertake and I give my perspective as a cancer survivor saying you know this one might be a really good one or this other one might be a really good one and You know they they really the research is really take what we do to heart as far as survivors and our opinions are very very greatly appreciated and it's really Amazing to sit there around the table with these world renowned cancer researchers who are also making decisions about what research to fund with very limited money man ad for cancer for ovarian cancer. The these are specific to ovarian cancer that I'm reviewing, and so we don't get a whole lot of research federal funding for Ovarian Cancer Research. So it is an amazing opportunity and I'm very very blessed and honored to to be able to give my opinion on that type on on that. We're we're. We're glad you're reviewer on that out I am a firm believer in the congressionally directed medical research program and the opportunities that that regular everyday survivor such as you back and can be involved in that. We've got just a couple of minutes away after Rebecca. Fact less than a minute and a half. Can you sum up some of your thoughts today for where audience? Sure. Well I. Just want to really reiterate how important it is to be your own best advocate No one knows your body like do so a few find symptoms but are off or you're feeling particularly tired it doesn't hurt at all to go to your general practitioner and find out maybe there's something off maybe you know not everybody has a diagnosis of cancer maybe something else maybe it's something vitamin deficiency or something like that. So it, it can't hurt something's different. Go get checked out. That is good. We have certainly enjoyed having a chance to just sit down and talk. To you about this Rebecca you you are a blessing that inspiration I certainly applaud I certainly I certainly applaud your efforts and. After after meeting you and talking to you and then having a chance to talk to you again today. I can underscore what they said about ten years ago at MD Anderson. You. GotTa Calls It that touches your life, and you're there to volunteer your time and knowledge and we appreciate you doing that. Folks. that. I'm sure that you'll enjoy looking up some of Rebecca because. endeavors as you look on the powerful patient website and look at some of the links that would have provided. Rebecca thank you so much. We'd love to get you back on again and in another episode of the powerful patient. Thank you.

ovarian cancer cancer thyroid cancer Texas Ovarian Cancer Research Rebecca Esparza chemo New Orleans Anderson MD Anderson DC Houston France depression US Joyce bloating
Happy Valentits Day (with Felicia Day)

We're No Doctors

1:01:53 hr | 2 years ago

Happy Valentits Day (with Felicia Day)

"It's a Buddhist show. Are we on are we by the way? I don't know why I always have to introduce the gas because when they click on the well people probably like who's this bitch. No, everyone knows who your fact this'll probably be a very successful episode who knows downloads, and you're like land does Slann landslide. Gosh that was a clunker Nolan knows this is going to be out of the park. Well, I love I was raised by hypochondria hypochondriac who thought she she is who thinks she's a doctor therefore, she'll never go to the doctor. Therefore, I'll never have to they're in the hospital. She just diner house because it's like, I know better and my dad's a doctor. So I grew up like on my twenty first birthday. I'll never forget this. I had a party and my dad was in the corner showing people graphic pictures of him doing liposuction on people while people were eating spaghetti. So people just kind of like stop by and say, hey, and they'd be like, oh, so like I just rate was raised with just like human meat. You're not a hypochondriac. I. Oh, yeah. When I get an exact I'm really anxious right now because I'm doing a I'm doing I'm on a book deadline, so I filled with things -iety, and I can't sleep, and then that just sort of feedings IT more, and then I just in convince uterine cancer or have an aneurysm starting like something's wrong with me. And so I I will be convinced that I'm dying very easily when I'm anxious. I think that's the having parents in or at least one parent in the medical field. Because my my dad who was an anesthesiologist always had medical books and magazines. He would always ask me if I wanted to go watch a surgery. Yeah. I I was a kid, and I was like not no did you. I never did. Until I went to my dad was in the military, a military, doctor, and he they had these I don't know if they still do, but they had these sort of charity missions, this was predating operations mile where they absolutely yeah. So they would send. Their doctors to the countries to do surgery in the field to sort of like triage training. But at the same time, they'd be doing cleft palates and burn revisions SO. I thought that was really interesting, and I was really bored actor about ten years ago before I started doing web stuff, and I went down, and I did a documentary filmed everything myself, and then the next year I went back and tried to track down the people and it was the Mila nowhere Honduras. So and I just remember the smell of that hospital in, and I would just go in there, and film, everything they did it was really easy to watch the surgery just through the lens like through the viewfinder of the camera and the nights. That's okay. But yes, so I saw a lot of surgery, then is is something that people can actually view. I've never released it. I don't know why you got to. I know I interviewed my dad, you know. Yeah. I interviewed all these doctors. And I got really I mean I submitted. It's like an hour long. It was like when you went back. Did you find the people I could find some of them like none of them had shoes or phones or anything? So. But some of the guides helped me track down several of the people there was this little girl that I'll never forget. She just lived in the hospital because somebody abandoned her, and I swear have been a little older. I would have just adopted this kid she's got sent to an orphanage later, and I couldn't track her down. But yeah, there's there were all these kids just living in the hospital because they just got abandoned. It was so sad. How long ago was this? This was a long time ago. Actually, this was like probably two thousand two or three God, even it'd be interesting also to go back now. And if you to see what I mean who knows though. That would be a great documentary. I would love to see full length like a person should make of it marry. Fifty two minute documentary. It's really well edited though. I mean, the editor is great I shot it. I've I really should just be behind the camera. You have salute. You was your dad, but your dad was not a hypochondriac right now. My dad never they're like, oh, unless it's like literally hanging by a piece of skin just like just patch it up. No, he they don't care. I remember my dad was in the backyard one day this this was like in the eighties. I was like super young. And he was he had one of those electric hedge trimmers looks like a chainsaw. Yeah. And he was on a ladder. Like, trimming the head and slipped. He dropped the chainsaw. And it almost finger all the way off, and he just went into the house into the kitchen and just wrapped like a paper towel around it. And my mom was like what the fuck are you doing you got to go to the hospital like, I don't he's like, no, it's fine. And she's like, no. And like when whenever I would get injured I had multiple use a kid. I would have to get stitches among times he would. Always just do it in the kitchen he'd be he'd get a needle and thread Kane, and he would just inject me. And then like on the kitchen table, just give us stitches and stuff. I mean, what's wrong with that? That's probably what I do too. I was like all right. Yeah. You got a skill set when I'm ten I'm not like dad, you really should take me to the hot. I was just like. I was just like this is this is how everyone's parents. Do it. Right. Exactly. It's all you need. I mean who wants to go the I mean, I don't like going because every time I go to my little experience with doctors. I mean going to hospitals is like you're going to die. They're more from something else. You get there than this than doing it. I mean, that's what the statistics say too, right? More but very risky, especially now, it's like whenever they can do a surgery as an outpatient procedure. Yes, they always don't want people staying in the high torture because they're required. Check on you ever to three hours. So when I was in the hospital with the baby I stay five days or four days or something like that. Because see section and like you don't get sleep. You don't not sleep like a week keep coming to give you pills vitals. And then. Yeah. I almost quit that was that was the worst. I almost went crazy there were crazy nurses to. They would just come in at all hours and squeeze your breasts, and I'm like what is going on here. Just pumping. Don't worry. Yeah. They. Mersa which is you know, the flesh eating bacteria, which is antibiotic basically antibiotic resistant anybody right now. Yeah, it's a huge problem in hospitals. That's one of the main reasons they want to get you out of there. And my dad when he was dying was in the hospital for. You know, basically pneumonia and then like congestive heart failure. But while he was in the hospital. He got Mersa like on his fucking foot. It's like. So how the fuck did that happen? He's literally been laying in a bed in a room by himself. How does he now have a flesh eating bacteria on his foot? So yeah, I'm more than happy. Like when I had my kidney stone surgery. They're like you come in not even to a hospital. They go you go to a surgery center. And it was like you are secluded. Yeah. They put you to sleep you wake up there. They're like get the fuck outta here. Well, I've got I've had a couple of dos copies to an horrible acid reflux said it'd be like did you wear a hole in your Salva, guess or not? I didn't. I mean almost. Holsters? I know I have horrible reflex. And I think it's all anxiety. I mean, it's partially diet. I could go listen you want to do an hour special. Just my acid reflux. We could talk talk about acid reflux really days. This is a good podcast. And this guy can I tell you. I've been on the Kito diet we were talking before Diana's. Actually, he does stands for Keita genyk, and it's short for Keita genyk, and it's a diet that's high in protein and low in carbohydrates for lunch. Better chocolate cupcake from down the street, really good, actually. That sounds delightful. I need Valentine's Day, happy Valentine's Day. Know what the side is. Because I need to lose about ten pounds. I lost like eighteen pounds eighteen nineteen pounds in the first two weeks. Granted my trainer said. Most of that's waterway a lot of water, you're retain, he's like that goes out really fast. And then it slows down to like a a pound or two a week. But I was also in the gym. So I I'd build muscle. So I wasn't heavy lifting and so- Kito genyk. He's like. You get in the thing called ketosis where your body's eating its own fat. And so you don't want to give it a lot of carbs. Yeah. And was breastfeeding. And I it was so hard to breastfeed that I just did anything to and now is just all carbs oatmeal and like fats and stuff like that. And so since I'm almost finished almost finished. I think I am actually to this morning. We did not do it. This could be my first day free Valentine's to my titty. Your free little titties. Oh, my God is actually might be the first day. She's done this before though. And then she was like try try she fully verbal now. So she's like may I have some Titi, please. So no, no. No, she she calls the milky. And that is I didn't even ever call. I never call the milky. She made that up. Okay. Writing this down as a possible episode title milky. We're happy. Click. Click click. Yeah. So so basically, I got so the first year I went like all all the weight, and I was like down to my lowest even from before. I and I look right. And then you start weaning and your body's like, no, we have to make more milk to keep this infant alive, speak come just real plump. And that's my problem now. So I'm hoping once I get all those weird hormones that. Make me have milk those been great. It's for the first for the first two weeks. My trainer was like. It's it's actually high protein low carbs, but for the first two weeks. He's like, I don't want you to any carbs, no sugar just nothing because they had done like a full body workup scan bloodwork and everything so he's like before before this happened. And he's like I wanna see how your body reacts to two weeks of just pure eating protein in vegetables. Like, all right, so bad. It was brutal for the first six days. I thought I was sick. I was like I all I could think about was shit. Did I never would eat in. There was one day. I I woke up the first thing that entered my brain as soon as my eyes opened was Oreo cookie and cream blizzard. And I haven't had one in twenty years, and I was like, oh, my God that would be fucking great right now. And my brain's like go get one. And I was like, no, I can't tortured because you think about it all the time. But you know, at a certain point on have new, okay? So I. Have so have longevity of trying to get pregnant, but basically have a very expensive because I spent all my savings conceiving her. But when it didn't work did IVF, and I'm planning a couple embryos, and they didn't work, and it was very upsetting to me. So that I took six months off and in the process of doing this. I went to an Arctic spa in town Palisades, and I spent an inordinate amount of money to do a two week a a week of cleansing. Okay. Aria vetted, you Vetik it's Indian it's like a traditional. There's like a very deep sea. Are you Vetik a Y? You don't ask me to spell this? But I do vague meditation. Okay. So there is well anyway, so are you vetting? It's kind of cleanse that you can do, you know, as I'm going to sound ignorant because I don't know the providence of it, and I basically culturally appropriate this twins apologize for that. So but for the two weeks leading up to the cleanse. I could only eat lentils and rice white rice, lentils, no. Rafu d-, and then some sauteed kale or butternut squash. Like, it was it was like five things very super bland chew weeks. And I have to tell you it was transformative. I was never hungry because the lentils team and then after a while I didn't lose that much weight. I was like maybe five pounds or whatever. But at the end, I would forget to eat because I had taken away that sort of pleasure trigger for food, and I wouldn't be sitting in the bathtub. I'm like, no, I didn't eat dinner. I'm not hungry necessarily. But I don't need to eat. And then after that, I started adding things into my diet again after I did the cleanse which involved a lot of like Animas, which I was not prepared for. I just thought it was massages when they came in with a bag. I was like what did I pay for? It was a little, you know, whatever so expensive for my. But anyway, so. I started adding things back into my diet. And I noticed I would I would literally see like oh, avocado. I can't ever again or sugar. Like, I would be able to see exactly what really messed my stomach up, which I don't really pay attention to one hundred percent. But if I do I feel so much better. That's what I was going to say regarding the Kito diet is for those first few weeks. I was not having acid reflux. I was not having sinus issues because I also wasn't eating dairy the milk out. I had this. I have these bumps on the back of my arm that are like dry skin. I don't know what they're called those two. Yeah. Well after I stopped. I think it was the dairy skinny really. Really? Smoothie. Yeah. I and I and you can have like dairy because there's really no carbs. You can have cheese and dairy on this diet. But like I've only ever had cheese on bread like four in a case a DEA. So I just wasn't eating the cheese, and there's a point at like eight or nine days in whereas I I can breathe completely clear through my nose. I don't feel stuff eighty now or he'd been back on dairy. And you're also I've got like an looking you there. Okay. And that's because of the surgery I had two weeks ago, the recovery I was like I couldn't go to the gym. So I was like eating sent play need comfort food. So I kind of went off the rails a little bit. But judging you I I literally had a peanut butter chocolate cook, I shouldn't have chocolate or sugar. Okay. So my days, but I it was either. I was so hungry. I forgot to eat and it took long to get here. Because people get driving the rain, and I was like, it's either Taco Bell or this. And I rather have this little too evil. I've never I've never had talked about since like before college. So I'm not going there again that felt like entering a cave. That's like, oh, this is middle age Pino voter, a huge issue for my acid reflux. Really? Well, it's fat. If I eat I used to like peanut butter sandwiches. Peanut butter and jelly were my fuck and favourite good. And I would all often just like late at night just be like fucking hungry. I'd make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Perfect food. If I would do that. I would. Almost always wake up like a couple hours later in the middle night with just the worst acid. I can't eat past like six. No, I had to eat like four hours before I go to bed, and if I eat anything with slightly with onions because everything's onions right has its default kind of like, but it's awful. So I have to take Zantac before bed or I wake up like Ella panic attacks in the night because I think my body's like you're burning me from the inside I'm being immolated by onions, have you ever woken up in the middle of the night with acid reflux, so bad that like the room's pitch black, and you don't know what's going on. But you're like you feel like you're about to throw up like just pure acid your throw up. But I know that I'm burning inside. Like, I feel like there's something in my body being wounded right now like a special life. Tag. I Zantac is the only thing that works for me. Any I've been on all the drugs, and I can't digest the food. If I'm on like, I'm nets appro or propel, you know like any of that stuff. So and I hate taking it and all the study say if you're on those things long-term, it's really bad for your health, and your bone, density, and all this stuff. So I was like, well, I occasionally take Zantac. It's great. It's fine. I started taking in college because my first year of college. I was a biology major and was so stressed out. By the time, we got to the first bit of finals that I I thought I was dying. And so we went to we went to the doctor, and they did an endoscopy. Dusk could be Alzheimer's. I had all sorts. And also he was like there's like like not scar tissue. But there's issues. Barrett's esophagus that you can get and that's what they thought. I had for a while. Because I was so stressed out. When I was running a company that I just literally was a withered Cronin side. But when I stopped, and then I'm always like, oh, it's because you had to coffees tonight, or it's all stress related like really, I could probably eat a whole onion and go to sleep fine. If I'm like, totally chill. Yeah. It was it was amazing because they're like here and they had to prescribe Zantac. It wasn't over. How did that got rid of ulcers? It was amazing ulcers are bacteria though. Right. So it's not they used to think that it was a lot of other things. But they just are like, oh, we just get rid of me. Really the biggest difference. I noticed was my throat my throat as far as the Alzheimer's. I changed majors. And what did you major in art? Oh, wow. And was immediately like so happy. So great. Did you feel great after you graduate because you were in debt and couldn't find a job? No. I all I felt was well I did feel good that it was done. But I was like I just wasted like five five years ago. That was ridiculous time though. I agree. You found yourself as a person. I started to all right? I'm not just still doing that. I'm almost. We'll never know. When you got the endoscopy was it fucking really awkward to them. Putting the camera down your were you remember, they lock you. I've had three of them. And each of them times. I was just I it's so good. I see Michael Jackson did it like for real. Like, I have such hard time. Like the idea that a human individual could go to sleep before laying in bed for an hour. Just kind of staring at the wall thinking is crazy to me. And then I see people who go to sleep in the plane and honestly wanna stab him in the throat with something sharp sleep on the plane. I hate people who do that too Benadryl. And I wouldn't be asleep unemployed. I have to be I mean, even a flatbed across. I mean, I I did use Ambien one time. But that just made me psychotic. I will never take. I have a friend who took Ambien, and she she like she was she took an ambient once she lived up on the corner, not the corner, but right by Hollywood Boulevard and Cherokee, and this is probably like fifteen years ago, and she took an Ambien to go to sleep when I woke up the next morning was just like Jesus Christ. I had the craziest fucking dreams. She goes. I dreamt that I drove to del taco and tried ordering boxes and drive through because she was moving and then. Like, she got up in her like her legs and feet hurt the Fusco. And then she went out at her car was going what? So she called up a friend. She goes just on a hunch. She goes, hey, can you give me a ride to Dell talk, and it was the del taco that was on Santa Monica in Highland far. That is a so she wants to and a half miles. She knows she walked home. She goes just on a hunch catch all the prostituting out to I know that chocolate thing. Yeah. Yeah. The benito. We used to be. It's not there anymore guy's sorry. Giving you a clue. Okay drugstores. I think like the Joe nuts. It's very good. There was like a gay and lesbian center. There. God is the nineties. Yeah. I wasn't here in the nineties but early two thousand mid-nineties older, she goes just on a hunch. She goes, can you give me ride to del taco and friends? Like, yeah. Comes gets her. They go to del taco her cars in the parking my God, she walks in the manager's still there. He'd been doing a double shift like he was on the graveyard new was still there and she walks in. He goes, oh, look who it is. Like in a movie. That's incredible. Oh, look who it is. And she goes, I'm sorry. He goes, I'm assuming you're here for your keys, and she goes. Yeah. She's like, I don't remember a lot. And he's like, of course, not you were super drunk, and she goes, I was not drunk. He goes, are you kidding me? He goes you pulled into our drive through and you are screaming at me to give you boxes. And she goes I've from does not drunk. I was she goes I took Ambien. Oh people. Do you believe Roseanne? No, no, no, man. I've not really I don't know like half-and-half let out something underneath that. You're keeping suppressed so she your friend really went boxes. Roseanne Burley was racist that whole in vino Veritas, where it's like there's truth in to everything. Right. So she she got her keys and was just like only got I they took my keys from me. And I walked home at like. Really, this is LA. You don't do that. Okay. Warning sign. Not in that neighborhood. Even her neighborhood on share good neighborhood. Terrible. So I just based on that story. She told like years ago, I'm never gonna take Ambien Zayda like even the when I came out of my. Sleep from having the kidney stone surgery. I think they used for that they use something a little more powerful than Pro Bowl sleep. So I woke up so high that I was like chatting up, the, nurses. Oh nurse named gale. She's the only one whose name I could remember I woke up and all of a sudden, you're in a new room, and you're confused. And then there's a girl. I know. I'm like, hey, Gayle. Wow. And she's like she comes over. I go Gail when can I leave? She goes we have to make sure you can p for because you know, so upsetting to had a couples actually now I remember I had a couple of five I have the whole I had seventeen procedures over three years to try to get pregnant, but a couple of them were fibroid surgeries where they have to go in and literally cleanup hole light craters inside of your uterus. Like, literally like rocks. Yeah. And then I couldn't be. So they almost like we're like you can't leave for to you prove to us. You can really upsetting. I was like I p Gail give me that. And it was that little square bottle with handle handles the weirdest shape. The kind of hangs on the rail. She's like proved us that you. Good to store like cereal in. I took one home. They'll have it. I'm not going to actually I left it my car because I'm like, hey, if I've ever on a road trip. This is actually great could be at Pete in a Starbucks Cup. It's not too. It's not good. And she goes just isn't even event Guerande who's a tall. She goes Steve you need to prove this. You could pay. I'm like gale gimme that bottle. And I didn't even give sh- I just pull my gown up. Grab my penis. I start pissing into I've told us before. But like right right in front. It was pure blood. Yeah, crush she goes yet. She goes don't worry about that. I go Gail. I'm not worried I go, but I'm not gonna lie. If I wasn't this high. I would probably faint right now because that looks horrible. She's like that's just because of the surgery she's like it'll get better over the next day flowers. I should. She was really awesome. I mean, she made an impact or your your stone. It was so high. Boy, that's not bad though. I mean, it's it is anesthesiologist as a practice. They become drug addicts pretty easily. They have a very very high. My dad was an anesthesiologist and. Proudly never lost a patient in all the years that he was practicing. But I I don't think he ever used it seem. It's just there around the time. So they have the highest percentage of drug abuse within sort of the medical community. They're just like that's their thing. It's pretty rampant in general. I think in general community. I mean, there was a whole on house about out. Really god. I was on house. You were star. I loved house. It was a good show. You probably watch my episode. I played apple a what was it a blind architect? I believe that sounds familiar. I am blind architect or architect. I remember it was something like I brought it up to the writer, and it was the kind of show. You don't bring up something like that. Like, they needed me to be a blind architect or something or it was something it was just bad. I was just like really an architect named apple whose blood. I don't not sure if I was blind or not because I don't remember being blind. I threw up a lot. I remember I threw up and then Hugh Laurie was like that was good like come lyrics. Come character threw up lot do throw up. I had sort of rain. I had a brain aneurysm or something. I don't know. I can't I literally can't remember. I just remember how hot he will Ori was. And I was like all the people I've ever worked with. He would be the one. I would go in the trailer. If I I'm not gonna lie. He is a really good looking man. He would stand outside. He's so much hotter than house though. Because he was standing outside in like a moat black motorcycle leather jacket next to his Indian motorcycle smoking, even though that so unattractive. Be like this is the hottest man ever, very nice British which is released. She was always down on his accent on the set. He was like fuck that was just terrible. And I was like, I literally didn't know you were British. But he was so hard on himself. It was not like the most fun set to be honest with you like sort of a very grim pallor to it drummer. So. Yeah, exactly. But he was lovely. He was really nice and hot you have the whole underlying. There's a whole underlying arc in the the whole. Series that he was addicted to painkillers because you walk. He he was an addict. But. He's also in a band with Greg Grunberg, do, you know, I don't know that I know Greg. I didn't know they were in a band together. Does he live here anymore? I don't know. This was during house. The band still going knows everybody is still in the band. I don't think Hugh Laurie is it's called banned from TV accident. Hayden planetarium that for a while or something maybe I know Kevin Weisman from earliest he was an all the white men all the Waco site. God. Thank god. We have them doing a ban. Thank god. We need more of their musical expression. Doctors from Devi. Boy. Yes. So drugs drags, I'm trying to think of like I had hernias. So I had hernia was when I was just trying to think of what? From ballet class. Oh, yeah. Because you were bellied and that was a teenager. And then I I developed a hernia on the right side. And my dad had it. So I clearly have like week hernia areas, but it's worse for a guy 'cause your your whole. I think you're hoping can fall off. That's not really testicles your testicles. That's it. I don't have him. So I did have a big bubble. And I was like, oh, it's weird that I have a doubt. Yeah. I had a pouch once then they fixed one side, and they're like ups, you have a pouch on the other. So I had to go in for two surgeries painful surgery. Right. It was it was painful. And now, I have basically I have like a v of scars there. And then right above it. I have a very long C section scar. So like my porn. I just can't do it. I guess it's just under. Is it the v that makes like, you know, how guys or even girls get that those muscles kind of like that? But like much smaller down on my vagina. I have. I have a. An appendix scar. Oh, you did appendicitis. I had one when I was eighteen. Wow. And this was I don't know dream surgery isn't really, well, my friend got it out. And I was it was I mean, it was terrible. Hey, guys. Let me ask you something. What company is America's largest independent natural product company where not a single product or ingredient they sell has been tested on animals, and they're planting one million trees by the end of twenty twenty. Give up its grove dot co that's grove dot CO. Grove dot CO makes shopping for natural products easy. You don't have to search for local store, hoping they carry what you want or worry. You're worry that you're overpaying for organic products from questionable websites. That's right. Grove dot CO is the only. 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Mrs Myers gift set at grove dot CO slash docs, grove G, R O V E dot as in the period, you know, Adat and then CO slash no docks. What are you waiting for? This is Ron burgundy telling you to listen to my podcast. Here's a little something to wet your appetite right now. I'm a little terrified because I don't know what a podcast Eve's. Let's take some calls. Caller, number one. You're on with Ron burgundy. What's on your mind, collars? No, collars. No. Because people aren't listening in real time. Check. Got it. If you are listening to this and have downloaded by mistake. Please turn it off. Now, turn it off. We have we have some the whole crews here. Okay. All right. Okay. So if you're Taurus, your horoscope is come on pull you together. You defecate was reduced to my basic angle. And gas. Vailable whatever podcasts found, do, you know, Toni Collette had her pendants removed, and she lied just because she wanted to have it out as a kid. She kept lying about appendix pain to the point where John panic shoot wanted to have her appendix out as a kid read. This unlike Google it will have to say it is fucking fascinating. She told it on you can actually see you're telling it on a talkshow, but she never Mantech saying that kid because it's like not lethal. But it's like dangerous you feel like, oh, I'm it's the safest surgery that you think you could Cup saying she was having planned on the right side. And they were like we can't find anything wrong. And so finally, they just removed her appendix. And it wasn't until years later that she was like she has a function does function in that. Yeah. It has something to do with an I didn't read the whole article. Okay. I'm sorry. But it has something to do with helping the the the flora of your body regenerate. That's super important because no, listen, I'm fascinated by this because as a person who has stomach problem. The flora and fauna of your stomach effects of your whole body been doing a lot of studies about like probiotic use. And and also I read this article about probiotics are not necessarily that good after because you have to have a customized probiotic. So if you take your own custom flora out of your poop and then implant it back in your stomach, then you'll recover from things much better generic probiotic does it work for everybody because it's not the same floor. You particularly have and autism. They've been doing a lot of experimentation with the flora play with the floor in. It's actually it helps those are all the headlines. I read about it. I didn't go any deeper than that feel free to goes dreamt about when have do you ever take probiotics? I did for a while. And then I I stopped because I just lazy. I take them. I don't take him regularly regular rela little I don't take him regularly. But I do take them if I'm taking antibiotic. Ix for something saying there was a study that said people think that they recover faster, but it has to be it has to associate with your Alrighty existing floor. Otherwise, you're putting four and floor in there, and it takes longer for your stomach to recover. So in a sense, somebody who created a company that did customize probiotics for people would probably be pretty awesome and make a lot of money because if you have your custom sort of like, you know, recipe then that actually helps you reintroducing what was already there are do notice though when I if I get like food poisoning or the flu or something and have diarrhea I will help I will take probiotics and like within an hour or two. It's I just forgot to do. It's going. I did for a while it helps, but then is it psychosomatic or not you know, what I'm saying? Also where like I. I if it is psycho somatic it works. Right. You plant your paints? And it works. Yeah. No, how long ago did you have your hernia? So you were doing I was in college. So after that, I had I went many years with no health problems. And then I developed severe always had severe anxiety. So mental health is always something. I've always had a problem with mental. Oh, this is good. So about last last may I would physical, and I because I think I burn my thyroid out. I think Oprah did this too. I read a headline over that. I've read nothing headlights, but she earned her thyroid out from stress too. And I feel like what we're friends we should be Oprah call me, but I burn my thyroid out of stress. So I have a slow Cy word now. So we're the symptoms of gaining weight, dry skin, depression, lethargy week nails hair falling out of circulation problem like body temperature. No. Although after my baby, I did develop restless leg. Which I think if I just took magnesium, it'd be fine. But but anyway, so when I tried to get pregnant they found I had this crazy thyroid problems. So I went on thyroid medicine I had to be on it for for forever. And then last may I went to have a general checkup. And then the doctor was like, well, you don't really need this anymore. So we just took me off it, and I had the worst summer my life because I developed a depression for four or five months that I literally couldn't. I mean, I was just like, well, I might as well just disappear. I have to take this. So I it's like I developed post-partum host post-partum post-partum really late because he took me off a very it's a nominal dose of Synthroid. It's basically what you take. If you have a slow tyrod. So and then somebody online when I posted about this on my own podcast, Phosa -tations. It's where I talked to myself for forty five minutes every two guys check it out. I have something else to promote to that's actually more. So we'll talk about that at the people stop listening. But. No, one will stop listening. Okay. Good. But but psychiatrists said, oh, yes. Sometimes we prescribe a a low dose of Synthroid for people who are depressed. So I was like, oh, so it totally makes sense. So I went back on it. And within three weeks, I was feeling like functional adult again, do you still dig it? I take it every day. I've take fifty milligrams a day. I've been on Alexa, pro for fifteen years. My friend will was on like, yeah. Yeah. It's a it's a lifesaver for a lot of talked about it on. My other podcasts has someone. I didn't do two years ago. I was pregnant it's fine. That's right excuse I was literally thinking about doing it. And then I went back on IRA medicine. I was like, oh, so I mean, I'm definitely not stable like, I I really should be. Just slight changes in any part of your life can throw you. I'm very susceptible. I am too. I had the kidney stone surgery sorry to keep going back to it's new and fresh I had it two weeks ago. And so they left the stent in me. And so I couldn't exercise I couldn't go to the gym which I've been doing for two months, and I basically just laid on the couch and got super like almost more depressed than I've ever like depressed on the same levels when my dad passed away. I was just like on the couch, but your door fence. So are you were going through withdrawal? And also just reflecting on. Oh, I'm in. I'm in bad shape. Right now. Physical Marta, I'm about to turn fifty like it was so like just dark all right for a week. It was just like really dark then they went in. They took the steno and like within an hour. I was just like. You know, it's like a constant reminder that you're just meet to know what I'm saying. They're all just meet, and we're gonna die soon. Like, we could all die tomorrow. Like, I think about that all the time, especially if you have a baby you're like suddenly become obsessed with I have to live just to get her over the hump. Let me ask you this. Because I my friend had Hughes a huge hypochondriac like and erotic lease the most neurotic person I've ever really can we have until on test. Yeah. I could beat out of I don't know he is bananas. And so he had his wife had a baby. And I was like, oh, this is going to be great for him. Because I always heard that people who were hypochondriac germaphobe and nervous about their own health. As soon as they have a baby they're like, you're just focused on your baby. You're not thinking about yourself. Or is that true? Well, okay. Because I asked him and he's like, Nope. I'm worse than ever hear worse than ever. Because basically. All those things that I turned down for money like for artistic integrating the past. I'm like why the fuck didn't you take all the money because like you realize the older, you get you know, you your opportunities are not flourishing the older, you get okay? By the way, especially as a woman and a mother people put you in this like the guy the the look of death in a man's. I compared to how interested they are. You are you at a party if you mentioned your child, it's just like something in there like they're like goes off. And they literally looking for anything to talk to other than you. It's great. It's a really good, really. Anyway, so, but then at the same time, you're like I have to keep this thing alive. Right. And the funny thing about me is that I was kind of like a lot of people who do and get their eggs out. They go crazy on the medication. I was the most stable I've ever been in my life when I was on those modal, right? It's. Modal right. It's all hormones, and so when I did the implantations so they have to put you more drugs, and I did estrogen patches to get to do implantations, and I did two of them failed. I went crazy the estrogen patches, so after I took six months off to kind of reboot the whole process for my baby choice. You know what I'm saying? But I got the baby this I will never tell one day. She'll hear this. Miracle. She's the one I needed, right? So that's fine. But I didn't do any drugs to do that which they normally never let people do. I just wanna do it without and that worked because I was not in saying, so the estrogen patches made me insane. And so for my pregnancy, I was super stable up until about twenty four weeks twenty five weeks when it's kind of viability time, and then it became my responsibility to like check the heartbeat. You know, so I don't this is going to bore anybody who doesn't have a child. But so before that it's like if something happens, I can't do anything about it. Right. Six months, six months. So you do this twenty weeks scan and you make sure they have organs and stuff. Right. And sometimes they don't, and this is why you sort of like, quote, unquote, late term abortions happen and need to be an option for women because horrible things you could find horrible things about your fetus, then. And that's really yourself yourself. Exactly, you could die. There could be, you know, this is kind of that's kind of the tipping point at which you find something really horrendous that could break your change your life forever in a horrible way. So anyway, so once we got past that scan. And I was like okay, everything's okay. I was like, but then I got another month to be like, well, you know, it's not really something still couldn't do it. But then in a certain point like around twenty seven twenty eight weeks, they can keep a baby alive if they're born. But it's kind of on the mom you start to have to count kicks. So basically, you're hyper aware of what's going on in there. And if you don't feel a kick for a couple of hours, it's like on you that you didn't go to the doctor that something. Went wrong. Right. So then I couldn't I was like a paranoid for like three and a half months. Are you studying your your iphone timer to be like, I mean? Okay. Okay. You're just consciously aware of it. Right. Because you're carrying a beach ball around. It's uncomfortable in terrible. So anyway, so that made me more than after she was born, I didn't really have post-partum depression. I had postpartum like anxiety. So I went to the doctor convinced that I had a heart defect. I had like a seato skin. Doctor was convinced. I was I was convinced because I was like, oh, there's this rare thing that some women get when they have heart palpitations that just die to getting Burs. I was a hundred percent Harper that position I've been dealing with for a couple of years. Yeah. Well, I think that's what triggers my anxiety to me too. Because I have a slight heart murmur. But it's so slight. But I think I just blame everything on the heart murmur do notice it more times than others. Oh, yeah. Auditions basically, I can I'll never get a job additioning because I'm a I'm a mess. I just collapsed. And then I'm like, it's not my fault. It's my body telling me, this is not a good profession. Why am I still here? I was getting him so bad that I was convinced I had some kind of blockage or something. Oh, really and then Kevin Smith had his heart attack. I think on my birthday a year or two ago. So good now, though as ING, and so I. Like, okay, he's two years younger than me. I have to get I so I went because of him. I went to a cardiologist. They did a a nuclear stress test. Which is what did they did? They play you up. It's they put you on a regular stress test where you get on the treadmill, and they have the EKG. To watch your heart rate and everything, but then they inject you go in in the morning and the inject a radioactive isotope into your bloodstream. You have to sit for about forty five minutes in the office while it circulates through your heart, and how did your superpowers manifesto? I made me super insane. So then you then after it's gone through your heart. You go into a room, and you sit in this share and you're like surrounded by cameras and the chair over a period about fifteen to twenty minutes moves in little increments. Awful, and you can't move. You're really know. And it just kind of moves slowly and having. All right. I mean, that's awful. It's scans your heart. Degrees. And then you go into a room, and they put you on a treadmill? And then they get your heart rate up to like. Eight the they raise your heartbeat like sixty to eighty percent or something and you have to hold that for three minutes. That's so scary. It is terrifying. And then today find anything. No. So I go in and get the scan. Oh, and while he's he's injecting this into my blood the doctor goes. He was planning on traveling anytime soon ago. No, he goes. Okay. He's like I just have to mention that. Because you'll you would set off the detectors because of the radioactive isotope. How and he's like. So if you were going to fly we'd have to give you a note or something that show the TSA as just like fuck any any? And then he goes, this is just a normal dose of radiation. He's like it's the same as if you spent twenty minutes in the sun or when on a flight from LA to New York, which freaks me out. Oh, no. Because I fly a lot. I do conventions. I fly for like when I read about this thing. Now, it's you know, how much radiation. But then I'm like every flight attendant doesn't die of cancer. Then it's fine. And he goes or a flight from LA to New York, and I go stop. What are you talking about? I go I go, that's the thing. And he's like, oh, yeah. You're exposed to radiation baby on a flight because I got really nervous that as a young child. She shouldn't be exposed to. And then I was like your crazy. So I was crazy. But that's so crazy, isn't it? Not right. And then you get on the treadmill and. He's like, so your heartbeats, you know, whatever one twenty or something he goes we have to get it up like sixty or eighty I'm bad with. I know you're great with Matthys. We gotta get the same because we have to get your heart beat up to I think one hundred and eighty and right? Yes. And so they get you on the treadmill every three minutes the. Every minutes the treadmill inclines a little bit now. And then until we been I've been on it for like, fifteen minutes and my heartbeat would get to like. One hundred and seventy nine wouldn't get to one eighty. They're like we just need you to get to one eighty and I was just like dying. And then they get you to one eighty finally to one eighty in there. Like now, then they reinject you with the same stuff like the most elaborate situation ever, dude. They reinject you and you have to keep that heart rate for three minutes. So so then you go back in and do the scans. So they have a contrasting resting heartbeat and elevated whatever man he said, it's the most. Comprehensive scan of heart. They can do and afterwards. He was like. Yeah. You have no blockage. Everything happening now everybody I love to get this scan. I that was my thing. I was like this is the most comprehensive. I go. Everyone should fucking do this. How do you get you have to request? It did your insurance pay for it insurance paid for. That's how do you qualify for it. I think you you could probably do it just by cardiologists and going I've been having heart palpitations. Okay. Because, you know, people just find out like, oh, I just had a whole part of my heart blocked. Yeah. That's what Kevin's was injured percent blocked. And incredible. The valve that they call the windows young. He's young and he is forty seven incredible. I'm not old like that yet. And by the way, I I would I would encourage everyone to just go lion. Go I have heart palpitations. I have I literally when I woke up all night last night, just having like, my heart racing and panic attacks all night. But when I'm under stress is what happens and now, I actually no because I have a deadline, and I don't think I'm going and just other things like I'm sorry being a parent is like I was such a good workaholic before. And now, I'm just a piece of. Overwhelmed by like I had to deal with jury duty today. And I was thinking what? But then if you have you take care of child, which I do during the day, don't you can get out which I knew, but I was like, okay. This is the best thing about reproducing right now. I moved in a never gave my new address and see I don't get jury summons go to my old address. And they'll do it. You probably have a warrant out for your respirator nine years. No because I can still, you know, I go into the DMV and reregister my car, and there's usually if there's something like even an outstanding parking like we can't give you your. There's nothing wrong. Well, and if they said, you haven't come in for jury duty, I can always say I've never gotten the true, you're deniability plausible deniability. That is a that is a defense. It's I've heard on TV. So it totally works. Yeah. And I I have a friend who. Speaking of lying to have medical procedure done. She. My friend autumn. She's been the same way like her whole adult life like no fluctuation at all and then a few years ago. She just randomly gained like two pounds, which for most people be like. L for her. She was like, I've never my weight has never changed. You get old. You get fatter. I'm sorry. Okay. She she goes to the doctor. They're doing all these tests and. For some reason. She's like, I think it's my thyroid and they're like all these testing final. We don't think it's your thyroid. Would you will you check? And they're like, no, we don't need to check your thyroid. She went to a different doctor. And they're like, yeah. Everything's fine. It's just yeah. You're getting older. She's like, I think it's my thyroid. And they're like, we have no reason to think it's your thyroid. And she lied and said, my mom at thyroid cancer total lie, and they're like, oh, you should have told us. All right. We'll do. We'll check. She had thyroid cancer. She had had thyroid cancer. What? Yeah. Just on a hunch. She was like, I think it's my thyroid because I have never gained a pound. You gotta go to the doctor right now. And so they removed her thyroid. That's tough. Wow. Wait, I'm worried what are the what are the symptoms of cancer because I've gained like ten pounds that I can't get rid of it. Like, you said, I think it's just part of getting older. No, I don't think the complete opposite argument of that. Are you kidding? I can give you my friends in vogue. You wanna talk about Google thyroid cancer. The I mean, I'm a web MD specialist me to delete it from my phone the app because I don't do that. I told my friend the other day, I wanna do a website for hypochondriac actors called Webuye web. I am. Where are you gonna upload your resumes and xrays, and I would love any actor had like I was on the set of Jewish ins, and I there's a guy place, Josh. And he and I talked for two and a half hours about acid reflux. He swears by. What was it? The he loves. Celery, juice. Hi, it's me, Steve if you want access to the full back catalogue of ad free. We're no doctors episodes ad free. New episodes and bonus content. Make sure to sign up for Stitcher premium at Stitcher, premium dot com. Plus for a free month of Stitcher, premium, go to Stitcher, premium dot com and use promo code Starbucks. Starbucks, you know, that's the that's the company I'm doing this podcast through come on get with it. Again, you can hear ad free. New episodes every week. Plus our entire archive at free on Stitcher premium for a free month of Stitcher, premium, go to Stitcher, premium dot com and use promo code. That's right. Good. Good. When you guys. Starbucks promo code starburst go now right now, listen. I'm not reading anymore. Just go. I have a friend who has IBS and friend who has Krones and they've both been like just recently, both just randomly both started doing like, celery, juice. It's good and of made I'm pot, and I make bone broth now, I'm obsessed with it. I have some literally Anita go home to check that a slow cooker. It's an instant pot is a pressure cooker that can be a slow pod. Just got us slow cooker pot. What's what are you doing? It's a pressure cooker. You can cook. You can cook a whole chicken in like thirty minutes man, thirty eight hours, forty five minutes. Yeah. I did it last night. I put a whole chicken in there. And then I took the juices and now making chick in the carcass put it making chicken broth right now. And then I have been soaking. So I'm gonna make a twelve bean soup with some bacon. It nice when I get home. I'm like, I forget a woman who had a career like this is what I'm doing. Now, you're you've rebranded yourself. I don't know. I just like making things in one pot. Have you ever do have you used a I'm going to slaughter the pronounciation Isufi now that seems too much work? My brother is really like Gorman. I just don't want to deal with it. But I do have to feed a baby. And we can't take out all the time though. She and less than two years old. Learn ped- tie. Say or how to make? Well, we're gonna work. What do you want for dinner, Honey, ped- tie? I love. I love. Last night. It's it's so good. If you get good stuff, if you abouts, you know, anyway, have you ever been to Jit Lada? No as its entire. Title in in like kind of east Hollywood, and there's just tons of tyrants. But there's one the Camille and a few other people turned me onto at Lada, and it's their old school where you go, and they can tell you stuff that's not on the menu. Granted you wait. A long time been to Thailand, I was my favorite place I've ever been. So it's so incredible. And the food there is like even the crappiest place. You just randomly walk into vacation. I did I went for two week going. Cock. I went to Bangkok for a little bit. I went to Chiang Mai. And I went to fuck PP island who I went to. Yeah, we were in Bukit. And then we went to island, which is like the most beautiful place on the world in a while. No, eight street food the whole time. Not only time. I did get sick. I got sick once and it was after eating a fancy restaurant. I h street food the whole time, and it was delicious of friends that are the same way. Like, I'm so paranoid. I've never been to India because I'm like, I know I would be sick the whole time. Yeah. I mean. Yeah. My meditation teacher goes every year for like two months to India. And he's like, I've never been sick. I eat street food. He's like the key is food that is cooked cooked all the way only cold like neurotic. Bottled water in your fucking fine. Yeah. Well, I mean, it's like they have a great way of living living there every is not sick all the time just living there. I think I've talked on this podcast before I watched this. Morgan spurlock documentary series on Netflix, and he did one episode where he went to. Thailand to hospital in Bangkok because Americans and people all over the world are doing these things now called Elliott medical vacation, they go, and they get have friends who do that to Mexico. They get their dental work down there. And it's like he he had like a shoulder injury tearing his rotator cuff, and so he went to a doctor in New York and the doctor's like, okay. Well, first of all I'm going to need you to go get an MRI. We don't do them here at my office. So you have to make an appointment at an a different appointment with somebody else. And it's this much money. It's fucking expensive. And then you have to go here. And and if it is torn, and we do surgery, it's going to be he's just like this is fucking ridiculous how expensive and so he decided to go to Bangkok to this hospital to have his shoulder like that. And he went, and he goes in first of all this. I encourage everyone to look at watch us document. I forget what it's called. But it's Morgan spurlock series on Netflix. And he goes in in this first of all from the outside. It looks like a hotel. It does not look like a hospital does not look, clinical and sterile. And gross. And scary you walk in it. Looks like you're in the four seasons beautiful fountains in the lobbies, and he goes up to the front desk. He's like, I have an appointment Morgan spurlock. And like, oh, yeah. Go to the fourth floor. And so he goes in there's another desk checks in and she's like, all right? Someone will be with you in a minute. And he goes, and he sits down and the chairs are like lazy? Boy chairs it's let's roll. It's not crowded. There's nobody around he sits down and starts talking to the camera. He goes, all right. So I've checked in. We'll see how long this. And then someone's like art the doctoral seeing the doctor not not as. So he goes in and like, the doctors. All right. Let's do. Let's do. All right. And he's like all right. When do we have to make that he's like, let's do it right now. So he goes downstairs has the goes back upstairs gets the result. The doctor's like, it's not torn you're fine. And then so while he was there he decided to do every he had a colonoscopy. Bloodwork everything he did every fucking conceivable pay cash for it. He made like, I think all total everything was just like a few thousand dollars. It was really cheap. And then he goes back and. He goes and sees his doctor New York, and he's like he gives them a paper with the list of all the shit that he had done doctors. Wow. He was you did all this. And he goes, yeah. He goes how much do you think this cost me doctors like? Ninety thousand dollars. He's like no cost me like three thousand the doctor is like what I mean, having a dad is a doctor, you know, how broken the medical and the fact that like, I know somebody who has to take a loan out to get her teeth fixed because she can't afford dental insurance. I mean, the fact that we have people on this. I mean, I was in the military group in the military and military doctor, and we just went to the doctor willing needed. And the fact that people literally have to go into debt and everything they've saved up in their life has to go to their end of life care and things like that. And I it just it entrenches people in a cycle of poverty because how can you give a legacy to help your children get a leg up on what you built when literally? I mean, it's just awful. It's off even with insurance. I have the highest sag insurance. You can get which is great. Brag. I work sometimes. I like two years ago had have a lot of dental work because the implants they don't pay for. Well, when my dad was sick like I just turned down work for a whole year while sick. And so I lost my insurance and then the following year. I spent just working my ass off to get my insurance back. Well, so it was like two years without insurance. My teeth were all fucked up. And so I'd have like a couple root canal like no implants or anything. But like lot of cavities like, wow, I used all my insurance money, and I still hadn't had half the dental work done. And that was with good dental insurance. It's really sad. It's sad. It's really sad. Anyway. Land. How long have we been recording? One minute. Go on for days. Like, do you have any health things? Hell teen minutes for the people at stiff your premiums were paying extra. Are. They really do. They have to you have to entice them with a little bit. Well, aggressee. All right. Thank you for doing this fully short, and thanks that your premium. I will catch next week by everybody.

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119: Sex & Intimacy Series: 3 Women 3 Ways & How Men Can Get Involved

Hearts Unleashed

47:20 min | 1 year ago

119: Sex & Intimacy Series: 3 Women 3 Ways & How Men Can Get Involved

"Hello and and welcome back to the hearts unleashed pass sex and intimacy series. If you are listening to this episode you are listening to a new intro. So Oh welcome back or welcome to your first episode of police. Listen all the way through this intro Last few episodes. I've had a repeat inter onto kind of you've preface this material however as we wrap it up we have about four five more episodes here in the sex intimacy series. And I just WanNa touch space about what's going on what's happening and where everything's going because we wrapping up the sex and intimacy series. We are also wrapping up season. Two and I'm really excited about the really proud season. Two brought us over one hundred episodes over a year long and over ten one thousand downloads over eleven thousand and I know we'll push past twelve and possibly thirteen before the end of this season. So I just WanNa start by saying thank thank you thank you thank you thank you. Thank you for tuning in this. Sex and intimacy series has just caught fire and is creating so so much commotion in the World. And you guys are. You know giving me feedback. You're sharing it with people. It's opening up new doors. I'm hearing from people I've ever heard from and it's just truly incredible because that is that is my commitment. And that's something that when I visualized having this entire resource available for people that it truly would act somewhat as. Let's say an adult sex ED class and we haven't covered every single topic. A lot of them are put together. So it's not a type. A one size fits all kind of format however it is highly educational highly insightful and very very thought provoking so. It's don't exactly what I would hope it was going to do. And it's only gonNA continue to do more of that so I just want to thank you again for listening and thank you for sharing. If this is your first time hearing one of these episodes no matter how you found it I want to be the first to welcome you to the heart salacious podcast in thanks for tuning in there is so much available in this podcast. That being said we are going to wrap it up as I mentioned we have about four or five more episodes in this series stories and in this season. And what's going to happen after that is Miss Abigail is going to go incognito for a minute I am going to partake in disappearing appearing December. I heard it from Gary and I was like Oh Haley I could tell my whole body told me like you just needed a reason so I am going to take advantage of disappearing December. I really set the series up to pretty much wrap up in the beginning in December. And so what I'm GonNa do is. I WON'T BE ON SOCIAL MEDIA I won't be publishing publishing podcast episodes. There's Poland t to listen to Ben. John do whatever especially during the holiday season. I learned to honor this holiday season and And the winter season as a time to hibernate and rest and restore and that is exactly what I'm going to do and I would highly encourage you to consider doing the same and so You will see me back in January and then in January we are going to launch a top. Twenty countdown of the hearts unleash podcast. We did this between season one in season two and it was so much fun. And so that gives you plenty of time between when you hear this and And January to listen to your favorite episodes share your favorite episodes. We have plenty of guests that if so you can bump them up. It's going to be so exciting and I just have to tell you the sex and intimacy series my Sexual history is the number one right now. The number one listen to episode is my sexual and then Make that money. Honey is one of my other favorite recorded episodes. It is up there number two in currently Nicholas Doll fe His episode getting rid of anxiety with ease is Number three and and so. It's just really great to see that we are opening. Our hearts were interested in expansion and what's available in a unleashing reaching our hearts and so I just acknowledge you for listening and I really can't thank you enough because this is my passion on display. This is my heart unleashed. And it's so much fun to share with you and so I will be joining you again in February for launching season. Three of the hearts leash podcasts. y'All I am so excited to even even save this kind of stuff. It is so amazing with that being said we are going to jump into these last couple of episodes and I am going to to reread the intro for this series because if you it is your first time I still wanNA preface it and introduce myself if you've heard the before feel free to skip over it and again. Don't forget to share. This hearts unleash practice. You guys were truly turning dreamers into doers by create by sharing. What's available in exploring your heart and doing the work around emotional intelligence so thank you? It is such a pleasure to welcome you to the sex. Listen intimacy series. My name is Abigail Gasden. I am a clarity coach. Helping you operate with more freedom power and self expression in every area of life in career. I have coached men. Women couples young people large and small groups a even taught middle and high go physical education and health during my years in the classroom. I was often the go-to teacher for age appropriate version of sex and intimacy for my students students I taught teens about puberty menstruation. Sex Std's pregnancy parenthood consent and non consent. And for those of you who are just joining us here at the heart's on each podcast. We have been talking about all of these topics OI invite you to join in and go and listen to the other episodes because in my time as a teacher I have really developed the skill to talk about these topics and I really relate to myself as an expert in this bill with the qualification to teach you guys about them in these episodes as a teacher. I have talked to kids about suicidal thoughts and self harm. They shared circumstances that made me want to adopt them. I walk them through healthy coping mechanisms and empowered living strategies. I taught them clear hand. Direct communication. I supported them in helping their own friends and family through troublesome times. I have supported. Many people of all ages come out of closets of all types I have explored the hearts and minds of many as they have learned to master. Unleash them that. Said this hearts unleash podcast. Sex and intimacy series is a great place to find out if we are speaking speaking the same language and if it is time for us to be working together and I can meet your current needs. I will be straight with you though. Health and wellness class with Miss Gasden used is a serious one. I do not take teaching this information lightly because I'm very aware that so many of us have not been talked to honestly about this topic. I found this very true. When opening the discussion with a group of sophomores? In telling them. Listen guys I want you to ask me on his questions that you you have so I can get you the answers that you need. You are not going to shock me scare me or knocked me off my rocker. It is the same as asking a doctor. I am a professional and I intend to educate you on the topics that you have questions about. I want you to ask the questions that you're afraid to ask your loved ones because I don't want you to go out finding the answers the hard way on your own cleese ask the questions that you need and know that there's No oh shame or judgment coming from here you guys. I told that a high schoolers and they understood it. I know that you get it too. I know that you have questions. And I know that some of this information will provide you answers or provide you the opportunity to look within you for those answers. I found this so incredibly important to explain to the kids because I knew I wanted to make a true difference in their life. Not In my classroom. I WANNA make a difference in your life not with my podcast. I operated with the intention at most any of these lessons that you learn here on the podcast were in my classroom would clear a few branches off of your path. I would feel so happy to shine my light a little brighter to show the away a little farther. I happily accept my intuition to share this information with you as well. It feels like a duty and an honor much much of what I will share in the histories is my expression of universal consciousness. No matter what I say or how I say I speak the language of love and I speak from the heart and if I am ever not you can count on me saying that too. I do my best to educate promote vote and facilitate understanding and self mastery of the human condition. This series will provide you a new Lens through which to contemplate the topics of sex and intimacy I personally would read this context. PG Thirteen. It is a mature audience topic. However I would not I use age to determine maturity for this topic or any topic for that matter? Young Developing Ladies and gentlemen would be greatly served by this information that said I will be speaking about the topics of sex and intimacy candidly. Listen to these episodes assuming responsibility and maturity charity. I would also invite you to listen with an open heart mind and being honestly if you are listening this far by now I simply want to acknowledge you for your commitment to expansion. I try to imagine each and every one of my listeners. I wonder about your life and how I get to serve you. I pray for guidance competence and trust just like you for you with you and to serve serve you. I am honored to present the sex and intimacy series as every aspect will impact your life. The better thank you for tuning into the hearts. It's only podcast where we are turning dreamers into doers. Let's dive in welcome welcome. You are listening to the hearts unleash. podcast cast where we are turning dreamers into doers. And you go is as you saw in the title of this episode. We have a threesome going on here today. Eh I am so excited to introduce my guests. Elissa lay is is say it. Yes let me lay. He Eliza he and she is a coach at age thirty nine while navigating and unexpected. Divorce Elissa was diagnosed with breast cancer and thyroid cancer rebuilding physically xactly emotionally and financially took more courage than she ever thought possible today she is surviving and thriving by helping others reconnect with their inner warrior warrior artists and exhibitionist which I am so excited to talk about She is the creative force behind had to be a temporary body. Art For breast cancer answers survivors and topless goddess a mentorship for reclamation and change and I have to share how I met Eliza at this luncheon attention is now working luncheon and she started to share how she actually also coaches men around divorce and self love and expression and I just as soon as she started talking about this you guys I had. I knew I had to have her on to talk to you and especially our men listeners. Like I pay attention to the statistics. You guys I see WHO's watching I pay attention and I'm constantly trying to serve you with the information that we're bringing and men. We want you to know that we care about you. As as much as this women movement I have to lays on here who are just who have spent their careers supporting men and so I also have another guest on here. Michelle Lyons who is a certified sex coach who also holds a Master's in expressive arts. Therapy is so cool you guys. She specializes in coaching single men to access confidence in their sexuality and themselves so that they can create authentic passionate relationships. She believes in finding wants full sexual expression. Shen which y'all know we've been talking about that on here on the sex and intimacy series so finding one's full sexual expression can bring vitality and a sense of wellbeing. Oh being to clients. She works with. She has worked with inmates homeless veterans and many individual clients but mostly men all men Michelle. Yes all men and I actually met Michelle a couple years ago already at another networking speakers network and she shared some of that information before. And it's just to know that there are women serving men in the world and ladies bring in right here but to know that there are women serving men in the world especially in this time where there's a lot of women movements going on. It's so refreshing to see and It's also just really exciting because I don't think especially here on the hearts unleash podcast. We have a lot of people who are listening in our new self development or transformation or stepping into authentic expression. And I feel I feel very committed to having men understand. There's so many resources available so just thank you for the work that you do in the world as an so elissa please. His share a little bit with US number one about your journey but then kind of how you got into working with men. It's interesting when I tell people what I do. And I say I helped and get their Mojo back after unhealthy relationships one of the most common responses I get is wow I never would have thought of that or thought that that's Thing or how did you come up with it. How did you think of it and I say the same thing? I never would have thought of it either. It completely found me because the major ruptures in my life which were divorced breast cancer thyroid cancer ultimately were healed. Because I wasn't wasn't a very nurturing space with women and with sisterhood I was allowed to be very vulnerable but also held accountable to not being victim. So it's very very empowering and ultimately I wanted to empower other women and I set on a mission to be more visible with both the tattoos and the body art and all this goddess nece women on the rise all the things and and what I found was that as much as we were being of service to each other there were more and more men that were coming to me very shy very quiet not in their personalities but in that very quiet ask of sort of I have a piece of that too right. I could use someone to talk to someone that I trusted someone to hear my story and let me know auto is am I. Weak Am I.. Pathetic is there something wrong with me because I have these creative intuitive tendencies because I've been rejected and um I'm so it's my honor and my privilege to reflect back the hero that eyewitness in these men and help them get back on their feet and get their confidence. I love that and when you said something right there they come to me not in their personalities right. Like there's such such a stigma around the man. Being male masculine unfazed impenetrable invincible. Like all the things that but there's this gentle. Aw I want to say crawl like but this gentle touch on like hey I might not be doing. Ra were so. What's that experience? How are you able to detect that? You know it's funny. We talked about this a little bit. When we met the first time I will often see it in the is you know it's a tenderness and a gentleness in the eyes and I sometimes take it is my responsibility to just keep talking and telling my story and letting them Talk about the clients. Men that I've worked with and what pain points that and frustrations they were having an alert. Transformations they've gone through and then usually through my giving it that amount of space an ease. A man will self identify with the circumstances that on describing and it's the most beautiful thing in the world when he has the courage to say. I think I'd like to have someone to talk to awesome Gino. They really want to have someone that they can trust. And so it's important and I really honor that and it all starts with that initial moment of courage courage to ask for help or to say I don't feel a hundred percent by this tough guy this with his armor in this masculine I sometimes. Sometimes I feel like I'm putting on a show and I'm breaking down inside and when they're willing to say that that's my first opportunity to reflect back doc The greatest strength the edit anyone can ever have which we just ask for help. It's beautiful and you know it's kind of twisted in a way or it's it we've we've managed to twist up the idea of courage right with bravery and strength and we collapse all three of those men and are expected to be brave and strong but the true courage to say that all right I could use a hand. I could really use someone to talk to do. You also made me think I would love to ask. Do you. Serve men only on the phone or only in person because you'd mentioned about seeing it in there is yet. Uh So it's usually I have the opportunity to meet them in person or They've been referred by someone who knows me. Yeah well and that's important to them. I understand that there's oftentimes multiple touch points because you know sort of dipping the toe in the water. And they want to get to know me and and I respect that very much. And it's very much inactive courage and some of them are more comfortable on the phone and uh they don't necessarily want to you know and I will say when I can sense a lot of emotion coming up. I will sometimes invite them to mute the phone. They all sit with you it or we'll do is. We'll do an awkward silence. Or if you don't want me to hear you cry. I invite you to mute the phone and have as much as has little privacy or spaces. You need around that now. I also meet with people in person. It's not one-size-fits-all I have a client. That loves to take take me to lunch. It serves him to be at lunch with a woman in an engaging conversation in any feels more empowered that way on likes to needed nature so I really help. The man cultivate his own understanding of where it is. He failed both strong invulnerable but also safe and and like himself for sharing. Yeah thank you for sharing in I'd love to ask Michelle. The question too is how do you work with men. Is it all all in person. Is it over the phone. I usually work with men in person than I am. An expressive arts therapist as well and use who's The arts with Wi- coaching. Yes usually in person and sometimes it's through zoom as well. Yeah and I want to play back aquit Elizabeth said about and also what you said Abigail about men having this idea they have to be a certain way that they grew up. Basically what I call a man box that they will only have the ability ready to share a couple of motions mostly anger and maybe some happiness and all the other range of emotions is not available to them and I find it an honor to work with men to help them get out of the man box in realize it that there's there's a lot more that they can express without the shame of those old messages telling them and that they can only be a certain way and that women have had so much more in the women's movement and support art that I feel really sad that men have in hand much support in its time for them and it's going to be good for everybody for men and for women to I'm so with you on that we've prioritized women and that's great and that's fine right but at the same time we we can't leave anyone behind. It just doesn't serve anyone to leave anyone behind and Back to you you know what really caught me. When at that luncheon attention was the way that you shared the work that you do about after a breakup so tell us a little bit? About how like men rebound with you instead. Yes that's true. I'll save rebound to coach right. Yes it is a again Adjust EXA- pass. Michelle mentioned it. There is not access certain types of emotions and sometimes they're only access to it is through engaging with a woman in her energy on its environment. That's mirroring that takes place and Access that to stay in touch with that often if it's a mom or a sister but usually it's not intimate enough in those settings so it's y you know I've heard it said In sort of critical way you know men can't be alone. There's there's the archetype of like the bachelor but really I remember sitting at a coffee shop with my ex husband very very shortly after we split and it was he's the one that initiated the split and he said the only thing I know in this whole world is that I do not I want to be in a relationship. I'm exhausted. I need time for myself. You know I all the things and within two or three months. He was in a relationship and I was the one that ended up getting the years of time to myself to explore to cultivate my Gifts in my inner knowing to be insisted hood and all of that so I understand that. A being having a female's female's perspective in having a female that will be honest and intimate but But with the boundaries of a client coach relationship is a beautiful way for a man to access access. Those feelings within himself and know that they're safe for him. You really hit a nail on the head about 'cause this episode this threesome episode. What is coming out after the Monday episode of the dance with the Feminine Masculine The dance between the Feminine Masculine? So we just had this conversation in you hit hit rate. There is like there are just certain parts of men and women that we don't fully have access to or being able to integrate them Without the partnership right and so just such a beautiful point there. What do you have to say about that? Michelle about tate again. The question yet eh. About just that dance between the masculine and feminine. Because you coach men and I'm sure that you as a woman pool so many different things out of them then if if they were to choose to work with a man and so what do you see about that that really great combination I would say. It's very very exciting to Sit in a room with a man who is starting to delve into his emotions and for me to be able to hold hold those emotions because as a woman. I have experienced a lot of the depth of sadness. Sadness fear uncertainty and that I have the ability to hold those emotions and and not be afraid of the emotions and eat in also anger not be afraid of the anger and not trying to change inch the subject or try to squash the the emotions but to even elicit more emotion and And so what sort of work do you do to do that to open that space in hold that space. One of the the things I do is or especially around sexuality is all asked the man a question about his current sexuality and how does he feel about it. The confident in the bedroom does he likes sex. Does he feel guilty after he has sex X or even guilty fees masturbating in. Hell give certain answers and then I'll ask him well. When was the first time that you started getting these messages? And oftentimes you know when when men are young and hot masturbating being with you know or they might have gotten caught with one of their childhood friends they were doing you know. Maybe they were doing role playing or showing each other their parts normal things that all children do in sexual development and they got caught and they got horribly horribly shamed changed from an adult and that can affect how they are interacting with their partner or their partners if they ah mostly the men are single the partners that they have had and how this affects their their sexual liken it really affects their expression ration of who they really WanNa be. WanNa be this person who's shy and you know who doesn't have maybe sexual energy with and underneath underneath a really have a lot of sexual energy might something has told them that. That's not okay. Yeah man just great points. You're making that. I really think you're putting words to things that many people haven't experienced they don't know they didn't realize how far back this van Gogh. And then you know I thought it was so perfect. Heavy both because Eliza. You really work with people coming through that break-up part and you help them to accept an express and then with Michelle all you really interested to know where your men will start to and then I'm hearing are you. Do you work with a lot of single men. Are you work with men and relationships. As well as the question stands for both in general I work with single man who might not have had a lot of relationships and who are interested in wanting relationship. Yeah I hear that for from both of you is like they. They really do know that there's more to them and and more possibility for them. How about you ELISSA? Yes same. And it's such a joy to work with them and to hear how much they Not only want relationship relationship but love women. I mean it's Great Assyrian receive. I can say about him in right. That feels so good. It's been a little bit different for each person has been a little bit different for me. I've had clients that have come out of really toxic narcissistic codependent relationships in. There's a lot of healing that needs to happen. There and a lot of detachment from the relationship. I've also had clients that. Actually we ended back up in a relationship with the same person but on completely different terms. That's really beautiful to see two and I don't tell them Tom what to do by Hanes right. We we go through it together and they process a night. I get an understanding on a lot of levels. I can validate for them On because there's so many mixed messages and they're so willing to give their power away because of a lot of things but you said it's very different for a lot of my clients. Some of them have gone back to relationship Others need a lot of space before they're going to do that again. Yeah Yeah and you said something and it hit me like a brick tip just acknowledged both of you for really being. The voice is an representation for a woman. Like all 'em in for these men you know you get to heal the woman wound that can and I'm sure you guys experienced the mommy stuff comes through. Dad's stuff come through and so I would love to ask for you guys to share maybe when on your favorite transformations or something just so just belting sure sure to share I had a client who who had very few relationships and with the art art that we did I had we were into the to my program about six sessions and he did many art pieces about what it felt like back to be lonely. What he what? His current situation felt like what it felt like when he was in his really insecure assurer place and his art. is I describe it to you on the on. A podcast is almost like a a moon seen the scene with some raggedy jagged mountains. And then there's a lot of space on the ground that has a lot the texture to it and holes in it and he described what that was for him and in our mid way session. I brought out all the art and I showed him that. There is this re occurring theme in his art and he realized looking at the art he said I can see how stock I really am. I keep going keep going. Oy being this comfort zone of not wanting people in women especially to see him and from that session on he started to make forward steps concrete actions to change a situation where he can get in situations where he could have women feedback positive affirmations to him or see that women do see him interesting interesting and attractive and unique. I think that's such an amazing lesson. In how beautiful that only through that art was he able to his his own art he was able to see his own block right. And I think it's valuable lesson for anybody is to like allow you allow yourself to see yourself and allow yourself to be seen. I don't think that many people in the world realize they're afraid of fully fully being seen for who they think they are all the layers to that. But just what a beautiful breakthrough. Thank you for sharing that Iraq. Yeah how about you Elissa really incredible. I love that was the art in the patterns to recognize the patterns You know something. Michelle said earlier about anger really stood out to me. Because has I think there's these different types of anger and I had a client recently going through a big transformation with that. And there's the anger that comes because there's been so many any repressed emotions and so it needs to be unleashed and her many of my clients and this one in particular. There's so much resentment because this is something you typically think of that women. Do we give give give. We don't think we have expectations. But oftentimes there are hidden expectations. Because we've set aside our own needs and especially when we've been giving to someone that is not available to receive it or is just doesn't appreciate it either that sort of the opposite of the giver and taker and So there's the moment where so much of the resentment and the anger comes out and to be the one to to say I'm not afraid of you and hold space for that and you know you can have that and be a man. I can be a woman who's done my work and stand in and be witness to that and be unafraid. But then to see this this is what happened with him recently to see the anger shift into a really healthy righteous anger. That says I you know. Because that's the moment that he realizes the value of what he's been giving the value of his heart in his instant. In his case it was poetry tree. He'd been writing her a lot of poetry and when we were first works together it was oh I gave too much. I showed too much of my hand. Dan Tried it with. I never should have done that. It was weak at pushed her off. She must have all the things and now he's got this righteous like all that beauty all all that creates in all that was all that magnificent artwork that is neither of my heart went to her in saying that. It's like yeah it's like you're handing over some. He saw the absolute value and the gold. That was so now he knows too I. Of course he will give it again but I to himself. How the value of his own utility for that was magnificent to see him? You know so beautiful. It's such a gift when we realize the gift that we are. I get me like Oh my God I agree it significant other end mine and we start to have some standards and that's a whole nother conversation conversation So I would love to ask both of you. What would you like to say to men who are still hiding in the shadows? Ato still sort themselves out having the internal conflicts like what do you want to say to those guys. I want to say that the world is waiting for you. The world is waiting for your unique precious gifts. I Oh love the gifts that men bring to the table of being problem Sauger's protectors providers and the world. The world is waiting for you. Yeah same because you know it's down with the Patriarchy right. Yes and an what's going to replace that mass. Yes yeah it's dis the men that are being called forward in their gifts a lot of times I think whether or not they like it. Whatever the catalyst is if if it's a broken heart or loss of a job or whatever it is really it's their gifts that are being called forward and I feel it's their responsibility to cultivate them and then integrate it with their strong masculine got next generation of conscious leadership member man that and that will be on par with goddesses such as ourselves for dinner waiting for you so bring all of what you have to the table? I I love at both of your answers I I go. Trump's cut the whole time like it's just such a cool invitation to hear such offenses invitation for men and As you are sharing I I can. Visually see this fully grown own man and he has that warrior essence but not a not a war warrior a warrior of love a warrior for his family see for his society for his community. And it's just it's so cool so cool and I. I really hope for our listeners. That they're feeling that energy energy and feeling that inspiration into to reach out to you and before we begin to wrap this up to incorporate the women that we have lots of women listeners. Why Mike Can we as women do to support our men? I you know I would just say pause pause and and be a little bit more curious about men in your life a little bit of listening holding space goes a long long way and young men and women are different obviously but we all benefit benefit from the integration of the masculine and the feminine and opportunity for expression in both. I also do women that will say to me things like Oh. I'm I'm glad you're doing that sort of insinuating. I don't like to be around men when they're in their like. That's there are a lot of women that do find that really unattractive unattractive and I respect that. I'm not necessarily looking to change that but to pause maybe to have some self awareness around that is important if we really want men to come to the table and feel safe on a percent. Great Great Point. Great Tim thank you. How about you Michelle and did to that? And I'd like like to add about women being aware of air expectations for men. That might be the come from. Oh Nat- mail box and from the Patriarchy of men can only be certain ways and for them to see how they're continuing the idea that men have to be that way like you were saying Elissa that they're uncomfortable with men having their feelings or they have a judgment about it or they're not attractive with that to step back and be aware that that men need acceptance in all their expression. I love that I would love to add my own tip to his Ramanan. Do Your word her. Yes you'll your shit. It's really what happens. Is Women are trying to derive the power from men so we need them to be indestructible you know and get ownership of our own power room for all of us to flow right right. Yeah that was a great point but gal thank you thank you because I mean it was very present in a couple of different points that you ladies have been making about like when I look at you and I pick up on your energy. You are women who've done the work therefore you are clean clear. Complete a hold that space for men to Flail flail and not understand and be confused and angry. It takes one hell of a woman to hold that space for a man and just I acknowledged the work that you ladies are doing in the world to help be a part of that shift because I interviewed a man on on this topic. That's episode for men and those confused by them and it's it's much earlier in the podcast but he explained how we as women we've had our own moments of this rise this anger this we we deserve something to they equality but truly when we are given the chance to kind of naturally fall back into our own natural not gender gender roles but the energy of the masculine and the feminine the puzzle pieces kind of start to fall into place so beautifully and so I I just. I really acknowledge the work that you guys are doing. And I'd love to ask my favorite question that I asked most guests is what does it look like for your heart to the unleashed the grass. Coach go ahead newsouth ahead. Well I would say the biggest thing that is one of my hardest. Totally unleashed is jumping in naked into the ocean. And that's when I feel totally my heart is unleashed I and when I have a bright smile on my face and I invite other people to show their heart in their love. Yeah Yeah I mean I think all of our expressions on our faces. Just say it's an IT's hilarity Like I I think it's old school. The movie were will fareless streaking. Let's go street gangs. And that's the piece when I talk about reconnecting with your exhibitionist as it has less has to do really with all the posturing of you know having a beautiful but it's all that's all great but really that part of you that heart unleashed that wants suggests show everybody what you got which are working with that self celebration. It's really yeah And I'm really a AH present to the like the work that you do and the way that you are is that Willie expect that full expression of love. It's really present and like I love. I bet you said Eliza 'cause they get the audio but they are glowing over here so ladies it's been such a pleasure to have you on. Please let let us know. How can the listeners reached you because I can only imagine that this has just opened up floodgates for them so Lsi how can people follow you reach you contact? You work with you yet yet. instagram and facebook is Alissa. Lahey Alyssa Lissa. LAYOFF DOT COM. It's a L. I. S. S. A. L. E. A.. Hi Dot Com. You can find me on and you can also follow tax. UB which is A.. T. T. O.. B. I. E. E. DOT COM and on social. Because especially for the ladies listening lots of toplessness. Lots of hearts up. open-heart spoiled spoiled self-celebration gotTa Snus so a Lotta and listeners will be sure to be doing all the links so If you do want to if you can't Spelling all the things. Did I get it. Right is. We're going to be linking on the blog post. So if you WANNA make sure you're following them head over to hearts unleash dot com for excess blog and make sure you look up our threesome episode sewed to find links. How about you Michelle? How can people contact and work with you? My website is Michelle. LYONS DOT COM. It's Michelle with one L Lyons Kawai and also facebook coach m. k.. Lions also instagram. And I will be giving in a series of free workshops for single men and my next one is November. Twenty third down in San Diego at thirty second and thorn aren't from two to four and then I'll be doing a couple one. In December one in January up in Encinitas area goes to my facebook page. Yeah and we have a good amount of southern California listeners will those links and all the awesome stuff How about you Michelle? Anything you'd like to share events programs that you'd love to put out there into the world. I typically Wrigley work with men one on one or not events but if women again are listening I do love to work with women in sisterhood in circles roles and retreats so that will be twenty twenty and if we get to connect I'd love to share that with any of the women listening very cool and I love look I I can't. I don't think I could possibly acknowledge ladies enough for the work that you do in the world. It's the Yuda fall and you know men women listening hearts whoever's on here Whatever every you've got whatever you're listening to whatever's opening up for you lean in on it the way that these ladies have leaned into their gifts their talents and share them because Michelle? I think you really nailed. It's a great place to wrap. The world is waiting. The world is waiting for that fully. Unleash chart of yours. And it's so beautiful when people bowl realize the gift that they are so thank you for being here. Yes thank you yeah and thank you listeners. Thanks for tuning into hearts on leash each podcast where we are turning dreamers into doers. The hearts unleashed podcast. Broadcasting is proudly supported by. I'm hearing stories. An audiobook publisher and producer audio. Books are fun entertaining N.. Leading edge way to break into new markets and spread your story like a wildfire. If you're an author coach Speaker entrepreneur it can exponentially enhance your credibility in your field and and make you quickly relatable okay so good news. I'm hearing stories has helped authors like our hearts unleashed creator. Abigail Gaza turn. That dream came into a reality and they can help you too with. I'm hearing stories. You get expert guidance to walk you through the murky waters of this process. So here's your inspired action. Shen Click the link below or go to. I'm hearing stories DOT COM and turn your dream of having an audio book into a reality

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a16z Podcast: AI and Your Doctor, Today and Tomorrow

a16z

44:34 min | 1 year ago

a16z Podcast: AI and Your Doctor, Today and Tomorrow

"Hi. And welcome to the a sixteen z podcast. I'm Hannah this episode is all about how artificial intelligence is coming to the doctor's office, how it will impact the nature of doctor patient interactions diagnosis prevention, prediction, and everything in between the conversation between a sixteen Z's general partner, VJ pond day. And doctor, Eric Topol cardiologists and share of innovative medicine at scripts research is based on Tokyo's book, deep medicine and touches on everything from how a is deep phenotype, and can shift our thinking from population health to understanding the medical health essence of you how the industry might respond the challenges in integrating. And introducing the technology into today's system, what the doctor's, visit of the future might really look like an ultimately, how I can make healthcare more human before we talk about technology. We talk about all the things that are changing. The world are making huge impacts visions think like what should a doctor be doing? And how do you see the that's really would? I was pondering. Thanks really did. This. A deep look into a I, I actually didn't expect it to be this back to the future soaring. Yeah, but in, in many ways, I think it turns out that as we go forward, particularly in a longer term view ability to outsource so many things to would help from AI machine. I think is going to get us back. It could could have big if to where we were back in the seventies and before what was better than was that. Doctors were spending much more time with us. Right. Exactly. That gift of time the human side, which is the center of medicine. That's been lost the big business of healthcare, and all of its components like electronic records and relative value units and all this stuff, basically, has a sucked out any sense of intimacy and time. And it's also accompanied by lots of errors. But of course, it's not a gimme because ministers want more efficiency by predictively. Yeah. I think you put this on Twitter or it's like. Some kid drew like drawing of going to the doctor and the doctor picture was a doctor with her back turned working on a computer, and that is what happens too much. But then but yet, we're talking about technology coming in. So how does this all work out? That more technology means less computer. Well, I think that is a kind of fundamental of the problem of, you know, doctors, not even making I contact as a child to drug that picture will, how unnerving that was her her trip to the pediatrician natural language processing, can actually liberate from keyboards. And so it's already being done in some clinics, and even in the UK and emergency rooms. And so if we keep that up and build on, that we can eliminate that whole distraction, doctors and nurses, and clinicians being data clerks MRs ridiculous. So the fact that voice recognition is just moving so fast in terms of accuracy, and speed is really encouraging Alexis. A very basic version of voice recognition. But you're talking about something much more sophisticated out something where they're actually doing an LP. They're doing transcriptions of doctors and have to take notes. If you were more sophisticated you could put on tala g onto this such that you're not just getting a transcript of what's going on. But that you have very machine learning friendly, organiz data. Exactly. So the note that are synthesized from the conversation are far better than the notes that you would get an epic or Cerna where eighty percent or cut and pasted and their error Laden. So I mean just as we Google AI published in JAMA of their experience. I think is really going much faster because the accuracy of the transcription and the synthesize note is far better than what we have today, an exceeds professional medical transcriptionist, in terms of accuracy, and says, I'm imagining like what the doctor visits like then. So we've got maybe so the doctor doesn't have to be transcribing and not interacting with. Pek who knows what's in the back end but doesn't matter anymore. Right. Presuming you've got like billing and all that headache for, you know, like a PCP all that's a huge headache go. That's all part of that conversation because he say, well, you know, Mr. Jones, we're going to have you have lab tests for such and such I'm never going to get the scan and it's all done through the conversation. We could bring in other technologies, right? We've thought about just how imaging or other types of diagnosis comes in, and it's we see it all these cool things about how machinery can improve this, but then, also that it's fine because at the same point I and you bring this up in the book that over diagnosing also can be very definitely like it was very stunning. You talked about how the incidence of thyroid cancer is going up, but the mortalities went flat. Exactly. And so, I guess the challenge will be is. How can we bringing these technologies and so doctors can do the things they should be doing not the things they shouldn't be doing right? Well, I think there is getting arms around a person's day. Ada, this whole deep FINA, typing. So no human could actually integrate all this data not only the whole electronic record, which all too often is incomplete, but also, you know, pulling together, sensor data genomic data got microbiome, all the things that you'd want to be able to come up with not only better diagnoses, but also the better strategy for prevention or treatment. So I think what's going to make life easier for both doctors and for the patient is having that Dato fully a- processed and distilled in the book, I tell the story about my knee replacement and how it was a total fiasco part of that was because my orthopedist did the surgery wasn't in touch with my congenital condition. And so that hopefully is is going to be something we can transcend. Yeah. In the future. And this is one thing that computers, do can do very Wallis. Let. Justic and coordination in there's tons of cases where you might like our cancer. We're just talking about, maybe you have to bring in an endocrinologist in addition to on columnist. And it's shocking that often there's no discussion there. There's no communication. But yet the challenge in my mind is how does computer magically no things that, that we can't do right now? Yeah. Well, that's I think we're the complementarity synergy between machines and people is so ideal because we just have early Sitadi with data. Whereas deep learning has insatiable appetite and so that contrast. But we have as as doctors in humans. We have just great contextual abilities, the judgment, the wisdom experience and just the, the features that can basically build on that machine processing because we don't ever want to trust an algorithm for serious matter. But if it tease it up and we have. Oversight. And we fitted into that person story that I think is the best of both worlds here. I'm really curious. Because what is the ground truth? Because generally, we don't trust individual person as, as like as knowing everything either. Right. So the, the ground truth would be like a second opinion, third opinion, or fourth opinion, or, or even like, you know, a board that they'll look at something, and that would be what I think most people would view as the ground through the ground truth went into ply to training an algorithm. Of course, is knowing that is the real deal that it is really true. And I think a great example of that is in radiology because radiologists have a false negative rate of thirty two percent. That's negative. And that's the basis for most of the litigation in radiology, which is over the course of a career. A third radiologist get sued mostly because they miss something. So what you have our algorithms with ground troops that are trained on hundred. Thousands of scanned so that whether it's a chest x Ray CT scan or MRI, whatever it is that it's not going to miss stuff. But then, of course, you've got that over read by the train radiologists. So there, you know, I think that's an example of how we can use a I to really revved up accuracy, somebody's going to need to interpret, the outgrowth. I'm sort of sort of be on top, and that in a sense, the doctor is freed from the stuff that doctor shouldn't be doing like that. The that Bs accounting or the typing and all these things, and that's not the best use of doctors time. And it's funny because it seems like the best use of the doctor's time is in understanding what these tests would mean whether being a test, or cluster all or whatever, and in how to communicate with a patient is and it'll be a theme running through the book. So for the first half in terms of the understanding, what do you think that's gonna look like I mean, the things I I've been constantly wondering about is, whether they'll be a new medical specialty like you know because you don't have radiology without like CTX race. Right, right zoom. You don't have radiology, one hundred years ago, I do have a algae or something like that of John who is a radiologist pen in. I penned a jam editorial about the information specialists radiologists and pathologic their foundation is reviewing patterns and information. But what's interesting is this an opportunity for them to connect with patients because they don't pre you know right now? They never cease a patient. The basement that pathologist look at the slides that, that group pathologist, but they actually want to interact with patients, and they have this unique insight because they're like, the honest brokers they're not. They don't wanna do a surgery. They wanna give you their expertise. And so I think that's where we're going to see a pretty substantial change as your touched on this new specialty it look different than the way it is today. And that case it's almost seems like everybody is better off the doctors better off because of pathologists and not just looking at size, but actually dealing with patients in Brasilia patients better off, because you have these false negatives. Yeah, get found the pathologists you know, they have remarkable discordance when they look at slides and to be able to have that basically, looked at as, if hundreds of thousands of them were reviewed the getting back to your second third and end the pinion to get his input for them to help incon- consult with a patient, I think, is really a bonus. We're talking about reality here in pathology. But I mean, we could sort of think about. This as an issue for diagnosis in general, and was one thing you point the book, I think, really beautifully. Now, you said, once trained doctors are pretty much wedged into their level of diagnostic performance throughout their career as an amazing things that doctors, I guess, go through CPA, and so on. But like you only go through med school once and that's intense process. You learn a lot, but you can't go through Mexico holds the time. No, it's so true in in that gets me to Dany, condoms, book about thinking fast and slow. And this system, one that is the reflexive thinking, it happens automatically versus what we want our reflective thinking, which is system to which takes time and it turned out that, if a doctor doesn't think of the diagnosis of a patient in the first five minutes is over seventy percent error are-, and that's how I actually that's how much time is the average width patient. So we have the problem as you've alluded to of kind of plateauing early on career, but we. We also suffer because a lack of time with the system. One thinking a thought is that the machine learning is reflecting what system to would look like because it's trained from doctors sort of doing system to exactly, you know, brings in the integration of would be the ground truth of thousand offer that particular data set. So I think it, it has potential. And of course, we a lot of this stuff need validation. But there's a lot of promissory studies to date that suggests that's going to be very possible. When I think about what am our, our fish intelligence could do. There's like two axes. There's ones like I'm just scale like the fact that you can scale up servers on Amazon, trivial, much more than you could scale human beings. I could we could scalp a thousand servers right now or ten thousand servers right now? I don't I don't think we could call ten thousand doctors and get them here. The only thing you can do is that you could sort talk about her. That access is like sort of intelligence or capability. And you're talking about both in a sense that you can scale up, not just the fact that you could have like a, a resident or Mets school students sort of doing things and having a lot of them. But you in addition to that, you have incense, a doctor through a that's in diagnostics, that's better than any single doctor. Right. I think that's really what is going to be one of the big early changes in this new AM medical era, is that diagnosis is going to get so much better right now, we have over twelve million serious errors year in the United States and of their dot just costly. But they hurt people. Yes. So this is a real opportunity to upgrade that. And that's a much more of a significant problem than most people realize, well. And so, so far, we've been talking about things that feel like the sci-fi fantasy version of stuff, right? I mean like because we've got like this doctor of sorts through diagnosis, second. Do what no single doctor could do presumably at scale, it's doing this at lower cost on it's allowing. Human beings. The do the things that should be doing undeservingly to still be intern here or this, there's no shortage of the and so how, how could this go wrong? And what can we do to? I mean, I think one of the things we've harped on his that you've gotta have Uman oversight. We can't trust an algorithm. Absolutely. Because for any serious matter because if we do that, and it has a glitch or it's been hacked, or has some kind of adversary of input. It could hurt people at scale. So that's one of the things that we got to keep an eye on. For example, if an algorithm gets approved by the FDA oftentimes it's these days, it's, it's an insular code, retrospective sort of thing. And if we just trust at without seeing how it performs in a particular venue, particular cohort of people easier things that we just shouldn't excel blindly, so there's lots of deep liabilities and it runs from, of course privacy security the ethics. Many aspects that are not ideal about this. But when you think about the need and how much it could provide to help medicine. I think those are the trade offs that we have to really consider what we should be doing now. And what people could be doing now to certain -ticipant this, or do you think it's too early as I mean because people have these algorithms now I'm one what do we see in one year versus five years versus ten years? Well, I I it is rolling out and other parts of the world. You know, I just finished this review the NHS, and I was fascinating because they are really going after this are the leading in the world of force in genomics. And now they want to be AI, so they already have emergency room center using that liberated from keyboards, and they are I going after this, and, this course in the middle of Brexit. And so that's kind of. Amazing. But China's really implementing this that you could say, well, maybe too fast because out of desperation or need. But one of the vantage is that we don't recognize with China, not just that they have scale in terms of people, but they have all the data for each year, and we have no data for each person, basically, our data's just spread around all these different doctors and health systems. Nobody has older data and that is a big problem because without the inputs that are completely. Of for like you personally. Yeah. What are you gonna get out of that? So this is a this. We are at a handicap position in this country, and the other thing, of course, is we have no strategy as a nation whereas China UK and many other countries, they are developing or have developed planning strategy and put in resources here as a nation, we have zero resources. In fact, we have proposed cuts to the same granting agencies that would would potentially help Lisa. What, what should one do at that scale like a you know, there's very sing people propose. Is this something to have a new National Institute of health? You know, in this area is there. I mean, I think when I think about the government playing a role, I think I want them to try to help them build the marketplace and set the rules. But we have to be careful that we don't put too much regulation as well. I mean what what you I mean, when you say we, we don't have a strategy what, what's, what's missing? What should we be doing? Yeah. Well, we have no national planning or strata. Jeez. How is not only for healthcare, but in general, how is it going to be cultivated and made transformative experience? I had in the UK was really interesting because they're they not only have the will, but they have a whole wing of the NHS for education and training. You just think about it. We already talked about a profession within medicine that are going to have a morph of their daily function. So we're not well, prepared, a who say take and one of the problems, we have that you're touching on his are professional organizations haven't really been so forward thinking, they're they mainly are centered on maintain a reimbursement for their constituents the entities like NIH NSF, and others could certainly be part of the solution. What you wanna do? Here, I think, is to really exceleron this we're in the middle of an economic crisis in healthcare, which is in the US. The worst outlier. I mean, we, we spending over eleven thousand dollars per person, and we have the worst outcomes life expectancy going down three years in a row. Yeah. Childhood mortality, infant mortality, maternal mortality, the worst people don't realize it. Then you have the UK and so many other countries that are at the four thousand dollars per year level, and they have outcomes at a far superior. So if we use this, we could actually reduce inequities we could make for a far better business model paradoxically, but we're not grabbing the opportunity. Maybe there's another solution. We can think about what you, you also point two in the book, which is what if what can we do to drive through consumer action? For instance. A lot of our healthcare is sick here. Right. What happens when we get sick? It's almost all of what about what can you do to stay healthy? First thing I think of is diet and lifestyle. Right. That could go a long way and so many diseases. How many things that we deal with. It's actually touch on. Diet, the four even talking about, like diagnosing, whether you have cancer should, we be diagnosing? What she'd be having for lunch? The I couldn't agree more that should be a direction. We have had this so naive notion that everyone should have the same diet. And we never got that right as a country. But now we know without any question that people have an individualize, and highly heterogeneous response. That's not just through glucose spikes, if you and I the exact same food the exact same amount. The exact same time are glucose response would be very different. But also triglycerides, response would be different and they don't track together. So what we're learning is if you get all this multi-modal data, not just your gut microbiome, and sensor, data and your sleep, and your activity, your stress level, and what exactly you eat and drink. We can figure out what would be promoting your health. We're not there yet, but we're seeing some pretty branded progress intriguing. Me is at in cases, their cases now, especially let's say just glucose, where you can take technology developed for type one type two diabetics, and now I'm not diabetic. But, like actually had the sort of sort of house about say joy, at least the, the, intellectual and intrigue of having a CG Amami for two weeks. Yeah. So I got to play all these experiments. Right. Right. Like I tried white rice, or Brown rice. Yeah. A house ice cream you know wine versus scotch, you know all the important questions when figure out and actually, those actually a surprise to me that how for instance, I did not spike on ice cream spiked on Brown rice. Yeah. I'm not sure I'm prepared to go on ice cream diet just yet. I don't think you would prescribe that either. Right. But I think the ideas that it's just different for everybody. Right. So maybe you spike on ice cream, I don't and that they're, you know, what's been kind of so knowing about nutrition is that we hear all these conflicting things, but press part of the reason why we're hearing, this conflicting things is that it is so individual examine it. Yes. So complicated and such a fundamental data science problem that it probably takes something like machine learning to figure it out. Well, I think that's central if we didn't have machine learning we wouldn't have known this, and it, only thanks to the group into Wiseman student, Israel. They crack the case on this shooting around seagulls. Yeah. Aaron Seagal and not now it's been replicated by many others in it's being extended a, what would be promoting your health? And right now, it's you know, these proxy metrics like your glucose or your lipids in the blood. But eventually, we'll see how outcomes and prevention can be fostered by your diet is really kind of mind blowing. How difficult data science problem? It seems nutrition is the problem VJ's the number of levels in this e of data. I mean, we're talking about terabyte today to crack the case for each individual, so it's not even just your gut microbiome of the species of bacteria and their density. But now he no is to sequence of those bacteria that are part of the story, then you have of course your these continuous glucose, every five minutes for couple of weeks. That's a lot of data besides that you've got, you know, all your physical activity. You're your sensors for stress. You know, your sleep data and enter your even your genomics. So when you add all this together, this is a real challenge. No human being could assimilate all this date. But what's interesting is not only at the individual level, but then with thousands of people so take everything we just talked about multiply by. Thousand or hundreds of thousands. And that's how we learn here. And so what I think is the biggest thing about the AI under appreciated is the things that we're going to learn that we didn't know, like, for example, another great example of when you give a picture of a retina to international retina expert, and you say is this from a man or woman, the chance of them getting right is fifty fifty. You can train them to be over ninety seven ninety eight percent accurate, and there's so many examples like that, like you wouldn't miss polyps in a colonoscopy, which is a big issue, or you would be able to see your potassium through your smartwatch level in your blood without any blood, and then the imagination just run wild as far as what you could do when you train things and so training, your diet with this torrent of data a not just from you. But from population is, I think a realistic direction and what I think is interesting about this is that it's something where. A a we don't need the MA or an HR anything else to get involved of in terms of diet. And right. Be actually people want to take care of these problems because I think most people are motivated. We just don't know what to do. Right. And so many aspects of, like, you know, now chronobiology is really this hot topic that that's about your circadian rhythm, and should you eat only for eight hours during the day. Well, certain people, yes, but, you know, the whole idea that there's this thing effort everyone we gotta get over that. That's what deep phenotype beings, all about to learn about the medical health essence of you. And we haven't had the tools until now to do that. Okay. So there's a ton of data, but, like a lot of it seems kind of subjective. Right. I mean, did I sleep well or not how you sort of overcomes? The fact that not everything is quantitative like my cholesterol level. Well turns out that was kind of old medicine where we just talked about your symptoms, but new medicine. Is with all sorts of objective metric, so a great example, this is state of mind or mood, and that's going to be transformative for mental health because now everything from how you type on your smartphone to the voice. Yes. Which is so rich in terms of tone in a nation to your breathing pattern to your facial recognition of, of yourself. I mean, there's all these ways to say, you know your video you really depr-. Yeah. You know that you're depressed. So the point being is that you have objective metrics of, one's mental health, as cardiologists for all these years. I'd had these patients, they come and tell me I feel my heart fluttering, and I would put in the note, the heart fluttering, that was so unhelpful. Now I can say, well, you know, you should be able to record this on your phone, or if you have a smart watch, and when your heart flutters just send me the. PDF and we have the diagnosis that is real world. No longer subjective. The whole different. Look, really. And by the way, did the patient, who has a fluttering, who record their, their cardiogram. They don't have to. Wait for me. They already have an automated read from a I it's more accurate than a doctor. There is something very anecdotal about the doctor. Visit it's not right there in the moment. Yeah. Right. To one at one off off. And, and so it's a funny thing because people wonder about let's say the knock gonna but will be that it's not like eight point EKG or something like that. But on the is there with you all the time. Yeah, I know exactly. And then there's this contrived aspect of going to see the doctor where you a lot of people find it very stressful. And when we talk about white coat, hypertension. We don't even know what normal blood pressure is because we need to check that out in thousands hundreds of thousands of people in your world to find out what's normal. We've already had this. Chaos of the American Heart Association saying that they changed the guidelines on the basis of no data. Speaking of, of lack of objective metric. Yeah. Well as one other area that I thought was really intriguing and just to me, this almost paradoxical concept of AI being useful for empathy because I would have thought, like if we're thinking about the things that a computer is good at, like multiplying numbers that's going to be something like they're going to beat humans of that any day, I would have thought, though, the empathy would be the one like the last bastion of what we're good at and what the computers go. But how does I get the empathy because as we, we started the conversation with us about how as a key part where the doctor does. Well, like what can they do there? Well, we are missing that in a big way today and how do we get it back? Well, you know, I think what how we get it back is, we take this deep phenotype ING we do deep learning about the person, and that's all outsourced. With oversight. You know, for a doctor or clinician, now, when you have this remarkable improvement in productivity in workflow, inefficiency, and accuracy, all of a sudden, you have the gift of time, if we just lay down, as we as doctors have over decades for administrators to go ahead and just I drive revenue, and basically have no consideration for patients or doctors where we're not going to see any growth empathy. We're not gonna see the restoration of care in healthcare. But if we stand up and if we say that time all that, all that benefit of the A, I part, the machines support. And by the way, that's also at the patient level. So the patients now would their algorithm. Mic support their decompressing the doctor low tune, yeah, yeah, they're using some of it for the simple things ear, infection skin, rashes, and all that sort of stuff. That's not life threatening or serious. As bypassing doctor a potentially almost completely, so between this fly flywheel of algorithm, make performance enhancement, if we stand up for patients, then we have all this time to give back once we have time to give back then we tap into why didn't you men's go into the medical profession in the first place? And the reason was because they want to care for their fellow human being, but they lost their way, and now we have peak burnout and depression, and suicide in the history of the medical profession. And by the way, not just in the US, you know, in many parts of the world, and how we going to get that back because turns out if you have a burn out, doctor, you have a doubling of errors vicious cycle, if errors the. Yeah, more depressed, so we have to break that up. And I think if we can get people, so there's time together and that real reason why the mission of healthcare. Is brought back. We, we can do this. It's gonna take a lot of activism is not going to be easy, and it's going to take a while. But if we don't start plenty for this, now it's not gonna happen. Yeah. How do you think that changes for you know what, what, how you become a doctor? I mean getting into med school and all the training is really difficult. What does if your medical education look like right now pre med degree is a lot of like biology and chemistry not too much effort in, in psychology, or empathy or in, in statistics or in machine learning. I'm you know what? What does that look like in the future? Like think we're missing the Mark there. We continue to cultivate brainiacs who have the highest mcat scores and grade point, averages and oftentimes, relatively low on emotional intelligence. So we have tilted things we want to go the other way, we want to emphasize who are the people have the highest interpersonal, skills, communicative ability. He's and who really are the natural empathetic people, because a lot of that brainiac work is going to be machine generated, and so, you know, it's something that we are starved to lean in that direction now and it's intriguing because I think there's a chicken and egg problem here because I think I this has to be put in often in these, these big changes resistance, who who's going to be fighting this resistance. We have to anticipate is going to be profound one of the problems. Is that the medical profession? It may not be ossified, but it's very difficult to change when it the only changes it ever occurred rapidly like, adoption of robotics in surgery or because it enhanced revenue that we, these are none of these things are going to hand to revenue. They're actually going to potentially be hit. We have all these interests that this is going to challenge. Like, for example, we could get remote monitoring. Of everyone in their home instead of being in a hospital room, unless they were needing an intensive care unit. Now, do you think hospitals are going to allow that to happen because they will be gutted and then they won't know what to do with all their facilities? So the American hospital sociation is not going to like this. So I'll be those advocated now could like revenue is would they say that would put patients in danger, because they obviously you at home? You don't have the hospital has. Well, you know, it's interesting thing is I don't know if you get in more danger than going into our hospitals, one in four people are harmed. Yeah. I mean sepsis an infection main thing knows a commun- factions from the Hosni. Yeah, yeah. But other medication errors and other things the comfort of your own home, you can actually sleep. It'd be with your loved ones that convenient, but most importantly, just think at the difference in expense. You could buy years of broadband data plan. Hostile which is five thousand dollars on average. It's amazing. We have the tools to do that now, but you're not seeing it being seriously undertaken because of the conflicts. So if you think about how all this has to happen, and we talked about what's possible. But like if you get to nuts, and bolts, it's interesting that they who's going to do it because if you take just a pure data scientists who doesn't understand the the medicine. I don't know if that would be enough, right? And, and but also, I don't know if you could take a doctor that doesn't under date us I understand data. Science. Right. And so is it going to be teams of combing groups that get this together because there will be interational between the data science end the biology and the Clinton class specs have to have to come one after the other to be able to make these advances. We need machines and people to get the best of both worlds. So in the book that example of how we cracked the potassium case we. Between mayoclinic cardiologists and alive. Core data scientists, and what was amazing about that experience to, to review with them. Was that the cardiologists thought you should only look at one part of the Cardi Graham, which historically known so-called q t interval, because it was known have something to do with potassium. But when that flunked and the algorithm was, it was a farce that the data scientists said, well, why are you so biased? Why don't we just look at the entire cardigan? And by the way, mayo, you only gave us a few million cardiograms and why don't you give us all? So then they nailed it. So the whole idea is that the bias is that we have that are profound. But when you start debiasi, both the, the data scientists and the doctors, the medical people, then you start to get a really great result. One of the scariest story, I saw was at this algorithm was getting cancer. No cancer right with crazy hackers. He like ABC of like one point, like never making a mistake, and it turned out that there was some subtle difference between like a high tesla magnet and a low tesla magnet, and that the patients who were very sick to start off with always getting one type of scan, and that a human being couldn't tell the difference. But that the machine was picking up some signal, not of whether it's cancer, whether they were getting like the fancy measurement or they're though, less complicated. One or another, great example, is like there's a classic example, where there, I think predicting tumors and they had rulers for the size of the tumor on all. The tumor once, and so really am L was a great ruler detector. Yeah. The whole idea that as a pathologist, we can't see in a slide, the driver mutation, of course, you could actually train the algorithms. So when the pathologists looking at it, it's already giving you what is the most likely driver mutation? It's incredible. And that does give me to touch on the deep science side of this, which we aren't recognizing is way ahead of the medical side, the ability to up in the microscope, you don't have to use fluorescence or h e you just train. So you forget staining, the idea that you see you used to be hard to find rare cells. Just train the algorithm to find the rare cells. I mean, we're seeing some things in science no less in drug discovery in processing cancer, and sequencing data, and certainly in neuroscience. It's a real quiet revolution. That's much further ahead than on the medical side because there's. No regulatory hurdles, and you make a good point. Because I think it's tempting to try to do what the human can do better. Or what the human new better now try to do as well. But now you're talking about doing things that no human being could do. Yeah. Imaging plus genomics, where the genomics readout let's say or the whatever the, the blood essay is the gold standard. I don't want to predict what the pathologist would say, I want to predict the biopsy are predict the, the blood or whatever the the true goal centers behind it. Right. And if you're training on the best labels, you can do things that no human being could do. Well, you know, this may be the most important point is that we have to start having immagination because we don't even have any idea of the of the limitless things that we could teach machines. And because I'm getting stunned almost on a weekly basis, I never would have thought of that. And so just fast forward, here we are two thousand nineteen, what's it gonna be like, you know, a few years of all the things I when the mayo clinic told me they can look at it twelve lead cardiogram for millions and be able to. Say this person's gonna get H O for relation in their life with x percent probability. I said, really and they've done it. And so I never would've expected that. Well, and that's really fun point. Because and you could think of two ways that human beings, aren't being imaginative or or or what does imagination mean for an algorithm. Right. Well, it into heavy into unsupervised learning world bit limited by the, the annotation, and the and the ground. True. Yes. Going back to that you can only imagine things when you have those for supervised learning, but you know as we go forward. We'll have more of those data sets to work with and we'll, we'll be better at going forward without with well with federated data sets and unsupervised learning. So the, the opportunities going forward are pretty enthralling. Yeah. Well, the unsupervised learning is interesting because you can finally just, you know, for those aren't familiar with the term, it's kind of like trying to find the clusters to sort of not have the labels, partic-. Lay the land, and that's interesting because no human being can sort of especially in high dimensional space, like visualize that. And see that. And so that's one thing. But the second thing is that if you just throw all of the data in, and maybe have the alga, make sure that it's not over fitting that it's not trying to find an overly complicated story, almost, like, you know, these conspiracy theories are like human beings over fitting, for, for the moon landing being a hoax, or something like that, when there's a simpler explanation, for things if you keep it to a simple explanation, the computer can try everything. Yeah. Yes. I'm like you talked about economic at the whole cardiogram. It could look at things that we don't look at because there were expert enough to know that couldn't possibly. Right. Even if it is, or we just don't have the time. It reminds me sometimes these algorithms, almost like children in that kids, just don't know until they'll try things. Yeah. And, and that's where imagination and creativity. I'll often comes from, I couldn't agree with you more. So we've been spending a lot of time talking about diagnosis. But prediction is another thing that is. Really important. I'd call that a real soft spot in a I and I show, I, I told a story of my father-in-law who kinda was my adopted father in the book about how he was on death's door. He was about to come to our house to die and he was resurrected. But any algorithm would said he was a goner. And so the idea that at the individual level, you could predict accurately, whether it's end of life or when you're going to die or in hospital. This is how long you're going to stay or you're going to be readmitted all these things. We're not so good at that. We, we can have a general sense of from population level. But so far prediction hasn't really panned out nearly as well as classification diagnosis, tree is that kind of stuff. And I, I still think that that's one of the shakier parts because then you're, you're, you're gonna tell a person about prediction. You know, we're not very good at that. When we talked to people with cancer, and we tell them, you know, they're, they're prognosis. It's all over the place in reality. And so, you know, the, the question is are algorithms, algorithms really going to do better. Or are they just going to give us a little more precision, maybe not much? Is there enough information to ever predict anything like that? Well, that's part of the problem, too. Is that the studies that have been done to date things like predicting Alzheimer's predicting all sorts of outcomes? You can imagine. They're not with complete data. They're just taking what you can get, like what's in one electron health record one system, rather than everything about that person. So maybe it will get better when we fill in the holes. I always thinking about what would be interesting challenges to work on. That's like one of the most interesting, I think it is because there you could improve the efficiency, if you knew who are the people at the highest risk, and who you wanna change the natural history. What their alka them is predicting if it's. If it's something that's an adverse outcome so that eventually, we'll probably get there. But it isn't nearly as refined as the other areas. But if you combine all these things together, you know, the single your mon- monitoring your body every five minutes, and your diet and your exercise and your drugs. And you have all this longitudinal data s something that no one's ever had before. Yeah. Well, you're bringing up the big hole in the story, which is multi-modal data processing. We are not doing it yet. You know, like for a perfect example, is I in diabetes, people have glucose sensor and the only algorithm, may have tells them with the glucose going up or down. That's pretty dumb. Why isn't it factoring? In everything they eat, and drink, and their sleep in actively and the whole works someday. We'll have multi modal algorithms, but we're not there yet while. So let's go back to restart. You know, a visit to the doctor in the future. And like the good news is that the doctor doesn't have to do any of the. Typing were there courting a is sort of figuring out the diagnosis and that the doctor has all the time now to actually be empathetic and communicate, which is great. But is that now all that's left? No, no. Not at all because Uman touch. So when you go to see a doctor, you want to be touched. That's the exam part of this people when they get examined where for their heart, and you don't even take off their shirt. They know they know there's a shortcut going on inches. They wanted to have a thorough exam because they. They know that, that's part of the real experience. And so what we're talking about is the exam may change. Like, for example, I don't use stuff the scope, I use a smartphone, ultrasound and do an echocardiogram, and I show it to the patient together, as we're doing it in real time, which the person would never see. And by the way, they wouldn't know what love dub looks like when sure keeps or sounds like, but you sure can show them. Yeah. So the, the tools of the physics may change, but the actual hands on aspects of it, and the interaction with the person the patient, and that, that's the intimacy. And we've lost that too. You know, the physical exams have really gotten a very much a detraction from what they used to be. I mean we need to get back to that. That's what people want when they go see a doctor people have deprecated exams because essentially, they said they weren't a value but it sounds like what, what was being? Done was done. Dealing with analog tools and, you know, they can be so superseded by the things we have today. And when you're sharing them with the patient. So here's what you have, and then you send them the video files or the metrics. They can look at, you know, when they get home and get more familiar with their body. It's not only the physics Zam that happens instantaneously in the encounter. But the ability to have that archive data that people get more they learn about themselves. That's all part of that. That awareness, it's important. You talked about back to the future. There might be another Seifein housing actually, if there's some Star Trek episodes like this. Where actually the group that has the highest technology is the one where the technologies invisible. Yeah. And it sounds like that's what all of this is gonna be in the background. That's, but that you really are interacting with a person and this person now has just he's power. So they couldn't have before. I'm with you all the way. Well, thank you so much, this has been fantastic. I really enjoyed it.

cancer AI United States UK thyroid cancer Twitter Eric Topol center of medicine Google National Institute of health Pek PCP Mr. Jones Cerna NHS Brasilia Hannah
How We Do Anything Is How We Do Everything with Daymond John

Living Fearlessly with Lisa McDonald

44:07 min | 4 months ago

How We Do Anything Is How We Do Everything with Daymond John

"Support for this podcast comes from walgreens. Let's start with everyone out there who loves a good story now narrow it down to all those passionate podcast listeners. Who are dedicated to living their best life. That's you right well. Walgreens created a new easier way to shop. Save and stay well just for you. It's called my walgreens. And when he joined you'll discover personalized deals instantly earn unlimited rewards and receive real time. Local health alerts joined for free at my walgreens dot. Com exclusions apply at qualcomm. We believe in staying connected and you can see us wherever five g is transformed telemedicine supporting remote education empowering mobile. Pc's the invention ages here. Learn more at qualcomm dot com slash invention age. This is contact. Talk radio dot cobb consciousness in action and you are taking action into your consciousness by tuning into contact. Talkradio gotta contact talk radio. This is al cold from. Cbs radio thanking you once again for taking time out of your hectic schedules to tune into another fantastic weekly episode of living fearlessly with lisa. Mcdonald's another shout out of wholehearted gratitude to living fearlessly with lisa. Mcdonald's corporate sponsors health honda forever. And ha that reviews clicks sheriff downloads feedback and testimonial or always appreciated. Lisa's purpose and mission is to uplift you to fearless and to live more to appear as a perspective guest on living perilously with lisa mcdonald for to connect with lisa regarding her suite of products and services. You can reach lease at living fearlessly with lisa dot com so for now they are fearless friends. Here's lisa living fearlessly with mcdonalds. Everybody thank you so very much for joining me. Rejoining me again on this lovely friday morning my name is lisa mcdonald host of living fearlessly with the contact talk radio network listenership spans to one hundred and forty five countries. Two hundred and twenty tv radio terrestrial satellites and the potential millions of tune downloads. Super grateful for my guest today. It took me two years a trip to nyc to pitch daymond john in person at the c. suite network thought summit this past december to land this gem of the leader on living fearlessly with lisa mcdonald. It's there is one profound belief daymond. John and i share in common. Is that one must never quit nor give up on what they believe. In from humble beginnings to a self made multimillionaire with over six billion to date and global product sales in a starring role on. Abc's newest business reality tv. Show shark tank. Daymond john is the personification of the american dream he continues to set standards of excellence. While expanding his in fashion branding marketing consulting entertainment and beyond this industry leader bestselling author and groundbreaking entrepreneurial expert has evolved into a highly sought after business and motivational speaker as dynamic business speaker with over twenty years of hands on proven business experience dame shares strategies that continue to bring him financial success as founder and ceo. Damon steered fubu from amir concept global fashion powerhouse with annual retail sales exceeding three hundred fifty million at its peak utilizing many of the same tactics commonly used today damon. John pioneered the art integrating fashion culture and music nearly twenty years ago from his then unprecedented guerrilla marketing and branding techniques to the continuously innovative ways in which he uses social media brand integration and his expertise on pop culture. Damon remains a cutting edge business. Strategist thank you once again to everybody for being now over half a million living fearlessly with lisa mcdonald. Podcast scrubbers damon. I want to say thank you very much for making this possible. It's taken me a long time to get you on my show. I know how off the hook you are so. I really appreciate you joining us here today. The gift of your time with myself to loyal listeners of the podcast subscribers. How are you my friend. I am gonna listen after that show. I'm great. I know you talking about me but i really appreciate it. Thank you thank you for having me fantastic you truly are one of my intangible mentors and it was such an honor to as i said in the intro having met you in person you know i i- sponge up everything you do. I've sponged up everything that you say. And i just want to say that you're conic in this industry and in in addition to that and outside of that what i love about you which i unfortunately can't say about everybody who's off operating at the line in which you are in terms of leadership you really are the real deal. I think you're a very classy individual. I think you've remained really true and humble to who you are as a human being so thank you for that. I'll look like you so much. I really appreciate it. Well the one thing i want to delve into is when we met in new york you had talked about two thousand. Eighteen being very strategically something. You wanted to go ahead in terms of talking about because of your own personal scare diagnosis and things that you've had to overcome and adversity. It was very important for you to really pinpoint the importance to people about prescreening and to be on top of and be vigilant with their health. So if we could maybe talk a little bit about that first of all how are you today. Health wise everything still good show. Yeah everything is a great you know. And i had a scare and a little challenge due to having thyroid cancer and That did not know. I had and I'm cancer free. And you know but still obviously monitoring you know a lot of different things You know within me because you know that it can pop up at any given time. And i just being very vigilant about my about my health and and as you said Early screening and pre early detection and things of that nature fantastic. So is this something. That's pretty much on the speaking circuit anytime you're interviewed or being interviewed. This is kind of a key subject matter in which you're impressing upon people because you yourself personally. No the importance of doing so. Absolutely you know I made a. I made a conscious effort to bring to the light and talk about publicly And i knew that it was going to first of all It's a very sensitive topic to to other people because so many people been affected by cancer and their loved ones on. I know. sometimes it's something wounded you don't want to open up but i also know on the flip side that you know we don't we don't know and as human beings we're just growing and learning every single day and that you know we see a lot of times people who are already suffering and from it and they they they pass away and public figures and you you just kinda you know wonder you know how did they. How did their number come up. You know there are people who don't smoke or don't do stuff like that and you and you you kinda try to just close your eyes and say i just hope you know that imaginer number of mine doesn't come up when when if you're educated properly and you realize there are ways to You know at history of your family health or go out and get coal nas. Because he's copies and You know all the types of things that can help. Bring this awareness to you that you can get on top of this would early detection and hopefully how a much better not even. Hopefully you definitely have a much better. Chance of getting in front of some things and being the survivor are being somebody. Who's been able to reduce the effect of these things you know on you whether it's hypertension cancer or anything else like that. You know heart disease things nature absolutely well and i can personally relate to this both my mom and my mom's sister. My aunt had passed away due to breast cancer So yeah well. You know vigilance is really important. And my mom Very fortunately focused on being proactive. What she could and So that's carried over into my practices and my mindset is well so thank you for being an ambassador on that specific topic because we know how many people are impacted by that Unfortunately exponentially growing every day. So the other thing. I want to jump into so many different subject matters. We're working with limited time. But i do believe in quality versus quantity. So we're going to dive right in now along the lines of health here damon you know in terms of i mean you've not slow down and we're gonna get into some of the meat and potatoes of what you've already other things that you're doing and spearheading an initiative endeavors that you've taken on but for somebody who can do the before and after contrast prior to diagnosis and now post diagnosis. You don't appear to have slowed down but do you think that because of the health scare that you had as a change your mindset in terms of how you do things strategically differently bearing in mind maybe some of the combined factors that do play a part in mind body spirit and overall health your I have changed You know i. I have always been someone who's tried to practice. What i thought was a healthy lifestyle and but again learning and more and more and more try to alkaline my body way more now I also try to try to put adrenaline in. My body isn't working out early in the day other than i used to do. A late at night. And and i've i've given up All all forms of red meat and chicken and things that nature. I pesca tyrian moment. do to knowing that you know i was the type of person figured less. Yes i'm healthy. And then if i go and something's wrong with me well then. I can get medicine to help fix that when that's really not The best thing to do is the best thing to do is to do something before you ever need the medicine which would be things such as Knowing the diabetes and so many other diseases come from the meats. We eat in the foods. We eat and You know every day. I'm i'm trying to figure out what is a better way to Put nutrition into my body. So that i don't have a more things that cancer and other things compete off such a sugar and acid in my body excellent. So you've changed some of the external things things that you ingest into your body your diet things of that nature but do you believe that you're still as maniacal in terms of your adrenalin your tenacity. Your fortitude your gumption your grit your daily grind. Is this something that you still feel needs to be embodied in the mindset and in the attitude and the daily execution of being a top tier producer. And somebody who's able to execute the way in which you do yes but the the the grind become the different form of a grind that wrote the book rise and grind. The rhine almost has nothing to do with work. It has something to do with Being as on top of your health as you can and not doing the two hours sleep because you know your body needs to repair so making sure that you get the eight hours sleep More i'm more effective because of The way that. I put my health and the concern for my Resting of my body. And and the in food nutrition that goes in my body and the exercise my grind is better now I feel i feel healthier. And i feel way more focused. I had this clarity And it's just so much better so yes i am still maniacal in regards to my work ethic but my work ethic My health move from number five one. My work ethic number one tastic fantastic and so for the loyal listeners. Who are tuning in. Because we have a lot of entrepreneurs listening we have a lot of Self employed people people who are doing startups people who feel that they do have to in order to get to the level of being so-called successful. They do have to commit the fourteen eighteen hours a day and in some cases. When you're starting out you are the person wearing five or six hats. You don't have the money or the the cash load in which to hire people to do things so that you can just focus on strictly content and getting things out banging things out so for the people who are listening. What would you impress upon them. In terms of no matter what stage they are in the game what they still need to be mindful of and going forward in terms of longevity. You know a couple of things Of course we've already touched on the fact that you need. You need help in your life. Would you also need a clear vision on what you want to. You know a lot of people you know. Can they take the time to write their obituary. You know what what what would you say about you today. And are you doing the things that you want to your to eventually say about you. Also it's how do you start off the day you know. Are you being selfish with yourself and taking to get clarity on what you want to accomplish for the day in the month in the year and your personal goals you know when we wake up in the morning you know. We have forty emails and a bunch of text messages and voicemails and then we go and talk to the kids of the wife of the husband. Then we get on the train the bus the plane and then we turn on the radio and the world blew up again and you know when your time to sit with cells and and and you know whether you want to call it meditate whether you want to call this setting goals whether you wanna call it You know Praying to and and and having faith but when do you take that half an hour hour a day if you take it. During the end of the day you generally are thinking about all the things that happened during the day. And how can you solve these issues. So i say that you know you a plan for success whether it's a daily success or or life success and i think that every single day what i do is wake up and i. I had these goals that. I read every single day and every single night before i go to bed I say i said that's the most important part because then under that you're doing the old saying of just working hard instead of working smart absolutely fantastic. Well i'd be remiss if i didn't congratulate you. Everybody in the world knows about this. But i'm gonna say it here publicly on the airwaves. I want to congratulate you on being the latest star to join michelle obama's initiative. That's fantastic. Yes yes yes. I joined her. I think two years ago On this initiative to get more kids to enroll in college You know directly out of high school. I was one of those kids. Who said i was gonna take one year off from college and that became the rest of my life. And i don't wanna see that's happened to other kids because thank god. I made it to a certain point. Where in the world. Sam successful but you know if i would have went to college and i would have had a better understanding of financial intelligent than how things work i think i would have been Leaps and bounds. Of where i am today is just for people to be aware of this is happening at temple. University on may second and this isn't just the first time that you've paired up with them. This is in fact. The second time in the first time having been with the brother's keeper initiative cracked i've been with The obamas and and biden on various things That it's on us campaign where we're trying to. We're trying to reduce and bring awareness to Sexual misconduct on college campuses. Of course this one with michelle obama and then the other one my brother's keeper where we try to get You know minorities up to third grade reading level by by the third grade and have It increases their chances to go to higher education. So changing this cribs to corrections to prince to college model. And so what would you say. Because i always play devil's advocate Damon so what would you say to the people particularly entrepreneurs People who have been very successful who did not go to former education. They did not complete former education because also a lot of people would site. And it's been said here on my show by many successful people that it didn't necessarily constitute the real values of what what one needs in terms of functioning in this world and not just functioning but thriving and flourishing That the school system and the ideology surrounding academics is not necessarily one. That's realistic for today's day and age. What would you say to that. I wish i agree. And i i would say whether you go to college. You don't go to college if you don't have dry. Then you don't have the ability to pitch yourself and realize that you're a brand that you're not gonna make it you can have a you can have a degree from harvard. You still end up scooping ice cream. you really don't apply yourself But i think the fundamentals. I think that there are things you can learn from college. And you don't have to go before years but you know finishing task Within a timely manner Doing task within a unit I think that we all need whether you're going to work as an entrepreneur instrument or we we all need to know how financial intelligence so i think. All of these things are a value. And if you wanna look at having access well seventy or seventy five percent of my staff and we're talking level. All the way down started his interns. You couldn't become an internal my company unless you getting college credit. It's against the law. So gives you the way to step inside the door of other places. I think college is useful for a lotta people and by the way if you wanna be a doctor a heart surgeon please go to school. There are some careers that you need to go to school for you know. Yeah don't put me on that waiting list. Please turn of You know damon on demand platform. What were the reasons behind that. If you can just explained myself that again the listening loyal audience here and the podcast subscribers. Eventually what is deemed on demand platform. What were the reasons that That inspired you to get this up and running so david would demand the digital curriculum. And it's eight hours of everything and access to the people that i use for taxes and and so many and taxes and fundraising and deployment of capital and branding and it's a it of course that i created because you know i have four books in a lot of people read my books and gotten information you need i do free facebook live broadcasts. You see me on shark tank but there are a lot of people who say i need step-by-step. i want to know the difference between You know what is what is my business. Need a patent or a trademark. You'll where do i go for funding. How you know. What's the best though financial advice. I can get. And i read it interactive course because i realized that people do want to study and go to school but they may not have time. 'cause they may be operating a current business right now or they need to know where the landmines are as they're starting a business and decided lay it all down because i didn't have anybody to give me this information when i was coming up and i lost millions and millions of dollars having to learn the hard way so i decided to create this digital curriculum for people who want a further education In the daymond. John world and because of technology. So great. Today you know. Listen if there's eight hours of it and one hour is on social media conversion and today we're on snapchat and tomorrow there's something else we just upload the the the new education or the new our up there and just like an app upload the self and you get to you stay relevant and so have you received any incoming testimony to say that as a result of tuning into your stuff what it's done to transform their business or their mindset anything along those lines absolutely and if you go to damon on demand dot com you play those testimonies people who are currently operating businesses or people who started businesses and they wanted to they want wanna share. You know how much they've learned from it. Tastic okay. i wanted to jump ahead here because again. I'm cognizant of time in your time specifically so when you're on shark tank when somebody's pitching you demand and you know you've got somebody who has a very viable product. Somebody who you know. There's really good potential for whatever it is. They are selling and they're looking for endorsement. Buying and partnership with you you know. It's gonna fly but they don't necessarily have the christmas they don't necessarily have to social media footprint they don't have a lot of the other essential core ingredients that you know you would call a package deal you contrast that with somebody else who perhaps is standing beside them. And they've got you know potentially a product that could fly but they completely command the room. They've got that aura. They've got that presence. And you see star material from gut instinct. And maybe you can tell us you make these decisions based on who you're going to go with based on intuitive nece related to the person or more so the product person always the person because you know Everybody's everybody's on their their their you know their best behavior and You know they can tell you all the bells and whistles helping going well but what we do know in businesses there's going to be bumps he's gonna be occurs and i don't know if you're gonna be gapped to the curves that are coming But the people that have the charisma the know how and you feel like we can work it out together and we're gonna learn together worst scenario. We're going to start another business investing in that person. Because we're going to start another business. You know you look at. You may look at all the people who said you know what i got. Twenty million people on vine now vine is going so if you didn't capture those emails on the people you starting zero. You may be in grapevine star. You weren't savvy enough to understand that you need to insulate yourself and grab these emails from these people to convert the sales so You may be a rock star now. But i want to know that you are. You know you're you're you're like a chameleon year swiss army knife and you're going to be able to adapt in any environment absolutely love that so in the world you're in with the people that you're immersed in the people that you are aligned with. Obviously there's a lot of people who would meet the criteria for seemingly being success asphalt. That doesn't necessarily mean that they're great people so what i would be interested to know from you. Damon is what does it take for you to truly respect and admire someone you know. We have to be in line morally on our values. And i think that the people that i like are the people who you know whether they have a million dollars or two dollars they never feel that they are a better person than somebody else i think they every person and they they may see a father or a mother of two that just struggling to work and and You know and feed their family. But yet they're they're they're they're satisfied with life and raising two beautiful kids. that person is just as successful. Somebody would a billion dollars because success means what that person is doing right. So i i want people who value of the people I don't want people who are gonna compromise their morals over a dollar so when things are going great. Everybody's great but i want to know how you how. How are you when the the shipping. The ship is sinking. I want to know that you're going to pitch in and you're going to be there right So and then. I like people who you know they act they learn and then they repeat they make mistakes. They make them fast. They fail as fast as they can. And they learn from it and it makes them better as we continue to grow and that is innovation. So i i like those people. And i have to just like the person reality. Is you know whether you are a a young man or woman applying for a or. You're somebody looking to get an investment. The reality is real human beings and you get more out of people if you like them. Because if i'm gonna sit next to you for eight hours a day five days a week for the next ten years. I'd bet like you and i wanna be around like minded people that i like so those are all the qualities of the person that i want to invest in where i want you know. Hire fantastic now. I think it's very important also to impress upon listeners. Here because there's a lot of people who are taking notes in there soaking in and sponging up everything that you have to say so in terms of a lot of people. The people who i showcase here on living fearlessly with lisa mcdonald you know. I am not always interested in the success story. We can we kapadia you. We can google you. Every accomplishment stands out. You know you're a forerunner in terms of initiative things that are upcoming things that are made public that go viral. I want to know for the benefit of the listeners demon. It's important for people to know the back story. I know your backstory in a lot of people here. Yes would be familiar with your backstory. but people. think that you and a lot of other people who i've Showcased here on radio who now iconic people who are forerunners people who are leading the pack that you know you were born with some type of ingredient. You've got a certain element of dna that somehow someone missed in the birth chain. Can you correct this for people and kind of debunked this and let it be known because you came from really really humble beginnings with your dad having left at ten your mom being thrown and catapulted into having to work multiple jobs in order to make ends meet. Can you talk about some of what was going on for you at the very inception if your journey and what you've learned along the way that's made where you're at today which could make it possible for anybody if they adopt the right mindset and skill set to be in that arena. Can we talk a little bit about the back story and the grind and the never quit and the fortitude I don't know we have enough time to cover all my failures You know It just reality. You know i I grew up an only child. And my father finale. Ten and I did not know that. I was dyslexic. But many of the teachers were not advanced me in certain type of groups in school. I wasn't allowed into the boy scouts. and i got left back in school As i was growing up in hollis queens where it was lower middle class Many of my friends like in many neighborhoods and the people who are listening to us now around eighty five eighty six. When cracks started to devastate. The neighborhood I probably lost Through whether it is through death or through Incarceration probably thirty of my neighborhood. Friends so You know they set a goal on us as as young african american males that we'd be dead or in jail by twenty one and and they'll you know my friends started to listen to those goals that they thought were gonna happen so they would do things to make sure those goals happen. Many of them were going. But at age i am i started. You know two or three. You know businesses because You know. I thought the idea was to be rich and i started the businesses Little to no money but my idea was to make money. And that's exactly what you don't make when you just start a business to make money. I didn't have any passion all over it. i did. Uh i'll You know out of high school. I i couldn't really afford college and i also thought i was so smart that i'll take off one year. College never went to college before you know it you know. I thought also smart but all the kids. I laughed at who will go into college. They're coming back. I'm twenty two years old working red lobster and i'm serving them. Shrimp and i'm embarrassed. I realized maybe. I'm not as smart as i thought i was. i'll go on and so a couple of hats on a corner because i just love the lifestyle of making clothes for people and i started to do something i love but full opened up at eighty nine and i called it three times from eighty nine to ninety two because i ran out of capital. I finally got public. Recognition by ninety six. Didn't have any financial intelligence. When i went out to golden loans from the bank got turned twenty. Seven banks then. I would turn my house into a factory. I would spend all the money that i did hand to turn my house into a factory because i didn't have financial intelligence again. I was paying for real goods ninety days ahead of time of paying for a staff and salaries and and i was giving my accounts thirty sixty ninety days credit. Like i'm a bank so before you know what what the lose the house You know i started bunch of ups and downs. Went through my first marriage and got a divorce because like many of us workaholics. I didn't value The family that i had and i put work first. When isn't the reason. I'm working to to Love my family You know and been would go down. And i would fail the four or five months or other brands that finally come up with another brand and you know and a whole bunch of ups and downs all in between there from health to personal relationships but the end of the day You know You know you can't be anybody else. Because everybody else's taken and i and i knew that at end of the day i wanted to be able to make my mother proud. I didn't want to end up in jail. I wanted to make change for other people and i I just keep pushing through. If i can go personal here for a second. I just because we talk a lot about the backstory. We talk about being in the shits and we talk about. I talked quite openly and publicly about turning shit into gold. And so you know in terms of your gumption your grit and you know all those things that you just cited and rhymed off for us damon which i appreciate you being brought in authentic and candid about that because a lot of people hide behind the failure. Lot of people see that as embarrassment a lot of people see that as oh god i don't want people to me to think that i was short-sighted once upon a time however you know i think it's important you know we we know your circumstances surrounding your mom and you wanted to make your mom proud because of course you you've identified. Your mom has made a lot of sacrifices for you in order for you to have whatever you could have in terms of the best start and the best footing possible in light of other. Things haven't gone awry now. Knowing what happened with your dad was part of you. Maybe even subconsciously where you thought okay. Well maybe that mark that was left on my indelible soul is kind of the birthing of the mark and the footprint and the imprint. I wished to now leave on the rest of the world improve something if not to the restaurant on yes or no so You know the of being an author is when you right. When i wrote my first book. And if you're ever talking about your personal life you can't just breeze over like an dad left and cool you know because the writers going to say well. How did you feel and you know you're gonna have to get in touch with your feelings about it now. I know my father hard-working Trinidadian man who you know in the culture trinian's most of my family members and a lot of people become engineers and people heavy mathematics and pretty good in mathematics. And i think that Number one. I would have been in a career like many of us that my parents wanted me to be in And i wouldn't have had that liberty. I also wouldn't have become. The man of the house is such an early age. And you know life happens right you know. People do grow apart from each other and things happen But i couldn't let that be a burden in my life. I couldn't let there. I couldn't let that whole down. And i didn't want to go necessarily prove Me right to him. I wanted to prove to my mother that her sacrifices to raise me as a young man would pay off because You know as being a parent. We start to see all the sacrifices that we do. And i wanted to make sure that my mother worked too hard to and i and i wanted to make sure that the love that she showed me. I was able to make sure that you know when she got to a certain age that she can just relax. She put her time in. So i think it's a little bit of the dad thing but it's more about. I became the manor house. And i took the responsibility that i felt. I needed to take a fall. I appreciate that. So much as i want to talk a little bit about rising grind. We did talk a little bit more at the top of the hour here and i want you to have the opportunity here damon to plug where specifically people get your book again and everything else all your books and materials sure. Yeah you know you can follow me on On any other social media platforms. I'm at the shark daymond. My name is damon. Raymond but with the day of i my book you can you can get it on audible. You can get it on You know all the barnes and nobles and amazons of the world I do have arrived. Podcast that Is out and Yeah you get any materials that need places of course and then you know you can just catch me on shark tank of course and any other places that i'm trying to give as much information as i can fantastic well and the thing is too even though rise in grind your more recent book and i wanna thank you for the personally inscribed. Copy that. I received in new york when i saw you at the c. suite network thought some of that was very touched by that but i also wanna talk about the power broke because i think that's a very important message is well and you talk about your five five essential core secret ingredients that everybody must embody if they're going to take things the trajectory of their life to that next level. So can you. Maybe break some of that down again knowing that we're cognizant of time and you've got a wrap up here shortly but maybe you took my shock points. Yeah yeah sure. So the power brokers my book prior to this and it was really that you know this whole theory of you need to make money is a bunch of crap because over sixty five percent of the Inc or for one thousand wealthy people are self made men and women that means they broke and What i put together is what. I call my shark points. And every time. I've succeeded every one of those points. Where somehow activated and every time i failed one or two or more of those points and missing so i basically call them. The fundamentals for long-lasting results and number one is s immediate. You have to set a goal if you don't you can't hit a target that you can't visualize right And and and people don't realize that they don't if they're not unconscious You know they're non control the goals they're setting. We let other people set goals for us that we can't do this. We can't do that. You're going to embarrass yourself. You're going to embarrass us Number two homework today with the way analytics are. it's amazing. how much is there. And don't go out thinking that this hasn't been done any industry you're at you can do your research. There's a million people who thrived in and twenty million people who died in it And people think that they're going to always have a new product or a new thing. It hasn't been done. There is nothing new. It's just a new form of delivery. A new customer base. You know a way to make it lighter faster or stronger. So do your homework. Do your research don't get too emotionally involved in what you're doing where you don't wanna look at the numbers you know The next one is a more. It's love you gotta love what you're doing like i said i started the first couple of businesses. I failed at him. Because i just wanted to make money and i would be bored of the business in six months two years and if i did make any money i've spent it right away. 'cause all i was trying to do was make the money you know. You have to really be fortunate and low. What you do now re reality is you gotta keep your day job too. Because you've got to keep the lights on to. You can love all you want and all that warm and fuzzy stuff sounds nice but you gotta pay the bills so you know you gotta you gotta find a way to pay the bills to relapse for five years while i started fubu and i just had to sacrifice various other things in my life no more hanging out no more of this and that but you know what but didn't work relapse for five years while that helped give me a salary paid for my medical coverage I was utilizing some of the people that work there to help me with stuff. If i didn't do that i would have had to do. Two million dollars in food would just bring the same hundred and fifty thousand dollars. I made over the course of five years in lobster so you know what you would be realistic about it my fourth point is are. You gotta remember your personally. The brand you and i touched on it several times. People are investing in you. I always ask people can go out and put themselves personally in two to five words. Can you describe yourself in if i work when you walk in the room. If you don't know what you're to five words are you stand for then you leave it up to other people to interpret and why is two to five words more than now than ever before because people think due diligence starts after i make agreement with union over the paperwork. No no do. I want to pick up my phone and i google you so if you're trying to you're trying to have this great company this great idea. Well let me ask you something. Would you bring your friend over my house for dinner. And i'm gonna be interviewing you do for a job or interviewing you to give you an investment. Will you bring your friend over my house that they were racist. Misogynistic pig well. It's a bunch of pictures and tweeting with them. Checking out your friends to right. And i think he thinks just like them right so you know you gotta be careful. You gotta be careful by the end. The last thing is like i like when you and i talked about it. You just gotta keep swimming you. You're going to get the door slammed in your face. Like i did ever since i was a kid coming up and even today you know being a thanks great anybody will pick up my phone call once but if i don't deliver they're not picking up again and you and you're gonna get door slam near face but if everybody knew so much and all your friends knew what you should do. Then they wouldn't be right next to you. You know if you're not successful where you wanna be surround yourself with like minded people and mentors and none. You're gonna keep getting the door slammed in your face. I saw interview with mark zuckerberg and President obama and marks doing pretty good these days. Now he said he's still he's he's still here's no he's still here he can't do and be even better so mark zuckerberg going to hear it. Trust me you. And i didn't hear too absolutely absolutely well and on that note because i've posted something i think he's doing a phenomenal job. And you know. I just think people have to be a little bit more tapped into the reality of the world that we're living in as far as technology goes in you know if people are just so naive but everyone's always looking to pass the buck but if you don't understand you know before you sign up for the terms of agreement. I'm sorry that's on you. That's not mark zuckerberg. I go on about that. I get irate for him i do. I really feel for the guy i think. He's handling everything like class act. But anyway. So i i just wanna say i'm super jazzed once again for this opportunity because again this has been something that's been in the works for me Something that i've been setting my intentions on something. I've taken massive action in which to get to this point where i could bring you onto radio and in introduce you and share you with my my loyal listeners. And it's been such treat. I think again you're fantastic person And i just. I i think the world of you so you keep doing what you're doing shining and if there's if there's any last minute thing that you would wish to impart to the listening audience before you have to kind of see cheerio here daymond. That would be greatly appreciated. Your the only thing is exactly what we opened up on. I think that it was the first thing to talk about. Because it's the most important part you know you gotta really you know entrepreneurs don't take care of themselves they they take care of everybody else They say they'll get to You know that later or whatever. The case is the two most important things in in you know in the world. Are you know you have to take care of your health because we need you around and You know it's something that's very delicate and the number two is make you make sure you love that family of yours. You know we we we you know. We see our husbands and wives and kids so often that we may not take the time that we need to spending and then we're so busy sitting next to a bunch of strangers every single day and we don't Show that love and that value and that end of the day. That's what you're working for right. And as i shared with you i lost my first You know wife You know my marriage. Because i was working so hard and You know and a lot of people listening are doing the same thing. When that's you know. And i don't want to be this again. You know warm funny guy. But i'm telling you right now as get older in life. And i see more of what success really is. Those are the most important things that are success. Your health and your your family and of course faith plays a big role in both of those absolutely fantastic again. Just gonna say thank you very much. I wish you all might continue sas Not that you need that for me. You're gonna you're gonna fly any way you always do But i just want to say you're welcome to come back here anytime in the future for anything else this upcoming of course for somebody at your caliber. Somebody who's always executing somebody who's a visionary there's always to be things in the tank. There's always gonna be announcements. There's always gonna be new initiatives being spearheaded on your part so if you ever wished to come back to living fearlessly with lisa mcdonald and share all that great stuff in addition to everything else. That's going on for you. You're always more than welcome. You have a open standing invitation here on my program will thank you. I thoroughly enjoyed it and really great questions. I haven't been asked some of them. So i definitely appreciate it when somebody else can make me You know think a little bit harder. So i really appreciate it. Well thank you damon and all my best. You take care and we'll talk soon to my loyal listeners. I want to thank you once again for taking time to tuning into living fearlessly here with at least mcdonald i go live as you know every friday at eight. Am pacific ten central eleven eastern if you have any Or you wish to appear as a perspective guest on my show currently reach out to me at least At living fearlessly with lisa dot com or living fearlessly with lisa dot com. I also want to say normally do this at the top of the hour but again be being Concerned about demons time. I'm preserving this to the end of the show. I do want to thank once again. My family and my friends over c. Suite radio network where of course following the live show you can see and hear Download share the interview of each guests. Who i showcase on a weekly basis on my hoes page again. Leaving perilously with lisa mcdonald. I want to thank my corporate sponsors and honda as well as forever forever living. I wanna thank you again as a loyal that we know. How time is. There's thousands and millions of podcasts out there but the fact that you continue tune into my show and to hear the content that myself and my guest of each week brings to you and the testimonials and the feedback that we continue to receive from you. I can't thank you enough for the outpouring of love and support and the endorsements. So i want to say have a fantastic weekend on uplift you to fear less and to live more gratitude to all of you take care and all my best buy. This is alcohol from cbs radio. Thanking you once again for taking time out of your hectic schedules to tune into another fantastic weekly episode of living fearlessly with lisa. Mcdonald's another shout out of wholehearted gratitude to living fearlessly with lisa. Mcdonald's corporate sponsors health and honda forever and that give reviews clicks shares downloads feedback and testimonial or always appreciated leases purpose and mission is to uplift you to fearless and to live more to appear as perspective guest on living fearlessly with lisa mcdonald or to connect with lisa regarding her suite of products and services. You can reach lisa at living. Fearlessly with lisa dot com and until next week are fearless. Friends this is alcohol. Coal from cbs. Radio telling you to be your own hero. The euro chiro. The your leader and be your own best friend.

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