36 Burst results for "Three Thousand Dollars"

Halo Championship Series Pivots Due to Pandemic

The Esports Minute

01:47 min | 3 d ago

Halo Championship Series Pivots Due to Pandemic

"I want Halo Sports back I think all of you probably want Halo eastport back how a top fight beloved game only a decade ago has fallen so far out of public perception is a travesty. Well. Somebody players are invested in bringing it back. They've had to pivot due to the coronavirus the halo championship series or h was begging lot on the release of Halo Infinite but halo infinite was just delayed to twenty twenty one due to the virus. Now, the is still want to get some competition out there but they definitely are on the level of what we were hoping with infinite today. The HCC announced the halo five pro series between September twenty six and mid December the will host a combination of open professional tournaments culminating with four season. Championships, the is still operating the master chief collection, pro series or MTC pro series as well, but those games being played in Halo Three. This new series we played, in Halo, five as you may have guessed in this press release the ATS. Also said they're increasing weekly prizes for the MCC from five hundred dollars to one thousand dollars. If that doesn't sound like a ton, it's because it's not he'll has an eastward has fallen far from when it stood in direct competition to call duty mini are hoping for return and the ATS is the closest. Thing, we have the halo five pro series will have total prizes of sixty three thousand dollars that's split across four regions. The release of Halo. Incident was also going to bring East sports engine created by longtime eastwards, veterans, atom up Selah and Ryan. Thompson engine posts, a wide variety of eastwards partners including the call of Duty League, and plenty of the franchise partners of Activism Blizzards Eastport Sports Leagues Right now, the Halo five pro series and the MCC pro series are mostly place holders to keep longtime halo fans with some content if halo is returning. To a place among eastward top titles, it's going to happen with eastwards engine and halo infant but we're going to have to wait till twenty twenty one to see if that can become a reality

MCC HCC Duty League Selah Thompson Ryan
Fresh update on "three thousand dollars" discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

00:33 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "three thousand dollars" discussed on Clark Howard Show

"Is it possible? You can just tell your sixteen year. The reality and maybe put off. Them having a car for a few months till the market goes back to more normal pricing. I suppose I could but I'd sure like he'll. If I did. Okay. All right your typical parent letting guilt overwhelm you just like I would. So. This. Time that maybe. You buy what we used to call a beater car. They just you know car you can buy for a small amount of money that hopefully will be reliable enough to get you through the months till the supply and demand of used vehicles gets back into sank. Because if you buy, let's say you buy a three year old for euro pickup truck, which is normally a sweet spot. Is You've probably seen in the market. It's really sour at this moment. If. You have to have a truck or can you get by with a passenger car because the deals right now I've got a lot of options right now, and that's why I wanted to call. You know I could buy like you said just to throw away car, and then you know by the three thousand dollars turn around and resell it for three thousand dollars in three months and get the truck I want that's what I to if you can handle that or do you have the ability to figure out because when you buy a very old car, you can end up buying something that is trouble from the first day. Do you have a good mechanic you can rely on or do you know how to evaluate adequately vehicle you buy there would be a much older when. Whatever I get we'll go to my mechanic. Okay. No matter. I mean even if I get a three year old. Nice looking pickup it's So that's great. So I. I know there are times that. It just works out great to buy a really older vehicle right now it's really important to look at buying a really older vehicle because that's not where the severe shortage in the marketplace is. Today it's really vehicles that are five years or newer is where this extreme shortages at the time. So buying some time for yourself. If you WANNA make sure you meet that promise to your teenager. Doing, it with an older passenger vehicle.

How to Not Have a Lost Decade

Money For the Rest of Us

04:13 min | 5 d ago

How to Not Have a Lost Decade

"Welcome money for the rest of this is a personal finance show on money how it works how to invest it and live without worrying about it. We host David Stein today's episode three, fourteen it's titled Don't have a lost decade. Recently, got an email from a new plus member. He says he's treating the material on the website like an online college course but he had a question he wrote that he's approaching a crossroad in his life and he would like to prepare himself for that crossroad. He works at one of the Best Public Gardens in us as a horticulturalist he's been there three years makes forty three thousand dollars per year has four weeks of vacation full healthcare and Hsa they have a four zero three. B. Defined contribution plan where he gets a six percent match his boss enjoy working with him and he enjoys his job. This member also has his own business, a lifestyle business providing premium horticulture services for high end properties. He started in two thousand nineteen gross four thousand dollars and anticipate grossing twelve thousand dollars this year he has no debt. The only thing he owns he says, that is worth. Any money is an old pickup truck that's worth about three thousand. Is roughly eighteen thousand, five hundred dollars in his defined contribution plan and using the online tools on money for the rest of US plus. That, he's on track to retire in his early sixties. y'All says about two thousand dollars in a savings account pays two percent and about fifteen hundred dollars in a wealth front Robo Advisor. Account. He's living on about eighteen to twenty thousand dollars a year. After contributing to is defined contribution plan and health savings account, he brings home about twenty, eight, thousand dollars but that doesn't include is overtime bonuses or the work in his business. After taxes and contribution he estimates that he's bringing home about thirty, five, thousand dollars with everything, which means potentially he could save fifteen to seventeen thousand dollars per year and certainly ten thousand dollars per year. He writes for the first time in my life I'm not living paycheck to paycheck am planning for the future. The business I own. Now as a hobby passion, I turned profitable. It has been a great space for me to learn and have done a lot of just that but it ultimately is a glorified landscaping business. What they really want to own is a retail nursery that one day will become an event, an education centre as well. I turned thirty two months. I thought at this point I would go beyond an entry level position. I thought I would own my own house and maybe own a business full-time. Those goals seem so far away. The question I want to pose to you is, how do I get from where I am today to owning a five to ten acre property that can use to develop into my next lifestyle business as soon as possible Had An additional investment question that address in a few minutes. I he's not in an entry level position. He is a master, her cultures he's studied it. He learned a lot of those skills working at an organic farm and Tasmania. Got, his university degree. He was admitted to a professional horticulture program at the Public Garden where he works, he is very, very skilled in all aspects of landscape design and gardening. and. There are a lot of people that would be very envious that he has his amazing job working in horticulture and one where he can listen to a lot of podcast which he does. In order to answer question I want to compare to couples I know I've known for about a decade. This particular members approaching thirty. He's looking out over the next decade. What has to happen so that he doesn't have a lost decade and can reach goals I'm positive he can reach his goals.

David Stein United States HSA Public Garden Advisor GOT Tasmania
What if lifesaving prescriptions were affordable for all

TED Talks Daily

05:01 min | 6 d ago

What if lifesaving prescriptions were affordable for all

"Hi Hugh Ted Talks Daily today a super cool idea to ensure people have access to the medicines they need to survive and thrive Kia Williams the founder of the nonprofit serum saw both a problem and a solution that exists in the pharmaceutical space and her idea link. The two together should explain in her talk from Ted Twenty twenty. Every day in this country families are forced to make impossible choices when it comes to their healthcare. Like Kimberly who said? There is time I to choose between my food and my pills. It wasn't luxury stuff because I didn't make that much. It was like, can I get shampoo or conditioner? Things you take for granted and Debbie. Who Said you put your medicine in one hand your living costs in the other. Okay. Well, what am I going to do? Am I GONNA get my medicine or am I gonNA pay my bills? Will. I can't live without my medicine but I can't live if I don't pay my bills ten thousand people die every month in this country because they don't take the medicine that they need. More people die from not taking medications than. Overdoses and car accidents combined. But you can't take medicine if you can't afford it. Today the average household spends three thousand dollars a year on medications about a third of folks who are uninsured said that they stopped taking medicine as prescribed because of cost even folks with insurance. If they make under thirty, five, thousand dollars a year half of them report skipping the medications if their insurance doesn't cover it. So there are. Million adults like Kimberly in like Debbie who are forced to make impossible choices every day. We all know that prescription drug prices are too high. In our healthcare system that makes some folks uninsured and other folks underinsured doesn't prioritize people who need access now and need medications. Now, ten million, it's a big number, but it's also a solvable number because there's also ten billion dollars of perfectly good unused medication that goes to waste. So this is an injustice onto sides people not getting the medicine that they need to survive and to thrive. In, that very same medication being sent to a medical waste incinerator to be destroyed this waste is unconscionable, but it also offers an opportunity I started serum a not for profit technology company with my co founders Adam and George. To turn discarded medications into a lifeline, we may not be able to fix all the ways in which our healthcare system is failing us, but we can fix this one. Medications come from manufacturers wholesalers who have safety stock, and when it's short dated, they destroy it. It also comes from healthcare facilities like fiddles pharmacies in nursing homes who end up with surplus when a patient stops taking medication or when they pass away. We can use this untapped source of medications to supply all ten million people who need medications, and we can do this today. Serum get surplus medications by putting recycling bins into the hundreds of facilities that have surplus they fill the been and when the boxes full serum initiates a courier pickup to pick up that medication in we handle the shipping the tracking the manifests in the tax receipt medicine donors want to donate because it's actually cheaper and easier than the highly regulated medicine destruction process. And they're strong tax incentives to actually donate. We then deliver those donated medications to people who needed a new prescription comes in in our platform matches that patient need with the inventory that's available. Our platform then generates a warehouse pick lists. The medications are picked in the prescription spills. We are building the twenty-first-century pharmacy experience that low income families deserve patients can register in under five minutes and have access to over five hundred different medications A. Stable list of medications for everything from heart disease to mental health conditions

Ted Twenty Twenty Kimberly Debbie Hugh Ted Kia Williams Overdoses Founder Adam George
Chromebooks Gain Share of Education Market Despite Shortages

Snacks Daily

03:27 min | Last week

Chromebooks Gain Share of Education Market Despite Shortages

"Four our first story pandemic has been huge for laptops and Google secret profit is winning it all chromebooks because we got, we got a whip out the history books here. We've come a long way with the old laptop computer my first computer ahead to live with my legs because it was a gateway, it was like to metric ton the only computer with a cow theme I think that's what they were going for their and then compaq laptops. I'm pretty sure doubled as a bulletproof like storm shield. Yeah, they were. Very Bruce Wayne, and then you had the dude, you're getting a Dell Guy. It's going to cost three thousand dollars. You better get a mortgage for that del. Ted Day the laptop market has changed in ways that might surprise you out. chromebooks are officially becoming the unofficial laptop of over Nineteen Jack. I noticed that because learning is happening remotely schools have been snatching up just the cheapest laptop option out there for kids and you know chromebooks are coming in at like two hundred fifty on the bottom of this is like a skinny computer with no hard drive it's basically a. Lego, it's a physical reincarnation of a chrome web browser that's about it oh, and if you're curious about getting one there sold out, it's a five-month way. Schools are snatching these up at such a rapid rate in preparation for distant learning that crumbs global market share for computers has climbed to ten percent from eight percent last year, which brought Jack and I do a key question. We found fascinating what Tech Company is. Dominating for laptops right now, this same tech company that was dominating for laptops three years ago Nick Microsoft. If there's a Microsoft makes its own laptops, but it's windows software still powers get this eighty three percent of laptops globally we're not just talking about those surface tablets. We're all seeing commercials for now Dell HP Lenovo, most of them are running on windows just like they were thirty years ago and you like look around a college philosophy class and see a lot of silver rectangle or apple macbooks not the winner smack books have just a tiny market according to the. Just, seven percent of global computers are Max ask because Apple has become the global club for high income people who pay in to get the fancy apple laptop. Attackers for the rest of the world, they're using windows or android or chromebook or something cheaper. So Jack, what's the takeaway for our buddies over at Google operation get kids hooked on our chromebooks, smackers most chromebooks in the world those belong to school at this shocking stat sixty, nine percent of all the computers bought this summer by K., through twelve schools in preparation for remote. Learning were chromebook. That's insane. Sixty nine percent. Koumba. Become like the modern day version of the OLA blue calculators used to have to the library did did you have those two? They're like ti like zero, zero, zero one the most fisted function on these things was all clearing before he could graduate to the eighty-three calculating absolute zero with those calculators. Now, Alphabet the company that owns. Google they benefit as kids start using chrome and Seymour. Google ads are also benefiting though by hooking kids at an early age into the Google ecosystem because if you're google docking in your google driving your google chrome booking since you're a seven, you're gonna live a different lifestyle potential. Yeah. If you've been since your seven, you're more likely to pick an android over an iphone. When you turn seventeen and finally get a phone maybe as early as Caney air by the way. Quick shoutout to all the teachers out there the new frontline workers of this country

Google Dell Jack Apple Compaq Secret Profit Caney Air Microsoft Ted Day Bruce Wayne Nick Microsoft OLA
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | Last month

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
How To Make Sure Your Business Finishes 2020 Strong

The $100 MBA Show

05:33 min | 2 months ago

How To Make Sure Your Business Finishes 2020 Strong

"The thing about time is that it keeps on moving and if you don't plan for if you don't move with it, it will leave you behind in just like that were six months into the year. Pass six months actually going on to seven months in. We're well into the third quarter of the year, and it's time to start hitting the gas. We gotta make sure we finish strong. We run through the tape of the Finish Line of twenty twenty, and the happens right now this is. Is when we pick up speed, this is when we make sure we dot. Those is and cross those teas. So how do we do it? How do we make sure that we don't get to October and November and start getting nervous that we won't hit our goals for the year? Well, the first thing is we have to establish what those goals are. We have to really be clear what we want to get done. Will we WANNA accomplish in our business in the next two quarters? It's really five months five months ago, so the way I like to do is I like to do it in quarter, so we're in the middle of quarter. Three two months left maybe a little bit more to wrap of this quarter. What do you want to get done in the next two months? What are your revenue goals? What are Your Business? Your team goals other products. Products you WANNA launched. Is there a change on making your website? Are there hires you WanNa make get crystal clear about them I believe that when it comes to short-term goals like two months you should be able to count them on one hand so three to five things you want to get done. That's a little bit of a stretch, but it's doable now obviously depends on. On the size of the goals, but it's enough for you to stay focused on them. You can actually repeat them off memory. No problem you're going to do the same thing in quarter four, so you have three months there. One of the goals you want to accomplish again quarter for it should be three to five goals. You want accomplish whether that's a revenue goal business goal. Goal a prodigal. Whatever it is, you want to write those down. I always kinda get really conservative in the last quarter. Because the last quarter's quite busy, we got holidays. Things are wrapping up. People go on vacation or winding down things. We want to make sure we leave enough room for us to accomplish what we set out to to have. Goals record three and four. Now what that's not enough. Most people stop right. There got my golden and my goals every so often and hopefully when it hit him right? No we need to do. Is You need to get people involved in those goals who is involved in those goals who are the stakeholders who the people that are going to help you get there who are impacted? These are most likely teamates. These could be co-founders is could be investors. Could be people in Your Mastermind Group or your coaching group? Sit Down and evaluate these goals with them. Discuss them see if we should modify them. Add remove things like that. You want people on board because you need the people that are involved or no, you're trying to achieve all have to be seeing from the same songsheet. It can't be confusing and this is like an announcement. This is like you're putting A. A stake in the ground and saying everybody. This is what we're doing. This is what I like to accomplish. What do you guys think? Let's all agree. Let's Kinda come together on the same mission once you've done that any trying to finalize these goals for the next two quarters. You WanNA break down the goals in two weeks, so let's take a look a same example for quarter four, and let's say you have four. Four goals for the fourth quarter on average you should be accomplishing one of these goals every three weeks, and you should be a third of the way of accomplishing that goal every week. Let's make it simple. Let's say one of your goals is a financial goal and you want increase your monthly recurring revenue by three thousand dollars. Okay, that's the goal for that quarter. Okay, so if you're trying to hit that goal and And it depends on when you wanna hit it. You WanNa hit in the first few weeks or do you WanNa hit it by the end of the quarter. Let's say the end of the quarter. That means every month. You need to be increasing your Mr by thousand dollars. You have to know if you're on track or not. We'll gets measured gets managed. That's what Peter Drucker said one of the fathers of marketing right. Right so you have to make sure you're on-track and you have to track yourself. Hold yourself accountable, and you have to hold the whole team accountable. That's involved and look at these goals every time you hey guys, are we on track? Are we hitting that goal? Already getting closer, it's week two. We've increased by three hundred. Okay, we're on track. This is the point same thing with any other goal whether it's product. You're. You're trying to launch a new feature or a new product, and you have your whole product Spec in the whole timeline of that project. Are we third away into that project by the end of the first month? Break it down by six. Are we one twelfth away right, or at least you can break down that project in two weeks. What should be done by the end of every week, so you hit that goal? Goal? You gotta get really micro here. Because every week we gotta make sure we're on track and if we're not, we need to make sure we get back on track. And then some. By the next week we got hold over bet accountable and make sure everybody understands. These are not just goals or Windsor, wishes these are actual plans. He's our blueprints to getting to the achievement to getting to where we want to otherwise. Otherwise. We're going to be high and dry at the end of the year. We're going to be disappointed. We're not GONNA hit goal. We want to finish strong, and that means analyzing and holding everybody on the team that's involved accountable and keeping it front and center every single week

Twenty Twenty Peter Drucker Windsor
How to Live Single - Single Moms in Brooklyn

Unladylike

03:48 min | 2 months ago

How to Live Single - Single Moms in Brooklyn

"Kristen last episode we talked about how expensive single hood can be and rent is one of the worst money pits for example like me, having to move back in with my parents after my last breakup before having to find a roommate, but if you're single and a mom like our guest Ashley, simple figuring out whether and where to live single gets way more complicated I couldn't just get up and leave, even even though eventually, that was like my bottom of the line. Last resort, just go back to California and live with my mom, but that wasn't really a viable option. I had to figure something out and I think unfortunately I think for a lot of women that option would have been to stay in an undesirable situation and impossibly abusive one and it happens a lot. When Ashley in her ex boyfriend ended things a few years ago, she had to find a place for herself and her then five year old son to live in Brooklyn where the median rent is three thousand dollars. It was like me after work, going to look at apartments and you know being told sometimes by landlords, and not a very direct way that they don't want to rent to a mom because you know. I've heard comments like well. It's a really quiet building, and we have a lot of single people who live year lots of couples, no kids, you know a lot of discouraging language, and it was really kind of gross so yeah, unfunny to say the least it was. Ashley's friend of ten years named Tia was going through a similar shit storm. Tia had just gotten divorced, and her two sons were three and thirteen at the time. Both women were commiserating about how hard it is to find affordable living situation as single moms like Ashley could have moved to a cheaper side of town, but her son was already enrolled in the neighborhood school. She felt invested in the community around her at the same time though she knew there is no way she could afford a place there on her own Tia meanwhile was still living in her pre-divorce apartment, but no longer had two incomes to cover the rent, so the ladies got to talking. And so literally to. Newly single moms with children all boys by the way talking about the same problem, so it was a very like it was like a light bulb moment where we were like well, what about because she had an extra room in her apartment three bedroom apartment, so it was also just it made sense like space, wise to and I will say honestly I mean. Both of us were kind of in desperate situation so even if that wasn't like. The first thing that we would do normally it seemed like the obvious. It seemed like the obvious to do. They decided that Ashley and her son would move into tears apartment they would divvy up the rent and expenses in childcare duties, and it seemed like a no brainer, even though Ashley said she'd never seen similar setups if you could have a roommate. Then why you have a roommate as a parent, if you're a single parent, especially like I, said an expensive city. It's Kinda weird like I. Don't know why that's not more common, but I do know that women and mothers have always been prone to Sharon resources and being communal when it comes to raising their kids I think maybe our generation has distanced from that a little bit, but you know I saw my mom and my grandmother and my aunts, sharing resources and helping each other out which is of the same vein, really so there was a loud checking in and letting each other know what was going on. There were times where you know. If she had a meeting that ran long, I went and got her youngest from daycare, or if I need groceries and she was going to the grocery store, I would give her my list and she would get the things that I needed. Although we shared a lot of groceries, you know different diets? There's different things on the list.

Ashley TIA Kristen California Brooklyn Sharon
Tanner Chidester - How to Boost Revenue with High-Ticket Sales

The $100 MBA Show

05:09 min | 3 months ago

Tanner Chidester - How to Boost Revenue with High-Ticket Sales

"Let's start with is the basics. What is a high ticket sale so typically? It's anything sold over three thousand dollars. You know some might argue that it's a little less, but typically it's anything that sold over three thousand dollars, the example of a high ticket sulphur business could be one to one coaching session how to do a handstand how to write a book how to get in shape. How to build an audience, it could be any things of that nature, so there's a lot of different things that can happen. But for me. Specifically two things I did to really build a very large businesses was in the fitness niche where I held a lot of trainers. I've also helped a lot of fitness. People get in shape so losing weight building muscle, and I also help some general business consultant, so those are examples of what you can do for high ticket sales where you're helping with a very serious problem, and you're giving a very high level of service, so the reason high ticket sales are so great is. Is ultimately they generate a lot of revenue in very short amount of time. So since you're selling them more expensive offering, you can sell a much smaller amount to get your goal so as a new business owner. This is great because at the end of the day. If you WANNA make ten k. a month, it's a lot easier to sell two or three three thousand dollar plus steals versus selling a couple hundred fifty dollar deals right, and that's why this is so good, especially as a beginning. Person In business because you don't have a lot of skill, you don't have a big budget and you have very little experience, so you want to do something that allows you to make a lot of mistakes and still make a lot of income because at the beginning of a business. That's what's going to happen now again. The reason this is so great is easy for beginners to implement, so you can do. Do a hunting different things. You can do cold calling which highly don't recommend, but you could do it. The other way to really do is starting to message. People be facebook linked in or Instagram, so I literally built my high ticket business about fifty thousand dollars a month before I, ever ran any paid ads by simply hustling a messaging people. So what I always say is, is that the fastest way or Or most efficiently, absolutely not, it's kind of like door door cells, but does it work for sure so if someone came to you and said Hey, look if you're willing to message people for six to eight hours a day for the next five six months, and it could get you to seven figures a year. Would you do it? That's kind of the reality with this type of situation when you start, it's. It's not super exciting, and it can take a lot of work, but once you get a rolling. It's amazing. It's just crazy. How much more you can do once you back cash and that's kind of the point of it now. The other way is once you really are getting these leads, and you start making a little bit of money organically. The way you really implement in making more faster is to. Add, facebook ads to this or you bads I usually say facebook ads for beginner, because it tastes a little less skill to run, but once I had thought approach from messaging someone getting them to a phone call, and then selling them over the phone. It was just easy to start running. More ads get more of those customers because for business roaming more revenue, it really comes down to making more sales and for to get more sales, you more applications to phone calls and get more of those more leads. Something also understand if I forgot to mention is you're going to have to sell these over the phone? No one's going to buy three thousand dollars plus private without talking to human being just keep down night. Night, it's possible without a blitz very difficult, and it would take a very expert type marketer so the beginner get them on the phone. Call and sell that way so going back to ads. If you wanted to scale now that she was starting to get clients, how do you get more leads? One of the best ways to do that is with the facebook. Ads give an example of how this looks so maybe you spend a thousand dollars on ads, right? And you get a hundred leads for about ten bucks a pop, so ten dollar leads is not that great, and for those listeners who don't know what a lead is thing of that is getting e mail a phone number something of that nature right now once you have those leads X. amount will sign up for a phone call. Usually it's ten to twenty percent, so let's go with the lower amount. Let's say I have one. Hundred leads ten sign up for a phone call at ten phone calls. Three will cancel to won't show up, and then you can close usually three out of five if you're. You're a good closer. If you're bad closer, you may close to out of five either way if you spend a thousand dollars and close to deals at three grand, you just made five thousand dollars, so if you're able to rinse and repeat that process, it's very simple to see how someone who doesn't know a lot about business can scale very rapidly, and that's what happened to me. When I started I had a lot of skill in terms of fitness and coaching, but I didn't know this part of business, and once I figured it out. It was very easy to scale because I had an amazing fulfillment. So that is the next way is once you get the organic messaging down and you have a process where you're getting clients, you WanNa, take that money and dump it into ads because that's GonNa. Let you scale to the next level. Now

Facebook Business Owner Consultant Instagram
Cobain 'MTV Unplugged' guitar sells for sky-high $6 million

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Cobain 'MTV Unplugged' guitar sells for sky-high $6 million

"The acoustic guitar Kurt Cobain played for nirvana's MTV unplugged concert in nineteen ninety three has sold at auction for six million dollars marches are a letter with the latest Julien's auctions as Peter Friedman owner of rode microphones is the new owner of the nineteen fifty nine Martin guitar that was the only one coping played for nirvana's MTV unplugged that's three times the presale estimate princes cloud to blue angel guitar that he played on tour during the nineteen eighties and in the videos for cream and get off sold for five hundred sixty three thousand dollars other items sold at the auction include Madonna's ivory gown from the vogue video and Elvis Presley's macrame belts

Kurt Cobain MTV Julien Madonna Elvis Presley Peter Friedman
Cobain 'MTV Unplugged' guitar sells for sky-high $6 million

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Cobain 'MTV Unplugged' guitar sells for sky-high $6 million

"The acoustic guitar Kurt Cobain played for nirvana's MTV unplugged concert in nineteen ninety three has sold at auction for six million dollars marches are a letter with the latest Julien's auctions as Peter Friedman owner of rode microphones is the new owner of the nineteen fifty nine Martin guitar that was the only one coping played for nirvana's MTV unplugged that's three times the presale estimate princes cloud to blue angel guitar that he played on tour during the nineteen eighties and in the videos for cream and get off sold for five hundred sixty three thousand dollars other items sold at the auction include Madonna's ivory gown from the vogue video and Elvis Presley's macrame belts

Kurt Cobain MTV Julien Madonna Elvis Presley Peter Friedman
Prince’s ‘Blue Angel’ Cloud 2 Guitar Sells for $563,000 at Auction

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Prince’s ‘Blue Angel’ Cloud 2 Guitar Sells for $563,000 at Auction

"Oil price tag for a music legends instrument correspondent Yuni Han has the story Reese's guitar which he played on the purple rain tour in the nineteen eighties has sold for over five hundred and sixty three thousand dollars the custom blue angel cloud to electric guitar was expected to sell for one hundred to two hundred thousand in this weekend's auction by Julien's auctions in Beverly hills meanwhile Elvis Presley's macrame belt fetching ten times more than expected at two hundred ninety eight thousand dollars and Madonna's ivory gown which she wore in her nineteen ninety vo video sold for just over one hundred and seventy nine thousand dollars the buyers identities were not disclosed

Yuni Han Reese Julien Beverly Hills Elvis Presley Madonna
Accused of Mistreating Employees of Color, The Wing CEO Audrey Gelman Resigns

Business Wars Daily

02:10 min | 3 months ago

Accused of Mistreating Employees of Color, The Wing CEO Audrey Gelman Resigns

"Audrey Gilman envisioned the women's co working space. She founded as a women's Utopia. In Two thousand sixteen. Then twenty twenty-eight-year-old Gilman partnered with another something friend. Lauren Cassen to found the wing, its mission to be feminist, safe workspace in which women surrounded by other ambitious women would feel empowered to succeed and unbothered by the Patriarchy among other issues. The wing vocally supported pay equity. The company rose on the back of the METOO movement. It attracted members who loved the idea of a progressive women. I space high profile speakers included. Included Hillary Clinton and actress Jennifer Lawrence Tennis Star Serena. Williams is an investor. Members pay up to three thousand dollars a year for access to the CO working spaces, and all that comes with them from breastfeeding rooms to hair, care products, luxurious spaces, and a magazine called no-man's-land the new. York Times reports prior to the pandemic. It had twelve thousand members paying at least twenty one hundred dollars a year, according to the Wall Street Journal. In the four years since its founding the glamorous Gilman of former publicist became a star of business publication, celebrating the supposed success of the instagram worthy chain before covid nineteen hit, the wing had raised almost one hundred twenty million dollars in venture, capital funding and expanded to eleven locations, but underneath it's polished suspicious. There was deep trouble at the wing, rampant accusations by black and brown workers, persistent racial discrimination and abusive behavior by Executives, senior staff and club members that's according to reports in the New York. Times the Wall Street Journal and the Feminist Publication Jessie Belle. Earlier this month. Gilman resigned the same day. Managers at the Wings New, York headquarters staged a virtual walkout protesting labor conditions in solidarity with employees of color, most of whom cleaned served bus tables, and did other manual labor, in addition, a separate group of those former employees, most of them black and brown formed. A group called flew the coop. That group is circulating a petition, demanding change and compensation for a variety of. Of alleged harms

Audrey Gilman Wall Street Journal Gilman Hillary Clinton Lauren Cassen York Times New York Metoo Williams York Jennifer Lawrence Jessie Belle Brown Senior Staff
Ecosystem Engineering

Front End Happy Hour

06:56 min | 4 months ago

Ecosystem Engineering

"Gave a little bit of descriptions early in your intros. But I'm really curious. How do you describe? What IS ECOSYSTEM? Engineering NF flakes. So I've my previous role. I was a manager also and interest netflix's have to do a lot of recruiting and I'd have to answer this question a lot. Like what do you do? And what is this an unusually posted by saying you ever go into a store costco someplace and you see the. Tv's for sale and on the box they have netflix on them. Netflix's already pre install on it or if you could buy a Roku already got netflix on their more comcast box you may or may not get it but if it does get loaded somehow. Netflix's getting on all these devices. How does that happen? What happens is there's a team at net flicks that makes the Netflix's player code and we package it up once a year and we call it the de k a software developers kit for the player and we might give it a name but every year we give it out to these partners in these partners are like Samsung L. G. Roku comcast of the world and they have to take it and make it work on their system. And so if you look at all the TV's out there and all the set top boxes you can see that you know they're different chipsets. There's different hardware. They probably have different compilers and compilers settings. They've God's maybe their own libraries that they have to do they have a different os on their TV. Every device out there. Basically a custom made device. And so how do you get those Netflix's player which looks pretty much the same once you start the APP whether it's on a Roku or a Samsung Smart TV or a cable set top box? How is it ended up at experiences? Pretty much universal. I would say in how that happens is there are other teams that work with these partners to make sure that AAA compiles and be that. It's good that doesn't crash We have a suite of tasks and Trevan helps with that that area. The part and my previous manager job was in area too. We don't let net Netflix. Go out or be sold or pre installed on and device unless we know that device is going to have good quality with it. I said it cheers. Cheers cheers cheers and how that happens. Is these partners. Have to run a whole bunch of tests and pass these tests and there's a a Cloud-based tests service that Netflix's made where they can take their device whether they're working in China or whether they're working in Japan or Korea or the US or anywhere in the world they plug it into Internet. They log into this cloud service and they can run tests and we can see these tests if they pass fail and so on so forth and was passed all these tests then it goes out into the field and people can buy them what people have them in their homes or they sign up for cable service and they get this box and they start net flakes. And if it's working great we can see the metrics remotely from here 'cause all these boxes and TV's are sending this logs all the time and if there's a problem we should be able to detect that and try to get it fixed so long story. Short Netflix's works with a whole bunch of other companies to get these apps working and what's out there are jobs not done. We have to make sure that it keeps working. And so that's where he may be a deluded to like. Qe which maybe you could explain. What the Kiwi Patrick. Is that your your teams looking at sure. So Kua we. Quality of experience cheers. Cheers kind of set. You up for that one. They are metrics that deal with how the APP appears to the user. So this would be. Things like is video smooth. Does it look like high. Bit Rate. So it looks like very high quality not just st but also hd for K. buffering a lot. Which hopefully it's not a re buffer is when you're watching in the middle of playback and there's this kind of spinner that appears on the screen where it's trying to load and it's ten percent twenty percent. Seventy five percent. Ninety nine percent starts playing again. It's probably because there's some interference on the network or there's a bug in the buffering on the device we want to keep all that buffering to a minimum so that when you start watching it smooth. There's no interruptions but it's not just limited to that if you have trouble starting the APP or if you're in the middle of the APP crashes or there's like network fluctuations where it goes high quality low quality too much on. These are all things that could be addressed usually on the device side and try to minimize those as much as possible wherever possible. Even things outside of the network that users network or the service provider's network lately. Yeah that's another one. I forgot about that one. The time it takes for you to press the button versus how long it takes to start the actual playback. Hopefully it's around four or five seconds but on some devices we see. It's as long as twenty seconds thirty seconds. That's something that could be fixed on a device. Hopefully I think that's always been something that I've actually been amazed at is just Michael. You paint the picture of the ecosystem of all the different TV devices. But when I think about it too is the Netflix. App is being built for something like a roku stick. It's a lower powered device. And then you have something lake the playstation four or Xbox at you can also play on. It has a lot bigger assessor. I think is really interesting. How you there's large ecosystem of devices that we are supporting and so I can imagine that becomes a lot more challenging in your world to to support all those different variables are those devices and especially when you think that every one of those devices basically a custom made device very few devices. Look or act exactly the same from the code perspective and so it's it's a challenge to make sure that when you start Netflix's whether on a fifteen dollars stick if you bought it on sale the way up to four hundred dollars playstation or even a three thousand dollar four K. SMART TV that the Netflix's experience is pretty universal. On all of them. You still log in the same. You still have your same catalog. He still are able to see and navigate through the you. I pretty much the same. It's pretty familiar despite that range and I think that's pretty

Netflix Samsung Costco Kiwi Patrick Comcast Trevan Michael United States China Korea Japan
Will COVID-19 bring down Airbnb?

The Big Story

10:54 min | 4 months ago

Will COVID-19 bring down Airbnb?

"Ever since we launched this show almost two years ago. Now we've done episodes about the housing crisis in Canada comes up often and it comes up everywhere from Pi to Nana avert to big cities like Vancouver and Toronto and Montreal. And every time we cover it we start with. Why how did this situation come to be and there are of course some different reasons in different places but one thing one thing keeps coming up again and again and you get one? Guess as to what we'll city place here in the downtown core as one of the highest concentrations of airbnb rental units in Toronto and tonight some housing advocates are saying. That is booming. Business is driving up the prices for those who are actually looking for a permanent home. That was then though and this is now on a city known for its sky high pricing when it comes to housing and rentals is seeing a bit of a shift. According to experts since the Ontario government has banned airbnb there was actually a huge influx in rental apartments being available right now. Nobody is traveling not even within Canada. And as you might imagine that has had an impact on airbnb business model and Bhai impact. I mean it has basically obliterated so what happens to the rental markets Canada's biggest cities to thousands of airbnb landlords some of whom have staked their financial future on this platform to the company itself. Does it di- Does it? Evolve and what happens to the future of development in big urban centers because in order to understand? How much could change from here? You also have to understand how much AIRBNB has done to drive the direction of cities in the past decade. So that's where we'll start. Who knows where we'LL END UP Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Matt Elliott is a columnist who writes about municipal policy. He writes in the Toronto Star. He writes for the CBC and several other publications. I mad. Hey we're gonNA talk about Airbnb today and It's decline. I guess in Toronto and in other cities around the world. But why don't you I kind of give me an explanation? As to how AIRBNB rose to such dominance in the rental markets of big cities. I mean the short answer is money. I mean. Imagine you're a landlord and you sort of have choices with the property. You Own the traditional way where you find. A long-term tenant You know you can make some money off of that. But there's some what landlords might describe as hurdles. You know the rules around addictions raising rent or whatever Whereas AIRBNB is way simpler. A bad tenants don't really last for longer than few days in most cases and then the money. I think the money is just the big thing I mean. Imagine you could rent a place for two hundred dollars a night for fifty nights a month. You're at three thousand dollars a month in income from that. That's more than the average rent in most Indian neighborhoods and Enough to carry a mortgage worth a million dollars or so so landlords are looking those two options they were increasingly going the RBM Dui. Because I know you cover Toronto. We'll just sort of use it as a proxy for some of the biggest Global cities which have some of the same problems with AIRBNB. Can you give me a sense of the size of AIRBNB IN TORONTO? Before the pandemic began like how dominant is it was it was very dominant and increasingly so a fair. Bnb which is an anti airbnb at secret supporting a note that but they did some number crunching and looked at the data from AIRBNB and they estimated there were about seventy three hundred Units on BNB that did not comply with the regulations passed by the city of Toronto. Those regulations are not enforced when they were doing this. But those were the rules. Saying you know you can't rent out an entire house that you don't live in you can only rent out your principal residence. So seventy three hundred units that would have been on the rental market but been consumed by AIRBNB. is hugely significant in rental market as tight as Toronto or vacancy rates over. The last few years have been around one percent so you know I think one of the reasons people got pretty fired up about AIRBNB. Is this idea that you know these are. This is a rental market. That is very very challenging. Very expensive very tight and airbnb comes along and suddenly another chunk of air. Rental market is no longer in the market. And we're going to get to the pandemic I promise in in one second but How much in the hallways at City Hall was this hot button issue in the months leading up to say February or early March? When things started happening I mean housing. In general is such a huge huge issue at City Hall There's increasingly concerns that you know we're looking at a city that is just unaffordable for anybody but the top of the economy. So if you're a service worker if you're a teacher you're a nurse if you're a police officer like all of these jobs some of which pay pretty darn well when you look at what housing was renting for in Toronto. It just wasn't really doable for a lot of these people especially if they're people that are looking at you know. I want to start a family. Have a couple of kids and the only one of the people in a couple goes to work in those situations. Those that arrangement used to be doable. In a city like Toronto increasingly. It was not so when you have that sort of greater backdrop of housing counselors and bureaucrats and policymakers and advocates are looking for levers. They can pull. That might improve the situation. How many looked at AIRBNB and said okay? This is a relatively new thing. It has taken units out of the rental market This is something that we can look at it as a way. You know for whatever difference. That'll make it would make some difference to to make things better. As far as housing goes but you mentioned that they weren't yet enforcing the regulations they were not and I mean that's that's an interesting story by itself because the regulations passed by council which I mean at a high level. The major changes that they wanted to impose. Were you know you can only rent out your principal residence so if you have a condo and you want rent it for a couple of weeks on AIRBNB in the summer while you're off on vacation or whatever that's totally fine but if you buy another condo with the plan to just rent it on airbnb making income off of it that was going to become a against the rules. There was also going to be a cap on the number of nights you could rent a a unit in Toronto. One hundred and eighty nine year was going to the CAP But when they passed those Suddenly there was a challenge by a landlord turned out. Airbnb was supporting this challenge. And while that was before the a tribunal they held things up for a two years pretty much but a year and a half to two years while they waited for a ruling on whether these regulations could actually go into effect that finally resolve itself in the fall. But then all of the sudden you have this pandemic happen and you know the has stuff stuff as ended up on pause result. What'S HAPPENED TO AIRBNB IN TORONTO? And other places since the pandemic began it all kind of blew up To be honest I'm AIRBNB. The renters are primarily travelers Whether international or domestic travellers they're people come in from one place to another and in mid March Traveling shutdown just is not happening so there goes the market for airbnb in most cities So all the sudden you have a situation where you have all the supply thousands of units that were on Airbnb and that's how landlords made their income Suddenly were empty a bookings being cancelled and going forward. There's not a lot of hope for our travel to resume in the near term so it was a major shock to the system as all these units suddenly no longer had people in them at all. How bad could this get for the company if it continues? And what have they sort of gun in an attempt to respond to they've done a few things Airbnb announced a fund support landlords. Who were facing cancellations? You know for bookings that came in before the Pandemic Aso I think there is a desire on airbnb. Parts to see this Just sorta sustain the urban economy. Obviously they want to make sure there's still people with airbnb listings after all. This happens That airbnb itself is facing major. Financial Distress They have laid off. I think a quarter of their workforce They are saying they are revenue for the year is about half what it was projected to be at the start of the year. So they're facing a multi billion dollar. Hit and resorting to layoffs. And it's a really tough situation for for the company and then for landlords. I think some of them are going to be able to whether this because they're looking at the situation where they know they bought a unit listed on Airbnb they can defer either mortgage right now at a lot of banks. So maybe there's a way that they can hold on and and keep going through this but you also have situations where landlords have hugely over leveraged themselves. You know really gambled on this as a way to make a quick buck. And you know they're looking at situations where okay. This was going to be my My Nest Egg is is how was going to get rich and that is is really starting to fall apart for a lot of them. When I wrote about this for the star a few weeks ago I got a lot of emails from Landlords with immunes who were just incredibly angry about what I had written Because I was not coming down on the side of the landlords talking about you know how much of their life savings tied up in this Airbnb Model and this their despair for what's going to happen in the future. Can you give me an example of what that looks like when you get severely over leveraged investing in Airbnb Imagine a situation where you come into Toronto and you buy a house for yourself for you know everything in Toronto as close to a million dollars these days. So so you buy a million dollar hosts to live in and then you think well you know to make some extra money. I will also by Condo for a half million dollars and

Airbnb Toronto Canada City Hall Ontario Government Principal Matt Elliott CBC Jordan Heath Rawlings Montreal Vancouver Airbnb. Officer
You Cant Outrun Your Fork

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

11:53 min | 4 months ago

You Cant Outrun Your Fork

"And today. We are going to cite you with a show about gluten called. You can't outrun your work. Dr Louis came up with that. Catchy Title I think he stole it. Perhaps from someone else but We liked it so extra. That's right but so we're GONNA talk to you about foods that might cause you to want more of the same and some very exciting testing information that we have been waiting very long time for Where it would be convenient for you and great reports and ways for you to determine gluten or wheat sensitivity so to day Dr Louis Would you explain to us about gluten and why it such a big problem? And why would someone be intolerant to it and you know what does it? 'cause what's the big deal with gluten gluten free so big deal right? I think it is a big deal. some of the research says is one out of one hundred or two out of hundred. That has gluten intolerance ILIAC disease. You know if you have that kind of Gi Issues go see your Gi doctor. So you're in tarnished Get the test made. Although we're going to tell you about tasks that you can do with us that I found to be. Oh my God blow you into new reality of knowledge and understanding again. I'M GONNA go down too much rabbit. Trails You know when I read this thing in interior. Was you know everybody should follow Tara? She really good health coach and she rat some pretty intelligent newsletters. Just like brandy does for Janet May You know I think anyone that puts beans chiles kind of a heathen might not love the Lord. But it's not just about beans beans can have issues too but mostly we don't talk about. Grind grain is not good and some of the myths. 'cause I I really think Janice going to get into more detail than me but and I hear this all the time but I'm eating whole wheat bread because I'm getting whole grains well usually Whole wheat break usually doesn't contain very much of the whole grind because the number one ingredient he's usually called wheat flour There's nips but I love my oatmeal. It's like well. I two or three bowls boat meal per year and I think it's the most nutritious thing you can eat breakfast. I personally think that's very very not true. And I think it's better than a breakfast. You know of sugary cereal but OATMEAL has a pretty high glycemic load. And so I don't think that's a good thing because it generally means when you have a high glycemic stuff. It usually means that you're going to spend the rest of the day over eating because you're hungry because of glycemic index Well you know I think we need to back up a little bit here and tell people why we got so involved with gluten you know before we we tell people. Don't eat gluten you know. It's not good but at the same time we didn't have a personal experience with it or where we could relate to own my goodness. That's what's causing it. If it's many of you have been listening to us for years. Thank you so much or someone that's new. You know the personal history there with why we found this out is because Dr Lewis was experiencing severe stomach pains to the point. He thought he was going to die. I mean I was bitterly I. I was giving him everything that I knew to give him. And you know we know all about nutrition for those of you that don't like me Janice WanNa keep me alive so ninette and happy but he I would give him so many things and it was like nothing was making it right and it got so bad. He tried to take out extra life insurance because he was sure he wasn't going to make it. And you know how God works. He sends people longer path. When it's just your bleakest darkest hour and shows you something you would not have listened to previously and incomes a Representative or actually. We had a a one of our bottom representatives. Tell us about this country. This company called vibrant labs and they did A lot of blood work with just a little bit of blood and we were very excited about it because we thought well you know. We don't really know what we need to have run. We've got a pretty good deal going with our lab companies. Now you guys get great pricing on the labs we you know. I don't know how this is going to help us. And she said but they'll do a gluten test on you and wheat sensitivity and food sensitivity testing and and maybe Dr Lisk and find out what's wrong so when we did the testing at that time it was a blood draw and it had to be a person that came to your office or they came to your house and they drew the blood and then it was sent off Which we did and Dr. Louis came back that he was not only gluten intolerant but he was borderline Celia disease. Which is what that turns into if it's uncontrolled so you know telling someone to quit eating gluten and then seeing it on a on a report where it's glaring at you telling you this is the result of you. Eating gluten is two different things which made us want to start offering this test. So Dr Lewis Stop Gluten. He thought well that's the issue. I'll stop it. He did and immediately. He started feeling better and I thought so. I did the test mine. Wasn't that bad. It wasn't great turns out that anybody who lives in the United States has it to some degree because of the Chemical crawls and the increase in gluten in the grange compared to what it was a few decades ago right and so we both more so than I will make sure he does not eat gluten in a meal and I cannot tell you the difference in how you feel with your digestive system. You know if you're suffering from you know things like bloating and brain fog and and you eat something that you just feel like it. Just you can't. You're not gonNA ever process it. It's probably because you have some sort of an allergy to it But belly pain diarrhoea. Muscle pain anxiety. Headaches nausea confusion numbness. They're all signs of it. And frankly with the lab testing the way it was at the time. And I know many of you and I'm sweating explaining this many of you've been asking us when you're GonNa get this going because we really want to do this We couldn't count on having a person that would draw the blood all the time everywhere because we are able to to draw lab across the United States. It's not always convenient place for someone to get drawn so vibrant look really just came out with The ability to have it as a finger prick test in your home so the way it works is we've said everything up on our website. It's under Specialty panels tab at the top and it explains to you. What all is in this test? And these tests that we've seen before because Dr has looked at them many times from different companies there about three thousand dollars to run what we're running for six hundred dollars and the fact that it can be a finger prick test in your home so you're secure. You don't have to go to a lab which a lot of people are scared of now and it doesn't take that much blood to do. All of this is just. We're just so excited to be bringing it to you But they have what? You're what you'll get for that six hundred dollars as a wheat. Zumur panel a leaky gut panel and a food sensitivity profile panel of ninety. Six foods Where'd you fill out the Hell Star Bay? If you've not done our health survey it'll ask you it. It includes Wheat Gluten and electons. And then you'll be able to pick two more primary foods that you eat the most of and those are added but it it detects wieght and gluten related disorders it aids in this specific recognition of antibodies to wheat peptides including gluten and non gluten components along with intestinal permeability. It allows detection of protein. Antibodies associated with wheat and gluten sensitivities. Were information to reduce monitor and manage the inflammatory effects of those sensitivities. So you'll be able to tail and it. It gives it to you in beautiful reports. It tells you what you may be missing nutritionally not specifically our products but just in general which Dr Lewis will turn around and come up with products that are ours to correlate to these tests. So that you'll know which things you need. So Dr Lewis. Can you explain to us? How Leaky Gut. Why why would we test for that so much? You know what? What is it? We're trying to see with leaky gut. Well the Gluten Causes Zanjan Zanjan opens up the gaps and then the leaky gut can absorb poorly digested food. Proteins back to our microbes and it gets things in your blood stains bloodstream. You don't really want It's just a bad thing. A you know anybody. Listen to enough my podcast. Now that I get in different moods well. I'm in a different mood today. You know you know my main thing I want to say. Today's it's you know we. We named this thing. It's hard to run your Fort It's also hard to lose weight when you have overactive knife and fork so folks you've gotta take responsibility Lake Innis is very very very common number. We'll get into maybe a little bit of detail but you know I looked up. Some research and it said leaking can be reduced by Herbs Courson Journal and Pharmacology And we have had trouble keeping our courson slash Brahma Lane in stock although we have in stock now because there was plenty of research that says corser tend to really really good for things that are Respiratory illnesses you. Draw your own conclusion there but It's really good because it has not just the Carson but rude and Brahma Lane. Pat Pain Pancreatic and which includes lap as protease and analyze. Because you need the enzymes and it's really really good. My Barranca have always always been a my weak area and I've been talking to in the morning to at night and you know it also lowers inflammation because that shows in your c reactive protein. Her chance heart attack and stroke and I've been taking it home I got. I feel better than I felt in years but given up. The gluten was good thing so think about the gut leak in this can be reduced by taking a course. It's not just about lowering your c reactive protein. It's about all kinds of other things. I'd say get away from grains I have plenty of stuff here depend on how much you WanNa get into but You have to you know. Had One patient says well. I did a test and I learned to get off of whatever food was bothering her. The number one is weight Number two is milk like if you have colitis or IBS and again if you WANNA really

Dr Lewis Dr. Louis Food Sensitivity Janice Wan Herbs Courson Journal And Phar United States Headaches Dr Lisk Zanjan Zanjan Tara Representative Pat Pain Janet Barranca Brahma Lane Bloating IBS Carson Corser
Creating Professional Slideshows and Albums

This Week in Photo

08:52 min | 4 months ago

Creating Professional Slideshows and Albums

"Welcome back to this week and photo. I'm your host Frederik van Johnson. Today I'm joined by Daniel you Cinco. He's the CO founder and the Chief Operating Officer of a company called Pixel Salou and they make some software called smart albums and smart slides. And I think some other things that maybe on the horizon. Hopefully we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA talk about the future of the company but Daniels here to talk about the slide show space and the album space and the cloud speech of how things are changing photographers. Daniel welcome to the show man. How are you doing? Hey Nice to see you here. Yes as well. We've been trying to do the interview forever. So now now you guys went through a launch and the software is out there in the wild. How's it going or people enjoying? Yeah Yeah No. It's it's been good. We've been around now for November. It'll be six years since we launched my sincere album the first version so yeah. It's been quite a ride for sure. Wow I've got a ton of questions for you on that specifically I wanNA talk about the competitive landscape for you. What the software is. Who's it for what problems that it does it solve and all that before we do that I want to? You know you mentioned you've been around for six. Years gives for the people that may not have heard of the company. But how did it start? Why did it start what? What was the entrepreneur problem? You guys were to solve Yeah I. I've been shooting weddings. Since I was sixteen year. Old Kid has been a really long time. I'm a certain to turn thirty five here so I've been in the industry for a really long time. I started. Actually when I was still film days I was learning film. Back then and I just had a lot of Guess back then. You know photography inside. I was teaching workshops. Those travelling was talking doger's and at the same time I had a friend who was a programmer developer. He said Hey. I have some ideas about some cool apps that we can build and you seem like you have a hold on line marketing and photography. Let's do this together. And so that was in two thousand ten so nine nine years ago and yeah we had A. We had an idea back then. It was like an IPAD APP where you could basically create a design that looked like a printed book and you would flip a flip the pages on IPAD and actually went. I just came out. I was one But we made the APP. We spent two years making the APP and we should go to a lot of her. They loved it but apparently not enough to pay us any money so we had one customer the entire time one from Saudi Arabia. Out of all places. I don't why or how that happened. She was very upset when we told her. We are closing the down. So but We we realized that that The big problem is not necessarily showing the album on an IPAD But actually creating it because in order for it to be prepared for the ipad. We had to go through a similar process of putting images on the page and making sure they're all lined up and they look good together and back then. Most photographers use either photoshop. Or in design and in order to upload to our APP you also have to use design and we thought that our project. We didn't have any customers because the process of creating that album for the IPAD APP was too difficult. So we're like oh we should have a companion APP that you can use to make the layouts that would be really really easy and so that was the beginning of smart albums and as we were making smart albums we realized that there is a big problem. Not just You know an IPAD APP design but making it design for wedding and portrait for our food for books and albums be printed because this is also the time where they're called flush mount books whereas the old old school albums you'd have basically openings on the page and you would slip for pictures in there but the new modern albums which were becoming popular. You'd have a entire page that was A whole print and for these albums for flush mount albums you needed to create designs and so we thought. Oh smart albums big grade help here as well to help with our grade printed albums and so when we launched it in November two thousand thirteen it was for the printed albums and they really exploded and change industry because something that used to take in photoshop days and designed probably a whole day. Now smart albums you can make you know in fifteen minutes And Yeah after that we we grew from three people back then to now over thirty people. That's been collect fight it right. Yeah congratulations man. That sounds fantastic. That sounds like the the the ultimate ultimate sort of Silicon Valley for the most part but the ultimate sort of Silicon Valley story of Guy Sees Guy has issued guy solves the issue turns out people like the solution in Bhai. It and the company grows right. Yeah except we didn't have silicon valley money. We have to finance it ourselves. That's the big big difference. Oh Yeah Yeah. I'M GONNA dive into both of these so smart albums and smart slides so just before we do that from from your perspective. How how has the or has the industry changed? You know in terms of what they want. So you mentioned going from sort of slip in prints and the evolution into the full page being a print which necessitated doing layout and design and all that. Have you sitting where you're sitting? Have you seen a shift away? From printing and into more online sharing through facebook can in that sort of thing or is it equal growth on both the physical atom side of the business in electron side of the business. Yeah great question. I definitely seen a shift toward more. Just shooting burn and you know we can the warriors type of approach where Dr Become wedding photography become a secondary job and a lot of cases. But those who try to make it their full time business and they're full-time thing. They realized that in order to make it a full time business. They have to make as much money on each client. That's possible because clients are limited. There are a lot of. I'm sure every photographer watching this will say. Oh my gosh. My market is so saturated I. It's so hard to make it And it's been a lot easier ten years ago. It was a lot easier and so with more photographers Everybody gets fewer clients viewer bride and fewer portrait clients so you have to find ways to maximize the amount of money you make from. Each individual client and prince albums are really really great. Way of doing that because clients want them. Most lines want them. It's just a matter of price and by saving what's might albums by saving time on design you essentially can lower the price tag of the album back in the day. Fifteen years ago malls photographers would tell you. Oh you have to charge something like two to three thousand dollars per hour which sounds kind of insane right now for a typical wedding. Typical bride is GONNA pay again. Typical bride is not going to pay three thousand dollars for album because she knows she can probably find something online. That may not be as great. You know shutter flyer or blurb but may not be as great but she can get something done for two hundred dollars or one hundred dollars and so was allowed photographers to make albums fast allowing them to lower that price tag because now they can afford to charge less for albums and still make it really good profit?

Daniel GUY Frederik Van Johnson Pixel Salou Daniels Facebook Saudi Arabia Co Founder Chief Operating Officer Dr Become Doger Programmer Developer
Millions struggle amid delays in stimulus and unemployment

Jim Bohannon

01:50 min | 5 months ago

Millions struggle amid delays in stimulus and unemployment

"Here's the problem people haven't received their stimulus checks their payments some states still haven't rolled out their covert unemployment registration website so unemployed people still haven't gotten a dime it is going to be too long before the stimulus money that you know everybody was sent and unemployment is still on the rise that money is going to be gone here we are the first week of may it's not looking pretty people were on end of unable to make their rants in their mortgage payments in April the ones who managed to scrape enough money together will be able to pay the rent and mortgages for may and it's not just the mortgage payments it's actually food in people's stomachs that is the the food banks have both come under unprecedented use and we are digging ourselves into a hole will never get out of that it's in people are all are struggling and not because of laziness but because they've been told they cannot work it's the perfect storm and if president trump doesn't find a way to connect with those people and help those people at the bottom of the ladder there is civil unrest there crime waves coming our way at the same time he's got to convince those people who have gotten these Jackson this unemployment to go back to work I mean why would you go back to getting minimum wage when with unemployment and an extra six hundred dollars a week you're getting close to three thousand dollars a

Donald Trump Jackson President Trump
Spilling the Travel Tea with Sarah Gaines, MSN, RNC-OB

The WoMed

04:19 min | 5 months ago

Spilling the Travel Tea with Sarah Gaines, MSN, RNC-OB

"What are your tips for doing it the right way because I feel like right? Now there's there's a lot of people offering eight ton of money get some travel. There says an extra help. I bill like the big craze right. Now are the crazy crisis rates that are related to Co vid and my biggest advice right now to any nurse. That's looking into specifically like the Kobe hotspot areas with a crisis rates. Is You want to be cautious in. You don't WanNa be fooled by the high numbers and this applies to not only ovid crisis rates right now but just travel nursing in general at big the first mistake that a lot of travel nurses make is they just chased the highest paying contract. They're like oh my gosh so much money. I'm jumping on it right now but one of the things that I really focus on is maximizing your income not just increasing your income. So that requires you to look into the offer From a different perspective so instead of just focusing on how much money you're making it's more important to focus on how much money you're saving though all US. New York as an example because that's where the high rates all right now So a couple weeks ago I saw a rate that was like almost ten thousand dollars a week for a nurse to go cal exactly. That's everyone's thoughts right. Yeah we're good. You're like oh my gosh. I'm going to jump on it. That ten grand a but me when I look at that number. There are certain things that I am going to consider As a travel nurse you can allocate your money in different ways. There's different portions of your income. Some of its tax free. The other parts of it are tax so depending on how you allocate your money and depending on what your hourly rate is you have to keep in mind that since who are getting paid a lot more money that could possibly bump you into a different tax bracket which means that you're going to be taxed a little bit more on top of that. You want to pay attention to the location that you're in. So depending on the location there may be a federal tax estate tax in a city tax So those are other things that you want to consider the next thing to consider. Is You individually like? Do you own a home. Do you have any kids 'cause or anything like me and you don't have either of those you're GonNa be taxed even more heavily all of those things especially in New York when I looking at it. According to my calculations in my unique situation it was going to be almost thirty. Five percent tax really. That ten thousand dollars is close to sixty five hundred. Plus you also have to think about once you get to New York the other things you had to consider. How much is housing going to be? How much is it going to cost Are you going to have to ship your car? If you need a car in New York you would need it but just assignments in general so long story short. You WanNa make sure that you are absolutely crunching the numbers and you know exactly how much you're going to be saving at the end of for me when I was comparing New York. That ten thousand dollars a week to other offers that have gotten in. California and this was just like a regular rate non-co patients regular nurse patient ratios I got a similar offer in California and it was three thousand dollars a week for just a regular contract now. Three thousand dollars a week compared to ten thousand dollars a week doesn't sound that like that much but when you look at it and you really break it down to how much you would be saving so in. California three thousand a week to make it. Simple is about a thousand dollars a day right yet in New York. After taxes we calculate the take home. And how much I'd actually be saving. It'd be about six thousand dollars a week. With that crisis rate you would have to work seven days in a row so that would mean that in seven days six thousand dollars a week. That's actually less than a thousand dollars. A day so it would be more lucrative. I would be saving more money to actually take the contracts in California. That is three thousand dollars a week. And if I want to pick up an extra day of overtime I

New York California United States
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on KOMO

"City council approved design plans to give it some upgrades Victor Steinbrueck park draws hundreds if not more on a daily basis the plant upgrades include more lighting enhance security better views and an overall fee slipped some nearby business owners tell komo news that overall the party is a good neighbor and brings people from all over others complain about increasing homeless population in one of the city's most visible public spaces the parts department tales como the intent is not to kick anyone out but rather make it safe for everyone Charlie harder como do the website smart asset dot com is out with its list of most affordable spots to own a home in western Washington hope Williams the most inexpensive the average mortgage costing homeowners three hundred sixty eight dollars Aberdeen a little bit more four hundred eighty seven dollars and it's four hundred and seventy seven dollars and Kelso property taxes and insurance will add about a hundred dollars more a month to those housing costs average mortgage payment in Seattle not including taxes or insurance a little more than three thousand dollars a month. buy used by ten new street cars for the First Avenue project have that hit a roadblock almost Kelly Bleier has the latest to Seattle department of transportation just announced it will back out of its contract to buy ten new streetcars due to rising costs it was cheaper to cancel the contract and it was to start over the size of the planned street cars would have added millions to the price tag and retrofits so no one knew bidding process will get underway to build vehicles that are closer to the size and weight of the city's existing streetcars it's helped the system's design will be finalized in twenty twenty one with construction starting in twenty twenty two an operation to begin in twenty twenty six Kelly Bleier como news. millions of dollars in annual fuel savings in ninety five percent reduction in carbon emissions and even less noise to bother the orcas among the things promise from the state's first hybrid electric fairy governor Jay Inslee went to vigor shipyard in Seattle today where he compared this boat to another transportation first created in our area we have substantial..

City council Victor Steinbrueck park Charlie Washington Williams Aberdeen Seattle Kelly Bleier Jay Inslee komo Kelly Bleier como four hundred eighty seven doll three hundred sixty eight doll three thousand dollars seventy seven dollars ninety five percent hundred dollars
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Brandon. Welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. Thank you, Dave. How can I help? So right now, I've got a vehicle that. I know you'll probably tell me I can't afford and really looking for some advice as to what to do with it. Okay. If you don't need me yard, you know, you can't afford it. Why? I'm upside down on right now. So I'm trying to decide if Besser nice house to sell it. Or if I should put away some extra money every month and accelerate my payments on it. How much do you make a year? I make about hundred thousand. Before tax. I'm twenty five. Wow. Killing it. What do you do for a living? I work in the field. Oh, okay. You working but off okay. Yeah. So what is the car? How much do you want? It is a Range Rover evoque, and I currently owe sixty thousand on it. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. You just went crazy. So so what will it sell for? I looked it up online and behind that I could get for it would be forty five thousand which team. Thousand. Okay. Did you roll negative equity into this? Or is it just suck that bad? Yeah. I had a Jeep in two thousand that I traded for a truck in two thousand fourteen which untraded for the Range Rover in two thousand seventeen doubled up on stupid, most people most people that it's okay. I mean, your your lesson. The good news. You can learn the lesson at twenty five and you never learn it again. I'd say probably went. Yeah. It's pretty thorough. I mean, you know, when you get any getting a whole this big teaches you, you know, where you don't forget leaves a Mark, you know, so yeah, I definitely got gotta get rid of it. And you gotta get the fifteen thousand who. Do you owe the sixty two? It would be to the Bank your local Bank. Okay. I I would troll over there and sit down with the branch manager and say yoga forty five thousand dollar car loan and fifteen thousand dollars unsecured loan because the collateral does not cover the fifteen thousand of this loan. You follow me? Right. And so I'd like to convert it to that formerly by selling the car and you release the title for what the car will bring forty five thousand and I'll sign a note with you for the fifteen and I think I can pay that often about a year. Right. And you get a beater. Until you get that loan paid off. You have any other debt? No, I did have three thousand dollars in credit card debt last week that I paid off. Good for you. And we had furniture loans that paying off user who's we? Fiancee. Okay. Who has the furniture loan? You're her. I have the furniture under my name. Okay. You gotta get that paid off too. But and when are you getting married? We definitely haven't decided on a day to getting married. Definitely don't be buying crept together until you until you're married and definitely going to debt anymore okay together until you're married because that'll get that it puts a strain on your relationship. So for sure. So yeah, you're gonna be she's gonna be marrying a guy without a Range Rover. I'm sure we'll with that. Okay. So what does she make a year? Well, I worked in the restaurant industry so say making in and around. I'd say forty thousand a year on the low end buddy is part time right now he's going to school. He did have. College runs away by parents. So. Student loans for now. Well, we are doing anything because we are married. You know, there's not a we into where married so you need to keep your financial separate until you're married until you're married. And then you combine things when you're married. So I think you treat this like a single guy 'cause you are that that has a mess, which means you're gonna have no life. The bad news is you're on the life. The good news. Is you make really good money? And if you'll take your lifestyle down to scorched earth to nothing, you can clean this fifteen thousand up this furniture loan up, and you know, you'll be cleaned up in no time easily a year and be able to move up in car and get you about ten thousand dollar car and pay cash for it and have your -mergency fund in place, and that kind of stuff, and that's how we're going to do it David is with us in Jacksonville, Florida. David welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. S news now speak with you to help. So I just found her for a couple of weeks ago. And I was looking forward to just because I had a lot of really small that shit were just chipping away. My paychecks. Now is looking at our paycheck at the end of the month. Not having enough money. Didn't make sense. I looked at my debt, and it was just staggering. Anyway, I was fortunate to sign a reenlistment bonuses military, and I was looking at spending all that money towards paying off. All my smallest debts. Good. It's honestly great because it was able to get rid of all all three of mine largest debts. Great on. So I have about five to six thousand dollars left at the end of that. And the mathematically I've always been told, you know, largest interest. I and that makes sense to me I understand why you say your small steps I. I was wondering what you would think of spending that five thousand towards my credit card, which is my highest debt that would actually lock it down to my lowest that so I would pay it off even faster. So you you have how much on your credit card. So the credit card that I have left is eleven five. What about the other debts? What are they? Those are both vehicles. Okay. And tell me what you on them. One vehicle it honestly would be really hard to sell. But it's worth about twenty eight on it. Okay. All right. And the other car I have a truck and Detroit about seventeen twenty seven. Okay. And are you married? Engaged. Okay. And is one of these cars hers. No, they're they're both mine. Like, I said what you said before. It's just I got in the stupid stuff on both sides of the road. Yeah. Okay. And so the car that's worth twenty that you ate on and you should difficult to sell tell me about that. So it's a sports car. I bought it. When I was freshly twenty one. And I've just I've modified it so much put a lot of money into it. I actually reenlist once before almost all the money for that. So what is it one time? To see.

Dave Ramsey Besser David Brandon. Detroit Florida Jacksonville forty five thousand dollar fifteen thousand dollars three thousand dollars six thousand dollars ten thousand dollar
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"That is awesome. Yes. That's why we say people who know go to Amco just Google co for your nearest location. That's Anco double A, M, C, O transmissions. A whole lot more Arizona's afternoon. News with MAC and Gaydos, skipper and his little buddy Gilligan will meet in Vietnam on talking Trump and Kim will they get anything accomplished last forever? Zona? Governor Jan brewer MAC and Gaydos, political insider today at three. Hi, we're talking with Shane in Huntsville, Alabama. On the oilfield for awhile and got a bunch of cars and house and getting a couple of repos foreclosure got three thousand dollars worth of credit card debt nine thousand dollars on car making sixty wants to know of bankruptcy chapter seven is a good option. Is that a fair summary of what you told me, sir? Yes. Okay. Let's go through these things piece by piece and see if there's options that are as good or better than filing bankruptcy on the mortgage. What type of mortgage was this VA FHA or conventional it was an FHA? Okay. They will not be chasing you for any difference. So the bankruptcy will not have any effect on the foreclosure. Okay. So the foreclosure just on their as your bad credit, and it will be for seven years. It will keep you from buying a home for four years. I don't own a mortgage that is not affected by the bankruptcy. Doesn't the bankruptcy doesn't help that. It just adds to the bad credit that you would have the car repose. Have. They contacted you for the death of sit balanced because they take the cars and sell them and come after you for the difference of what they sell for versus. What was I would have? They contacted you for that deficit balance yet they said letters in the Vale without what are they saying? How much does the balances due cars are for one car was setting brand? Another car was earned seventy five hundred and third car was I was for what fifty to fifty two hundred. That's the balances after they sold them. Yes. Okay. All right. And you got three thousand dollars in credit card debt and a. Family. You said an inherited family, meaning you married a lady that had children. Right. He s married. I married. A woman to kids we had to walk. Okay. Creator author and your total household income is sixty K. All right. So the only thing that the bankruptcy would clear would be those car repos and the three thousand dollars in credit card debt. And the car repos can typically be settled in cash for fifteen to twenty five cents on the dollar somewhere in there. And you've got. About twenty thousand dollars worth so somewhere around four thousand five thousand bucks, you'll get you out of debt there. So if you if you saved up four thousand dollars and save up a fourth of seven thousand and you call the seven thousand in your satellite, you save up. Are these all with one company? No, there are three different. Good stuff. That's even better. Okay. Good. So you could call the fifty two hundred and like satellite for twelve hundred fifty bucks, right? And then you would call up the seven thousand and settle him. You know for a couple of grand something like that. Right. And so when we start adding that up, then what we're saying is if four or five thousand dollars will settle those, and it's it's work to do it. But it's also worked to file bankruptcy, which by the way. Filing chapter seven is going to be between two thousand.

FHA MAC Governor Jan brewer Google Arizona Gaydos Zona Vietnam Trump Gilligan Huntsville Kim Alabama Shane VA a. Family three thousand dollars twenty thousand dollars five thousand dollars four thousand dollars
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on The Road Home To You

The Road Home To You

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on The Road Home To You

"And it's the difference between standing in front of a Bank teller and having the conversation about why you're count is three thousand dollars overdrawn versus just speaking to somebody over the phone about it. It's so much easier to just go off on the person you're talking to over the phone because there's not you're not seeing the look in there. You're not seeing the the softness of their expression or the tension in their expression. The, you know, you're not having to read that body language when you're communicating across the screen, and you lose that humanity and pretty soon, you're just shouting into the void. And all you're doing is putting out negatively, and maybe you started with a good, pure heart. But now you just look like ravine. Right and an angry one at that. And and that's a real it's hard, man. I've got some friends that on Facebook that that you know. I mean, obviously, I know them in real life, but their post sometimes are so negative lyrically. And then every now, and again, they'll turn around, and they'll write something that's like really nice or funny or artsy or whatever. And and it's hard sometimes to turn that off because it's like you kind of feel a little jecklin hide their right? You know, are you at a hateful political person? Or are you just like a nice funny person? I know you as a nice funny person. But what I see online is different. Yeah. So the anonymity that the internet provides is definitely driving some of that divisiveness. I think in nother piece of it is the failure in the breakdown of our education system. Mm-hmm. Honest, gosh. Yes. Be out to be fair. We live in Oregon, right, Oregon. Apparently, I just learned this like our education system is among the worst in the nation in the state of Oregon..

Oregon Bank teller Facebook three thousand dollars
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

08:31 min | 2 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"I have three thousand dollars saved up in savings and then an emergency fund as well. I was just wondering when I should move out. And if I should used that three thousand savings to start attacking my that what is your income? I make about sixteen fifty an hour. Okay. And you're getting forty hours or sixty hours or what? Forty hours a week. So what do you think you're gonna make this year? If I do the math I should make about I would say thirty to give or take. Okay. And. What's your what's your career? What do you do? I'm in marketing, I work for an ophthalmologist. Okay. Very good. Good for you well done or and you have three thousand in addition to your emergency fund in your emergency fund is what how much is in it. Right now, I have nine hundred I'm just waiting and so my next paycheck to top it off at us out. You've got your starter. You're beginner emergency fund. Oh, okay. All right. So you don't have a lot of cushion here, and you have twenty seven thousand dollars student loan debt. Do you have a car payment? I do not. I just bought a little three grand car a love. Good job. Good job. Okay. Well, yeah. I mean, you can start to look towards moving out. You've gotta let you got to put together a budget of what it'll be like when you're out if you're going to have a roommate are we going to split expenses, and what's the rent gonna be and what grocery is going to be and, you know, talk to the apartment complex. You're looking at what's the average water Bill light Bill, or whatever is included that you have to pay and you begin to lay out a budget of what it would look like if you were if you were living there this month, and then relate that against your income and go, okay how much wiggle room? Have I got here. You're going to need some money for a deposit. You're gonna need some money for utilities deposits, and that's gonna use up some of that three thousand dollars. So I probably would wait then you probably going to a little bit of furniture. Aren't you? Yeah. Yeah. So I'm thinking that three thousand dollars is probably going to get you out. Okay. And then you're going to start working, your your, you know, your total money makeover baby steps which baby step one thousand emergency starter emergency fund. And then you start working through your debts as fast as you can pick up as many jobs and do as much as you can do to whittle on that and beat on a dispatched as you can't how are the things at home relationship. I I love living at home. And my parents are letting me so that's why I'm like do. I move out or do. I say, okay. Well, another option would be. I don't recommend you stay long. But if you stayed like six months and made a big dent in this. Okay. That might be okay too. But I probably don't know. I don't want you there till you're debt free because that sounds like two years. Yes. I don't want to stay that long. Okay. Sean. I it's good for you emotionally. And you'll just you'll just walked different and be different when you're on your complete own and you have to pay the light Bill or there's no lights, you know, that kind of stuff, and I it's good it. I've noticed with my kids when they moved out it just changed them. He just felt the weight of carrying the responsibility, and they grew up one more notch. And I'm not saying you're not grown up. I'm just saying they took one more notch and alarm. I might stay six months. Or nine months or some kind of a plan like that. But lay you out a mathematics game plan and a target date and say okay before next Christmas before next thanksgiving. That's a that's a year. Right. I'm gone. And in the meantime, I'm gonna pay off this much debt. I'm gonna work extra. I'm going to completely focus and. And I'm going to build up enough of a slush fund to make the move out by a little bit of furniture, make the deposits and stuff like we were talking about a minute ago. If it's a strain at home, and you wanna go ahead and do it. Now, it you know, you can you can. But it sounds like you got a good situation. I just don't want you to stay too long just long enough to kinda get get your good solid footing. And then jump, you know. And so if you stay another six nine twelve months, something like that. I probably wouldn't stay more than twelve. The next thanksgiving. I'd be gone. If I were you if I woke up in your shoes, that's what I would want to do knowing what I know. Now. And if you were my kid living at higher in our house, that's probably what I would tell you to do for your sake. Not because I don't want you to leave. Because I mean, our kids is easy for all three of them to have lived there as adults it would have been real easy. Now, they got grandkids, and it would be ridiculously hard because I don't want to raise babies anymore. I just want to hand them back, but I love babies, but somebody else's so, but, but you know, at your stage right now, I think you're in a good situation. Abigail is with us in Cincinnati. Hi abigail. How are you? I'm good. How are you better than I deserve? What's up? I would like to know my husband, and I would like to know is we should sell our rental. Okay. We eighty five on it it just appraised for two fifty five and we to thirty on our home. It was purchased the house. What's his from his previous marriage? It was where he grew up and he bought it from his grandparents so there's a little bit of an emotional attachment as well a positive and a negative. Yes. Yes. And. Okay. What's your household income? About a hundred and twenty you have no other debt, we have thirty. No twenty five on cars that we hope to have paid off by next gen that sounds good. Okay. It. It depends on whether it's more of a positive or negative emotionally. Does it way more than it? Does it way more that it was his family home in a positive side or more negatively that the experts there? Positivity that it was a family how okay, I'll probably holding it. Then you're going to work my way through this darn okay? But there's not a right or wrong answer. Okay. It's it's kind of a call that the two of you can make. If you if you want rid of it because the extras was there, that's a that's a fair statement to make. I want rid of it because we could. We could pay our house off in six years. You can pay your house of three years, even better. I mean, you'd be done in no time because you almost pay it off with the sale of that. Yes. You ought to do it really really fast. If you're going to do that. I like that idea. I like that idea the question just becomes a. Do you wanna fight through more debt for seven years or do you want are eight years or nine years, or however long it takes you to clear these two debts not counting your cars or do you want to keep this rental house that that was in the family? I I love Reynolds. And you're gonna fight through it all in under ten is what I'm hearing. And so I'm not gonna yell about it because it's real estate. What would Dave and Sharon do. I think it would depend on how emotionally attached I was to that particular piece of property, and I don't get emotionally attached to property much. But if it was your Grandpa's house, it might be something I'd think about okay. That's all I mean, some people are more than others and some people have more memory. They're less memory there that kind of thing, and you know, like my grandpa passed away years ago, yet this whole really cool old nineteen sixty seven truck, and I should have bought that truck from the estate, and I didn't I wish I had that truck. Know is only a truck is probably a couple of grand. You know, it's not not hundreds of thousands of dollars. But you know, it's that kind of thing there's a few things like that that this is personal finance, and it's.

Abigail whittle Reynolds Sean Cincinnati Dave Sharon three thousand dollars six months twenty seven thousand dollars six nine twelve months Forty hours eight years forty hours nine months
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

"Kevin van Ican three thousand dollars. He gave Burt gave zero dollars, of course, Kevin vani Crans bigger than, but even even here, the last guy who gave. Ted Canoga ten dollars, hey, that might not be nearly as much as fucking Kevin Vini three thousand, but it's ten dollars more than fucking fat. Ass gave. So. Without my with everyone's generosity. I'm now going to read every comment that was left on this gofundme page. I assume by the time the day is over, we will have. The three, the ten thousand total dollars that the what do we have to get to ten? Nine, six to two hundred eighty bucks left to get see more. See more. A lot of comments. I'm just going to beat him in order. Let's do it that way. Okay. Here we go starting four months, cancerous child, fuck your bird. I hope get gout. Casey, Lagoni. Fuck Burt, unforgivable, agreed. Alex, Wayne, Burt is a monster. Couldn't beat said it better myself, Jacob, Georgia, Bert, you should be ashamed of yourself shame on you, Bert. Well, said ten or to to Herbert, hey, probably match this fund, raiser Bert are if you're trolling, it's great if not very sad. No, I'm not trolling. I'm actually raising money for sick children to cover my friend. I guess I'll still call my friends, horrible, horrible idea fucking way to get Twitter followers, Eric miracle doing my part to pick up bird slack big. Thanks to all right for thinking of the children. Hey, thanks, Eric, really? I'm selfless Jimmy, right? Such a shame how can hate sick children. He saved thirty thousand dollars by not drinking less October..

Fuck Burt Kevin vani Crans Bert Kevin van Ican Kevin Vini Eric miracle Ted Canoga Alex Jimmy Twitter Casey Lagoni Herbert Georgia Jacob Wayne ten dollars thirty thousand dollars three thousand dollars zero dollars
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Three thousand dollars a minute. Have a naughty gotten so much free press from particularly CNN, but also a CNBC. And the fact that he put his name or was I should say he was involved with that sweating allegation. I mean, I knew that was garbage day that that happened. I was calling conservative friends of mine. The media just saying are we living in some alternate universe. Who believes this who believes this? This is just this is just nonsense. There's just no way. What we're supposed to forget that too. They keep doing this and doing this and doing this and we're supposed to act like we don't see the coordination. See the broad spectrum effort from the left would try to take down Cavanagh. It is just it's as appalling as it gets. They're gonna try and make this also about not just his temperament, but you know, his his drinking suggestion that he must be some kind of secret alcoholic. Worth noting everybody. The Democrats will do anything and say anything, including attacking you for beer that you drank when you were in high school for things that you wrote on your page. Just remember that the next time either someone's telling you, oh, Trump is Trump is. So mean, he's so out of line. He does all this stuff. That is. So course, nasty Trump's got nothing on the Democrats when it comes to fighting dirty. He just impervious to most of their dirty tactics. That's what this is really about. Oh, man. It is in a last week last week Kavanagh's rapists this week. It's that he drank too much beer in thirty years ago. And they just don't like him. I think that he's mean. I would say that we could nor there safely, but the truth is when you got somebody like Jeff flake out there who could bail at any point in time. You just don't know. Lindsey Graham is still Lindsey Graham is still out about fighting the fight. I sorta surprised to see the Lindsey Graham hasn't really backed off yet. He's still he was at the festival for the Atlantic the Atlantic, which is a thing that you should all know because it's the place where they hired Kevin Williamson one of the best living aditorial writers of the day on either side left or right, and then fired him after his first article not for what he wrote. But because of some tweets on abortion from years ago because he is very pro-life. And if somebody who was adopted I believe, he's even more pro life than many on the left realize. That's the Atlantic that bastion of electoral, courage. Lindsey Graham went in there and he did some donuts in their front yard play eleven. So President Trump went to.

Trump Lindsey Graham Kavanagh Kevin Williamson Cavanagh CNN CNBC Jeff flake President Three thousand dollars thirty years
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"Behind three thousand dollars for each classic felony. And I'm actually of twelve years and fined up to twenty five thousand dollars a class b felony. The department is pursuing criminal case in cooperation with the district. Attorney Robert J Carter's office citizens who suspect violations of Tennessee's revenue laws J call the toll free tax fraud line at one eight hundred frothed TX that's one eight hundred three seven two eighty three eighty nine. Four juveniles charged after they allegedly wrote racially insensitive comments in and on doors of an African American church and stole property Tuesday. According to run for county sheriff's officials deputy Shawn Mathews responded to the walnut grove missionary Baptist church where he found KKK written and bibles, and we are white, and we are watching you wipe power written on the doors of the predominantly African American church damage to the church was extensive and included overflowing toilets and water damage at the twin oaks drive location with the of citizens deputy Matthews developed two suspects and located the juvenile's, nearby, items stolen, included, a laptop computer and a video camera. Matthews charged boys fourteen and sixteen with burglary theft and vandalism on Tuesday, a video cameras stolen from the church was found in the woods behind the church detective, Jim and Humphries arrested. Two more boys ages fifteen and sixteen with burglary and vandalism wins. Morning sheriff Mike fits you said he appreciates the manner deputies and detectives responded swiftly. He plans to speak with the district attorney's office about additional charges the two juveniles arrested Tuesday were released from the juvenile detention center. They are expected to begin juvenile court on Monday court hearings are pending onto juveniles arrested Wednesday..

burglary vandalism Matthews walnut grove missionary Baptis Mike Shawn Mathews Attorney Robert J Carter Tennessee fraud TX Humphries Jim theft twenty five thousand dollars three thousand dollars
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"A controversial legal maneuver called civil asset forfeiture they had already seized his bank account with sixty three thousand dollars in it at the time without even convicting him of a crime which turns upside down a fundamental principle of the rule of law innocent until proven guilty randy was made guilty before anything was proven although these irs agents didn't tell randy that they had seized his bank account yet they still needed to trap him and i said well you know we do store and farmers markets in some ways we give as much as twelve or fourteen thousand dollars played and ask questions because that's the answer the question they need to answer to say that sometime i had more than ten and i wasn't depositing the government agents tricks of randy and got him to admit to committing a crime that he didn't even know was a crime i think about this question should the government be able to go after you for a crime that you don't know is a crime when we come back more this remarkable story randy sours story here on our american stories.

irs randy sours sixty three thousand dollars fourteen thousand dollars
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"And i sell it that's a capital appreciation that three thousand dollars is taxed differently than the three thousand dollars in interest it's still three thousand dollars on each investment but it was created in different ways in the cd i put one hundred thousand in and assuming i could find a three let's pretend you get three thousand dollars of interest one hundred thousand in the thing but the interest was paid to me that is interest i still own the asset this is after one year yeah the stock though i have to sell the asset to get the good the cash out of it and you no longer own and i don't own it anymore now i have a capital gain or loss and they're going to tax capital gains and losses assuming i held the asset for more than a year they're gonna let me pay less than taxes on that three thousand dollars of capital gain i will pay less than taxes than i did on that three thousand dollars of interest everything else being equal ordinary income is taxed at a different bracket than capital long term capital gains long term capital gains and something called qualified dividends are now taxed at a lower bracket again everything else being equal if it falls in the same spot of the tax you know if i'm in the twelve percent or lower for the most part that twelve percent interest is taxed at twelve percent that long term capital gain would be taxed at leroy right so if you are if you are in the ordinary income marginal tax bracket of twelve twelve percent or lower and you sell a capital asset and you look to see that you're still in that twelve percent bracket or lower there will be no taxes paid on that capital gains the current twelve percent bracket and i'm gonna round it off get away from some anomaly that they've got in this darn thing let's say the top of the bracket for both zero percent capital gain and twelve percent bracket is.

leroy three thousand dollars twelve percent twelve twelve percent zero percent one year
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

The Jason Stapleton Program

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

"And he didn't he spent forty three thousand and for those of you who think that that's a lot of money to the government i just want you to explain i just wanna explain to you that billions of dollars in the government is a rounding error so forty three thousand dollars to the government is like getting two cents back off of your cup of coffee and then just like tossing that into the tip jar is like you're not even really being charitable you just don't wanna carry the change that pennies around in your pocket or that's why you're doing it it's so worthless it's so useless to you that you just throw it in there because it's easier than keeping it in your pocket that's what forty three thousand dollars is to the us government so they are not hauling him before congress to answer questions about forty three grant none of them care this is about the decisions he has made to try and strip the epa of its power and its thority so that he can then rollback regulation and and there are a lot of democrats a lot of progressives a lot of big government folk who don't like that now is it a good thing or a bad thing i don't know i'm sure it's going to be they're going to be mixed results one of the things that one of the things that we know is that not all regulation is bad now doesn't still doesn't mean that government should be the one over citing and regulating it but not all regulation is bad and you can read a little bit or listen to milton friedman talk about the soiled shirt analogy said you know when it comes to the epa there's big questions about okay if there's pollution in the air and the pollution in this silt falls onto your caller and it dirties you're caller who's responsible for the dry cleaning bill will it's very difficult in in for the free market to solve that problem it it's very difficult because now the guy for bs to go and he has to somebody to reclaim the money they would use to go to the dry cleaners and and and of course he that the money that he would pay to sue the guy to take him to court the time is well in excess of whatever it would cost to clean his shirt in.

congress epa us milton friedman forty three thousand dollars milton
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"Is there in my name may be how long you've been married uh ten years okay and what his his income i never really new well give me a guess thirty three thousand dollars a month now twenty six a month i think that's pretty close for gifts this is a more than eur led known uh jahor at the thing is is the based on the disparity of your income i suspect your divorce settlement mike calls him to have to pay even the cards that are in your name well i would rather not get into any kind of spitting contest with him i don't think you have a choice you have a seven hundred dollar month tom yeah is there anything i can do to get rid of some of them myself wow go see your income come up to do that uh i don't know how you're going to see how you're going to do your survival on seven hundred well i'm living with the french so i don't have rent or anything like that well if i can get out from under the credit cards then i can always go through the government housing section eight types of what is the nature of your disability anomalies i was in a car accident and had tree compression fracture of my lowest fine so i can no longer see it's for extended periods i can't drive for extended periods i wish i'm trying to go to school yeah i think he looked for something that you can do with your limitations to get your income up because i'm having trouble give near really bright future on seven hundred bucks a month anthony's thank you for stopping by nays americans think him anthony on the alleged illness this is the dave ramsey show.

mike compression fracture anthony dave ramsey thirty three thousand dollars seven hundred dollar ten years
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Boxes and reach in my financial goals doing this thing ninety three thousand dollars donald fowler anti why don't you i ninety five thousand wonderful donna now they found at one people made more than that it actually made them feel less satisfied in here's why they started wanting nicer things than the luton really afford and they were comparing themselves to richer people so maybe there was this own is the at about one hundred thousand dollars and up you feel a little bit richard than you will her or if any of your peers know that you're making that amount they think that you're a little bit richard than you are and then you look to what who you perceive to be rich people in your life and you try to match up to what they're doing who who she had a big house we should get a better car yes it's always trying to keep up with the jones's tale i noticed that when a friends of mine had moved to the suburbs started a family in than just started you know knowing their neighbors i've never seen anything like this before like i have was obsolete shippers of the weather yes like i have a friend who is convinced that is she puts out a a a snow man like a light up man in her yarjani like will be passing by a neighbor and she'll be like see that snowman they didn't have that 'till they saw me put it up and i'm like oh who cares right you start doing that he comparing yourself that i have another front who would always kinda do the same thing well their yard is you know they just updated their front porch so we should probably do ours why well listen i think it's just the way you're wired to absolutely but there there is that that one upsmanship um and the the comparison trap i've middle recommend book tanny one who who suffer from this now let me just say i'm about to recommend a book shame on me that i haven't read i have reason to believe that this is really going to be good for people in our era who live in the world of social media okay where it looks like everyone's got a better life than yours okay the.

donna richard jones donald fowler ninety three thousand dollars one hundred thousand dollars
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Know like three thousand dollars long you've been doing this all we been we've been saving a thousand a month for five or six years or is about even spending that thousand a month for five or six years to so we have to get a new but they were thinking they were saving it and they forgot that they were bringing it back into their checking cap when some larger field bill meemaw up your property tax that you know the the health and whatever the case big so we have to get down into okay what is it that you actually have today and what are you saving that's the first step you can't decide where you're going to be unless you know where you're at today well that's it is sort of like putting together a meal for a bunch of people you know as some kind of gourmet meal you say okay well one ingredients do i have to work with if you've already point i want to make an apple pie do i have any any apples or something like that and then we then it's a matter of time into other issues but we have to start look for the hardest part and why a lot of people i have found this is my own personal experience may not be the world's but a lot of people don't like taking that step they don't like or don't want to go through and say well here's all my accounts for and one of the reasons is that when they don't wanna see that they're not on track or they're not even in the game and so that you know they don't you wanna talk about it well actually by the time they w they come to a financial advisor obviously they're talking about it so where are we starting from then the next thing is to look into retirement where do you want to be so let's take a look at where we are today and what we are doing where do we want to be in the future what do you mean by where do you wanna be let's explore that for just a second what was what he you want to retire how much income you want to have yet we talking about whatever your financial goal is maybe it's education savings here's what i'm doing to pay for.

property tax advisor apple six years three thousand dollars
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on KKAT

"Three thousand dollars a year for health insurance senator john mccain says he cannot support the republican healthcare measure because no hearings and debates have been held under reform senator rand paul is also opposed revisions have been made to president trump to travel restrictions instead of a general ban on travellers from these six muslimmajority countries that's been tied a partially ian courts the administration will issue countryspecific prohibitions according to white house sources seen as more likely to withstand challenges the targeted approach would include theoretically persons wanting to do business in the united states were students are those with questionable background seeking visas the wall street journal reports targets might include more than the current six countries and it certain the specific nature of the denials will require a lot more investigation than what was originally intended as a blanket ban bob costantini washington millions are still without power in puerto rico which has pounded by hurricane maria correspondent leyla santiago the government really dealing with a logistical nightmare because even admit they have not been able to reach uh parts of the island and what are they reach i don't mean just by phone i mean by roads these roads are flooded filled with debris desserts continues for survivors in central mexico in the rubble left behind by this week's magnitude seven point one earthquake the death toll has climbed to two hundred eighty six on wall street the dow jones industrial average up thirty two points the sp down two points does.

john mccain rand paul united states puerto rico mexico health insurance senator president travel restrictions wall street journal bob costantini leyla santiago dow jones Three thousand dollars
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"You know three thousand dollars long you've been doing this all we been we've been saving that thousand a month for five or six years or as the model you've been spending that thousand a month for five or six years to so we have to get a but they were thinking they were saving it and they forgot that they were bringing it back in the checking up with some larger the building of europe your property tax the you know the health insurance whatever the case be so we have to get down to okay what is it that you actually have today at what are you saving that's the first step the the fbi you can't decide where you're going to be unless you know where your at today well that's it is sort of like putting together a meal for a bunch of people you know some kind of gourmet meal you say okay well one ingredients do i have to work with if you were already point i wanna make an apple pie do i have any any apples or something like that and then we then it's a matter of time and other issues but we have to start looking for in the hardest part and why a lot of people i have found this is my own personal experience may not be the world's but a lot of people don't like taking that that step they don't like or don't want to go through and say well here's all my accounts for and one of the reasons is that they don't wanna see that they're not on track or they're not even in the game in so that you know they don't wanna talk about it well originally by the time they w they come to a financial advisor obviously they're talking about it so where are we starting from then the next thing is to look into retirement where do you want to be so let's take a look at where we are today and what we are doing where do we want to be in the future what do you mean by where do you want be let's explore that for just a second well what you want to retire how much income do you wanna have yet we talking about whatever your financial goal is maybe it's education savings here's what i'm doing to pay for my kids education.

property tax health insurance fbi advisor apple six years three thousand dollars
"three thousand dollars" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"three thousand dollars" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Or four thousand dollars a year so now i want to buy vaughn naive a hundred thousand dollars and you have a bond paying three thousand dollars a year and the new banzer paying four thousand yes i want an interest rates now you have yours oh so now i want to buy von i can buy yours and get three thousand i already i could buy the new ones paying four thousand years against where i'm going you come with the four correct yes so you still on your vaughn but he wanted to sell it last year one no interest rate movements happen you could self one hundred thousand because someone would buy because the new bonds pain the same rate jersey i say yeah but now that interest rates went up vaughn is no longer worth one hundred thousand dollars so sad but you don't a shot the reserve shortterm is because nothing's changed their who is still getting a three thousand dollars you're gonna get you a hundred thousand dollars back after the fifth year would has changes if you want to sell that bond ice no one's going to pay one hundred thousand gonna pay would discount is what they call a limit value whatever ninety six ninety seven thousand they'll say whatever this two or three years and i like that but essentially your if you wanted to sell your vaughn you'd have to sell for discount so you want bonds at a shot term not longterm because a longerterm to more price fluctuation will happen then bonn so there's a lot of people out there that would scare you in regards to be careful would bonds with their right but as you understand the ball how ones operate in you you you purchase the right ones you know obviously it's a good defence a against a downward turn the market yeah and it would be the same if you had a bond paying three percent in new bonds came out and there were only paying two percent because interest rates went down we don't expect that to happen just my example then you wouldn't sell your on one hundred thousand cause new on joint pain two thousand on the air very happy and may be a little your good self one and four lives going i've got my at three.

vaughn interest rates hundred thousand dollars three thousand dollars one hundred thousand dollars four thousand dollars four thousand years three percent three years two percent