25 Burst results for "Three Offices"

Haiti's Future Uncertain After Brazen Slaying of President

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Haiti's Future Uncertain After Brazen Slaying of President

"The Dominican Republic has closed its borders with neighboring Haiti following the assassination of Haitian president Jovenel Moise on Wednesday welcome traders and locals mill about at that company border unable to cross over to continue activities balance in the province of independence say border gates will only open to let all Dominicans who require evacuation as well as consular staff leave Haiti are already struggling under Kelsey Katie stumbles into an uncertain future reeling from the assassination followed by a reported gunbattle in which authorities say police killed four suspects in the murder detained to others around freed three offices being held hostage I'm Charles Taylor this month

Jovenel Moise Haiti Dominican Republic Kelsey Katie Charles Taylor
"three offices" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

02:04 min | 3 months ago

"three offices" Discussed on WBUR

"An ambush The Michael Morrisey says the officers with the police dog began searching the woods next to an apartment complex. After they responded to a call is three offices and the dog get into the wooded area approximately 75 yards, They became onto fire from an individual in a defensive positions. Some would say lying in wait in an ambush for the officers to come to the wooded area. Morrissey says the police dog was killed and two of the officers were wounded and the officers were taken to hospitals for surgery. The suspect was killed. Group of seniors in Springfield is calling for the removal of the city's police commissioner, calling her resistant to reform Karen Brown reports when members of the Massachusetts Senior Action Council met with police Commissioner Cheryl Clap route in April. They were hoping to educate her about racial profiling and other discrimination by police. Um aerial. Holloway is a 76 year old retired educator, the police department as we black and brown people see it is the department that protects white people from black people. But Holloway says clap Rue dismissed their concerns. And in a follow up letter, the commissioner told them the police are quote. Not murderers or systemic Racists. Holloway says a leader should at least acknowledge racial bias. The activist seniors and other Springfield leaders plan to rally on Wednesday to demand clap prudes removal for the New England News Collaborative. I'm Karen Brown, in a statement, clap route, acknowledges racism in the criminal justice system and says she is working to move the department forward. Tanglewood has increased its attendance capacity limit from 25% to 50% for the summer. However, the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra is also announcing the cancellation or postponement of several of this season's concerts, including shows by James Taylor, Ringo Starr and John Legend. In the forecast. It will be cloudy with scattered showers and thunderstorms. This evening. Four trays dries out late lows in the low sixties.

James Taylor John Legend Karen Brown Ringo Starr 25% Holloway April Massachusetts Senior Action Co Springfield Four trays Boston Symphony Orchestra Wednesday Cheryl Clap Morrissey Michael Morrisey 50% approximately 75 yards three offices This evening New England News Collaborative
"three offices" Discussed on V103

V103

01:58 min | 4 months ago

"three offices" Discussed on V103

"And gentlemen, Miss A and trip Thank you very much and good Monday morning, everyone. This is Andrew put the news well. The White House has declared a state of emergency for several states this morning because of a cyber attack on the colonial pipeline, which supplies about 45% off the fuel to those states. Authorities say it appears to have been an extortion plot by an Eastern European community, and they're still checking because, they say, also seems to have some ties. With some Russian hackers. Ah federal grand jury. Minnesota has indicted Derrick Show Vin and three other former Minneapolis cops for violating the late George Floyd's constitutional rights. These new charges come nearly three weeks after a jury found show been guilty of murder and manslaughter, and attorney Benjamin Crump says Legally, this should be no surprise was very evident. The first time you watch that video. That they have violated the constitutional right of George floor because the very basis of our constitution Is the promise of constitutional rights to life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness in this new case to towel and J. Alexander King accused of not supporting not stopping, showing from kneeling on George Floyd's neck for over nine minutes, and with the fourth cop Thomas Layne, who apparently had his knee on George Boys back Yeah, they face charges of willfully failing to provide medical assistance. Mr Floyd as he cried and gasp for breath. The three offices go on trial their own charges in August. The video of George Boy's murder, of course, you know, spark, not just a national but international movement against police brutality. The latest jobless numbers were rather disappointing, apparently, the Labor Department says Economy gained some 266,000 jobs in April, far fewer than March. Republicans have been suggesting a lot of people simply don't want to apply for jobs because of the extra money. They've been getting a jobless benefits. However, Commerce Secretary Genera Mondo says that's not the case. People are still telling us the number One reason they're not.

Benjamin Crump George Boy George Floyd March J. Alexander King August April Thomas Layne Floyd Monday morning Derrick Show Vin Minneapolis Andrew Republicans 266,000 jobs three offices Genera Mondo George Russian White House
"three offices" Discussed on B2B Marketing Now

B2B Marketing Now

08:03 min | 6 months ago

"three offices" Discussed on B2B Marketing Now

"And seeing all of the interesting things you are up to birth. Was professionally and personally on LinkedIn had me inspired. So I'm really excited to have you on the show and I promise I'll I'll throw you an easy one to get started. So are you ready to get radically transparent with me off accidently fliptastic. So I was hoping that you could start us off by giving us a brief look into your professional journey and how you found yourself as c e o and actually it's the first time I'm hearing of this term Chief platform officer at Sun exchange. So if you could even dive into a little bit about what that means that would be fantastic. So so that's a bit of a theme actually new girls that never never existed before and so the boring bit was that I I studied law so I didn't study marketing. I I worked for in house legal counsel since terribly formal found my way into project management. So I was Project managing lawyers across Europe on on really interesting projects that I had no involvement in birth. So realize that I needed to move away from that and I I saw this thing called technology happening. It was very interesting and I got involved back in the day like in the nineties now in White Oak. Okay, so, you know everything was going to include implode because we haven't got our dates. We haven't thought about our software development correctly and they're not going to i t and I was working in banking wage and very quickly started watching this thing from the side called digital marketing and thought well, you know, maybe it'll catch on. Maybe it won't maybe it's a passing fad, but that looks really interesting and I like new things. I understanding. You know what these are around new things. So I joined a small agency with a very diverse client base was very early days where you still downloaded log files to do analytics at 3 in the morning. The report was due to the client and you're still awaiting like in the salt mines trying to get the report to load. There's no real time analytics do the bit of everything really enjoyed the digital dead. I survived the.com bubble. And then I wanted to spread my wings into a bigger agency. So I joined the wpp agency and I worked with some really fascinating clients was really different business changes from HSBC through to MI5. So the government portfolio like was good agnostic, but so fun fact, I actually have a background just opening my window here. That's the noise are going to hear but I actually have my master's degree in counter terrorism and Homeland Security that that's interesting to me but fascinating Czar really great meeting. So, you know, I can go back to the beach be business as well as working on our clients customers fascinating. I'm going to work for the royal family as well. So I had meetings and Buckingham Palace, which is wonderful. Can I have your life? I mean that's incredible. It's real it was quite surreal. But then also agency working on my big retail Banks International audiences again, they were very interesting job. I had a little spread at a different network agency. And then I ended up moving to South Africa. I was actually born in South Africa. I still have family here extended family here and I learned very quickly that across Africa Emerging Markets had a fascinating kind of LeapFrog technology and Innovation opportunities mobile-first for money kind of organizations and and customers so like really fantastic learning. I love learning. I I joined a high-profile digital agency very involved in educating people about the page or marketing space became a board director and really clients that you could look at all angles and marketing for and understanding all kinds of business problems. My background was as where I splashed was inclined service and I became the chief relationship officer. So it was also a very new role in an agency World designed around a business problem, which was that the embassies across Business we had three offices of that point they were struggling to keep connected to their own clients where they were rapid like fire fighting a growing and scaling. So what we offered those clients was kind of the inspiration and that kind of old-school agency engagement. We used to run workshops. And and we did you know, we we did some life scenario planning and stuff that they were so focused on being a building their business they didn't get to to do that. And what I would do is give give our clients headspace it was it was wonderful. So for example for a very large conglomerate, we entertained a scenario planning session for a big International competitor coming to the shores of South Africa and what would that mean and you know so far into the future as a possibility. We just you know, they were all like, wow, this is and it happens and yeah, we were able to do that kind of thing then birth. I became the MD of a boutique advertising agency. So again spreading my wings into more integrated marketing doing a larger-scale TV production type stuff or TV ads and things we were all award punching above our weights in terms of winning Awards. We were purchased by wpp. So we became part of the network and then and I'm nearly there now what what in this space for a long time? So it's like Twenty-One years now was fascinating with just as you're sharing your experience as you as you're talking about and as I'm what I'm thinking what's going through my head is off how many technology check how much technology has over such a short time? Yeah. That's what's going through my head as you're telling your story and it's fascinating. So passionately like, oh wow. Yeah, not of times and napped. And it's always changed and so, you know things like the the pandemic and the shift that that's created hasn't really changed marketing at all. You still dealing with shifting back and changing perceptions Behavior like all the time and and and I'm very grateful that I have skills that better equipped me for such a major shift that we we have these shifts that you know, some sometimes they've taken longer to take effect. But yeah technology for sure and things like doing social media engagement before Facebook race think about that often, but I laughed because for me so you you definitely are a bit more seasoned in the marketing field than I am, but I'm not too far behind in terms of some of the things they're saying and and and when I walk in college, there was no social media. So to even think that I've grown my career in a field I didn't study that didn't exist. It's constantly going through my mind. Exactly and you know and this new stuff all the time. So if you are yeah if you like learning it's definitely the right place to be so I finally made the move in house, but I think it was an itch to scratch to see what it was like from that perspective and I I moved to 10% which is no small small organization. I had no idea really when I joined that they were off at that time bigger than Facebook because they're just like was like, you know, nobody was really talking about the Chinese Giants at that point. They've happened very fast about having very fast. So I led them in charge across Africa as kind of an Innovation Hub understanding how those products might work in Emerging Markets fascinating and very app focused. So again learning A Whole New Jersey around streaming platforms and streaming music and social media apps actually went up against Tik-Tok in the very early days, really and so fascinating face off. And then they merged with musically and we were just that we everything else was dead in the water you had like this great East-West kind of combination was a fascinating world to.

South Africa HSBC 10% Europe Homeland Security LinkedIn White Oak Africa MI5 Facebook Sun exchange first time Chinese Giants Banks International 3 in the morning three offices Twenty-One years Buckingham Palace New Jersey East-West
"three offices" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:34 min | 8 months ago

"three offices" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"About things like we need to get. We need to make decision decisions. Let's all get on zoom and switch. We need to make this decision. Let's all get in dock. We need to know each other better. Let's let's go. We trust building exercise. We need to like learn a little bit more about each other. Now let's get on zoom. That's actually very remote before this. We were not not this level like we we had. We had three offices in about ten percent of the team spread all over the world and of course now we're are much more so i think we've had ten percent of the company move since we started. Whoa like to other places. My co founder. Now lives in a big ranch in idaho. My like everybody kind of so. They're never coming back on. No they're not coming back because this is this is. Where do you think happens to san francisco. You've been awhile right. Yeah i've been here for almost twenty years on and off the i would say i'm of the i the set of people you know saying that goodbyes on twitter. I think there are pretty small minority. I think i think. San francisco's getting continue to be a very special place. When we started my first companies in trotta. I was living in boston. It was started out. I went to mit. And we were starting it out of school. And i still remember the vinod funded the company but i'll khosla one of his requirements in the term sheet. Was you have to move from boston. Silicon valley you gotta be within fifty miles of his of santo road. It forget this was in the term sheets. There was the turkey and his case. It wasn't fifty miles. We literally moved into you. Know the space. Forty seven fifty sandhill. Where's dave a little office right underneath it. We office right. He's.

idaho boston ten percent san francisco twitter Silicon valley santo road three offices trotta about ten percent San francisco first companies almost twenty years fifty miles turkey Forty seven fifty sandhill one each
"three offices" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

02:39 min | 11 months ago

"three offices" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"There are three office locations to know his main offices on Derby Street in Hingham. He has satellite offices with one on Wyman Street in Waltham and one of the coming center in Beverly. The number to call. This is very important. 8553188387 again, 8553188387. You know, we're talking about a election that is very monumental. It's contentious, but it's huge in regards to the implications for the next several years, you know and so weird. Where does it end in regards to the impact it has on our economy and what it means for the stimulus package vs Hey, there's Kobe. There's no cove it and like I was telling you during the break in China, they are 95% back to normal. You know in Asia, and that makes you wonder? Well, what's going on here in the U. S. You know, I'm not trying to downplay the cove it too much because I do have clients that have lost family members to covet. Most of them are we're in assisted living nursing homes. I mean, actually, all of them that I'm aware of, You know, a lot of these clients were in their nineties. But I understand if you've underlying conditions, you know things can take place. But the fear that's driven upon that is what they've always relied upon. I was watching. I don't watch local news. I was watching the football game last Thursday. I think it was And the local news came on right afterwards, and they were talking about the covert numbers. They're not really talking about the death toll to much anymore, but this was a focus on that. And you know Donald Trump tweeted that 100,000 people die from the flu every year and I was, you know, it could've been anybody but me and the focused on Donald Trump, of course, and a doctor came on that was speaking with one of the anchors, and he said 100,000, That's you know, that's that's ridiculous. It's more like 70,000. And I was thinking myself and I mean, it's not 5000, right. Right feet 170,000 you talk about the nation's population. Is still a drop in the ocean when he talked about 170,000. It's It's not a big number. But then they were talking about compared to Cove it at 210,000 at that time, which is also a drop in the water, But they made it seem like it's so much more when you're talking about our country, our entire country. It's not It's not, you know, seven billion people or whatever, you know that's not a big number, but You know, people die from a lot of different things. The fluid they could die from pneumonia. You mean the list goes on and on right, And so I guess to me as an American..

Donald Trump Cove Hingham Waltham Asia Beverly pneumonia China flu football
Interview With Shayla Hunter

Revision Path

03:23 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Shayla Hunter

"All right. So tell us who are and what you do sell. My name is Shayla. Hunter and I am a strategist and also an illustrator and a creator of the one hundred black females project. Nice. Now. One thing that I've been asking everyone and I'm sure for folks that it listen to the show they know this but I've always kind of doing this my covert nineteen check in just to Kinda see where people are at. So power you holding up right now during the pandemic. Cell. Holding up pretty well, we're just at the August second. Yes. kind of wild that it's been this long but I'm doing pretty well, I think that you know in the beginning. In late March into April and there was a lot going on obviously and it was a a day by day and you know kind of in my apartment and trying to take walks outside and be away from people, and I'm still doing all of that but I feel as though now that it's been. been into summer her can of have a little bit more to can be outside a lot more things like that. So I'm holding up. Okay. Yeah Denver's really nice in the summer to I I went there was last summer. I think it was last summer I was in Denver for some reason I was surprised at how hot it was but then it makes sense because it's the mile high city so much closer to the sun. Yes. I was like this isn't that Lanta heat is expected. It is intense and but I must say the fact that I forget it's not sunny three, hundred, sixty, five days a year but it's like sunny three, hundred and fifty days you know something like that like sooner. It's sunny all the time even in the wintertime when it's cold out, it's nice to have the sun as well because it doesn't really feel like a long winter as in the east coast. So let's talk about your work that you're doing at Eck strategy like what are your workdays looking like right now? Yeah. So strategy is a marketing research and strategy consultancy, and so you know we work with a lot of clients across lifestyle consumer packaged goods. So that means things that you find on the shelves in grocery stores and things like that, and then also house brands as well in companies. So right now we've been. Really, busy doing lot of work with our clients that we've had it new clients I work really well amongst my my colleagues in we've been with it within the pandemic feel as though the transition has been fairly easy for us when I say that just because we have three offices so there's one in Chicago and Denver, in New York and we work in. Teams amongst one another you know across the three offices and then there's you know people who are sometimes in other places as well. As a team as a company, I felt like that we worked really well already had virtually and so is it pretty sort of easy transition into kind of going on and and that sort of thing. So as of late, you know been kind of working on different projects and it's been going going pretty well. So can't you know no complaints.

Denver Shayla Lanta Hunter Chicago New York
How the things that seem like your disadvantages can be your advantages

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:52 min | 1 year ago

How the things that seem like your disadvantages can be your advantages

"Hey everyone it's carly. This show might sound a bit different today because we are still working from home because of Covid Nineteen Danielle is also. And she will be back next week today. Jenny. Britain Bauer joins us skin from the couch. Jenny is the founder and chief creative officer of Jenny splendid ice creams. And Artisanal Ice Cream company. You can find in grocery stores around the country and in my own freezer and it is a personal favorite game. HQ Johnny has probably one of the most unique jobs of anyone we've ever had on the show I am so excited to get into this conversation Jenny welcomed skimmed from the couch high made my own job. So you know if you made your own job, you could just do whatever you want to be an ice cream maker. Jedi I'm always out of is like out but I actually. So happy she is out because I get to talk to you alone would make so much fun of me right now I have the biggest we choose to if there was ever a podcasts for me to record by myself, it is this one. I. Don't even know where to start I. Do WanNa just like trump a funny story of how we almost met in person ones, which is I don't know if you remember this, it was the skins third office. We had an elevator that opened right into our office and there were a bunch of companies in the same building and we had somebody on our team who at the time was just absolutely like your number one biggest fan in the world and the elevator door opens you happen to be in the elevator and this girl and our team just screams because you only hear our she. Just. Here Jenny. You go into a meeting in our building. No. That was one of my favorite favorite moments I was actually like confused in the elevator trying to get to I must have. Pushed the floor, your floor or whatever instead of the where we're supposed to go and I was just trying to figure it out, and then the elevator opens and everybody's looking at me because you know your off, it just goes right into the office and then Jedi and also I was already a fan and so I got to you know it was really fun I got to they showed me around and gave me all the mugs and everything and it was so fun. Really like one of my favorite moments. It was a good story. So let's jump in with how to start all of our interviews, which is just skim your resume for us. My resume is as skin I mean I would. I quit art school to make ice cream to start a little shop in the north market, which is indoor public market in Nineteen Ninety six and I've never had another job and just for our listeners who don't know where you're based. You're hi I'm in. I'm in Columbus Ohio. Yes. So I really went from like high school jobs and you know like working at the bakery in college to starting my own business and I was twenty something years ago. What is something that we cannot Google the value that we should now? Oh Gosh. Well actually, a lot of things but not maybe not that you should know I love driving like. Track driver I like my car a lot. I have just a GTI but it's out and you know I go out to the track and drive really fast I like that while we may have a lot of common about ice cream I think we just found our big difference which is I learned to drive not too long ago. Wow. Daniel is still learning. Oh my gosh. When we're when I was reading about your story something that really struck me was just that Ube only known and identified as a very creative person and it's clear in just reading about you. You probably would have ended up doing something very creative and ice cream is something that you found and became your outlet. But did you always think you're going to be an entrepreneur? I did I've always had that. I just always had that independent sort of way of thinking we approaching the world and so I knew somebody told me about it when I was very young I mean my grandfather was an entrepreneur. I. Mean just like he you know he had a little like a cleaning company after worked where he will go clean offices. My Grandmother said I remember she said this to me you know if you can't find a job. And so we would like go pick all the marigold. Dry Out, and then go sell them back to the neighbors later on I just always felt like it was freedom and I guess even from a very young as early as I can remember I always wanted to take responsibility for all that in my life in fact, I don't know if I was ever a kid. I always felt like I wanted I was. Always mad that people look at me as a kid I always wanted to be a grown up when I was a kid just to take over my my life and take ownership of that I mean like was I couldn't sit in class I don't like being told what to do. I. Think I'm a very nice person. I'm a very community spirited person I come from a place of service and I'm a total introvert. But I also like can't follow rules. At all.

Jenny Danielle Britain Bauer Covid Chief Creative Officer Google Daniel Columbus Ohio Founder UBE
Wisconsin police shoot unarmed Black man in the back.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:47 min | 1 year ago

Wisconsin police shoot unarmed Black man in the back.

"Wisconsin's governor summoned the National Guard on Monday for fear of another round of violent protests after the police shooting of a black man under murky circumstances turned. Kenosha. into the nation's latest flash point city in a summer of racial unrest the move came after protesters clashed with offices in riot gear on Sunday night over the wounding of twenty nine year old Jacob. Blake who was hospitalized in a serious condition in a widely seen cell phone video made by an onlooker he was shot in the back as he leaned into his SUV while he's three children sat in the vehicle. Tensions flared on Monday after a news conference with Kenosha Ma- John, and Tomean hundreds of protesters rushed to the building and Adore was snapped off. It's hinges before police in riot gear, pepper sprayed the crowned the man who claims to have made the video said he saw blake scuffling with three offices and heard them yell dropped the knife drop the knife before the gunfire erupted. He said he didn't see a knife in Blake's hands. The governor said that he had seen no information to suggest blake had a knife or other weapon but that the case is still being investigated by the states justice, department the officers involved were placed on administrative leave standard practice in a shooting by police. The governor was quick to condemn the bloodshed saying that while not all details were known, what we know for certain is that he's not the first black man or person to have been shot or injured or mercilessly killed at the hands of individuals in law enforcement in our state or our country. Civil Rights Attorney Ben crump representing blakes family said, Blake was simply trying to do the right thing by intervening in a domestic incident.

Blake Kenosha Ma- John Wisconsin National Guard Blakes Family Ben Crump Adore Kenosha. Attorney
"three offices" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"three offices" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Those who are retired those who will soon be retired three office locations, his main offices on Derby Street in Hingham. Satellite offices. He has went on Wyman Street in Wolf Ham and one at the coming center in Beverly. Now the number to call Jake is 8553188387 will have that number for you threaten our show today. That's 8553188387 Jake. Good to hear from you. What's going on today? First of all, Happy 40th birthday. It's a day late, but you know we're recording this and it's a day later than normal, right? Hey, Thanks a lot, man. I appreciate that. Yeah, it's I was. My birthday was yesterday and I turned 40 and I'm looking forward to my forties man. So all is good. All is good and Let's also let people know that we have a guest on our show. This is your good friend Nate Simple. He has spent 15 years working at the Chicago Board of Trade, and today he has more than 20 years of experience in the industry. And he spends a lot of time living on his farm in Minnesota. Nate, How are you today? I'm hanging in there. Just kind of trying to make sense of it all, like everybody else, But you're doing pretty well. Thanks for having me on guys. Always my friend. Always So, Nate, I remember you telling me that you're always trying to make a calculated decision, whether it works out or not when you're doing your trading How informed our specialist and options traders when they're working on the floor. Um I think the main thing that you need to realize that specialist and market makers are more worried about what's going on at that current moment, and what inventory they have In their book at that moment versus what they think's gonna have in a long term, so they're very informed with what's going on What's just traded. Who's doing what versus what they think's gonna happen in a long term. I mean, the best trade you could make a trader in and out of You're already having out before you haven't and you know that's the best. You can do it. That's what people trying to do when they're actually trading. Assed faras making markets versus speculating. Where do you think things are going to go? So I mean, yeah, they already there already preparing to unload what? They just picked up Iggy at the best case scenario, and you have somebody that thinks one thing going up and one thing's going on another person takes going down. You both call you. I want you to do business with them. Yet. I mean, it's it sounds like everybody thinks when they think about the markets, and they think about the exchanges. That is just a bunch of yelling and people, you know, scrambling and, AH, lot of that's changed, though, since the computer is coming to the industry, isn't that accurate to say? Yeah. I mean, most of it. If you go to the exchange is now there goes count. Just right. There's probably by Big Pitts left that really do a lot of business. In our country right now. The euro dollar pit, The vic spit and whatnot, and there's a couple in the bonds of the boundary rocking and rolling right now, honestly, there moving But all right. Yeah, For the most part, it's A lot of people going away from it, but you don't need to be on the floor. Don't even exchange no need to be in these big cities right now. Hence you moving to Minnesota, buying a farm being able to hunt and fish and do your trading at your at your home. So you and I had a conversation a few weeks back regarding the extremely high costs premiums on puts or the options to short the S and P 500 index. And or its components. Can you tell our listeners what a premium is and why the shortening of the S and P 500 has become so popular in expensive in our economy today. Well, Basically, you do it through options in the best way to do it. You can short the future's also, but the premiums on option get so expensive because they function as insurance contracts. So you're buying insurance that to the markets printing 3300 today. And you want to protect yourself with going below 3200. What the markets whipping around well around 100 handles at a time. You know, there's a better chance that blows through there. So if he wasn't selling you this contractor this contract going to charge you more money for it. Now versus Which of the slow grind up $5 here, $5 here $5. Here is the market rally. So this all just beer central right? It's priced and after prima same reason if you want to buy insurance on out That plugs every 10 years versus a house up on top of a hill somewhere. So to supply. I mean, I'm assuming that a lot of the Ah The traders that are the options traitors they're placing puts. Obviously, they're bearish on the market, right And so supply and demand comes into play. If there is a lot of people wanted to Take those positions is that what causes the in premiums to increase? Yeah, it was the volatility index that the CBO he came up with, and it's basically just saying what percent off The stock's value. They expect the mood to be over a certain amount of time, right. So in a lot of a lot of times when people buy put, they aren't really bearish, protecting a portfolio, or they just want to make sure if it does go down something bad happen that they're protected a lot of its just laughing and return. At that point, you're up 25% on the air. You go and put 3% to make sure you know. He will give 3% up and lock it in. I mean, it's a no brainer not to do it at that point. Especially in this whole thing. The whole financial assets under management business is driven by returns returns returns. Oh, yeah. A.

Nate Simple Minnesota Jake Chicago Board of Trade Hingham Wolf Ham Beverly Big Pitts Iggy
"three offices" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"three offices" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Other three offices to be arrested before George floor is laid to rest but a spokesman for Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison would not confirm that telling NPR the office continues to conduct a thorough review let me just tell you something might not be popular this is Allison in an interview with NPR this week as he took over the prosecution prosecuting the police is not an easy thing to do L. as a points to several examples of police officers killing black man who posed no threat on video where juries did not convict the jury will not be made up exclusively of people who were at a rally in fact if you were at the rally that might mean that you be excluded from the jury so you understand that the jury is likely to resolve doubts in favor of the police most people trust nonetheless legal experts say the videos help build a pretty strong case against all of it but it's going to be more difficult against the others mark ostler is a former federal prosecutor who teaches law at the university of St Thomas their defense is likely going to be yeah we didn't know that you know death was going to result we didn't anticipate that we didn't have the view that Chauvin did we weren't committing the acts that Chauvin wise but also says that doesn't mean it's not worth pursuing charges especially considering the horrific nature of the killing and it's enormous impact on the community David Schaper NPR news Minneapolis Minnesota senator Amy Klobuchar's with us next before being elected to the Senate she served as the prosecutor for Hennepin county which includes Minneapolis senator welcome back to the program well thanks Steve it's great to be on I would you approach the case of the other three officers if you were still the prosecutor well first of all let me say it is really good they keep Allison has been brought in to lead that back or he is the Attorney General of Minnesota long time civil rights leaders with a lot of support in our African American community and really across the country and he is but I like listening to your tape because he has forthrightly honest I in advance that he needs time to build the case on the other the other officers that he's asking for patience to look at subsequent charges and that is also a frankly might but he's also Frank that he might not get a favorable jury in the end but you have it if when you look at what I don't know about this case do you see room for charges against the other three I do because of the video especially the second video that came out R. where you saw them in a much more active role than you did in maybe one of the first video that came out and of course the attorney general's office were working with the county is going to have access to all BT up including the the body cam video some of which we haven't seen so that's what's going on right now I cannot tell you how important it is to get justice for George Floyd and for his family that's the number one focus in our state right now and the second one is just a broader and it's really fits in with what keep it staying in your interview and that is that we need to make changes to their criminal justice system because systemic racism calls for systemic reform and we have a let's not by hand okay go to go yeah yeah if you don't mind let's let's talk about that a little bit because Noel king is of course reporting from Minneapolis this week spoke with your lieutenant governor and she described a broader investigation of the Minneapolis police department here's some of what she had to say investigation will look at the last ten years of the Minneapolis police department can feel safe in their communities and know that they are protected by law enforcement are instead of fearing law enforcement's Peggy Flanagan speaking there ten years senator knowing that police department as you do what do you expect that there are deep rooted problems there yes and I actually at one point I got in a public argument with the Minneapolis police chief when he actually took the grand jury consideration which we had back then of police involved shootings and death and put the investigations into its own department that was years ago and now they're back outside of the department and so I think the best thing is a long time full scale investigation talked about him this is a state effort I've also called for a federal effort it called a pattern and practice investigation and I led an effort with twenty five senators I got aboard on that last week to Concord and I think you could do both and should do both at the same time so I would really like Attorney General Barr to respond to my request I'm not sure that we can get this started because it's not just one officer it training it's what they've done and how they've hired people what their standards are why he thought that was okay to put his knee which is still outside the realm and watch this man George Boyd live about great before it is just wrong senator as you know some activists would like to go back further than ten years and look at your time as a prosecutor in the Minneapolis area and they've noted that you typically did not bring charges against officers who were involved in shootings you instead refer those cases to a grand jury which of course is the thing a prosecutor can do but you don't have to do looking back on those police cases would you do them differently yes but I want to point out something that's important to now at that time that's pretty much what the practice what the idea was that you would be able to get rid of any political bias and presented to a jury and so what I would do now is make that decision myself but I want to be clear that every single one of those cases we did present the facts to a grand jury but they could decide whether or not there should be criminal charges and now that is shipped it I also have done things that I that we have continued on and now it's become pretty much a standard I am videotaping interrogations I was one of the first people to advocate for that across the country we had it in Minnesota back then I pioneered a new form of I wouldn't that dedication to get the bias out of that the racial bias out of misidentification our DNA review of major cases but now it's shifted and there's so much we can do as I said to my colleagues on the floor in a speech I gave yesterday you know we took it out we didn't wave a Bible in the air for a photo op like the president we placed our hand on the Bible and we swore to support and defend the constitution of the United States against all enemies foreign and domestic and the enemy we face now is racism injustice and it's time to stop talking and do our job get rid of the whole American public media the American public media did some very interesting reporting on this looks back to eight years beginning in nineteen ninety nine so this is a time when you were a prosecutor they found the city of Minneapolis had to pay out four point eight million dollars in legal settlements related to one hundred twenty two police misconduct incidents that surprise you I had known about many of those cases that were published but not all of them and so if I could just there are so many reforms we can make nationally to get the information out one so we can find out about that police misconduct immediately I'm calling for public release of all that data and that will help us to do better and to hold more people accountable secondly different standards of police conduct I'm having a model police standard across the country we have a preview support right now we have a patchwork a number of fifty getting rid of chokehold on the federal level all in the center Booker and Harris leading effort I'm putting out a number of proposals out there and working with them we've already had a bill that we've long supported on racial profiling there are so many things we can do but I think this mobilization that we're seeing nationally and for someone like me it's worked in the system and I've tried to make change it's been hard to do because of the thing that keeps Allison was talking about in that direct interview that you had it is hard to do because of where some of the public is right now public opinion is on our side they have seen the horror of the video and they are mobilizing across the country righteously protesting and we must take.

Attorney General Keith Ellison NPR Allison George Minnesota
"three offices" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"three offices" Discussed on KGO 810

"He's got three offices around the bay area is based and so Norma line welcome to the show what do you call a lawyer we always need good legal advice and we get a lot of questions as you know in all of our seminars or workshops lined what we do is financial planning and estate planning can gently overlaps Sosa simply we've got to make sure our clients are holding those assets and the registered properly so the kids don't fight afterwards and you leave a legacy behind that's crystal clear absolutely you work really hard for your money and you invested carefully and if you don't plan what to do with it after you're gone the government takes a bite your kids have problems the lawyers will make a lot of money she learned I had a couple come in the other day and they've got the classic son in law that you're not really in their armored with why their daughter married disposal he spends a lot of money he's got to buy a brand new car every year he bought a boat he never uses their fear line you've probably heard these kinds of stories before their fears when they died this slick son in law is going to be buying another new Lexus and going to be just blowing their money in record time what do you do with a case like that no question about it your daughter you love about what she saw and this guy who knows love isn't really blind six months after your death and you go to get all this and heaven forbid of course it's her separate property because when the kids inherited their separate property he'll say the hot you know in a moment of passion on the pillows what's the matter don't you Love Me how come you are more than I do and you have done to our custom essentials the swatches where would the money I I mean you know I could make this story go on and on he runs with the receptionist what do you work for some strange woman is getting if your daughter is left with nothing how do you avoid that have you you know you could say why don't you sign up post marital agreements where you could get married a prenuptial agreement to look at you like that for most of the romantic thing in the world I love him I trust him it Gerry that half the marriages end in divorce they're not finding anything so you'll continue to get your money instead of giving the inheritance outright to your son or daughter you put into what's called a dynasty trust the generation skipping trusts the same thing and by the way we'll talk about it briefly here but you should Google dynasty trust D. Y. and A. F. T. Y. dynasty trust the Wall Street journal love for them what it is because if you have negotiated a prenuptial or post nuptial agreement for your son or daughter instead of giving the money to them outright put it into a dynasty trust if you trust your son and daughter and they're responsible they can be in charge of it that can be the trustee but the key here to keep in mind is that the money it's not their money you're not giving it to them you've given it to the dynasty trust issues there for their benefits and they can use it and they can be in charge of it but the trust prohibits the son or daughter your son or daughter from giving it to anybody else so when the sun was says don't you let me give you half sure all I'm looking so much I would do anything what my parents do on it so you're the bad guy my parents started what what we do with the deepest dynasty trust what do you care if you're the bad guy you're dead anyway you've protected your son or daughter so she can't turn it over other benefits let's say your son or daughter gets sold your daughter could be an architect OBGYN could be a truck driver any any kind of occupation that has a lot of attention liability where you can get sued if you put it into a dynasty trust it's not your daughter or son's is protected from creditors was if you gave it that about right the credit can take the money just as they wanted so when this is not for fifty million dollar people you don't have to have a you know a lot of money this is Jordan may not have over two hundred thousand dollars we have class at the two hundred thousand dollars to give each child a dynasty trust for that child well protected also and by the way if you put a million dollars into it and your kid manages the money well Pat I'd like my kids thirty years longer than me a million dollars invested and usual times becomes what after thirty years yes since seventeen eighteen million dollars it's a big it's a big it's a big number of dollars if you scan your kid's name it will be subject to a state tax most probably where as if it's in the dynasty trust it's not subject to state tax this is the ritual but it's not really the charges state that's what which people do that help people get richer generation skipping trusts so let me ask you another one this is always coming up more more I'm not sure why I guess with autism and all a lot of other issues with with children special needs trust if you've got one child and you only have one child let's say we have a couple children and one is a special needs there's a disability of some sort Eddie handle something like that if you have a disabled child for example fifty autism rates are climbing and more more kids being diagnosed with fifty if you've got a child's got a disability if you leave the money outright even even if they can handle it themselves if if it getting government benefits and and many disabled people for lying on that account S. as supply government benefits to cover their health insurance special housing needs group homes whatever it is if a child is more than two thousand dollars to their name they lose all the government benefits it's a means based program you can't have any money US disabled children frequently naive that experience in the way the world and a really subject to manipulation by other people will come in and check them out of their money so instead of leaving it in a trust just a regular revoke herbal trust you have to put into a special needs trust I'm a special needs trust says that the trustee would be another one of your children or of professional fiduciary he's talked to a lawyer about this we can talk about that the special needs trust protect the money you're leaving your child able to your child to continue getting government benefits and the special needs trusts instructs the trustee to first seek government benefits both for spending your money on that child but they keep government benefits they keep SSI and Medicaid no section eight housing they keep all that and then if the family's going to Hawaii or if your son or daughter needs a special call for their handicapped needs was a medical treatment that's discovered by a surgeon or doctor in Chicago you want for your kid out to Chicago they can use a special needs trust for all of those things supplement government benefits which you to keep a close up and then it seemed to be getting more and more meters concourse box only wash that trust there is for disabled child so you and your team really do a lot of hand holding I mean anybody can generate these kinds a living trust what is that hand holding when you take people through some of these these episodes that are pretty darn difficult pretty stressful that's where your contribution to times I can't tell you how many times Parker said I feel so relieved I'm so glad we finally taking care of this and it's not difficult to figure out what your needs are and then we take on the information we send you documents come back and the trustees signed and done it is not a lengthy drawn out process it gets done quickly and there's so much relief because it's in the back of their mind they want to get it done and they finally stop procrastinating in this let's get this wrong thing done thank you if I do a trust I'm gonna die next week I don't think there's a collection get a little worried.

Sosa
Greek Islanders attack police in migrant camp protests.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Greek Islanders attack police in migrant camp protests.

"Greece's government hoped to defuse tensions after protests over plans for new camps onto of its islands. Yesterday turned into violent clashes between police and local residents some armed with Molotov cocktails and shotguns. Hundreds of residents attacked police officers guarding the sights of the future detention camps on the islands of less boss and she us dozens of police. Officers were injured during the unrest. And the Greek government spokesman said many of the riot police deployed to the islands. This week would be pulled out. Government migration officials vowed to press ahead with plans to replace overcrowded and squalid migrant camps with more restrictive detention centers but local officials and residents opposed the plans with many demanding that no migrants should remain on the islands. Local Authorities declared a twenty four hour. Strike that devolved into the violence yesterday. Greek officials said forty-three offices injured on Lesbos. Which sees the most arrivals as migrants crossed the sea from nearby Greece's? Gnc Islands are a main entry point for migrants seeking better lives in the European Union managing the flow of people and growing discontent among island residents has become the main challenge for the center. Right government of the Greek Prime Minister under two thousand sixteen deal between the European Union and Turkey migrants reaching the islands. Must stay there until their asylum. Requests a processed and if these are rejected they must be taken back by tacky but delays in the asylum process coupled with increased migrant flows placed massive strains on the system and led to a sharp deterioration of living conditions in existing camps whose populations burgeoned despite Greek authorities. Moving people judged as vulnerable to the mainland nearly sixty thousand migrants and refugees arrived on Greek islands last year. Almost double the number recorded in two thousand eighteen according to the UN Refugee Agency.

Gnc Islands Greek Islands Greek Government Greece Un Refugee Agency European Union Prime Minister
"three offices" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

06:54 min | 2 years ago

"three offices" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Three office alignment of their five yeah I made the Pro Bowl but it's a new all line coach and I know I feel I've been told for years that Mike Munn check is a terrific coach and I believe he moved on to Denver because of his daughter lives in Denver and it's more convenient for him how has it been and you seen any real regression in this dealer line without money check there. well it not run the ball well I mean all you can say is that through the first two weeks they've not run the ball particularly well and and therefore they've not block to particularly well now again two weeks that does not define this season but I think that that's something Larry they're going to have to count on and focus on if they can't run the ball and get started a lot of long yardage situations with a second year quarterback who for the most part is a little mechanical and robotic then it's going to be a tough gig so I think they're going to really have to work on the run game this week one could argue that David Castro is the best poing guard in the NFL so they don't have dad players up front but they have not done a very good job to two games. did you get a chance to see any of the the cardinals ravens a break that down at all. yeah I I I look to a more Jackson I'm in the process of watching color Mari he actually looked really good he missed a few throws at you know had potential but I thought for the most part some of the throws the through with conviction he saw right away I mean through cement cuts amount cuts he had that one to brown at the end that there was it was a big time brawl yeah with Titan and then mixing in the running capabilities to I just I again I'm not gonna get to over and about two games but there was one of the questions I had going into this season could the guy you know makes in the past with the run and so far maybe even exceeding expectations yeah I know he's throwing the ball well no question and and I think there's a lot of factors involved in their options it's it's very tough to defend it's a highly scheme confidence it features multiple run game dimensions and how they get to them is heart how they get to me don't have twenty rounds but they have to get to these based runs and a lot of different ways. asking kind of works off the run game and the differences need to play more safe zone coverage concepts he that's the thing that's where the run game in Jackson's running ability can at times limit what difference does and then that helps define the read in the throes of the quarterback so it's either you know right now it's working he's made some very very good throws and we'll see if it continues. he's made the throws he looks great against the blitz to I mean when they blitz enemy knows where to go with the ball is get the hell out of his hand. no I mean I think you know the one thing you can say which a lot of people I'm sure were were wondering is he's not looking to to scamper out of the pocket you know he he's he's sitting there and he's throwing the ball it is time please Mr few but you know we'll see how we continues you know it's funny because I thought his last year in college I thought one thing actually did well was throw the ball. in the numbers even again zones throwing the ball through underneath defenders and you know I thought he did that well in his last year in college it's it's throwing outside the numbers that he did very poorly Hey are you did you see any of the I'm sure you'd with that though it's a little bit of the chiefs and the raiders I watch the chiefs offense okay that's only ask about some of the game on TV yeah I'm going to ask you about the Robinson touched on the first touchdown that them homes through of the second quarter where he just went bananas and maybe get sit here and talk about how good we got the one where you know was he just ran free in their words yeah it's the one where the running back came out of the backfield and pulled the the corner back up with them and nobody went with the the nobody went with that Robinson who went right down the field and I wanted to just ask about the schema that play because you know we think about Shanahan and his ability to schemes that but reads incredible forcing the defense to make decisions and that was on full display there they made a decision they made the wrong decision I would always suggest going with the guy that can really hurt you down feel but what do I know and I decided that was a really really cool design got a question do you want me to answer we're going. I want I just want it answered at all but I just want to get your thoughts on the plate design and it reads ability to force the defense to make these decisions if I'm not mistaken now with the play where the motion of course yeah and the then ended up with four receivers to the field side which you don't see very often and if if memory serves me correctly as I watch this tape on Monday hi this safety got stock to safety to that side got stock because when you get for two aside things change especially if you're playing its own concept because it's really difficult with four to a side so the the safety and I forget which safety it was but the safety got stock and therefore when Robinson ran from from the number two receivers spot to meet all of what was initially trips no one ran with them at all and and it became easier if you just put in cash it's funny because I actually thought that the the raiders had a pretty good game plan and they got beat by mistakes and by a and some really good individual plays by the chiefs on third down and then a couple of plays where guys just like the Hardman forty two yard touchdown you know the Riley to safety you know he's a cover to prior you can't allow any receiver to get on top of you in any circumstance in cover too no matter how fast the receiver is so that was not a bad defensive call that was bad execution of the defense of call this is like the patriots albeit in different ways just put so much pressure on you is ideal into a game plan you get the best intentions you're doing a great and it takes one or two mistakes and then they're off to the races and that's hard for any somewhat mortal team to deal with on a on a mental level knowing that Hey man if I dropped as we look at this third down this could be the last that we see the ball for nine game Mets. yeah and the thing is on like a lot of teams win if you make a mistake defensively that mistake again cities can turn into a touchdown after such a twelve yard gain for a first down it turns into a touchdown turning a corner where you don't do anything to drop twenty eight points on your right right Craig ground time good stuff but I'll tell you next week we got to get into the Darnell savaging Green Bay while at all over in buffalo incredible those two rookies are just playing at a great level right now we'll talk about and maybe we have more time next week all right sounds good I've been there I Greg Cosell the Amherst College sharpshooter look it up joining us for his weekly chat here on the toll recruiter and Brooks show giants baseball coming up in just a bit three twenty five it to be exact Mike you strip ski I've been a home run last night obviously back in line at leading off once again will this gets.

Mike Munn two weeks forty two yard twelve yard
"three offices" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:35 min | 2 years ago

"three offices" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Are they. I have three offices that's of yeah that's a big question I mean part of me stand I I'm sometimes I feel like an Armageddon this amid farms was to blow the whole thing out and start over but I don't know that that's a really healthy. I think so the couple is answer I mean first of all let me just carry out my comments I am not a policymaker mean policies huge piece of this and all sorts of things about the mechanics of medical of the industry and practice of medicine that I don't understand it I'd be careful how I critique it but I think it's clear to me and many other of condition or a patient that. the system could be better than it is that the experience of being a patient is unnecessarily faxing and hard the experience of being a caregiver like I say it's unnecessary faxing and hard Mr for this reason why is that you know on some level all conditions are humans and we're talking about very human things should be relatively straight and there's they learn from their patients all the time why how has it that we've gotten so off of the tracks will. I think a lot of us see it is for backing up into a kind of a concept of health care what you know I would love to see HHS rewrite revisit its mission statement what is the mission of medicine what we doing here because too often it starts feeling self. activate the industry of medicine protects itself really first and foremost a lot of ways. wow okay I could ramble on this one for a long time but let me just say I I the the I think that's I think what I've come to understand is that there's there's. you've got a health care system filled with passion that smart caring people undeniably true devoted up the ones who had this amazing group of people and then you also have these outcomes that are so undesirable in some ways so how do you reconcile the two Conor seems to be it has to be a design flaw in the system because it's not malignant malevolent people creating the system is not evil it's just haphazard and it probably was designed in the wrong around the wrong fake and that access I think a lot of us for this it was built around disease that's internal backwards so let us say we might need to move from this disease centric model two of person centric model and that that design Q. that that would just automatically shift things in ways that would answer a lot of our concerns. so that's one kind of convenience your to your question but then if it's another minute I mean I think Sir getting down into the trenches beyond that serve construct and conceptual framework. I think there are four four four pillars one is infrastructure. the buildings you know wire hospital such deport deplorable places. because you never want to be in place and you can't wait to leave I mean that's not a design prompt for a place it's feeling so I love thinking about what could happen in the environment of care there's a lot of room for improvement there second pillar would be like the work force training and education how we support clinicians and how we train them huge problems there we could talk about that the third piece would be sort of the the social peace that we patients need to take this we need to engage with medicine and from where we don't just hand ourselves over to our clinicians it's a very dangerous thing to do even if you have a very well intended clinicians are just too busy we have to kind of phone are experience little bit and participated in it differently so that's that's a huge piece of us let's on us as a society. but I think so you can put your focus anywhere among those of mine that cluster I'm particularly interested in infrastructure right now and information and communication how do people get their information it is incredibly hard to know the truth of your situation that's kind of ridiculous but anyway I'll stop again I contended forever on that one thank you will this is such intimate and universal material I'm sure many many of you have questions we have microphones I think on two sides of the room and the grief for the question the more questions we get to hear Sir we'd love to hear your questions. no looking people yes I. this question will come from your right. thank you thank you for being here I was wondering what your experiences or if it's changed over time in terms of as you're watching people die. what's your thoughts on where they go is there a soul you know when the physicals not fair what what is if anything what one what do you notice how have your views changed. sold my views have changed in that they've just sort of I'm more confident in this not knowing. I used to be a source of it's about like in security and not know now that feels like a source of confidence like I can open a security awesome like I'm very happy to say hi I don't know what's going on right now are the advent sites where some tapping some forces a place you can't quite explain and I don't try to anymore and undefined with patients and family often times that's a relief to again there's no pressure to somehow understand all this up this is a brace of the mystery of it all is very useful I think and I guess for me is there is a a faith that there are things happening that we can't see that we can know if there's a faith in may I have faith in that that seems barely of faith and so that's all I feel comfortable saying about an afterlife I mean I you know when I think about what happens to the body of particular interest in like a green very I think I would for me I think I would be buried just in the ground a B. ends linen she for something but just but the ground so that my body gets to melt into the earth. to me that's like a kind of immortality and if there's something more going on than that that's wonderful but that's pretty dang amazing by itself. or this idea of immortality that the way we affect each other the emotional residues we leave behind that those are kinds of immortality and if there's more than that that's a that's even more amazing so I kind of try to help with for myself and with patients families get really just fascinated with all all all the basic stuff and let the rest be gravy so this is my way of being folks and I guess another thing to say is I've never seen you know all the bad sides of their own I've never seen anything that's I never saw any out of body kind of moments I never had one myself I don't discount the day it happened I just had never seen them. and that's okay no that's that's fine by me. yeah. I don't know if that answers your question that's an answer. hi this question's all the way you're left in the front. a good evening thanks so my experience has been losing parents the fiance and being a nine eleven first responders so my experience through these different very close encounters with death has opened me up in in a lot of ways if you're talking about I don't work for medical foundation here in San Francisco. my brother is.

Armageddon HHS Conor San Francisco.
WeWork Announces Billion-Dollar Loss as it Prepares to Go Public

Business Wars Daily

05:45 min | 2 years ago

WeWork Announces Billion-Dollar Loss as it Prepares to Go Public

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by sent pro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk is never been simpler than with sent pro online from pitney leabeau's. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit p._b._a. Dot com slash b w daily in uh from one. I'm david brown and this is business warriors daily on this tuesday august twenty seventh we work the enormous us real estate company that made its name renting co working space to startups filed paperwork for its i._p._o. Earlier this month in could go public in september that i._p._o. Has been eagerly anticipated but the perspective has drawn confusion instead. It's filled with contradictions and some downright weird stuff stuff so odd in fact that inspired bloomberg op ed writer shiro vide to write one of the best leads recent business journalism history and i quote i get paid to write words for a living and i am nearly at a loss for words about we work companies. She said now let me try to explain lovie days. Speechlessness snus adam newman founded the company in twenty ten with a vow to transform the way we work he wouldn't just rent office space to freelancers lancer and creatives he'd make beautiful and above all communal after all the growing hordes of independent workers are lonely. Newman's concept could solve not just the need for affordable physical space but a more existential problem as well in two thousand ten newman's company had two locations in new york and four hundred fifty tenants whom we work calls members by the way we works parent company changed. Its name to the week company earlier this year today. Only only nine years later we work claims five hundred twenty eight locations in one hundred eleven cities around the world and five hundred twenty seven thousand members. That's a lot of numbers and we're not even going to try to do the math to figure out the percentage growth. Let's just say it's insane and that we work claims to be the largest private holder of office space. Yes in manhattan london and washington d._c. But it's losses are also enormous its biggest investor japanese tech giant softbank values the we company at close to fifty billion dollars but it lost nine hundred million on revenues of one point five billion in the first half of this year alone. The company is also obligated. You pay close to fifty billion dollars for long-term offices around the globe over the next ten to fifteen years. We company officials say they'll be resilient to recession kids but real estate businesses stuck with long term leases have struggled in previous economic downturns one of those was we work rival. I w g i w a._g. Owns the regis brand of flexible furnished office spaces that company filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection in two thousand three office vacancies had soared after the internet net bubble burst and i w g was obligated to pay rent on all those empty offices today i w g has six hundred two thousand desks in offices across across the globe only two thousand fewer than we work. It's been profitable for years. The wall street journal reports despite its profitability its market cap is less than five billion billion under ten percent of the week companies unicorn valuation. The reason for the gulf in values may lie in the difference between the two companies narratives ribs regis portrays itself as a real estate business but we's adam. Newman refuses that term according to see n._b._c. Where not a real estate company. He says we're a community of creators. The journal says newman has referred to the we company is a physical social network invoking a mind bending metaphor for social life in the real world mimicking that which is online they just happen to be growing community through leasing offices and a few other communal businesses as well such as apartments call we live and even new private schools called. We grow one question. Stumping bloomberg's shiro vide and others is whether we company actually has a path to profitability or not and whether a real estate company asari adema community company employing the fast growth strategy of tech startups like uber and lift will soar or deflate on the public markets. We'll be watching whether this this one works from wonder. This is business wars data. Hey feel like this episode. Sir chartres with a friend and show them how can subscribe for free. We're so grateful to our view of listeners. I'm david brown back with more. This episode is brought to you by send pro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk desk has never been simpler than with sent pro online from pitney bowes with simple online is just click sand and save for as low as four dollars ninety nine. Yeah that's right four dollars and ninety nine cents a month. Send envelopes flats and packages right from your p._c. And you are back to business in. I'm not-i'm try it for free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale but only when you visit p b dot com slash b._w. Daily that's p._b. Dot com slash b w daily.

Adam Newman Pitney Bowes David Brown Pitney Leabeau Bloomberg Softbank Lovie New York Writer The Wall Street Journal Sir Chartres Asari Adema Manhattan Washington London
17 killed in attack on military parade in Yemen's Aden

Radio Specials

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

17 killed in attack on military parade in Yemen's Aden

"Who see rebels in Yemen have attacked operated a military camp near the city of Agen killing at least seventeen people rebel sources say ballistic missile and drone we used in the assault Alan Johnston reports and I come from a witness at the parade grounds said there had been an explosion behind a viewing stands later soldiers was seen weeping over the body of what's believed to be in a come Monday the rebels say the parade as part of preparations by pro government forces for a fresh assaults on who the hell terror tree north of Aiden a suicide bombing at a police station in the city killed three offices it's not known who was behind the blast but both of Qaida militants and Islamic state group extremists have carried out to taxing Aiden in the

Yemen Agen Assault Alan Johnston Aiden
"three offices" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"three offices" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"This three offices across the Tampa Bay area so this should be do today when I talk about take your required minimum distribution or are in the like a rock star so if you have an array of for one K. four oh three B. you have a qualified accounts which we call is infected with taxes but every year once you pass seven and a half you have to start taking the required minimum distribution but let's take that requirement distribution just like a rock star I will give you two examples that might make you think because anyone everyone is has to take the or in the show even rock stars they get older so it may seem hard to believe but Steven Tyler many of you might remember of Aerosmith fame and rock legend and reality TV star Ozzy Osborne listen to this they celebrate the seventieth birthdays in twenty eighteen so Steven Tyler turned seventy on March twenty six twenty eighteen and also you reach that milestone on December third twenty eighteen so the question is do rock stars Chris have to take Irish well if they do like the rest of us they must take in the required minimum distribution to the answer is yes the rules say that our Indies must start for the year the IRA owner reaches age seventy and a half the first key or the first orangey can be delayed until April first of the following year in the calculate the arm the the IRA owner will use their age on their birthday in the year for which the arm the must be taken this is so important to make sure that you calculate your IRA's make sure you know where your IRA's are in one of those what accounts are qualified or areas in which accounts are not going to talk about that but it's real simple the R. M. D. rules they are tricky so if you're not working with the night adviser that does not understand your recording and distribution set to take it pick up the phone give us a call eight one three nine zero nine zero zero two two and the reason why you say that is it's important because even I work with the right adviser they could be a penalty of fifty percent for not taking the right amount plus is taxable so be really really cautious on who you're working with exactly if you have nyrick so let's go on to so even though Steve and Ozzy will both celebrate their seventieth birthdays in twenty eighteen they aren't these are gonna work differently because Stephen seventieth birthday is in March and he's going to reach seven and a half in twenty eighteen he must take it all room do you for this year now his deadline for taking it will be April first twenty nineteen and it's going to calculate his arm do using the age seventy because that is the age that he attains on his birthday in the year for which he must take his arm he christened that's where people get confused okay so for Ozzy this a little differently it's gonna work differently for him because his seventieth birthday is in the second half of the year so he's not going to reach age seven and a half until twenty nineteen so the first year for which he's going to need to take his arm the is next year in twenty nineteen and his deadline for is first recorded in distribution would be April first twenty twenty tricky very tricky very confusing yeah it is yeah because if you're working and you have an IRA outside your employers sponsored plan you gotta take the arm D. but you might want to delay it because maybe the year that you do have to take it you might not be working might be retired so could put you in a lower tax bracket right it is the other thing he's good at the calculus arm do using age seventy one because that it's the age that he's going to attain on his birthday in twenty nineteen and that's the first year you must take an are empty so which rock star are you so if you're celebrating his seventieth birthday in twenty eighteen just ask yourself which rock star are you are you like Steven Tyler or you likes Ozzy Osborne so if your party like a rockstar on your seventieth birthday in the for the listen carefully in the first half of twenty eighteen that's January through June you're like Stephen and will follow the same rules as him if you're like Ozzy and celebrating a big seventieth birthday bash in the second half of twenty eighteen July through December you gonna fall the same set of rules as Ozzie and and that's the simplest way Chris are what we just talked about to make it if if you're in January to June then you're gonna have to follow the same rules of Stephen if you're in the second half then you fall the other was a Chris this is a big question that we get all the time and the always confused as to when the heck do I have to take well that's the thing in to go back about the penalty and you do not want a penalty so you have to take out twenty thousand dollars your requirement distribution and you don't take it out well this fifty percent penalty so ten thousand dollars which you plus you take I have to pay the taxes on all that money so you're in a deep situation because you can calculate or your adviser to calculate it the right way so that's why it's important it with the right adviser at negative acts and financial group we do a lot of things here you know we're not transactional advisors were completed visors.

Tampa Bay fifty percent twenty thousand dollars ten thousand dollars one K
"three offices" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"three offices" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Really easy. Forget. Right. And it's been over a year now that a young man gave his life, so you and I can walk on the streets and they're a little bit safer than they were. And we understand that whatever got throws at us. We're going to be able to carry we push through, we've come together, clearly as Kewnyan as department. And we keep moving forward. And you know, this was an officer twenty three years old, but had four years. Department and I like the fact that we honor and remember that, that's the key part of this. The legacy of what was a very deadly year for Milwaukee police departments. The fact that three office officers were killed in the line of duty the first being Charles Chuckie Irvine junior. I think it's important that we remember that it's been a tough time for MP, and as you don't move on that was one of the key things that I took away from some comments that I heard on Wisconsin's morning news, you'll move on you move forward and honoring the men and women who do this job, honoring those people who pay the ultimate sacrifice in, in the sense that they gave up their life while performing their job. I think is important. And as I said, we'll hear from his mother, Charles Irvine's mother Christie Irvine Bachman later in the show and just heartfelt s- it will tug at your heart strings comments about what the last year has been like, only your second public comments. The other ones, of course being at the sentencing for the individual. Started that pursuits and eventually ended up at the loss of life of what walkie police departments finace. You're listening.

Charles Chuckie Irvine Christie Irvine Bachman Charles Irvine Milwaukee officer Wisconsin Kewnyan twenty three years four years
"three offices" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"three offices" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Three seven three three office Fort Lauderdale. There's a lot going on right now and broadcasters are on the ground covering all of it bringing you the weather the traffic and breaking news. Oh, well, entertaining. You twenty four hours a day. Someone needs to tell you what's going on around the world, and in our hometowns, and that someone is us. We are free radio. We are always there. We are broadcasters. Visit we are broadcasters dot com or text radio to five two eight eight six to learn more. Furnished by anybody and this station even though we're out of hurricane season. That's exactly why now is the best time to protect your home from hurricane winds and storms and now is the best time to call. The best of the best Florida. Home improvement associates, all it takes us one. Call two five six one three three zero fifty seven hundred and f HI will come out to wherever you are into a free consultation once FHA and slows high impact winners endorsing home. That's it. You'll never have to worry about potential hurricane damage ever again. So why wait do it now? Call five. Six one three three zero Fifty-seven hundred the cost. Don't worry about that either. Because FHA makes it extremely affordable with financing options discounts rebates, and you can also pay for these super windows over periods of five ten fifteen even twenty years of you wish who something called the pace program. So don't wait any longer. Call five six one three three zero fifty seven hundred and give you in your home, the gift of security and safety with high impact windows and doors from FHA five six one three three zero Fifty-seven hundred call now may as customer appreciation month at Staples right now, you can fifteen percent back in Staples rewards, when you purchase seventy five dollars of Angkor two hundred dollars toner in-store only offer ends five eighteen nineteen. Visit Staples dot com slash fifteen rewards for details. Staples, the south Florida morning show. Weekdays starting at five. Thirty news talk. Eight fifty W F T L. Markets are opening now voice to rebound. After the Dow dropped over six hundred points at the close yesterday. Traders were spooked by the US in China. Trading tariffs. The Trump administration now says it's putting together a list of new targets for tariffs about three hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports. The NTSB on its way to the scene of deadly collision in Alaska between two small planes to people are missing four were killed ABC's. Alec stone. The FAA tells us they were reportedly sixteen people on board the two planes in total eleven on one plane five on the other both were float planes this apparently happening in Coon cove, Alaska, which is east of catchy can catch. A candy is a popular cruise ship. Stop at a remote section of Alaska. Immediately. The coastguard.

FHA Staples Alaska Fort Lauderdale FAA NTSB Florida Coon cove US Alec stone south Florida ABC China three hundred billion dollars seventy five dollars two hundred dollars twenty four hours
"three offices" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"three offices" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Accident if you've been involved in an accident. Anna, Jon Levin. One eight hundred seven four seven free. That's one eight hundred seven four seven three seven three three office Fort Lauderdale. Got issues with youth or high school sports positive coaching alliance can help VCA national nonprofit offers more than a thousand free online resources for youth and high school sports coaches parents students and administrators visit UCLA Dev zone dot org. Joyce Kaufmann keeps you informed and educated. So that you can make smart decisions. She's back in sixty seconds. News talk. Eight fifty W F T L. Attention Florida homeowners are you putting off having a roof, redone, don't risk dry rot moulder water damage by going one more year with that old roof. Make the smart move and get an instant manufacturer rebate of up to two thousand dollars off Andy reroof project when you call roofs for America, we've been Florida's trusted local roofer for more than twenty years in having installed over a million roofs. No one has more experience on your roof than the team that roofs for America. Plus, we're a g a f mastery leak dealer and provide the industry strongest fifty year, golden pledge roofing Wardi, so don't wait and get slammed with material price increases or worse. Have to deal with mold or water damage right now is the time to lock in great prizes and get up to two thousand dollars in rebates. When you call. Oh roofs for America today. Just call eight eight eight eight five one nine to nine one that's eight eight eight eight five one nine two nine one four the lessons. Number CCC, one three to eighty one CVC five six.

Joyce Kaufmann America Florida Fort Lauderdale Jon Levin Anna Andy reroof CCC CVC two thousand dollars Eight fifty W sixty seconds twenty years fifty year
"three offices" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"three offices" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And right now at a glance were about two hundred fulltime employees across three offices, New York, Canada and London we're about seventy percent female or board is sixty percent female, our engineering teams fifty percent female. So it looks a little different than most companies and we just cross last year. Well, over one hundred million dollars in revenue right Eric cited about them. So when you say, you don't know, if you're a beauty or a tech company explain that for me because a lot of, you know, different companies, they say, they're tech company or their media company, or this do you have to choose or how do you look at that? So the way we look at it is that we're building this people powered ecosystem we have co-created since we launched four and a half years ago with our consumers the reason we're able to do that is because we know who they are. So we have a direct relationship with every single person who buy something from us on like, you know, all of the. Incumbent companies that have been built through retail channels. Right. We've never existed through till channels. We don't plans to exist, the retail channels, and the reason being we think that, you know, through using technology, we can do three things very differently than what all beauty companies have done in the past one. Is channel discovery in the third is listening scale. All right. So so displaying that was like sure so you so when I'm talking to direct direct relationships with consumers are people are fighting about right now. Amazon is trying to has completely overwhelmed. People by doing that by having the data on people having the relationship with everybody the way retailers didn't and brands are fighting back. You want to own that relationship in a similar way? Or how do you think about that? I mean, fundamentally we just think about how do you give people amazing experiences? So I think in that way, perhaps we're similar to Amazon and that they're extremely devoted to the customer. We're very devoted to the customer from the standpoint that we. Don't wanna put things that aren't amazing into the world. So since we launched we've always relied a lot on user, generated content and feedback. I would start it which is really how it started out of a blog that began in two thousand ten that was all around this premise that people are going to drive purchasing decisions in the future. Not algorithms not up selling cross selling if anything absolutely crossing people's opinions. Right, helping to evangelize people's voice such that people can decide what they want and at glossy, we've really taken us your feedback and ask them for things like what products to make where to go in terms of pop-ups or countries and fundamentally have been able to really change the relationship between brands and customers because you know, traditionally the way that I grew up with beauty products and brands was always sort of from brand speaking tops down to customer, saying, you're not good enough saying, you know, you don't know. What you want? Let us tell you what you want sort of take this lip gloss and use it. Yeah. Really really dicta to'real really digital. And kind of I think in a way like really not giving people enough credit to be able to say, hey, actually, like, you know, I use this Yoder in every day. So I am an expert at this DOD and seriously like we're all experts the things that we consume in the things that we use. And what we're trying to do is provide the tools be at the physical products that we created over the last four years or the digital conduit that we're creating now and in the future to help people use their voice to help people really use their voice and say, hey, how can I help someone else? You know, talk about what they've learned about beauty and their their products. And hopefully, inspire owes that relationship you're basically ship a marketing relationship on its head because usually companies market to customers you're using their feedback to do that. Yeah. I mean, we've we've just typically. Had a pretty simple premise, which is make incredible things that can really stand the test of time that has equaled so far building these very modern essential products that we hope he come icons in the same way. And I phone or a Air Jordan become essential products with boy brow is like an Air, Jordan..

Amazon Eric New York Canada London DOD one hundred million dollars seventy percent fifty percent sixty percent four years
"three offices" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"three offices" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington i'm windsor johnston the pentagon says a wide range of military failures contributed to the deadly ambush that claimed four american soldiers in the last year npr's tom bowman reports the investigation cites numerous problems from communication to training journal thome waldhauser told reporters at the pentagon that there were clearly problems with a green beret team that was caught in a vicious firefight on october fourth still he said all four who died fought to the end in their comrades tried to come to their rescue before they had to withdraw only the arrival of french fighter jets prevented a massacre now the general said they'll be more prudent planning for future antiterror emissions in green berets will have more firepower armored vehicles and drones watch overhead and caz avec helicopters to pick up their wounded general waldhauser said the report singles out three offices for being at fault in both the army and special operations command and will deal with any punishments tom bowman npr news washington police in chicago have seized more than one hundred highpowered assault style weapons this year npr's cheryl corley reports authorities say that's both good and bad news in the city's fight against illegal guns chicago police superintendent eddie johnson says on average officers have seized an illegal firearm for every hour of the year included in that mix more than one hundred highpowered assault style weapons johnson says that's a third more than the number reported the same time last year veges goes to show you how many legal guys get out on the streets of chicago the johnson says in the fight to get them off the streets police have increasingly gotten more help from residents as a result of that we're able to recover more weapons you know they tell us things chicago police will relaunch gun buyback program later in the summer offering one hundred dollars for each gun turned in cheryl corley npr news chicago the department of homeland security secretary is defeat.

washington pentagon npr tom bowman thome waldhauser army chicago eddie johnson windsor johnston assault cheryl corley superintendent department of homeland secretary one hundred dollars
Recall petitions against Nevada state senators ruled invalid – Las Vegas Review-Journal

Jay Talking

00:36 sec | 3 years ago

Recall petitions against Nevada state senators ruled invalid – Las Vegas Review-Journal

"Courtnall university immigration law professor stephen yell lor thinks the high court justices could side with the president the court may have tipped it's hand last fall when it allowed this third travel ban to go into effect while the case percolated up through the lower courts the court had wanted to stop it then it could have a federal judge in washington wants a total reboot of president obama's daca program that protects young illegal immigrants so called dreamers from deportation judge john bates ruling the trump administration's decision to end daca was predicated on its legal judgment that the program was unlawful but that that legal judgment was virtually unexplained he called it arbitrary and capricious so the trump decision was unlawful and must be set aside administration has ninety days to appeal a shooting outside a home depot in dallas texas left to police officers and historic security officers seriously wounded police chief rene hall three offices are out of surgery that is the two police officers from dallas and our loss prevention officer from home depot surgery we're asking for your continued prayers for them and their families suspect twenty nine year old armanda lewis juarez was arrested after a police chase late tuesday night made a rising number of complaints from parents and teachers the fda's moving to crack down on jewel labs makers of an electronic cigarette that's disguised to look like a computer thumb drive the kids are using it to vape in class and in the public mitch zeller heads up the fda center for tobacco products e cigarettes remained by far the most popular tobacco.

FDA Lewis Juarez Rene Hall Texas Stephen Professor Courtnall University Mitch Zeller LOR Officer Dallas John Bates Barack Obama Washington President Trump Twenty Nine Year
"three offices" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

Bytemarks Cafe

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"three offices" Discussed on Bytemarks Cafe

"A state agencies were able to come to us and say look this is the business problem that we have and this is a solution that we really need can you help us and that's really what we did was enable them through office three 65 to solve those business problems now when we were you're talking about the paperless a solution i think anybody's worked in an office has been called into a coalition party i can imagine with a legislature you everybody got twelve binders at the start of the session there's somebody with a cart has to move paper around there's probably a copier in every third office what are my questions for you tatas have you on on the bottom line realized the kind of benefits you talk about it certainly saving paper and saving forest as important but for taxpayers or they say are we've by all this expensive technology signing up for officer sixty five and going you sign is that just chip trading one bill for another argue seeing financial benefits so yes the answer is yes the governor also tasked me with china come up with more effective ways of running government and one of the biggest things that we started to ask within state government was you know what is the return on investment what is the roy the roy for all of these projects and that's where a lot of times questions aren't asked or weren't being ask is why are we doing this project what is the return on investment and we've set up an entire governance process that now determines whether or not an it project moves forward piece on the return on investment so there certain projects that we won't move on because there's not a positive return on investment.

officer china roy return on investment