35 Burst results for "Thurgood Marshall"

Howard Names College of Fine Arts for Chadwick Boseman

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Howard Names College of Fine Arts for Chadwick Boseman

"The man who starred in Black Panther is being mounted in a big way at his alma mater when Chadwick Boseman was a student at Howard University he helped lead a student protest of plans to merge the college of fine arts into the college of arts and sciences recently the arts college was re instituted and now the school says it will be named after Bozeman Donna comes less than a year after both men died at age forty three of colon cancer and it re establishes a tide that he had with the newly minted school's dean Felicia Rashad the two met when both men was an undergrad and he considered her a mentor both men rose to prominence playing this year was a black icons in movies like Jackie Robinson James Brown and Thurgood Marshall he was nominated for an Oscar in his last movie role in ma Rainey's black bottom on Oscar wells Gabriel

Chadwick Boseman College Of Fine Arts Into The Bozeman Donna Howard University Dean Felicia Rashad Colon Cancer Jackie Robinson James Brown Thurgood Marshall Oscar Ma Rainey Oscar Wells Gabriel
Lee Daniels and Andra Day on the hidden activist life of Billie Holiday

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:07 min | 8 months ago

Lee Daniels and Andra Day on the hidden activist life of Billie Holiday

"Good afternoon. I'm jonathan kaye. Part opinion writer for the washington post. Welcome to washington post. Live the united states versus. Billie holiday is the incredible story of the fbi's effort efforts to keep jazz great billie holiday from singing strange fruit. Her signature song about lynching director lee daniels presents a gripping drama that shows holiday in all her glory and tragedy. Andrew o.'day gives a stellar performance. So convincing you'd think you were watching lady day herself. That's why i am thrilled and honored to welcome lee daniels and andhra dade to washington post. Live thank you both very much for being here to see you again. I know it's been a very long time. Greats isn't a you again both of you. Congratulations on this film. The moment i saw it. I immediately sent a letter to y'all saying okay here. All your options. I need to talk to you about this film. Le- let me start. Start with you. Thanks so as we saw in the in the opening clip. The film tackles pretty much everything. Racism sexism addiction art abuse. And i'm wondering. How did you come to this project. And what influenced your approach to billie. Holiday's life susan lori parks the pulitzer winning a prize winning playwright Sent me this beautiful script that really depicts the government breaking her down coming for her coming for billie holiday and and really trying to cripple her. As an artist or singing strange fruit which was about lynching black people and that wasn't the understanding of billie holiday that i had. I thought that she was a troubled jazz singer. Got in trouble with the law. And you know the drugs and was fashionable. I did know that she was a political activist. And so and i you know i pride myself in being smart about our history and i thought to myself that i i don't do this. I don't know i had. I had to do it. And i thought also like how many other stories about our people have have. They have been hidden so yeah that was more threes in selena. And so right and i am going to latch onto what you just said before. Which was you thought of billie holiday as a jazz singer But you didn't really know that she was an activist. What what more did she do. Other than being defiant about trying to seeing strange fruit despite government opposition and government targeting. What other things that she do that made you realize that she's she's more than just lady day. What other than she did. Besides stand up to the government. I guess a lot to say i couldn't. I don't know that i could today. I don't think that i could. They told me lead. You can never make a movie again or coming for your mother. I'm going to come for your kids and you will. I'm like take it. But the thing about her strength and her being born in the into the world that she was being born in tipton board she didn't she didn't get to fly in you know what because she. She had nothing to lose by living in her constantly. And let me bring you in here. I saw your interview go ahead. Go ahead now. I just wanted to back off that too. I mean. I think what shows so brilliantly in the movies that apart what she did in standing up to the government was being human. She's black queer woman in the nineteen thirties. Forties and fifties and that living in an owning their in itself is is is defiance than accident that she's integrating audiences music one of the first artists a black woman to integrate carnegie hall. She wasn't the first but she is one of the first shoes audiences in athlete. People understand. This is sort of pre. They're real reinvigorated civil rights mellon so we wouldn't have our heroes would not have been as bold in as they were no thurgood. Marshall end the light on downs. You know rosa parks on down if it were not for her singing. Strange fruit in defiance of the government for not for setting off this alarm in the nation. In letting people know that it's that this was a really really understand. How much for june that emboldened the civil rights news we know today you know as as arrested in the so and him showing her in all her. Human element is is access. Defiance all in itself nelson young. I'm proud from did work.

Billie Holiday Washington Post Lee Daniels Billie Jonathan Kaye Andrew O Andhra Dade Susan Lori Parks FBI Pulitzer United States Selena Tipton Carnegie Hall Rosa Parks Marshall Nelson Young
Lee Daniels and Andra Day take on Billie Holiday’s legacy

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:07 min | 8 months ago

Lee Daniels and Andra Day take on Billie Holiday’s legacy

"Afternoon. I'm jonathan kaye. Part opinion writer for the washington post. Welcome to washington post. Live the united states versus. Billie holiday is the incredible story of the fbi's effort efforts to keep jazz great billie holiday from singing strange fruit. Her signature song about lynching director lee daniels presents a gripping drama that shows holiday in all her glory and tragedy. Andrew o.'day gives a stellar performance. So convincing you'd think you were watching lady day herself. That's why i am thrilled and honored to welcome lee daniels and andhra dade to washington post. Live thank you both very much for being here to see you again. I know it's been a very long time. Greats isn't a you again both of you. Congratulations on this film. The moment i saw it. I immediately sent a letter to y'all saying okay here. All your options. I need to talk to you about this film. Le- let me start. Start with you. Thanks so as we saw in the in the opening clip. The film tackles pretty much everything. Racism sexism addiction art abuse. And i'm wondering. How did you come to this project. And what influenced your approach to billie. Holiday's life susan lori parks the pulitzer winning a prize winning playwright Sent me this beautiful script that really depicts the government breaking her down coming for her coming for billie holiday and and really trying to cripple her. As an artist or singing strange fruit which was about lynching black people and that wasn't the understanding of billie holiday that i had. I thought that she was a troubled jazz singer. Got in trouble with the law. And you know the drugs and was fashionable. I did know that she was a political activist. And so and i you know i pride myself in being smart about our history and i thought to myself that i i don't do this. I don't know i had. I had to do it. And i thought also like how many other stories about our people have have. They have been hidden so yeah that was more threes in selena. And so right and i am going to latch onto what you just said before. Which was you thought of billie holiday as a jazz singer But you didn't really know that she was an activist. What what more did she do. Other than being defiant about trying to seeing strange fruit despite government opposition and government targeting. What other things that she do that made you realize that she's she's more than just lady day. What other than she did. Besides stand up to the government. I guess a lot to say i couldn't. I don't know that i could today. I don't think that i could. They told me lead. You can never make a movie again or coming for your mother. I'm going to come for your kids and you will. I'm like take it. But the thing about her strength and her being born in the into the world that she was being born in tipton board she didn't she didn't get to fly in you know what because she. She had nothing to lose by living in her constantly. And let me bring you in here. I saw your interview go ahead. Go ahead now. I just wanted to back off that too. I mean. I think what shows so brilliantly in the movies that apart what she did in standing up to the government was being human. She's black queer woman in the nineteen thirties. Forties and fifties and that living in an owning their in itself is is is defiance than accident that she's integrating audiences music one of the first artists a black woman to integrate carnegie hall. She wasn't the first but she is one of the first shoes audiences in athlete. People understand. This is sort of pre. They're real reinvigorated civil rights mellon so we wouldn't have our heroes would not have been as bold in as they were no thurgood. Marshall end the light on downs. You know rosa parks on down if it were not for her singing. Strange fruit in defiance of the government for not for setting off this alarm in the nation. In letting people know that it's that this was a really really understand. How much for june that emboldened the civil rights news we know today you know as as arrested in the so and him showing her in all her. Human element is is access. Defiance all in itself nelson young. I'm proud from did work.

Billie Holiday Washington Post Lee Daniels Billie Jonathan Kaye Andrew O Andhra Dade Susan Lori Parks FBI Pulitzer United States Selena Tipton Carnegie Hall Rosa Parks Marshall Nelson Young
NAACP LDF Announces Marshall-Motley Scholars Program

The Takeaway

01:02 min | 9 months ago

NAACP LDF Announces Marshall-Motley Scholars Program

"Of peril but also a time of tremendous possibilities. The head of the end of the Legal Defense and educational Fund says the organization wants a new generation of civil rights lawyers in the South. Now it has a $40 million gift from an anonymous donor to put them through law school. Here's NPR's Carrie Johnson. LDF president, Caroline Eiffel says the scholarships will focus on the place where most of the LDS cases originate. The South is a critical region in this country for civil rights activism. It is still the region where a majority of black people live. The program is named after two LDF alumni late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and Constance Baker Motley, the first black woman to be a federal Judge. The scholarships will cover tuition, room and board and other training. In return, applicants agree to spend at least eight years working on civil rights cases in the South. Eiffel says they're likely to handle voting rights disparities and housing and education and other cases. Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington This

LDF Carrie Johnson Caroline Eiffel Justice Thurgood Marshall Constance Baker Motley NPR Supreme Court Eiffel Washington
Anonymous $40 million gift funding 50 civil rights lawyers

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 9 months ago

Anonymous $40 million gift funding 50 civil rights lawyers

"An anonymous donor gives forty million dollars to the N. double ACP legal defense and educational fund to use for scholarships for racial justice law students the LDF says with that money it plans to send fifty students to law school in return they must commit to eight years of racial justice work in the south starting with a two year postgraduate fellowship in the civil rights organization the LDF chose Martin Luther king day to announce the Marshall Molly scholars program named after former Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall and Constance Baker motley as lawyers both played a pivotal role that led to the courts brown V. board of ed ruling outlawing racial segregation in public schools I'm Julie Walker

Acp Legal Defense And Educatio LDF Civil Rights Organization Marshall Molly Constance Baker Motley Martin Luther King Thurgood Marshall Supreme Court Courts Brown V. Board Of Ed Ru Julie Walker
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:31 min | 9 months ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on KOMO

"In the come with its own him turns on come on news on Inauguration day, along with Joe Biden, becoming the nation's 46 president. Kamila Harris is poised to make history and she's drawing on those who helped inspire and pave the way for her. ABC is Michelle Friends and has more vice president elect Kamila Harris is ushering in history as she gets ready to take office as the first woman and woman of color to be elected to the position and we're learning. Harris will be sworn in by Justice Sonia Sotomayor. She is the first Latina Supreme Court justice at the swearing in, There will be two Bibles used. Harris has chosen one that previously belonged to a family friend and the Second Bible that belong to Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, the late civil rights icon. One of Harris is inspirations for her career path. Michelle Franzen ABC News I'm Carleen Johnson with a couple extra. It is looking more likely 2021 will bring Ah, year of virtual high school graduations again for a lot of students. Younger students have started to return to classrooms but not older ones. We asked Washington Education Association president Livery Delaney about that much easier cohort. Those students If you think of a middle school or high school and keeping small groups of students separate, it's nearly impossible. Many older teachers, fearful of getting covitz at work, have said they don't want to go back into school buildings yet, but she's a really struggling academically and emotionally, this young man who recently graduated told come up. He's worried about his younger friends. They're not. I don't think.

Kamila Harris Justice Sonia Sotomayor president Joe Biden Michelle Franzen Supreme Court vice president ABC Michelle Friends Thurgood Marshall Carleen Johnson Livery Delaney Washington Education Associati
Harris to be sworn in by Justice Sotomayor using Thurgood Marshall's Bible

News, Traffic and Weather

00:21 sec | 9 months ago

Harris to be sworn in by Justice Sotomayor using Thurgood Marshall's Bible

"Harris will be sworn in by Justice Sonia Sotomayor. She is the first Latina Supreme Court justice at the swearing in, There will be two Bibles used. Harris has chosen one that previously belonged to a family friend and the Second Bible that belong to Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, the late civil rights icon. One of Harris is inspirations for her career path. Michelle

Justice Sonia Sotomayor Latina Supreme Court Harris Justice Thurgood Marshall Supreme Court Michelle
Viola Davis and Chadwick Boseman star in 'Ma Rainey'

Fresh Air

06:04 min | 11 months ago

Viola Davis and Chadwick Boseman star in 'Ma Rainey'

"The enter chadwick. Boseman died of cancer in august at the age of forty three not long after he finished shooting the movie mall. Rainey's black bottom now streaming on netflix. The movie stars viola. Davis is the famous blue singer mall rainy and was adapted from august. Wilson's play our film critic. Justin chang says that boseman's final screen performance ranks among his very best. One reason chadwick boseman was such. An extraordinary actor was his ability to command the screen without hogging the spotlight. His presence was so quietly magnetic that even when he played real life. Heroes like jackie robinson and thurgood marshall or fictional ones like king to challa in black panther. He still seemed like the most self effacing of movie stars but boseman could also go big like when he took on james brown in the musical bio-pic get on up and gave his most electrifying performance. Until now it's devastating. That ma rainey's black bottom is the last new. Boseman movie will ever see this. Excellent adaptation of august wilson's nineteen eighty to play from the director george c wolfe and the screenwriter ruben. Santiago hudson is both a precious parting gift and a punch in the gut even more than get on up. Boseman holds nothing back. He emptied himself out onscreen. He plays levy a gifted and ambitious trumpet player struggling to forge his way in a white man's world or this case a white man's recording studio where most of the movie takes place. It's a sweltering hot day in nineteen twenty seven chicago in the pioneering southern blues singer ma rainey played by a superb viola. Davis is planning to record some of her most popular songs. Mas name may be in the place title. But she isn't the main narrative focus here much of the story unfolds while the four musicians in her band are waiting for her to show up at the studio. During the rehearsal session cutler the guitar and trombone player played by colman. Domingo wants to stick with their usual arrangement for a particular song but levy wants to use a new edgier version that he composed. It doesn't take long for the arguments to start and the egos to emerge. How's your name in. So i just played a piece whatever they want them. Criticizing the people's music like you. I got talent. Oh man is we tagged. My dad had a note. I was gonna turn out like the name mccabe. I'm going to give me a bad and make some shots. I don't give them instead of my. I wrote and he say going to let me record when i get my band together. I just got last part of song. I got stopped or everybody gets out there. And other keeping the same idea from the beginning in everybody got a game plan for all his outward swagger boseman later lays bare. The anguish beneath levies self-assured grin in a spellbinding monologue about his southern childhood. He reveals the acts of violence that were committed against his family by a gang of white men he's witnessed unspeakable horrors and fought hard for his shot at success. And he's not about to let anyone stand in his way not even marini herself when she finally shows up at the studio via davis who won an oscar for her work. In another wilson. Adaptation fences is magnificent. Here in the kind of full throated diva showcase. She's rarely taken on becoming more rainy. Required quite the transformation davis wears a padded rubber suit and sports. A mouthful of gold teeth and her vocals are supplied by the singer. Maxine lewis but the performance never feels needlessly. Flashy and davis is best moments are the ones in which she shows us. Ma rainey's anxious calculating side when she stops the recording session because no one's brought her the bottle of coke she always insists on before singing. She isn't just causing a fuss. Exactly what she's worth and how much power she commands in a predominantly white male industry and she's determined to push yourself right up to that line without crossing it marines. Black bottom is one of ten plays in august. Wilson's epic pittsburgh cycle and the only one that isn't actually set in pittsburgh wilson's insights into the complexities of twentieth century. African american experience cemented his reputation as one of this country's greatest dramatists. The filmmakers haven't opened up the material in the manner of so many stage to screen adaptations if anything they've ruthlessly tightened the play and paired it down to essentials wolf directs at a furious clip. The sets are spare even drab which has the effect of your concentration on the performances and while boseman and davis are the stars of the show. Every actor gets a chance to shine including michael potts as the bass player. Slow drag and glenn termine reprising his role as the pianist toledo from twenty sixteen revival at the heart of the play is the bond between levy a fictional creation and rainy. A real life figure. The two are antagonistic by nature levy keeps trying to put his own stamp on mas music and he makes the mistake of trying to seduce. Her young girlfriend played by taylor. Page but levy and ma are also kindred spirits. They're both trying to make authentic commercially viable art with an assistant bent on exploiting their talents but levy doesn't have martinis experience or her knack for self preservation and the weight of his past trauma ultimately proves too much to overcome the climax is hunting beyond words were seeing a man peering into an abyss played by an actor who knew his own life was slipping away chadwick. Boseman last moments on the screen are among his darkest and also is

Boseman Ma Rainey Justin Chang Chadwick Boseman George C Wolfe Santiago Hudson Levy Davis Wilson Rainey Chadwick Thurgood Marshall Jackie Robinson James Brown Netflix Ruben Maxine Lewis
Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:16 min | 1 year ago

Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Britannica. Today's politicians but most of her life fighting for civil rights, she put her life at risk to change the course of American history, but she's often left out of history books. Let's talk about Constance Baker Motley. Constance Baker Motley was born on September fourteenth nineteen, forty one in new haven connecticut she was one of twelve children born to working class immigrant parents from the West indies. Constance. Was a bright child who grew up attending integrated schools and quickly fell in love with reading. She didn't learn much about black history in school. But what she did learn about civil rights leaders inspired her she decided she wanted to become a lawyer, but constance couldn't afford higher education. She took a job as a maid for a while before moving on to work for the National Youth Administration an organization focused on providing work an educational opportunities for young adults. Constance was giving a speech at a local community center one evening when her oratory skills impressed a wealthy white philanthropist. He, offered to pay for constants college tuition. So in nineteen, forty, one constance began attending college at Fisk University in Nashville. She later wrote that the train ride down to Tennessee was the first time she experienced overt racism and Jim Crow laws after being forced to ride in a broken down segregated train car, it was a perspective changing moment for constance two years into her attendance at Fisk Constance transferred to New York University and finished her bachelor's degree in economics. Then in nineteen, forty, four constance became the first black woman to be accepted to Columbia law school. After graduating from Columbia in nineteen, forty, six constants worked for the NWC peas legal staff under Thurgood. Marshall who later became a court justice over the course of her work at the N. double ACP constance assisted with almost sixty cases that ended up reaching the Supreme Court. She also personally argued ten supreme court cases and one nine. Constance is work integrated multiple southern state universities putting her toe-to-toe with racist governors determined to bar black students from schools. She also helped protect the right to peaceful protests and opened up parks for. Black. Americans. She did all that despite the sexism and racism personally experienced during her legal career. Some judges actually turned their backs on her and refused to hear her speak. But Constance didn't let others biopsies bar her from success. Her work made her a key player in the civil rights movement and she even occasionally represented Dr. Martin? Luther. King Junior. Constance was constantly in danger when she was working in the south racists threatened her life and the lives of other prominent figures in the black community constance was barred from staying in hotels. So she had to stay with local activists, but even that didn't make her feel completely safe her friend Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar. Evers. was murdered his own driveway. So in nineteen, sixty, five constance left her work in the south and moved back to New York City. Shortly thereafter, she became the first black woman to serve in the New York State Senate. She was also elected president of the borough of Manhattan which made her the first woman in that role. During her time as a politician constance focused on raising up under served communities in the city like Harlem and East Harlem in nineteen sixty, six president Lyndon Johnson appointed constance to the US. District Court in the southern district

Constance Baker Motley Fisk Constance Constance District Court Supreme Court Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network New York State Senate Fisk University Columbia Law School New York City West Indies New York University National Youth Administration Connecticut Nashville Mississippi Manhattan Lyndon Johnson
Dont Mess With Notorious RBG: How to Fight For The Supreme Court

On One with Angela Rye

05:55 min | 1 year ago

Dont Mess With Notorious RBG: How to Fight For The Supreme Court

"To this week's on one with Angela. Arrived podcast. NATORI is a CB does not have the same notoriety as notorious RPG and what is really notorious is the Senate Republicans for trying to bulldoze the traditional Supreme Court nominations process. So we have assembled an all star legal panel today that also reflects how Supreme Court should look it probably also think here to break it all the way down like a fraction are Kristen Clark President and Executive Director of the National Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law Christopher. Kane. Chief counsel of demand Justice Ellie Misao justice correspondent at the nation and Tina Johnson President and CEO of times up. Hello everybody. Angela. Thank you so much for being here. So I want to start with giving honor where honor is due in. That is to start with Ruth Bader GINSBURG who we lost on September. Eighteenth. I feel like she held on just as long as she possibly could end for that I say thank you. To our BG to the to the real story is and I just wanted to give you all the opportunity to share some thoughts on route Baiter ins, birds passing on her impact in jurisprudence in which he wrote some phenomenal opinions including just two words, I dissent and you know anything else on your hearts to share about that because then we're going to get into the battle that is the Supreme Court nominations but I really WanNa give her some some time just do. Well, if you're a lover of justice than you definitely are feeling this, you're feeling the loss of Justice Ginsburg on the court right now having been inside the court was always great to see her in action. She was always an active questioner questioner always asking all of the tough questions and and really pushing. The. The Orleans before her. I also think though about Thurgood Marshall and what he meant for the court and Thurgood Marshall is somebody who dedicated his career to the practice of civil rights law when he was appointed in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, seven, and justice Ginsburg frank lease the only a second civil rights lawyer to sit on the court. So right now we're at a moment where there's that void that vacancy in terms of somebody brings that lens to the issues that come before the court. So for me that really matters because we're not getting that with this nominee has been put forward. I'm. Christian I agree with you completely, I mean this this her career even before she got on the court is astonishing in all of us who are working women who are women who can sign around credit card applications and hold a mortgage in our own name and pursue our careers including. Alexis. Johnson wrote this morning you know including the current nominee to the court. We are -bility to do that to repair Berg I mean she dreamed up the idea that the equal protection clause should cover women equally as we weren't in there we were you know the kinds of. Laws kept women out of the economic life of our country. Were not challenged until she had the foresights quite frankly and the legal ability to think that up and percents that and so even before she got on the court Mike Thurgood, Marshall's she had transformed landscape forever for all of us and my dog is Getting this okay. Tina go ahead see. My my story about Ginsburg is is a personal one. So I was in high school I was on trial and a week with states or nationals whatever and one of the guest judges was at school year. And then after the thing he he gave a talk for for the kids and we got to ask questions I asked him a question and answering made fun of. I I asked him how he squared his opinions about originalist. I didn't know what was called originalism. Downing intangible whatever. But how he's wearing those opinions. Brownie. Be Bored event, which was obviously against the original intent of the founding slavers. Yet like super important right and he laughed at me and then everybody else laughed and you're like I. Don't know what they're teaching school and everybody else. A bunch of jokes and then some like really not really credible answer I would later. So he kind of any make of me dismissing it is sat down kind of embarrassed son how GINSBURG heard this story? I am magid now that since they were friends was probably bragging. Point about how? Of. This seventeen year old or sixteen year old. But anyway she's GonNa Message to remark. That was held back. Kids they keep descending. which you know is again, I didn't even realize how awesome and amazing was. Sixteen seventeen year old kid. But it really to me goes to show that at even kind of social setting in A. In a private setting as it must have been for her earth the story. The her her commitment to raising credible questions and raising the sense not backing down She lived at right and she gave me a nice little note when I was a kid. To keep trying.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Thurgood Marshall Tina Johnson Angela Justice Ellie Misao President And Ceo Kane Senate Chief Counsel Mike Thurgood Kristen Clark National Lawyers Committee President Trump Executive Director Magid The Orleans
Trump holds campaign rally in Virginia

AP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Trump holds campaign rally in Virginia

"Campaign rally Friday night in Newport News. Virginia. President Trump Relish the chance to nominate yet another justice to the Supreme Court. We don't have to do it by the election, but we should be even really able, that would be a great victory. Going into the election earlier in the day, Trump told reporters at joint base. Andrews. I'll be announcing the decision tomorrow is very exciting. Five o'clock at the White House Rose Garden. The likely shift in the courts make up from Ginsberg, a liberal icon to an outspoken conservative would be the sharpest ideological swing since Clarence Thomas replaced Justice Thurgood Marshall nearly 30 years ago. I'm

President Trump Justice Thurgood Marshall White House Rose Garden Newport News Clarence Thomas Supreme Court Ginsberg Virginia Andrews
Trump expected to announce conservative Barrett for court

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Trump expected to announce conservative Barrett for court

"Congressional Republicans say president Donald Trump will nominate federal seventh circuit court of appeals judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace the late Supreme Court justice Ruth pater Ginsburg during a campaign rally Friday night in Newport news Virginia president trump relished the chance to nominate yet another justice to the Supreme Court we don't have to do it by the election but we should be easy really able that would be a great victory going into the election earlier in the day trump told reporters at joint base Andrews I'll be announcing the decision of March very exciting five o'clock at the White House rose garden the likely shift in the courts make up from Ginsburg a liberal icon to an outspoken conservative would be their sharpest ideological swing since Clarence Thomas replace justice Thurgood Marshall nearly thirty years ago I had to acquire

Donald Trump Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court Andrews White House Clarence Thomas President Trump Ruth Pater Ginsburg Newport Virginia Thurgood Marshall
Trump expected to announce conservative Barrett for court

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Trump expected to announce conservative Barrett for court

"Congressional Republicans say president Donald Trump will nominate federal seventh circuit court of appeals judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace the late Supreme Court justice Ruth pater Ginsburg during a campaign rally Friday night in Newport news Virginia president trump relished the chance to nominate yet another justice to the Supreme Court we don't have to do it by the election but we should be easy really able that would be a great victory going into the election earlier in the day trump told reporters at joint base Andrews I'll be announcing the decision of March very exciting five o'clock at the White House rose garden the likely shift in the courts make up from Ginsburg a liberal icon to an outspoken conservative would be their sharpest ideological swing since Clarence Thomas replace justice Thurgood Marshall nearly thirty years ago I had to acquire

Donald Trump Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court Andrews White House Clarence Thomas President Trump Ruth Pater Ginsburg Newport Virginia Thurgood Marshall
How Have Hispanic Americans Helped Shape the U.S.?

BrainStuff

04:57 min | 1 year ago

How Have Hispanic Americans Helped Shape the U.S.?

"Brain Steph Lauryn Boban here. Here in the United States, it's Hispanic heritage month, which officially began as Hispanic Heritage Week in nineteen, sixty eight. Unlike many other campaigns that observe and honor the contributions of a particular group of Americans Hispanic heritage bump run throughout. September. But rather starts on September fifteenth and continues through mid. October. So, why does it start in the middle of the month? Well, a Costa Rica El Salvador Guatemala Honduras. Nicaragua. All celebrate their Independence Day on September fifteenth. Mexico's is on September Sixteenth Chili's is September eighteenth and believes independence. Day Is September twenty first. By, stretching into October, the holiday also includes de la Raza on October twelve, which is a kind of rejection of Columbus Day because of Christopher, Columbus's many crimes against humanity and see our episode on Columbus Day for more about that. De la Rosa instead celebrates the melding of Hispanic races or Raza, and cultures. In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, let's talk about three times at Hispanic Americans have changed the course of history. Some three hundred years after Spanish, conquerors became the first non native Americans to view the Mississippi River and later the Grand Canyon one host. Jeff Marianne Hernandez helps smooth transfer of the territory of Florida into US rule Florida was still part of Spain when Hernandez was born in Saint Augustine in seventeen eighty four. But that changed when he was selected to serve in the House of Representatives and was sworn into duty in eighteen, twenty three as the first Hispanic person to serve in. Congress. In historical context Hernandez being a slave owner is a controversial figure. Still. He remains the first one, hundred twenty eight Hispanic people to serve in the. US Congress. Maybe of more relevance today is the first Hispanic senator elected to a full term in Congress. New Mexico's Dennis Shabas in nineteen thirty five. We spoke with Paul Orbits Historian at the University of Florida. He said in addition to being the first American born Hispanic senator. He's critical for the time we live in because he fought on behalf of all working class. Equally, he fought for higher wages legislation he fought for people to have the right to organize a union he fought for more progress and you as foreign policy for Latin America he organized N. Double ACP leaders against Jim Crow Segregation. Then, a Chevette as one of those people we can use Hispanic heritage month to talk about our connection other people's democratic struggles. Today's Congress. The one hundred sixteenth has forty seven members of Hispanic heritage. Hispanic Americans also helped turn the tide of the civil war. Some twenty thousand were involved in the conflict. While some in the southeast sided with the confederacy especially those who came from wealthy families with plantations or other businesses in Louisiana Alabama more supported the union. or it said a lot of Mexican American soldiers fought on the side of the Union army in the southwest and actually helped defeat the confederacy in the southwest. Hispanic people in the West back the Mexican government to and celebrated the country's defeat of the French at the battle of Puebla on May fifth of sixty two single Demayo in a victory that may have helped prevent the French from siding with the confederacy and thus ultimately helping the Union win. A bit more modern only about eight years before the US Supreme Court ruled in Brown versus the Board of Education, that segregation in public schools is unconstitutional as Spanish schoolgirl showed the way. Sylvia Mendez a Puerto Rican and Mexican heritage was just eight years old when she and her brothers were denied enrollment into the white only Westminster School district in Orange County in nineteen, forty three. At the time about eighty percent of California, school districts were segregated. Her Parents Gonzalo. Felicitas Mendez enlisted other parents to fight the decision and they took the school board to court. After appeals that were abandoned short of the US Supreme Court Mendez Versus Westminster became the first successful federal school desegregation case in the nation that was in nineteen, forty seven. The case was important arguing that segregation itself even if schools were separate but equal was harmful unconstitutional under the fourteenth amendment specifically, the clause, the calls for protection of the laws for all citizens. In appeals Sylvia's case was argued by Thurgood Marshall who went on to argue for the

Hispanic Heritage Month Jeff Marianne Hernandez Congress Senator Us Supreme Court Mendez Us Supreme Court Felicitas Mendez United States Steph Lauryn Boban Costa Rica El Salvador Guatema Nicaragua Mexico Columbus Raza De La Rosa Dennis Shabas Union Florida
Why Mitch McConnell is unstoppable

Post Reports

05:07 min | 1 year ago

Why Mitch McConnell is unstoppable

"The reality is in the Senate right now, it takes just simple majority to advance any presidential nominee Paul Kane is the senior congressional correspondent for the post whether it is to some random commission overseeing the Great Lakes or the Supreme Court of the United States of America, and that has left the minority party with very few options. The reality is that there's not a whole they can do. and. What are some of these theories that we have heard of that Democrats could do or that people think the Democrats could do right now oh, there's this thought of if you impeached someone anyone bill bar or in the trump again and sent to that resolution across the capital that it would instantly stop all other action and forced them to hold an impeachment trial. You know I got an email from a reader asking about they could just deny unanimous consent blocking unanimous consent is something that blocks the action from taking place and basically would make the voting process go much more slowly. Yeah. But there are provisions. Already in line for how to deal with those things, you file something called a cloture motion. That's the that's the way you blocked a filibuster defeat filibuster and yes, it'll take three days to overcome that process but think of it this way if there really were away for this minority party to block this Supreme Court nominee then Mitch McConnell would have thought of it in the eight years that he served as minority leader and was considered the obstructionist in chief. He was considered the greatest structure in the history of the Senate blocking Brock Obama at every possible way if there were ways for digital block Supreme Court. Nominations of Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan from the minority position McConnell would have done it but he couldn't do it, and then I've heard these ideas that potentially if Democrats were to win control of the Senate in November, and if there were to be a Democratic president that there's this idea, you could pack the court afterward, you could just change the number of justices that there are on the Supreme Court and increase them. So you could have two more. Democrat appointed justices or you could have four more. Well, that is a the that is something that can legitimately be done in the legislative process. There was no. Foundation in the constitution that set the number of surpreme. Court justices at nine. It started with six justices the chief and five associate justices an grew over the years and you know to be sure you know the considered the greatest Democratic president of all Franklin Delano Roosevelt tried in the nineteen thirties to pack the court and very infamous way and eventually was shot down and the reality is if Democrats were to go through the couple year process of adding justices to spring court that would immediately be met in return with Republicans. Next time they have the power and you know we just would go back and forth by. In twenty years, we might have twenty one justices and also probably need support from actual democratic leadership, and this seems like something that Congressional leadership isn't that interested in something that Joe Biden has said that he straight up doesn't think should happen Yeah Biden had got a little bit cagey the other night when he was asked about it in a local interview I think it was in Wisconsin and he basically said that he didn't want to answer the question because of the answers the question. Then that's GonNa change the. Discussion and what Democrats are trying to do right now is to avoid these. These are processed fights. I know that there is a bigger bigger goal at hand here in terms of overall policy and how that policy is reviewed at the supreme. Court. But most of the public tunes this stuff out because they, they hear things about over Republicans are being hypocrites and well like eighty nine percent or more of the public says, yeah, they're all hypocrites no big deal and they really want to try and focus this fight politically. On, what the impact of trading in Ruth? Bader GINSBURG. The most iconic liberal justice of the last twenty five years for a very staunch conservative jurist like amy, Coney Barrett like that is the biggest ideological jump that the court would have seen since thurgood Marshall was replaced by Clarence Thomas They WanNa make this fight politically not about these seemingly random efforts to put more justices on the Supreme Court and they want this fight to be about the impact on the affordable care act on voting rights on clean air clean. Water

Supreme Court Senate Mitch Mcconnell Joe Biden President Trump Great Lakes United States Bader Ginsburg Sonia Sotomayor Brock Obama Paul Kane America Ruth Thurgood Marshall Elena Kagan Franklin Delano Roosevelt Wisconsin Clarence Thomas AMY
Remembering Ruth Bader Ginsburg's life and legacy as she lies in repose

The Takeaway

02:36 min | 1 year ago

Remembering Ruth Bader Ginsburg's life and legacy as she lies in repose

"And tomorrow at the U. S. Supreme Court building. On Friday she will lie in state at the U. S. Capitol. She's the first woman ever to be given this honor all this week. We've been looking back at the life and legacy of Justice Ginsburg and we'll continue that today in 1993. When President Bill Clinton nominated Justice Ginsburg to the Supreme Court, he referred to her as quote the Thurgood Marshall of Gender Equality Law. Begins work herself sometimes pushed back on the comparison to Marshall and his trail blazing civil rights work. I'll take this opportunity to say I don't like the comparison of me. Deserving Marshall because my life was never in danger. His wass he went to his southern town in the morning. I couldn't be sure he'd be alive at the end of the day. I never had that. Kind of threat. That was Justice Ginsburg, speaking in 2018. While much of Ginsberg's legal work indicated clear understandings of racial discrimination, some critics have called out some of her more personal shortcomings when it came to race, for example, Like most of her male colleagues on the bench, she hired few law clerks who were black or people of color. Joining me now is Fatima Goss Graves, president of the National Women's Law, Center. Fatima, Thanks for being with me. Glad to be with you. So how did racial equality factor into some of justice Ginsburg's early legal work? One of the things that I think few people know is when she was at the two women's rights project. She out actually filed a really important Grief in the court in a case involving whether or not there should be the death penalty for rape. And she really used that case and that breathe Toa High light. Both the race tropes around sexual violence for black men. And also the way in which notions of purity that have been attached to white women that they actually are harmful to white women into everyone. And so you know, one of the things that I think may seem more quiet and subtle about her work is that she got really clearly the idea that we were all harmed by discrimination. We were all harm by Whatever form it took, whether is racism, sexism, disability discrimination that that is a through line throughout her work. In yesterday on this show. We've been

Justice Ginsburg Fatima Goss Graves Thurgood Marshall Supreme Court Ginsberg President Trump U. S. Capitol Bill Clinton National Women's Law Toa High Rape Center
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Little more drier air tries to come in tomorrow as temperatures get back up into the mid upper eighties with clouds and sunshine. Less of a chance of rain is still pretty stiff breeze around. Not only today, Jimmy, but also as we get through tonight and tomorrow. All right. Sounds good. Thanks for much. We will talk to next. See then. Well, the death of Ruth Better. Ginsberg has really changed this election. The president says he will nominate someone for that vacancy on he will do so it will be a woman. And Mitch McConnell, the majority leader in the Senate, says he will hold a vote for vote on that nominee. Let's talk about it with the India Shapiro's director of the cannons to the Center for Constitutional Studies and the author of Supreme Disorder, Judicial nominations and the Politics of America's highest court. Follow him on Twitter at I Shapiro. Good morning. Really good to talk to you. Good morning. Need to talk to you. Yeah, Tell me first. Let's talk a little bit if we can about Ruth Bader Ginsburg a year a lot of hyperbole whenever anybody pass away, But this seems to be real, in the sense of her, her shadow being cast over the court, too. What about our opinions and or the most important thing she did for the court? And there are a lot of parallels to justice. Scalia's packing four years ago moved against RBG or notorious RBG issues become known as ascending Tio hero status on the progress of left. I was a pioneering female lawyer was many people have said was to the woman's legal movement. What Thurgood Marshall was to the civil rights era on so a lot of professional women, regardless of their politics are a tribute to her now is as blazing the past. In the last decade or more of the board has taken a slight turn to the right. She's been on the dissenting and most of the major case is her. That's no majority opinion is probably in Virginia versus United States required Virginia's military academy, D. M. I to admit the female Cadet, but she's always been passionate and a hard worker and very nice on her relationship with Justice. Scalia is one of the things that's often mentioned been often mentioned the last since her passing on Friday as an example of Some away that we should be able to have human relations with people, even if we vehemently disagree on professional matters. Right. Exactly. The president says he will replace her. From what I understand, There's been 29 such circumstances where there's been an open court seat at the time when the president a presidential elections to be held in all 29 times, the president has nominated someone Of this present, says he will go forward. What's your take on that? Should he go forward? And should Mitch McConnell put a floor vote before the Senate? Was purely a political issue required purely political calculus. It's not about the Constitution on historically said every time there's been an election, your vacancy there has been a nomination as Faras. The confirmations go generally when the standing is controlled by the same party as the president. The nominee has been confirmed that one. It's not the nominee hasn't That's just historical record doesn't mean doesn't necessarily mean there. There should know this all should press ahead. There's a lot of, uh, calculus here, especially with the Democrats, potentially threatening to remove the filibuster and packed the court at as many justices, as would be required to make A new majority and for the election, one of the better for Trump chances the Republican Senate to have this nominee beginning processing maybe the hearings but not have the final vote, and I have that. Staying out there for the election. What will exactly drive voters to the polls? And historically, the judge's Ishan Supreme Court have benefited Republicans much more than Democrats, which is why four years ago, Hillary Clinton on the stump barely mentioned America, Garland and during the Democrats virtual convention. Last month. There was no mention of Ruth Bader Ginsberg or Eric Harland. So we'll see what happens. You know, I'm not gonna advise other trump or leader McConnell about what they should do, but You know where we're going there There are hell rose, where we're in an unusual situation during a polarized time in our country. Without question. We don't have a lot of time left. But you could just give me the two names that seemed to be at the top of the list for the president is for his women are concerned for the vacancy. All right. There's two federal circuit Genovese the account level right below the Supreme Court home. President Trump has appointed both of them any Carly Barrett in Indiana and seventh Circuit on.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg president Mitch McConnell President Trump Scalia Senate Supreme Court Jimmy Ishan Supreme Court Ruth Better America Thurgood Marshall Virginia I Shapiro India Shapiro Republican Senate United States Faras Genovese
Chadwick Boseman buried near South Carolina hometown

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Chadwick Boseman buried near South Carolina hometown

"Boseman was buried near his South Carolina hometown six days after he died at his home in Los Angeles that from a death certificate obtained today by the AP. The Black Panther's star was laid to rest September 3rd at Welfare Baptist Church Cemetery in Belton, South Carolina. That's about 11 miles from Bozeman's home town of Anderson. They held a public memorial for Bozeman. A day later in Anderson, Very few outside of his family knew that Bozeman was fighting colon cancer. He played Black Panther in four Marvel movies. He started the Jackie Robinson biopic 42. He also portrayed James Brown and Thurgood Marshall in films. Chadwick Boseman was 43.

Bozeman South Carolina Chadwick Boseman Anderson Welfare Baptist Church Cemeter Thurgood Marshall Jackie Robinson Belton Colon Cancer Los Angeles AP James Brown
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on 790 KABC

"You've heard of Murphy's law. But have you heard of derbies law? Anything that could go wrong can be made right now. Here are your hosts Carey case of at Allen Girl. Well, it's not carry case. Um, it's and Bremner and Alan curvy and Yeah, Anything that can go wrong can also be made. Right? And we're speaking with Martha Men, our former dean of the Harvard Law School from 94,017. Clerked for Justice Thurgood Marshall of the Frame Court of the United States and David Basil on of the US Court of Appeals will talk about that shortly. Also and Bremner and the two of them when I think of Martin and I think of two attorneys with hearts, and it's so important for people to understand about caring and that there are lawyers out there, Professors deans, who really Are thinking about doing the right thing and actually doing the right thing, making things that are wrong, right? Professor Paul Butler, who Waas a student of professor Mino Dean. You know he's had the Georgetown University Law Center described Martha the following way compassionate. Brilliant, wise and gently provocative. I love that gently provocative, and when Martha was introduced, the Harvard Law student, Beka said she has unparalleled grace and curiosity and unfailing caring. These air really important attributes that lawyers don't usually hear about themselves. How does it make you feel when people are recognizing Martha the good in you and how you have been able to be so effective? But, yeah, still having affect Well, it's very kind. I'm embarrassed by these very kind words. But ah, yes, I referred to my parents. Earlier in our conversation. I was brought up to believe that kindness and decency Are more important than brilliance or winning. Um and I think that's one of the lessons of this pandemic. For many of us is how important to stay today, Kindness is being gentle with one another. Life is hard enough. So I am so lucky. I get to work with very talented and creative and motivated people. My students like my colleagues, my staff But I also see such sadness and difficulties in the world. You know, I served for many years A CZ, the vice chair of the Legal Services Corporation, which is the largest funder of legal services for poor people in America. And in that role visited a lot of courtrooms and a lot of offices where poor people are trying to get help when they're dealing with domestic violence or eviction, or Failures to get their veterans benefits or other situations and you see the suffering and the challenges that people face. That means the police we can do is be kind to one another. Yeah, I know and feels the same way. She has devoted so much of her life to helping people and we can hear about that in a moment for man. But you brought up the legal Services Corporation. That is something that President Barack Obama appointed you to how did that appointment go? And, of course, was there any personal connection with respect to the fact that as and pointed out earlier That Barack Obama actually said in 2008. I had a teacher who changed my life. And that was Martha Mino. Well, I think Barack Obama was on his path, No matter who came toward him, but I was very lucky to have him as a student. I've had incredible students in my 40 years. You know Loretta Lynch, his attorney General, Karen Been Wilson, who became the mayor of Gary, Indiana. Paul Butler, you mentioned Paul Cappuccio became the vice president of Time Warner. I mean, just extraordinary and talented people, many whose names you haven't heard. President Obama was in a class of mine on law and society, And as I recall, he wrote a paper with a fellow students about the duties we owe to our fellow citizens. And we became friendly and stayed in touch. And when he ran for of his first offices in the state government of Illinois, I was supportive and Then, when he ran for the U. S Senate, I was as well and when he became president, United States I said The only thing that I wanted from him was a chance to have dinner with him, which is instead he asked me to serve as you noted on This largest funder of legal services for poor people was created actually, ah, under the administration of President Richard Nixon. It's a bipartisan effort. It's always been bipartisan. It's supported by the American Bar Association. Because so many people you know. In Texas, for example, 80 to 90% of people in family law cases don't have lawyers. So many people don't have access to lawyers and and navigating. The legal system when you are at risk of losing a child or losing your home or not getting benefits for in your disabled, they could be devastating. So I, of course, said Yes, I'd be happy to serve. And I learned a great great deal. A TTE this moment in the country because of the pandemic. We're about to have a tsunami of evictions. And it's the the low income people, of course, who were hit the hardest by any natural disaster, and this is no exception. I did have the chance to coach your attack force about tackling natural disasters for legal services. And I learned something very important, which is Every other field and profession has emergency planning preparedness..

Barack Obama Martha president Harvard Law School Professor Paul Butler Legal Services Corporation United States Bremner Martha Mino Martha Men Georgetown University Law Cent Justice Thurgood Marshall Murphy Allen Girl Mino Dean Carey US Court of Appeals vice president Alan curvy
'Black Panther' star Chadwick Boseman dies of cancer at 43

Safe Money with Bill Carter

02:16 min | 1 year ago

'Black Panther' star Chadwick Boseman dies of cancer at 43

"Boseman died this week, the Black Panther's star losing a health battle, he kept secret tributes pouring in from around the world mourning the loss of a man who inspired so many ABC is TJ Holmes looks at his life and legacy. We'll go as the iconic Black Panther Chadwick Boseman became an inspiration for millions and that King of all people I am King of Wakanda, first black superhero to star in his own movie, Wise, important, Teo, that there's a movie like this represents black here house it supported because I didn't I didn't have this. Growing up. I just know what it's going to mean. See you. When you see it there, it could give you a certain type of confidence. We walked to the world. His death at the age of 43 from colon cancer is shocked the world. He received the diagnosis four years ago and kept his battle private. The loss felt by Children everywhere, a much needed superhero now gone. Those kids remembering the man that made a dream a reality have someone who is African American via lead in a movie. He was someone that looked played us. His secret struggle even kept from his closest co workers, like his Black Panther director, Ryan Coogler, saying after his family released their statement. I realized that he was living with his illness the entire time I knew him. But while he was suffering, he was still bringing joy to countless others inspiring graduates at his alma mater, Howard University. I don't know what your future is. But if you're willing to take the heart away The more complicated one, the one with more failures. At first, that success is the one that has ultimately proven to have more meeting well victory. More glory. You will not regret it. Visiting Children with cancer at ST Jude's, from Jackie Robinson to James Brown. Chief Justice Thurgood Marshall here were promised. Equal protection. Under the law, Bozeman became a Hollywood star portraying icons, and now he'll be remembered by so many for his remarkable work and

Chadwick Boseman Ryan Coogler Colon Cancer TEO Chief Justice Thurgood Marshal Tj Holmes Bozeman ABC Wakanda Director Howard University Jackie Robinson St Jude James Brown
Celebrating #BlackJewishUnity Week with the National Urban League

People of the Pod

21:28 min | 1 year ago

Celebrating #BlackJewishUnity Week with the National Urban League

"Next week, two of the world's foremost human relations organizations the National Urban League and J. C. will unite against surging levels of Anti Semitism and racism to declare black Jewish unity week. Together, we will strengthen ties between our nations black and Jewish communities and combat all forms of hate. To discuss the importance of this event and to talk about the challenges of fighting racism I'm joined now by Clint Oda, the National Urban League Senior Vice President for Policy Advocacy and the Executive Director of the Urban League's Washington Bureau Clint, thank you so much for joining us. It's a pleasure to be with you. Now this special week, this black Jewish unity week is not happening in vacuum. It's happening because of rising antisemitism and racism in this country my listeners here plenty about antisemitism. So I just wanted to start by asking you this. It's been a Helluva summer. How are you? I would describe myself as weathered a little bit. We've been going through this quite some time this summer at least the notoriety of these police incidents are is much higher than it has been in the past. So we're we're hanging in there. We don't have a choice. Because this work is so important. And it really does reinvigorate me to see that we've got allies in this fight and we've always had allies in this fight but to see them step up in the way that they have his really reinvigorated me and I'm very excited to keep the fight going. I'm sure that our listeners are familiar with the name, the Urban League because it is etched into the annals of history of this country and anyone who knows anything about the civil rights movement will know the names of the Urban League of the ACP Snick we can go deeper also start really getting to the deep cuts. Tell us a little bit about. What the Urban League has been up to lately and what you've been up to especially over the summer in the wake of the George Floyd killing and other events in recent months while we're one, hundred, ten year old civil rights and Economic Empowerment Organization and we have been working on I'd like to say ending systemic racism for the past one. Hundred Years. we've been doing that through our programs such as making. Housing more Ford audible teaching people how to purchase homes how to stay in homes. We've been helping people to get work meaningful work they can sustain them and their families. We've been working the traditional voting rights area and civil rights area for the entirety of our existence but social justice is taken on a real importance in our work right now as as well as doing all this work in the midst of a pandemic So that's so interesting what you say about systemic racism and then specifically citing home-buying and things like that. You didn't mention education, but I think there's a pretty robust education. Portfolio at the National Urban League as well. Absolutely I think if you look at AJC's goals and National Urban League goals, you'll see mirror images of each other. That's been the real cool thing about this that this partnership and all of these things that people are talking about and I'll show my millennial miss. All of the things that people are are posting on instagram talking about explaining what systemic racism is and why you know wealth divides between black and white communities are so important and underpin. So many elements of of racial injustice today all of those things are things that the National Urban League is. Working on absolutely and I can't say that when I started about a year and a half ago I spent the previous ten years working in the United States Senate including four vice presidential nominee Senator Kamala Harris. I believe crazy how these things happen working for her and the agenda that she pursued is so consistent with the work that I'm doing today. One of the first things we did when we walked into the place is lead a resolution condemning hate antisemitism anti racism xenophobia homophobia. It's as important to her as it was to me and so coming here was just a natural extension of that but. As I was saying just the Times in which we live are so unique and perilous parallels between the early nineteen sixties which I'm sure we'll talk more about and today are really really compelling. It's almost like we're back in the sixties again, I want to go there right now because this week is going to be all about black Jewish. Relations and the story of black Jewish relations is not a new odd. We might be writing a new chapter, but there's a whole book that comes before us here. So what's one element clint of the Black Jewish relationship that has meant a lot to you personally. I would probably say the religious and spiritual aspect of the relationship. Growing up as a as a young kid in the deep South. There were a lot of Jewish people around although they were president. We didn't know it I grew up Protestant Christian and a great story is on Sundays. We were always able to use the parking lot of the temple across the street and it used to just puzzled me is to how generous the temple folks could be. Given that they must have services on Sunday to. Eat of the temple was empty or they were just being generous over time and as I moved out of south, then went to law school and live here on the East Coast I. got a much greater appreciation, not only for the religion. My Wife, for instance, used to teach at a Jewish day camp in new Rochelle New York but just meeting. So many friends of the Jewish faith drawing those connections between my own faith and their own and. Also learning the rich history of black Jewish communities especially in the era of civil rights as a lawyer was a big fan is that really don't have you could come up with a Thurgood Marshall and no understanding of the work at the end of Lacey P., Legal Defense Fund was complete without understanding the role that Jack Greenberg played and lots of other Jewish folks in philanthropy in spirituality and pursue the nonviolence movement just a wonderful partnership over the years. As a religious person myself that resonates with me a lot as it happens our listeners probably talk about this before for college I went to a joint program between Columbia University and the Jewish illogical seminary and actually not migration at the graduation of the class ahead of me which attended representative John Lewis spoke, and of course, John Lewis all of our listeners will remember passed away this summer I think he actually was an ordain ministered and he told a story that I'm sure you've heard before because I've heard until it multiple times of preaching to his chickens in Troy. Alabama and that had a certain resonance in this audience of basically all Jews including some we're going on into the rabbit. Those ties between our communities where were not everyone is a person of faith but certainly, there is deep faith and religious history kind of threaded throughout our communities I think those are really really powerful things to focus on. And I hope over time you take a look at surveys of religion in the country in other pugh has done some study in this area religion is trending down a little bit. Don't always necessarily consider themselves religious if you look at community surveys and so it's really important to reinvigorate this relationship and put it on a firm spiritual pudding in Judeo Christian tradition is so rich in the African American community and there's just so much there to really build on. I'm really looking forward to getting that history more prominently understood and remembered in our communities. So when we're talking about black Jewish unity right and we're talking about building black Jewish unity they're really two levels to it, and this is something that we talk about with a lot of our advocacy work. At AJC, there's the grassroots and there's the grass tops right. I want to ask you about both. Let's start with the grass tops right at the high profile level at the celebrity role model level, the politician level what do you think? Needs to happen there to demonstrate the Jewish people and black people should work together and are stronger together. The grass tops may be one of the more important roles in unity and understanding. We are a celebrity driven culture for better or for worse and ideas have a lot more resonance and a lot more acceptance when someone that you know and admire to saying the same thing. So grass tops to that extent are the key in moving opinion. Notions like reparations notions like black lives matter notions like social justice have mood and pretty quickly I think because athletes because celebrity on television and other artists have been saying the same thing and in a short period of time we've seen. Opinions shift in this country not just age not just religion not just race, but everything seems to be moving in the right direction from a popular standpoint. The grass roots which we're going to talk about next is where you really determine how sustainable this movement is. Right. Yeah. So tell us about that I mean in our neighborhoods and our schools in our churches, our synagogues mosques, how can we strengthen those relations? Sure. I've seen a lot of encouraging evidence that we can do this at grassroots level. This is a very human. Very, empathetic movement when we're talking about grassroots, we've seen some of these grassroots efforts come up in. Pittsburgh for instance and New Jersey. And in Brooklyn where when horrible acts of hate murder violence take place the communities come together and they usually come together I with religion. It's the pastors it's the churchgoers. It's the temple goers that really give me some hope that we aren't just a moment, but that we're in a movement. So I think in many ways, the church and the faith community are are in central piece of grassroots. That's kind of what I'm seeing sort of on the ground right now I think black Jewish unity week can drive those grassroots even deeper because understanding the tragedy of the moment is not nearly as important as understanding these deep historical ties right in our faith and our families and what we want from each other in shared history sometimes things that aren't so great sometimes shared history of oppression. Lutely, and for our listeners WHO WANNA learn more about black Jewish unity week, they should go to AJC, dot org, slash black, Jewish unity, or text black Jewish unity all one word to five to eight, eight nine not to keep hitting the faith note here you know we're we're a pretty secular organization in JC but I love what you said about the houses of worship I live on the upper west side of Manhattan which is this incredible. Kind of Jewish bastion historic whatever and if you go twenty blocks down for me in twenty blocks up for me, you probably are GonNa pass by twenty synagogues total and we're also steps away, I mean. We're a mile two miles away from Harlem and the two neighborhoods are very different and that's something that's worth exploring as well. Why that is how that happened etcetera, the strengths and the challenges of both communities, but I was in synagogue on. Chabad after the shooting in Muncie and Lo and behold there in the front row, was a a delegation from church in Harlem that wanted to come in and to be there and to show solidarity, and they got up and spoke after services, and then fast forward to this summer were all obviously in lockdown. But the rabbi of the synagogue made kind of Zoom appearance at that churches services after the killing of George Floyd talk about solidarity with. The black community in the wake of the killings of and Taylor George Floyd and so many of the challenges of injustice that are being faced right now and I think you're right that the grassroots level it. So often does start in those kinds of houses of worship, our religious leaders reaching out one to the other in something that you said, really struck me about the proximity of Latte community and Jewish community in relatively small plot of land. As a policy Wonk I'm sure you appreciate this but either just for the benefit of your listening audience, blacks and Jews were both subject to the same kinds of redlining restrictions in many ways throughout much of the United States where banks would identify areas and they would say this is a desirable area in this is a less desirable area, and so you know Jewish and black families were often circumscribed by these lending lines that still have an ongoing lingering vestige today. If you look at housing segregation patterns certainly in the African. American community they are just as bad as they were in the nineteen sixties things like bike homeownership, which is at a low point especially because pandemic in or closures any fictions Is Worse than it was in the late nineteen sixties. So some of these things we were still wrestling with they seem twins dental, but they're not incidental at all. But again, it's this proximity you know that gives me hope and hope that even outside of crisis, we can expand and strengthen these relationships crises great reasons to get together but it's the more sustainable relationships happened over time outside of the crisis built on shared values and shared interests. So once again, this Jewish unity week has the potential to to be a real game changer. Well, so talk A. Little bit more about that. What do you hope is going to come out of this week if you believe that the basis of a better relationships and greater understanding comes from exposure than my hope is that we can use this week to focus on our rich history on our shared cultural values and to help understand things that we may not understand about each other but to be able to come together in a safe place and talk about those things, this has been tried in lots of different ways you know with lots of different impetus over the years. But in this country, as you know until you can make a sort of a holiday of it until hallmark starts to sell. It really difficult to have something that is stained and that you can go back to know every year. and. So that's the thing that excites me the most I know how excited I was to leave the south. And to meet people of different faiths including the Jewish faith and and get to know them get to count them among in my close friends. I would like that for everyone and so that when issues come up in our communities as we saw in Brooklyn I think earlier this year there was a really terrible assault in Brooklyn by a woman African American woman and if we had a built in long standing. Unbreakable trust between our communities. We can weather the storms we can come together and mutual condemnation, mutual understanding and mutual healing. It's not enough just to condemn something, but it's more important. I think to learn from it and make sure that it doesn't happen doesn't happen again and then five years hence, we can be sending each other black Jewish unity. We cards produced by hallmark absolutely creating whole new language in a around. It, it could be it could be urban slang and Yiddish expressions that. Unless you're in the know you don't you don't know. I'm hopeful hallmark if you're listening. Might be onto something big year. We'll see we'll see what's things we can pull their. I want to close by asking you for a few tips for our listeners actually the few months ago we had an amazing friend of AJC on the podcast named Eric. Ward. The Executive Director of the Western states center. We were talking about racism and I asked him what he thought as a professional opponent of racism and as a black man, what he thought American Jews should be doing to fight racism. His answer was pretty surprising to me actually because he said the best way for us to fight racism was to fight antisemitism since in his work he's bound that white supremacist racism is always based on a foundation of Antisemitism. So I I'm just interested in your reaction to that I, I think I'm citing him basically correctly I'm interested in your assessment of. That and second I want to give you a chance to answer the question from square one. Also, you know what would you like to see Clinton? What would you like to see American Jews doing proactively now to be effective allies in the fight against racism and I WANNA go back to Eric's point. Let me see if I can make this one I. I've only recently come to understand the difference between anti-racism. An anti-discrimination has a lawyer I've grown up understanding that if you want to fix racism, you have to attack it as a matter of non-discrimination don't discriminate against people in hiring don't discriminate against kids in school, and sometimes that anti-discrimination is in the form of color blindness. So whatever the remedy is, it can't be race specific right because the constitution doesn't allow such a thing but let's let's just come up with big broad sweeping solutions that african-americans might incidentally benefit from. You know by virtue of maybe being lower middle income people, we're going to come up with solutions that will work for everybody including African Americans. I've now come to understand that that's just not cutting. It goes great disparities that you talk about the at the beginning their persistent for a reason it's like trying to perform surgery with your eyes close, but you may be able to route around and feel where the patient is but your ability to be precise with a scalpel. And and fix the problem identified at problems impossible. If you don't open your eyes that has been the character of how we approach race in this country for decades. I've now come to understand and have really been encouraging others to join me in. This is becoming an anti-racist. It saying I may not have owned slaves I may have never committed an act of racism or discrimination. Even if that's true. You have to personally get involved to fix these problems. It's not enough to say, well, you know we have laws to address those issues. Laws had been very inexact and very unhelpful. In many ways you've got to get in there, roll up your sleeves and say, okay, is lack of capital in the black community a problem I need to figure out how to get more capital into black communities are educational disparities problem. Okay. I need to figure out how do we improve schools whether it's funding whether it's through pedagogy whatever we need to do, but we need to come up with solutions that actually help. Like people. And not just. Continue to perpetuate these gaps in Hustle meeting well in educational opportunities and health and civic engagement. That's my biggest message to the community, the An anti races. Just. As you know, we should all be fighting against anti-semitism. It's not enough to turn your back and say, well, you know they're not talking about, knee they are talking about you. And it's when we get to the point where those protests and in the halls of Congress where we're trying to make change we see people who look like you see people who would like me and seek people or Asian and and people who are all different walks of life saying we are here because we care and black lives matter and we've got to change the way this country works. I want to dive in and ask a million more questions and and talk so much more about where you just this conversation we are unfortunately out of time. So I hope that this will be an effective way to wet our listeners appetites for the week ahead, I should just add that in addition to his impressive titles at the National Urban. League clint wears another half. It's one of my favorite. Hats it's the hat organizational podcast host and Clinton is one of the hosts of for the movement the National Urban League podcast which people should check out and especially check out for this next episode where my colleague Dan Elbaum will be a guest on the show. We will link to the podcast in our show notes, Clinton let me just say once more. Thank you so much for joining us this week. She said thank you for letting me be here.

National Urban League AJC George Floyd Bureau Clint Brooklyn Clinton Executive Director Clint Oda Instagram Washington United States Senate Harlem National Urban Senator Kamala Harris J. C. John Lewis African American Community Pittsburgh
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thurgood marshall the first black supreme court justice announced his retirement his replacement was clarence thomas The news is next. live from n._p._r. news in washington i'm janine herbst the trump administration wants to scale back a program that safeguards undocumented family members of service personnel from deportation the program called parole in place allows undocumented spouses or other close family members of troops to remain in the united states while they apply for green cards and here's franco or donuts has more immigration has been part of the military basically since day one they are weaved into the fabric as you know the united states recruits immigrants they recruit spouses of immigrants they recruit to children of immigrants nearly one hundred thirty thousand immigrants have been naturalized from over thirty foreign country n._p._r.'s franko or donuts reporting immigrant advocates meanwhile have asked a federal judge to issue an emergency order requiring immediate inspections and access for doctors at border detention facilities as n._p._r.'s joel rose reports the lawyer say migrant children are languishing and filthy conditions the federal court filing asks for immediate inspections by public health experts to ensure these facilities are quote safe and sanitary this follows allegations that children were being held in squalid conditions and without adequate food at a border patrol station in clint texas one doctor compared another border patrol station in ursula texas to quote torture facilities unquote where immigrant children are deprived of sleep and basic sanitation federal officials deny the allegations took reporters on a tour of the clint facility they say the children have access to showers toothpaste and other basic necessities as well as meals and snacks joel rose n._p._r. news l. paso texas there's a new problem in boeing's troubled seven thirty seven max planes that will likely further delay its return to service and david schaper reports the f._a._a. has identified an additional issue that needs a software fix before the regulatory agency will certify the grounded jet to fly airline passengers once again a boeing seven thirty-seven max has been grounded since march after crashes of max planes and indonesia and ethiopia killed three hundred and forty six people investigators linked both crashes to an automated flight control system that put the planes do uncontrollable nosed is boeing says of his completed a software fix for that system but sources tell n._p._r. that during simulator testing of those modifications last week at the test pilots discovered another issue that affected their ability to quickly and easily follow recovery procedures to stabilize the aircraft in a statement the f._a._a. says it found a risk that boeing must mitigate boeing says it is working on the required software to address the newly identified problem david schaper n._p._r. news wall street is trading in mixed territory at this hour the dow is down seventeen points at twenty five thousand five hundred twenty the nasdaq is up forty five points at seventy nine ninety five and the s&p five hundred is up eleven this is n._p._r. news from k. q. e. d. news i'm tiffany cam high hundreds are expected to attend today's memorial service for a rookie sacramento police officer who was killed in what thority is described as an ambush while she responded to a domestic violence call organizers expect the roseville church to be filled to capacity for taro sullivan more than five hundred police vehicles are also expected to join a procession through the capital city o'sullivan had been with the police.

Thurgood marshall
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

09:22 min | 2 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Plays, a lot of historical movies that advocate his name, but he was the, the king in Black Panther. You plays Thurgood Marshall. In a time. Where African Americans were subject to Jim crow. Segregation and over outwardly racism will put braces them in the fifties and sixties. They didn't hide it. But the, the greatness of the United States of America, we have overcome net. Encourage you, if you can find that movie Thurgood Marshall, they call it, simply Marshall. You, you will enjoy it. Most of it's true. What I get frustrated about as a conservative. Is equally. Many of Republicans than I am not a Republican ever. Have never will be. There are innumerable problems that we're having. Doing nothing about I'm literally nothing because they don't want to take the political heat. Equally. Many of the Democrats, not call them that because they lied. They deceive in a us poor people. African American spending and poor whites. But number one taking them for granted. Which the Ford machine did. But that's a whole nother issue. In many of. This great cities populous, who happen to be African American. I don't care how much reason you try to impart to them. And I'm not talking with an air superiority, I'm talking. But I get on the ground next to you. And Shannon choose. I did that in my youth. But some black folks, they won't think they won't reason some Hispanics. They won't think they won't reason. And if a democrat says they in be say in be. Yet many in the democratic hierarchy had been the worst enemies of the poor. I think it would Brenda Olinda who called she wanted to talk about poverty. We'll give you an example. If you go to port I do prints in Haiti. What you can do. Right now. The average median income, they are those that are not trained is maybe a hundred dollars a month. Here. In Memphis, Tennessee. If you're a female, you got one or two children, where you can get snap benefits. You can get all kind of benefits, but your Evian come run any weapon thousand two hundred thousand five hundred and that's ten times. They'll pay you in Haiti. Go to New Delhi. The average median income. There's fifty dollars. Unless you born into the right social situation, or you're fortunate. And you get an education and allow the poor their meaning India and other countries. They'll have cable TV in trying to make light of it. They don't have. Social security. They don't have many of the government agencies that we do here in the United States of America, where we're blessed. Yes. Poor in this country is bad. But until you travel, and you go across that big pond go across the water is we used to say in the military. You have not seen poverty going to Mexico City. On one side, you will see the gleaming towers business, the business world. And you go, full-fat blocks you see Balas that's what they call them in, in, in Brazil, and they're on the side of the mountains, Misao demon, and tin, shacks, and literally thousands, and I do mean thousands of poor people, but they don't have snap. They, they don't have food stamps. They have to do what they have to do to survive. Now, am I doing you? Some of these countries that aren't civic, and church organizations that are trying to our but anybody born in knees United States compared to much of the world girl, you're in having one. Hell, do you want to come here? And yet. Trying to get through to this generation of how good this country is they don't listen. Let me go back to Billie. Billy, you're on six hundred WRC. Regarding. Washed, a ten people where they need to be able to say it. And yet, they nurses station by I can't. Was able to sue. Country in the middle of. And not been colder. He left on buses on airplane. He did. And I know this to be a fact. No, no. It wasn't. He did do that. He did. How that he didn't make opposition? President Trump wants today meets opposition. Well, it's number one, because Trump is white number two. They can't control Trump number three he's white. But everything that you said, is absolutely true. The abominate ministration sent literally thousands of illegals all around this country. And many of the governors didn't know they raise tell about it just look it up and many of the mayor's rate hell about it, because he about ministration didn't tell anybody, what they were doing and I was referencing some of the schools, notably in Illinois. And I o n is other places. They play several thousand illegals in some of these cities and under federal law, you got educate these and yes, children should be educated. Most certainly. But these school system didn't have the budget. They head to hire translators. They had to hire folks to deal with this influx, the a lot of you have gotten an app blood, you Billy for bring this up because it's true. And there's a double standard. In the congress, and I asked any of the Democrats who feel offended by what call me and I will put you on the end. I won't give you hard time. Explain to me, double standard. The cage is that you I saw the children were separated. We're from Obama. I hope buddy tone, Nicholson's listening, because I double research this, and those blankets, though, silver blankets. Well, I done by Bama. By democrat. But this past year. You would think that Donald J Trump was the evil of all the eagles because the mainstream miniature hell is not going to tell you that, that whole separation. No. He didn't do it to the extent Trump did. But it was first done by a bum and not challenge any of you to dispute that nine zero one three five nine seven three too, but you won't hear that on the chicken news network, because that's not their agenda. They want to attack Trump, by any way or any means necessary, and thank about this. If you take hypothetically, if you took ten thousand of these illegals and you put them in San Francisco, they go crazy. That's what Gavin Newsom doesn't want them. They're about fact, let me play this and get your reaction, and call his hang up, and, and thanks. Thank the Billy Ray. Hang on. I wanna play this in case you didn't hear anything. I'm Jeff floor and we're going to begin tonight with a highly controversial immigration proposal. The president has. Embraced. He says the country may place large numbers of migrants in sanctuary cities, often, large, democratically controlled cities that protect illegal and undocumented immigrants. This began with a report in the Washington Post at some administration officials tried to knock down the president picked it up and ran with it. White House correspondent Paula Reid has more. So we are looking at the possibilities, Trump says he's considering whether to release illegal immigrants in detention onto the streets of so called sanctuary cities, California certainly is always saying, we want more people, and they want more people in their sanctuary cities. Well, we'll give them more people we can give them a lot. We can give them an unlimited supply California's home to several sanctuary cities, which are fused to cooperate with federal immigration officials. Democratic governor Gavin Newsom fire back at the president's plan today. It's illegal. It's.

President Trump United States Billy Ray Thurgood Marshall America Gavin Newsom Haiti president California Shannon Jim crow New Delhi Washington Post Memphis Brenda Olinda India Mexico City Evian Ford
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Not complicated. He believes that it is. I quote the right of all of our children. Whatever their race to an equal spot in life, and to an equal opportunity to reach their full potential as citizens end of quote, I agree with, what Thurgood Marshall said, and in my view, the only way to accomplish that goal is to guarantee every person in our country, a quality education, as a fundamental human. Right. Regardless of their income charter schools could be feeling the burn my friends Bernie Sanders going even further than some of his democrat colleagues by saying that he wants to. To halt all new funding for charter schools have a whole review of courage charter schools. This will have a disproportionate impact on a lot of minority students, by the way. So what is going on here? What is the truth of charter schools as it stands right now in this country, we have inas filter Stephan with us now, she is a contributor at the fretless federalist, or the federalist also sometimes known by those who can't speak English. She knows school suffer very, well, she's an education expert also an old friend of mine in as great to have you. Great to be your buck. And by the way, the federalist is also known as the federalist society online by a bunch of leftists who can't tell the difference between those two organisms Asian, so. Oh, good to know. I think I caught some of that on the Twitter this week. But I stayed out of that one, I figured the leftist baby will start using the Google to learn the difference. But tell me what is Sanders. Let's start with this. What is Bernie who wants free college? So in that sense, he's at least willing to change it up at the university level have other people pay for the students education in the future. What's his deal with charter schools in this? He put out the plan last week where he called for as you mentioned in the beginning a moratorium on charter funding. Yup. Called for total ban on four prophets school. That would be trauma full contact with a for profit provider. So it's not really clear how that would even happen because there's a relatively small amount of federal money that goes to charter schools, theoretically one could cut that off. Although I don't know why you'd wanna cut off the one part of federal investment -education that actually has shown some result, but he could cut that off in terms of a moratorium. I mean, he doesn't seem to understand, or perhaps, you know, as the socialist that he is. He doesn't actually care, that most American education decisions are actually made on the state level. So it's not really clear how he would implement that kind of moratorium. Nevertheless, back what he's calling for. So he wants to work toward him. Why? I mean, what, what's the what's the reason that, that he and leftist like him give for this? And then I'm sure there's a, a more and more cynical. But more true reason as to why they wanna cut off this funding so workers through both of those. Sure, I think I think with burning the general or unit would be that charter schools drain funds from public schools, because they provide than alternative and some parents take advantage of that, alternative in fact, not only are there, three million kids over three million kids attending charter school today in the United States. There's another million kids who are waiting on weightless trying to get into charter schools. So Bernie Sanders is bad saying he thinks that everybody to go to their assigned public school, even if it's not working for them, which is the case, especially in some low income areas that have high percentages at risk students or minority students, and that's why there are more minority students than the general population who aren't golden toiler school Charlottesville have moved into a areas with schools that are struggling, and how attempted to meet that need, and providing alternative to parents. So for Bernie Sanders. Because the disproportionately served poor kid and minority students that this is quote unquote, segregation, right? Insured..

Bernie Sanders Thurgood Marshall golden toiler school Charlotte Twitter United States Google Stephan
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Are Kelly's lawyers putting the heat on prosecutors to share a video that allegedly shows us singer sexually assaulting underage girl. After a court hearing held Tuesday in Chicago are Kelly's defense attorney. Steve Greenberg told reporters he's still waiting for prosecutors to make a copy of the tape for him to view reports say that Greenberg was joined by at least five more attorneys at the hearing is trying to preserve all emails text messages and other communications between Cook County state's attorney Kim FOX's office and attorney Michael Nadi who turn turn over the video allegedly showing Kelly assaulting the underage girl. Kelly isn't due back in court until July twenty six for his criminal case. But he is expected to make an appearance today for a child support hearing. Wow. Oh, really? He's the worst. It's just the worst yet. I'm glad he's finally at least the process of bringing him to Justice is going on slow and steady. Yeah. Black Panther star. Chadwick bozeman will produce and star in the center ice story. Your suitcase set in sixteenth century Japan. Narcos co-creator Doug mirrow is writing the script which centers on an African man who arrived in Japan and fifteen seventy nine and he served seven Italian Jesuit and served under the Japanese warlord ODA, nobody Naga according to legend yet soup as the only person of non Asian origin to become a samurai bozeman. Of course, start and Black Panther along with portraying Jackie Robinson and forty two and James Brown and get on up and Thurgood Marshall and Marshall so he's good at at by a bio-pic. Yeah. Who else is? Colin time on TV, I called a bio pickup biopic. That happens know that it was a bio-pic by. I was young pop, and it was embarrassing. I bet either or acceptable bet. Okay. Not on the show. And then more movie news vendors endgame star. Chris Hemsworth and Tiffany haddish are set to star. In a film down undercover. The buddy cop back in comedy could be shopped at cans the feminazi play cop who goes undercover to solve a.

Kelly attorney Steve Greenberg Japan Chadwick bozeman Thurgood Marshall Chris Hemsworth Chicago Michael Nadi Cook County Kim FOX bozeman Tiffany haddish Doug mirrow Jackie Robinson James Brown co-creator
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Now, I'm getting people challenging the on social media saying you bet Black Panthers going to win best picture. They hope it wins. Best picture. Somebody demon me bet wanted to bet me twenty bucks that it wins. Best picture, it might it might it might not win best picture because it's the best picture that what might win best picture because politics ammonia in the district ammonia on WBAL. Yeah. I'll just tell the patient. I totally disagree with it. When I saw the movie, and that's supposed to some free to say if somebody came from another planet and say, what would you show them the soda black holes? A blackout was not in the shoulder. Fracture family in the beginning of the movie showed a brother the brother and leaving a homeless it. He becomes the villain and you had to first cousins killing each other so socialism at its best because. The sale of the technology with brain. And they only get the technology. They had to say a lot of Bob Brady. I did not like it. Now, ammonia black. Yes, they're gonna they're gonna take away your card. They took a long time about. In other words, you got Hidden Figures. You got the Jesse always you got Thurgood Marshall, you got so many other movies to say, this is what black people all? But this why he was just like just so much violence much blacks and blacks, and it was like when you look at all the superheroes. Stop stories. Yeah. It's all you saw a different alien or some some other creature that came out fighting each other. So I had a problem with that. All right. All right so zone. I can put you on hold. So you can set us straight because I think so listen to you more than she listens to me. I I'll try. And good luck to you. Because you know, if you get some secret sauce there something please send me an Email on it because I need. All right. That's a Mon taking issue with tasers take on Black Panther. And I think we've sorted everything out now coming up apparently Joni Ernst refused the running mate position that may or may not have been offered to her by then candidate Donald Trump. And apparently, she didn't take it because of some competition between she and her husband ladies of WMA, Al is that really a thing. Do you modify your career choices and deference to your husband's feelings? Triple eight six thirty WFAN WFAN.

Black Panthers Joni Ernst Thurgood Marshall Bob Brady Donald Trump Jesse Al
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"MIR Becca s Venice to Andrew Girod Martin Jonathan to that's our show for today, and it is to Dan Martin and to rip of met Damon's. All right and begrudging. Thanks. 'cause this is actually this is this is real person drives me nuts, but they pledge. So I guess, you know, the rules of the rules maga- Hatter hate funding. Libs at real faceless men. I think that somebody I ended up blocking or muting on Twitter 'cause they're that annoying. Hey, but fund us like go, right? That's fine. Yup. Yup. Sam Wackle black Elim Wakeham immune foreign sovereign David backs and satanic nightjar weird. Okay. Thanks new patrons. We really appreciate opium joy the goodies. Oh, no social this firm ever failed the bar exam. No kidding. And now it's time to find out if my improbable street continues, and I go to in a row, or if as usual crashed and burned on a on a real property question. Yeah. You're improbable streak of one is on the line. Yeah. Here we go. So real property question seller and purchaser signed a contract for the sale of a sixty year old house. The purchaser did not bother to ask. Whether the you know, what the condition of the house was the contract required a warranty deed to be given at closing. And so put a pin in that. Because that's the that. That's the test of this question. Right. So then the purchase purchaser receives the warranty deed with all covenants of title at the closing records the deal and then one month afterwards, the entirety of allies house, just busts. You know, the basement floods it becomes uninhabitable. It's terrible. Then. Then. Delightfully in the question. It says the seller was genuinely surprised, and so obviously purchaser sues the seller is he likely to be successful, you instantly eliminated. Both. Yes answers. And said yet seems like you can sell fixer uppers. So got to be a yes answer. So you eliminated the the first. Yes answer. Yes. Because with a conveyance of residential real property warranty of fitness is implied. And that's a great elimination. I am really hoping we get some a answers from lawyers and law students over the weekend. Because when you have a newly constructed residential property that does convey a warranty of fitness, right? So the builder or the developer sells, you a brand new house that has a fee of a fitness of for that particular purpose now, I don't wanna take credit..

Damon Andrew Girod Martin Jonathan maga- Hatter Twitter Dan Martin Venice opium Sam Wackle developer David sixty year one month
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"So. Yeah. Like a minute to talk about Bill bar. Yeah. So here's what I want you to be on the lookout for about Bill bar our friends over at the F F R F crew, including intersectional have pointed out that bar has expressed really extreme positions when it comes to decrying the quote secular influence in the United States, and he in particular bar wrote an article for the Catholic lawyer in nineteen ninety five in which he argues that the demise of the quote, Judeo Christian system would have grave consequences for the future of self government in the United States, and then he quotes from James, Madison. And here's the quote, he attributed to James Madison in the words of James, Madison. We have staked our future on the ability of each of us to govern ourselves, according to the ten commandments of God. God and of quote, and then Andrew notes, which by the way, five or six of those are related to not worshiping other idols before God, which is not something we at all care about or worse than that though. Because as as Indra Seidel points out, although bars twelve page article contains more than nearly fifty footnotes citations, he does not cite this quotation for Madison. And the reason is because it does not exist. James, Madison, never said it. It was made up by David Barton, serial plagiarist, and and prevaricators David Barton and puppet of the extreme religious right who just pumps out high-grade nonsense. I mean, you know, Bertin's book had to be pulled from the shelves by the publisher. Because quote, the basic truths were not there, and of quote, if something is sourced, David Barton, you you can almost be certain that that it is made up for an attorney general to be reading and familiar and quoting and running in the circles with David Barton is troubling. So that's what I want you guys to be on the lookout for in the Tuesday and Wednesday hearings. Whether these questions are asked whether someone asks Bill bar, what his views are on separation of church and state how he intends to utilize the attorney. General's office. Whether he endorsed wrote an op-ed endorsing Jeff Sessions, and so, you know, whether he intends to continue the shift under sessions towards protecting quote, religious freedom, and quote of the overwhelming majority religion in this country, be interesting to watch man, I love how people think the ten commandments has anything to do with government or how we would want the country to run. It's they're terrible. The ten commandments are terrible as everybody know this Google them. They're not by the way, thou shalt not have slaves is not a commandment. Just it's not one that didn't make it. You'll you have to do top ten right? Yeah. And five or six of them are are like, I'm very jealous. God, I'm a I if you worship something other than me, I take it very personally. So please don't do that guys. That's like the first five of them. So to say, you know, okay. That's. The idea that they have anything to do with law government is as absurd or or that they should rather with with with any good, you know, civil government. Okay. That's is that all we have time. We have time for okay? Well, it is time for our co favorite segment of the week. And that is thinking our new patrons over on patriot dot com slash law. And thank you to.

James Madison Bill bar David Barton United States Jeff Sessions Indra Seidel Bertin intersectional F F R F Andrew attorney publisher
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"And then co Patrick goes on to praise his quote skill and industry, and of quote, but says that we should oppose having Thurgood Marshall on the supreme court because it would quote upset the rough balance of liberalism and conservatism that recently has prevailed upon the high tribunal and place the judicial activists in full control. So and you will recognise right. Like, that's the same argument that has been leveled at every democratic appointee cents. Right. You know, the more things Jeff I think I'm gonna link in the show notes a a one Williams article from the Washington Post nineteen ninety summarizing Thurgood Marshall's career he was still on the court. He. Would remain on the court until nineteen Ninety-one. But he was eighty one in nineteen ninety and and it I think summarizes the. Wide broad based regard with which Thurgood Marshall was was held. And I just do not believe that anybody can muster the evidence to show that it was the prevailing view that Thurgood Marshall was intellectually lazy or not qualified for the supreme court. Now that begs the question was it if you of anybody and here, Robin gives us four examples. And I wanna tackle all four of these. I'll I'll link his his tweet out to us. The first is, and I'm I'm doing these in analytics are just wanna make sure I have this. Right. He doubled down on the third Marshall. Because I thought you did a good job of pointing out that like, no, the only time that people criticized him, as you know, possibly intellectually deficient was when his you know, he was at thousand years old, and he was maybe and cory's Horry way Robin says that's not true Corey Robin says there are wide ranging criticisms racist, criticisms of his intellectual capacity and laziness so here are those four claims, and I'm going to tackle these in an analytical order, they're not the ordered that that Corey presents them to us. But he the first law clerks on the court called him Justice Brennan slash Marshall behind his back. Now that I gotta unpack this a little bit because it's not really the same claim it is related to another claim that people have made about Clarence Thomas, which is that Clarence Thomas was internet Scalise second vote, and by the way, that would be a fair thing for Corey to criticize when people say said, I guess is dead. But if you if you say that Clarence Thomas was, you know, just Antonin Scalia second vote that that would not be true, right? As of twenty fourteen Scalia was the Justice with whom Clarence Thomas. Most voted ninety one percent of the time. But he also noted ninety one percent of the time with Sam Alito ninety percent of the time with Roberts. And you know, what that shows is the Clarence Thomas is a conservative, and he voted with the other conservative justices. That's not surprising and Kagan and Ginsburg for exam. Voted together. Ninety three percent of the time. And nobody says that Elena Kagan is Ruth Bader Ginsburg, second phone, right Robertson, Alito voted together. Ninety three percent of the time. And nobody said Alito is Roberts second vote or or or vice versa. So I I agree that there's that that claim which we didn't talk about would be a little bit unfair to let to level Clarence Thomas. But what about as leveled against good Marshall? Right. So this is what he's trying to say. Is that the law clerks accused him of being a puppet for Justice Brennan? William Brennan is the most influential liberal supreme court Justice least of the past fifty years. Probably of all time. I've talked about him on the show at great length..

Thurgood Marshall Clarence Thomas supreme court Corey Robin Sam Alito Justice Brennan Elena Kagan Ruth Bader Ginsburg William Brennan Antonin Scalia Patrick Washington Post Alito Jeff Williams Roberts Scalia Robertson cory Ninety three percent
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"And then co Patrick goes on to praise his quote skill and industry, and of quote, but says that we should oppose having Thurgood Marshall on the supreme court because it would quote upset the rough balance of liberalism and conservatism that recently has prevailed upon the high tribunal and place the judicial activists in full control. So and you will recognise right. Like, that's the same argument that has been leveled at every democratic appointee cents. Right. You know, the more things Jeff I think I'm gonna link in the show notes a a one Williams article from the Washington Post nineteen ninety summarizing Thurgood Marshall's career he was still on the court. He. Would remain on the court until nineteen Ninety-one. But he was eighty one in nineteen ninety and and it I think summarizes the. Wide broad based regard with which Thurgood Marshall was was held. And I just do not believe that anybody can muster the evidence to show that it was the prevailing view that Thurgood Marshall was intellectually lazy or not qualified for the supreme court. Now that begs the question was it if you of anybody and here, Robin gives us four examples. And I wanna tackle all four of these. I'll I'll link his his tweet out to us. The first is, and I'm I'm doing these in analytics are just wanna make sure I have this. Right. He doubled down on the third Marshall. Because I thought you did a good job of pointing out that like, no, the only time that people criticized him, as you know, possibly intellectually deficient was when his you know, he was at thousand years old, and he was maybe and cory's Horry way Robin says that's not true Corey Robin says there are wide ranging criticisms racist, criticisms of his intellectual capacity and laziness so here are those four claims, and I'm going to tackle these in an analytical order, they're not the ordered that that Corey presents them to us. But he the first law clerks on the court called him Justice Brennan slash Marshall behind his back. Now that I gotta unpack this a little bit because it's not really the same claim it is related to another claim that people have made about Clarence Thomas, which is that Clarence Thomas was internet Scalise second vote, and by the way, that would be a fair thing for Corey to criticize when people say said, I guess is dead. But if you if you say that Clarence Thomas was, you know, just Antonin Scalia second vote that that would not be true, right? As of twenty fourteen Scalia was the Justice with whom Clarence Thomas. Most voted ninety one percent of the time. But he also noted ninety one percent of the time with Sam Alito ninety percent of the time with Roberts. And you know, what that shows is the Clarence Thomas is a conservative, and he voted with the other conservative justices. That's not surprising and Kagan and Ginsburg for exam. Voted together. Ninety three percent of the time. And nobody says that Elena Kagan is Ruth Bader Ginsburg, second phone, right Robertson, Alito voted together. Ninety three percent of the time. And nobody said Alito is Roberts second vote or or or vice versa. So I I agree that there's that that claim which we didn't talk about would be a little bit unfair to let to level Clarence Thomas. But what about as leveled against good Marshall? Right. So this is what he's trying to say. Is that the law clerks accused him of being a puppet for Justice Brennan? William Brennan is the most influential liberal supreme court Justice least of the past fifty years. Probably of all time. I've talked about him on the show at great length..

Thurgood Marshall Clarence Thomas supreme court Corey Robin Sam Alito Justice Brennan Elena Kagan Ruth Bader Ginsburg William Brennan Antonin Scalia Patrick Washington Post Alito Jeff Williams Roberts Scalia Robertson cory Ninety three percent
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"Right. This is from that Fordham law review article Dworkin says constitutional lawyers like to think that fidelity the constitution means fidelity to its text. It is the kind of fidelity demanded by self-styled orig- constitutional quote originalists like supreme court Justice, Antonin Scalia and rejected by critics of originalism. Like professor Laurence tribe. Then he says I shall argue that even if we concentrate exclusively on textual fidelity, we reach radically different conclusions from those that Scalia and other originalists expect right? So that's where that that little bit of kind of saying, even if we use your methodology, we don't get your results was what led a couple of lawyers to say. See Dworkin has embraced originalism Dworkin wrote back to that. And in fact, in in the same footnote, he says because Laurence tribe asked him, right? And said, I it sounds like you are reaching kind of a similar result. And in the footnote to tribe to work in says tribe must have been misled by my argumentative strategy. He means an engaging with Antony Scalia. I did not mean in my brief remarks again in a matter of interpretation to abandon either my long standing opposite to any form of originalism on the count of statutory and constitutional interpretation. My argument on this occasion was ad hominem. I was responding to Scalise lectures, by pointing out the deep inconsistency that I just described I argued that if one is a semantic originalist escalate says, he is then one must endorse a reading of the constitution from which he and any other self-described constitutional originalist would recoil. So I read that I was super puzzled and like you I I was like where in the hell is this Nixon thing coming from? And I think I figured it out. And again, I think I figured it out at the time. There is a two thousand one law review article written by Keith Whittington. It is called to work originally them the role of intentions in constitutional interpretation. And it is one of those handful of articles that I described that that tries to make the argument that I previously described. It contains the Nixon reference, right and the first footnote, thanks, Robert, George, Corey, Robin. Joe mink and the anonymous referees for quote, they're helpful comments and of quote now, let me expand Keith Whittington is a member of the federalist society. He is a very conservative legal theorist rapper short is a very conservative legal theorist. He has a view of natural law as having normative implications, which means that the supreme court's decisions on gay marriage. For example, are in his view. Invalid it it's I don't have the time to go into Robert Georges natural law theory. But it is it is incredible minority view, and it is being offered in defense of socially conservative. Religiously motivated positions usually relating to gay rights. I don't know who Joe mingka's, obviously, Donahue the anonymous referees are, but so I kind of put all that together. And I said, okay. And again, look like as clearly happened here. Right. It wouldn't be surprising. If somebody very conservative sent me their law review manuscript and said, hey, pick as many holes in this as you can, you know, make do, you know, do whatever you. Want to this?.

Laurence tribe originalism Dworkin Antonin Scalia Keith Whittington Fordham law review originalism Nixon Robert Georges Joe mink Scalise Joe mingka Donahue Corey George
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"But has a lot more nuance. Right. But but was basically like she was paying respect to Antony Scalia 's jurisprudence on the court and the effect that it had even in. How those who oppose what he has to say are responding to. That you're sprints. So was that quote, like a Overton window Carney thing? Like, he's pulled us all so far this way that we're all kind of playing his game. Is that with that kick kind of? Yeah. I mean, it it basically what it said was that that Scalise contribution to jurisprudence is that even justices on the left, even as her were arguing in opinions in ways that responded to Scalia textual analysis, right? That that in a William Brennan opinion in the nineteen seventies. For example, it you would not have if you had five votes, you would not have had to describe like what you think the founding fathers meant when they decided ex you would have just said, you know, what it means today, and what it has meant over time. And so under having having to forcing liberals to define what the words of the text of statutes and constitutional provision. That that was one of scully's lasting legacies. Even though, you know, obviously, cheap strongly disagreed with Scully on just about everything. And so it's one of those like conservative. Gotcha. Like using that to say, I see where they're actually. Yeah. What liberals are secret textualist or secret. No, exactly right to try and legitimate originalism as a constitutional philosophy to say, see, look even Elena Kagan says, it's not just a legitimate. But but you're all right. And and I would also add parenthetically that Elena Kagan is to the right of tribe and work, right? Like her jurisprudential model is not as liberal as Laurence tribe. How did Nixon factor? So okay. That was the hardest part to figure out right? Because at so so put a pin in that. I wanna get back to Nixon because I think I figured this out. And it was I really wanted to share with you on the show, but it was such a total rabbit trail that I wound up, you know, kind of giving shorthand next the criticism that Ronald work in is a secret originalist is a misguided criticism that conservatives have launched over the again, they're only a couple of law review articles. But they're law review articles with which I am familiar that badly misrepresent Ronald Dworkin position, I should add in terms of crediting. It to Laurence tribe. Laurence tribe in two thousand eight wrote a book called the invisible constitution. Right. The idea that Laurence tribe in endorses textual ISM is or would say we're all originalist now is. It just it is one hundred percent the opposite of his jurisprudence the link that Corey gives too because he's got say hyperlinked in the blog goes to Antonin Scalia 's book write a matter of interpretation, which was published in nineteen ninety eight and in that book Laurence tribe Marianne Glendon who is kind of an interesting non originalist conservative Ronald Dworkin and somebody named Gordon would whom with whom I am not familiar the four of them each wrote essays in Scalise book with which Scalia then engaged. So I, you know, look, I don't own that book because I try not to put money in the pockets of Antonin Scalia. But, but there's a Fordham law review article that response to those essays, and so it is just. It is clear to me that this. This is not a fair representation of tribe or Dworken's position. And in fact, right? Here's here's what work in says..

Antonin Scalia Laurence tribe Ronald Dworkin Elena Kagan Nixon Fordham law review Scalise scully William Brennan Dworken Corey Marianne Glendon Gordon one hundred percent
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"But has a lot more nuance. Right. But but was basically like she was paying respect to Antony Scalia 's jurisprudence on the court and the effect that it had even in. How those who oppose what he has to say are responding to. That you're sprints. So was that quote, like a Overton window Carney thing? Like, he's pulled us all so far this way that we're all kind of playing his game. Is that with that kick kind of? Yeah. I mean, it it basically what it said was that that Scalise contribution to jurisprudence is that even justices on the left, even as her were arguing in opinions in ways that responded to Scalia textual analysis, right? That that in a William Brennan opinion in the nineteen seventies. For example, it you would not have if you had five votes, you would not have had to describe like what you think the founding fathers meant when they decided ex you would have just said, you know, what it means today, and what it has meant over time. And so under having having to forcing liberals to define what the words of the text of statutes and constitutional provision. That that was one of scully's lasting legacies. Even though, you know, obviously, cheap strongly disagreed with Scully on just about everything. And so it's one of those like conservative. Gotcha. Like using that to say, I see where they're actually. Yeah. What liberals are secret textualist or secret. No, exactly right to try and legitimate originalism as a constitutional philosophy to say, see, look even Elena Kagan says, it's not just a legitimate. But but you're all right. And and I would also add parenthetically that Elena Kagan is to the right of tribe and work, right? Like her jurisprudential model is not as liberal as Laurence tribe. How did Nixon factor? So okay. That was the hardest part to figure out right? Because at so so put a pin in that. I wanna get back to Nixon because I think I figured this out. And it was I really wanted to share with you on the show, but it was such a total rabbit trail that I wound up, you know, kind of giving shorthand next the criticism that Ronald work in is a secret originalist is a misguided criticism that conservatives have launched over the again, they're only a couple of law review articles. But they're law review articles with which I am familiar that badly misrepresent Ronald Dworkin position, I should add in terms of crediting. It to Laurence tribe. Laurence tribe in two thousand eight wrote a book called the invisible constitution. Right. The idea that Laurence tribe in endorses textual ISM is or would say we're all originalist now is. It just it is one hundred percent the opposite of his jurisprudence the link that Corey gives too because he's got say hyperlinked in the blog goes to Antonin Scalia 's book write a matter of interpretation, which was published in nineteen ninety eight and in that book Laurence tribe Marianne Glendon who is kind of an interesting non originalist conservative Ronald Dworkin and somebody named Gordon would whom with whom I am not familiar the four of them each wrote essays in Scalise book with which Scalia then engaged. So I, you know, look, I don't own that book because I try not to put money in the pockets of Antonin Scalia. But, but there's a Fordham law review article that response to those essays, and so it is just. It is clear to me that this. This is not a fair representation of tribe or Dworken's position. And in fact, right? Here's here's what work in says..

Antonin Scalia Laurence tribe Ronald Dworkin Elena Kagan Nixon Fordham law review Scalise scully William Brennan Dworken Corey Marianne Glendon Gordon one hundred percent
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"Hold water. No Andriol is wrong. Are you? Sure. I'm pas. Oh, wait a minute. Hold on. I'm seeing the initials Andrew was run a WW for Andrew was wrong. So more that you're wrong about no wrong could one Andrew. Apparently pretty wrong. No I wanted. I felt like our listeners sort of deserved an explanation of how I came to misidentified Corey Robin week ago. And and I think there's some really fun stuff along the way. So so if you'll indulge me I'd like to have like she, and I think it's also good because it does kind of you know, point to the fact that you don't just willy nilly, call people conservative that you don't like you. There's a lot more behind this than just you. Call people conservatives who you don't like or something like that. Yeah. I look I try really hard. You know, not not to do that. And also this was in response to a listener question. And and I wanna be a hundred percent clear, right. Like when I get listener questions. I tend for the main segment of the show I tend to put. It in about ten hours of researching and writing sometimes it's more the the PG e segment required a ton of reading and casework in documents and stuff like that. And you know, that that that took like twenty to twenty five hours just to genie. When when I do listener question, I try and pick those that I can get by with a little bit less research on. And this was a question that asked for my subjective evaluation of a summary of Cory Robbins thesis regarding Clarence Thomas. So I tried to put some error bars on it. I disclosed up front that. I'd I'd never heard of Corey Robin read anything about him. I drew the conclusion erroneously that he was a conservative orthodox Jew. And and here's why. So the the first thing I did after you know, kind of general googling was to go to Cory Robbins blog and to read what? He writes in his own words and the first that top post right now on Cory Robbins blog. Give the Lincoln the show notes says the I'm just going to read the paragraph, right? It says in schrool this morning. I came upon this passage from the Talmud everything is in the hands of heaven except the fear of heaven. It's interesting thought on grounds, I we tend to think of nipple powers causing fear even terror if the one thing the Talmud says that I'm nip unt power cannot determine whether we are afraid of it second. We send to think of fear aside lacked out for mid. Religion. What? Yeah. So. So in other words, listen mind, the right podcast happen. So we're doing a sermon his his first rate that that that's exactly right? That like, look if you take that I post and you replace Schule with bible study and you replace Talmud with Romans one, right? I don't think anybody would have. Objected to my drawing, the conclusion of okay, the seems like this is a religious conservative, particularly when I had gone through. And concluded that he was conservative politically for the reasons that I'm about to get into I felt like they were sort of mutually self-reinforcing. Apparently, he's neither. But that's the source of the I had said, I think he's motivated by orthodox Judaism beliefs, and obviously orthodox Jews like religious conservatives of of of other stripes Jews in general oppose Trump orthodox Jews support Trump seventy one percent at last at last count. So why did I think he was conservative? There were a couple of reasons for this. The first is that there is an ongoing tone and substance to Robbins comments, a q. Using liberals of playing identity politics, and this is a hallmark of the right right now. And in fact, the hallmark of folks on the right with whom we have frequently engaged keep going. Yes. And I end to complicate matters further. It's also a hallmark of people who are trying to claim they're liberals than actually on the left, but really they're centrist or right wing useful morons or not now that's the wrong word there there there. There are a lot of people who do this like fake. Oh, no, I'm liberal. I'm gre- with you. But you know, I just here's here's how we fix the Democratic Party is get rid of all the Democrats stuff and do a bunch of conservative, Ed..

Cory Robbins Corey Robin Andrew Democratic Party Trump Schule Clarence Thomas seventy one percent twenty five hours hundred percent ten hours
"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"thurgood marshall" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"This is episode two hundred forty four which is twelve squared plus ten. Right. There's some square. I saw that's a square like no, not quite. Yeah. Twelve. That's the most important thing about the show is the numerology aspect now. Just kidding. How's it going Andrew? I am fantastic. Thomas. How're you? I'm doing great. I'm excited to talk about. Corey Robin the word yet. I like right like eight or nine people wrote to us to to tell us that you know, he was a socialist Marxist. I I don't I don't wanna I'll let him identify himself, whatever. But that that he was not a conservative. Nobody wrote in to say it's pronounced Robin and not Rovan. Yeah. No, believe me. Why got some heat? I got some heat in the Facebook. It's okay. I deserved it. All right. But we're going to talk more about Corey, Robin. And we're also going to talk about William bar, and as usual, I'm sure this will go far longer than Andrew always anticipate. So I like that I feel like you set a you've recognized that you always go long, Andrew. And you've kind of you've said a more modest goal for today's show. We'll see where where it ends up. It'll be it'll end up being ninety minutes. I'm sure but for now. Well, the Bill bar attorney general confirmation hearings should be underway as you download this. They're scheduled for today, Tuesday and Wednesday, and we want we want you to be well prepared for that. And I just had so many fun jurisprudential legal rabbit trails on the Corey Robin stuff that I figured I'd share it with everybody. This is the number one show for jurisprudential rabbit trails believe that's what the reviews say. Anyway, fun fun on inside fact jurisprudential rabbit trails was along with lawful. Neutral, one of the rejected names for the show that we originally. I've thought you're gonna say it was like a band from the sixties. Or like, a prog rock band from the seventy be so great a a Jefferson airplane cover band called the jurisprudential rapid tryst. I don't know who's going to sing the grace slick parts. But you know, we'll we'll put ZipRecruiter. Anyway, that's fantastic. All right. Let's get to our show vita. Please answer. The question does the defense is case..

Corey Robin Thomas Andrew Facebook William bar attorney Rovan Jefferson ninety minutes