35 Burst results for "Three Hundred Year"

Bonsai Trees: A Privilege To Cultivate

Plant Of The Week

05:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Bonsai Trees: A Privilege To Cultivate

"Your plants of the week. Well it is plants than this time and and it's on purpose I am privileged to have. Because i've kind of created them bone. Cy i bone side now. I'm gonna pretty loosely defined as a as it. Is i think a japanese turn. Perhaps if you go back far enough so chinese term but it boils down to a plant in a tree now. That's very very loose but in boils down to in the case of my plants i have various bone side dishes and well official ones as well as some makers on my part various old antique things The the shallow is just inch and a quarter. Most of them are about an inch and a half deep and then a couple of them. I kinda cheated a little bit us. Some old vessels if you will that are probably three and a half inches deep now that boils down to a mighty flat root system. Most root systems are flatter than we think in the first place even out in the forest and front yard and so on in this case. We're talking about several of my plants which have obtained a significant age for me. Now they're they're Growing in a tray the tray is not flat. Although i've seen that actually done where you very carefully drip water on to the root mass so it it just looks like it's just sitting in a pile of the soil but in any event it's a lot of fun. I have several different kinds of plants. I have Presently a juniper seedling and a text the seedling that i so to speak found this fall in one of my quick cleanup situations i left them going to dig them in the spring. I'm going to be very careful in doing so. They will probably have a root deeper than. I'm going to be able to have by dishes. But at the same time they're going to go into containers bonsai trees if you will and they will start their life on toward Hopefully three hundred years. And the reason i say three hundred is i had the good fortune of being the national arboretum. A number of years ago when it collection of i think few as sixteen is is memories of fading. But anyhow i think it was just sixteen major bone size now. They were in dishes little deeper three and four inches and maybe three foot wide cetera. These plants ranged up to as i recall three hundred and sixty four years of age now. How does that happen well that he picks his first son to take care of the daddy. Does this through the generations and they get that old and then they end up in an arboretum under very careful care and this this probably thirty years ago that i saw them So that when. I tell you that that few plants came here by ship on the high seas in trays protected boxes. If you will that collection of sixteen plants. If i remember right i was told they were insured for six million dollars because they are absolutely irreplaceable. All you can do with the insurance money as be able to start over again or by some some mid age when at only one hundred and fifty years so mark this is a. It's a fun thing to do. You can as i do. I try to create accent precipitate. Now there are forms factual forums and the the bone side collectors and growers Work with these forms wire they do all kinds of things to create the shape. They want usually. It's in one of the bonified classes. All of mine are simply trimmed for character. And i have the greatest fun of that. How well more than half our outdoor plants they are presently so to speak buried or under a pile of leaves in the end of the compost bin getting cold staying cold getting their their normal winter rest and then the the well tropicals are in here. Sitting right near where i'm speaking from they. They are in growth very minimal growth at this point and they The the beauty of these plants is. You do have to be a little careful. But i don't water them more than once a week. Some few that are a little bit larger trae per their size. I water even once a one and a half weeks. You wanna keep them growing for sure that you don't really want to push them certainly not this time of year. This is not gross. Time for normal plant. So i'm keeping them alive. I'm happy with them. They seem to be happy with me. i like to think they add a little clean hair to my my house but i'm not sure you just don't need quite get as involved as i have become. I got bitten by this bug. Probably thirty five years ago Have lost a few along the way but I have a. I think there are twenty total plants and and i do it for

National Arboretum
Who Was Thomas Becket?

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:14 min | 2 months ago

Who Was Thomas Becket?

"Thomas becket yes okay. Born around eleven twenty and died in eleven seventy. he's also known as saint thomas of canterbury or Sometimes who refer to him as thomas a becket. Okay yeah anyway. So thomas becket. He is venerated as a saint and martyr by both the catholic church and the anglican church He engaged in conflict with henry. The second king of england over the rights and privileges of the church and at one point excommunicated the archbishop of york so tough rain away to france for a bit under the protection of king. Louis the seventh of france but then he returned in eleven seventy two england so henry second in england said something to the effect of like ugh. This guy is driving me. Four of his knights interpreted this as a command to go. Get rid of thomas becket So on december twenty ninth seventy reginald fitz ertz huge morville william to tracy and richard le breton showed up at canterbury cathedral. According to accounts left by the monk jer vase of canterbury and i witnessed named edward grim. The knights placed their weapons under a tree outside the cathedral and hid their chainmail armor on your cloaks before entering the cathedral to challenge becket priest the night. He's hold beckett. They were taking him to winchester england to give count of all of his actions and kind of like hold him accountable in front of people but becket refused so the four nights retrieved their weapons and rushed back inside the cathedral. Oh my god. I beckett proceeded to the main hall for evening prayers and the other monks tried to like themselves into different parts of the joe for get said to them. It is not right to make a fortress out of the house of prayer in order them to reopen the doors so the four nights wielding they're drawn swords ran into the room saying like thomas becket. He's a traitor. To the king the knights found beckett in his spot near the door of the monastic cloister the stairs into the crypt and the stairs leading up to the choir of the cathedral where the monks were all. They're like still saying their prayers. Like oh no right. There's just four guys having running in with okay upon seeing them becca. I am no traitor. And i'm ready to die so Edward grandma eyewitness. He wrote a very extensive account of exactly what happened. I will save you all the details. Let's just say that for nights wielding swords kill the priest in canterbury cathedral. That's terrible so soon. After his death the faithful throughout europe european venerating beckett as a murder in february eleven seventy three which was just a little more than two years after his death. He was canonized by pope. Alexander the third and so sure typically like canonization of saints takes lake decades. Yeah stuff happened so the fact that this happened so quickly was kind of saying that. This guy was a big deal. So related trivia. Facts about thomas becket. Geoffrey chaucer's the canterbury tales. Ninety two is set in a company of pilgrims on their way from southern to the shrine of saint. Thomas becket in canterbury cathedral. Okay never made that connection no me neither ever okay So the schreiner was built between eleven eighty and twelve twenty and up to one hundred thousand. Pilgrims would have visited the shrine every year for more than three hundred years. That's my gosh locked. Yes it was adorned in marble gold and jewels and murdered saints. Tombs was one of unparalleled splendor in fifteen thirty eight. during the reformation. The shrine was destroyed following the orders of henry. The eighth who definitely be talking about in a little bit more twenty. Twenty researchers digitally reconstructed the raised sanctuary and available to view on the beckett story online and we'll share linked to that because it's really interesting how they did that. They took This thing had been such a big deal for more than three hundred years. And then it was raised more than four hundred and fifty plus years ago at this point and so they took accounts that the pilgrims had made that other monks had made in in digitally recreated which is pretty up and also modern works based on the story of thomas becket include. Tes elliott's nineteen thirty. Five play murder in the cathedral later adapted the opera assassination cutter. Dry ill the brando pizza'd in nine hundred fifty eight. You did that. Can i tell you flawlessly Also nineteen fifty-nine play by John we called beckett which was made into a movie with the same title and paul. Webb's play four nights in nair's borough which was written in one thousand nine hundred nine which recounts the aftermath of the murder of thomas becket by the four nights who made the worst career choice in history. Yeah that's goes without saying well if you don't if all of these facts don't stick in your head. Look at the name k. e. t. the cane. His name is right in the middle. And if you look at it. It looks like four blades. Good the name so four blades. Stuck together by the four to killed him in canterbury. That's thomas becket.

Thomas Becket Canterbury Cathedral England Beckett Becket Reginald Fitz Ertz Morville William Richard Le Breton Edward Grim Henry France Saint Thomas Edward Grandma Anglican Church Canterbury Catholic Church Tracy Knights Thomas Louis
Is Email Marketing Right For Me?

The Email Marketing Show

05:35 min | 3 months ago

Is Email Marketing Right For Me?

"Now you might be listening to this and thinking. Should i even be doing this. E mail marketing thing. Like will this work for me. Will this work for for my business. Or i don't have a less than for. I can't do email marketing wilco. That in a minute and like you know you might just think. I'm ashley i'll be doing this. Will this work for me. Is it worth the effort. Is it worth the time. Is it worth gain to see. It can be quite intimidate enough supposed like if that point twentieth thinking right of maybe we listened to the show for a while or been reading up a while this first episode but it can be intimidating to thank everybody else. I mean we've done this with other things like everybody else's ahead of the game or i see everybody else doing it but whatever it worked for me. My businesses different good thing is all of our businesses are different. That's great and we will have to do things. And it's not way but the big thing we've got to remember is every body us you. The people who've got gillian subscribers. Every single one of us had a very special day when we got subscriber number one of course at the end of the day you end up sitting there going. I get subscriber number two or will it. Just be me mom listening to me emails. So the good news is everybody does start off with suitable. And that's a really humbling thing. Think about that. Every body the bigger is the people. You really respect even us. We got subscriber number one. One day that happened to that person there was a day when they cracked open a brand new active campaign accounts something convert it whatever and they got their first subscriber and the good news is the sooner you do it. The sooner you can get your second one. But you can't get your second one in the sounds bad but you can't get your second subscriber until your first one so quickstart. Let's get on with it. Let's do it New point is the heavens going to open in the list. Ferry is going to come down and give you a list of people so you don't expect and don't want to just like start your business and go right. I'm going to go hundred subscribers day. One and then i'm gonna crack on from that because it's not gonna happen. You're going to get one and then you're going to get a second kennedy said and the good news is as we said before thought person. The first subscriber doesn't know that subscriber number one. They don't know that you don't have a list of a billion people because you don't tell them and of course it's not like instagram. Or if you've only got three follow us. They know they don't know you. You'll only subscriber. That's a really good place to start right. This is a really really powerful position for you to be. What's really interesting is one of the big things. I remember in mark one. When i was first learning to read response email marketing one of the things that they used to hop on about all the time in all those big causes by john kennedy and all the other big people they used to talk about. You've got to write an email as if you're sending it to one person so when the person receives it they're reading it as if it's a one on one intimate conversation you don't want to start him off with hi guys. Everyone's doing this. But what do you mean. I am not guys. I am not guys that that's wrong. So actually you're gonna remember we. These emails must feel like a one communication. No you're not going to fake it. You don't going to pretend they all want a one. Communications obviously going to be legit and above board with it all. But they've got to feel like the communication sue. The best way to do that. Get you. I Let's get that off the table to begin with so nobody knows about the first subscriber you can you can crack on the thing is every single type of business no matter. What kind of business. You've got your customers your followers your audience your ideal perfect customer. Who's going to stick with you forever or or spend the most with you or you're going to enjoy working with the most. They've all got email addresses because you can't have an instagram account or a facebook account or anything out without have an email address. He can't so everyone's got an email address. That's good news your customer whether you're dealing with people who are older people who are middle age or people who are like if you're dealing with kids most kids these days full school stuff need to need to have an email address so one of the thirteen thirty or three hundred years old. They have an email address. Everyone has an email address. in fact. yeah. I think this is really interesting. You know if you look different businesses so maybe teach scuba diving. Maybe you teach Health and fitness. Whatever it is if you look different niches you'll often find people say well my audience really hang out on this platform a mile audience. Really hang on this phone for example. If you're selling wedding dresses than one of the best places that you could be is going to be pinterest. Probably pinterest instagram. The wet selling light wedding dresses and bridal stuff and if you saw interior design same saw a deal but if you're selling something that's more corporate you probably want to going to be on linked probably gonna be a maybe facebook as well and so people always talk about. Where is my audience. I'll tell you where all those people are. Email one hundred percent of them like it's not like a pig tiktok or instagram. Like the oled that so. If you want to know what your audience's email good thank you. Let's face those social media platforms. Send emails all the time. The first thing that happens when you first lineup lasagna cooed. by email to verify. That's your email address. They do that because i have them. Having their email address is really important because every time somebody talks you in a photograph sends you a message. People send you a facebook message and facebook email to tell you got a facebook

Gillian Ashley John Kennedy Instagram Kennedy Facebook
How Tall Is Mount Everest REALLY?

Short Wave

09:51 min | 3 months ago

How Tall Is Mount Everest REALLY?

"Okay lauren fire. Today we are talking about mount everest. Which is the highest mountain on earth when you measure from sea level and today we're focusing on how that measurement is made weird we start. How about some old timey newsreel resort evidenced bothering his survey of eighteen hundred and forty one estimated his height pinton nine thousand feet back in the nineteenth century. When george everest brit was the surveyor general of india the used trigonometry to measure the height of the mountain like what we learned in middle school points angles and triangles totally. Yeah and incidentally the mountain got its english name from sir george everest but it was actually an indian mathematician. Radin seek dr. Who did most of the work and actually figured out that. This mountain is the highest point on earth. That sounds right for colonialism. Totally yeah okay. So how accurate was this trigonometry. Approach will i put that question to be nagaraj on. He's a geoscientist. One of george everest's successors at the survey of india office which still exists about is now staffed by indians. In fact i was sitting in the same chair. Our team location. Where you're sitting. Because i didn't want to change the room. So he says the trigonometry that his predecessors use throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was surprisingly accurate. I mean the standard height. Everyone now uses for everest that twenty nine thousand twenty nine feet. It dates back to nineteen fifty five. Wow that's pretty impressive. Okay so how did they actually calculate that measurement for mountain like. Walk me through it. It was not easy. They measured it from eight different points throughout langdon distance and everything and computer and took the mean. It was a very difficult matter very heavy machines. Heavy machines called theod delights instruments used to measure angles between visit points on the horizon and vertical planes like a cross between a telescope and compass. You might have seen municipal surveyors using them sort of on a tripod. Oh ya know. I've seen those folks reflective vests and their little tripods them. Yes yeah okay. So but for measuring mountains. They are these big heavy versions. I don't know how many hundreds of kilograms they carried forward to make this measurement it has slowed colored most of the time we didn't know work so the foot that was put on. Who's very difficult nowadays. Nothing much what the chinese are doing. Our a nepalese are doing their hypic instrumentation with the chinese and the nepalese are doing now involves satellites so instead of measuring everest from afar on the horizon with these theod delight contraptions these send a team up to the top of the mountain with a hand held. Gps receiver hey. That sounds like a little easier to me. Maybe but maybe not. Here is d nash mandar. He's gps expert from nepal. Who teaches now at the university of tokyo. It's a very harsh environment. There that very windy and you have all these battery or power problems and like the people who climbed everest. They come steadier probably more than half an hour. I think that's limit for them because they already exhausted. So they've got thirty minutes to connect to multiple satellites because they are solar flares and interference. at altitude. You can't rely on just one reading and they have to measure the thickness of ice and snow underfoot because you wanna reading from the actual rocky mountain right and not the ice and so for that you need a ground penetrating radar so another piece of equipment to haul up the mountain. Yes oh fumbling. With all of that on top of everest. You've got wind. you've got your oxygen depleting. The clock is ticking and that is still the easy. Part monitor. Says because all of that data from the top of everest. It's only half the story. Yeah so you need to know from his point. And that's the biggest problem then need a reference somewhere but we don't have a seat difference in nepal because nepalis a landlocked country. It's land everywhere. The nearest sea level is in india. Sitting knew how high this mountain is you. I need to know how low sea levels and you need a reference point sea level which it turns out varies depending on where you are. Yeah i mean sea levels tricky right. It's not necessarily constant and climate change is really messing with sea level these days. Yeah and has monitor says there isn't even a cenex to so here's how they do it. They measure sea level in india at the bay of bengal at china's yellow sea at many other points hundreds of them to calculate the mean sea level. And then they figure out where sea level would be. if there were a ac- right next to everest o- okay and then you measure from there up to the peak. Oh no no. No you have to account for the shape of the earth bishop of the art okay. It's a live swyto very much. Swyto right the earth is elipsoid. Soil like a oval-shaped watermelon because of the earth rotation makes it kind of bulge slightly at the equator. Plus you have to account for how gravity effect sea level in different places around the world and mountains themselves affect gravity so the earth at sea level this invisible line along the earth's surface. It's actually like kind of lumpy. So you're telling me that we are standing on a lumpy elipsoid. That's exactly what i'm telling you. So sea level is actually not level at all and the next step. You got map. Those lumps essentially variations in the earth's gravitational force. And then you get the gop lead a. I'm sorry a joy d- yeah so the geo is the shape of the earth at sea level taking into account gravity and the planet's rotation. And now you follow that joy to appoint directly under everest. And that's what you use as a reference point for the mountains height okay so after all that sea levels gravity you finally get a reference point you take that you compare it to your. Gps measurement from the top of the mountain and you get everest height. Well not so fast. Because there's also these pesky plate tectonics oh my lord. This is harder than actually climbing everest. I'll say i'll say right now. Yeah yeah so. The mountains peak is variable to like and i'm not just talking ice and snow like the rock is actually moving. Sri daddy jaw is an engineer and expert on himalayan plate. Tectonics i have been field kinney. My philosophist been between behaviors and then ever asked is on the edge of two plates. The eurasian plate and the indian plate and j has measured how the indian plate is slipping underneath the eurasian plate and how that is pushing everest skyward measurements for last you. One point four million yearning threes in high. Like a few hundred years. We can only do bring Comes johnny has concluded that everest is gaining roughly a centimeter every ten years. So that's about a foot every three hundred years other scientists say that's far too conservative that the growth could be three times even four times that much but i mean however fast everest is rising. Things can happen very quickly to change that like earthquakes hung or at least they have in the past. So professor john day studied a nineteen thirty four quake that calculated took about sixty centimeters off the mountains height. So that's at least six hundred years of growth a raced in an instant and there's been another quake since in two thousand fifteen and we're not sure how that affected the height because there haven't been any definitive measurements since then so i'm guessing you're about to tell me it's time to remeasure mount everest. It is indeed so last year nepal sent up a team of scientists to do just that and this year with the climbing. Season cancelled for kelvin. China did the same and both countries have been analyzing their findings and their due to release the measurements pretty much any day. Now this is very exciting yes especially because most of the surveys of everest has been done by foreigners british colonial rulers. There was an american survey was an italian one and professor monitor. The gps expert from nepal says yes. He's motivated by science and the search for truth and all of this but you know also in part by the previous. Why don't we measure our own mountain and so nepal dead and we are waiting for those findings now. It may turn out to be taller shorter. Whatever the point though is that it's changing and that's what scientists say matters to them. Here's garage on the former survey of india guy again. I feel the joint will here. Shedding the knowledge will use the society beget understanding. What is there a big deal if you come and see okay. I'm announcing mall. Dividends did this much healthy that who cares you know because she missed the learning that teaching how people understand how do people perceive almost put in what model you used. Then be be happy if he's happy about what this tells us about. The earth overall the technology. They're fine tuning on. Everest has all these practical applications from agriculture to defense and scientists say if their research gets more eyeballs because it involves the tallest mountain in the world. Hey that's a great

George Everest George Everest Brit Nagaraj India Nash Mandar Nepal Mount Everest Langdon University Of Tokyo Lauren Yellow Sea Himalayan Plate Bengal Professor John Day
UK cuts overseas aid amid worst recession in over 300 years

The Briefing

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

UK cuts overseas aid amid worst recession in over 300 years

"Warned the economic emergency caused by corona viruses. Only just begun as he set out his spending review in the commons. It comes as official forecasts showed. The uk economy is expected to shrink by eleven point three percent this year that puts the nation in the worst recession for more than three hundred years. We've got six graphs showing the bumper levels of borrowing plant and drastic plunge in gdp. The most controversial part of mr kinnock statement was his decision to cut the government's overseas aid budget foreign office. Minister baroness has resigned. In protest at the cut branding it. Fundamentally wrong and gallant has details of the backlash

Mr Kinnock UK Minister Baroness
The earliest human footprints in Arabia

Science Magazine Podcast

07:54 min | 5 months ago

The earliest human footprints in Arabia

"Now, we have contributing correspondent and gibbons. She wrote this week about the likely earliest human footprints on the Arabian Peninsula high an hi Sarah how old or how early are these footprints but that's a good question. They threw a whole package of dating methods at them and came up with in the Ballpark of twenty, one, thousand, two, hundred, and ten, thousand years old. Now the dates are not absolute. There's some questions about them, but that's a pretty good ballpark. How does this age compare to previous hints or clues that humans modern humans early modern humans were on the Arabian Peninsula. Here's the. We know that early hominids members of human family have been migrating out of Africa for two million years because we find fossils of our ancestors in the public of Georgia we find them in. Asia. We find them in Eurasia place, but we don't know how they got out and the most logical route is they had to walk through Rabia because they couldn't fly. They couldn't paddleboats a at that point the one landmass in the way between Africa where humans arose originally, our ancestors arose and Eurasia is through Arabia. So we know they had to go through there, but there's a huge gap there are. No tools older than three hundred to five, hundred, thousand years, and what is there is not definitive. The only fossil have a member of the human family from Arabia is a finger bone that is about eighty eight, thousand years old. So the mystery is, where's the evidence of members of the human family marching through Arabia, and then the second part of that is modern humans specifically, our ancestors Homo sapiens arose probably in Africa, because we see fossils in the ballpark of one, hundred, eight, thousand, three, hundred, thousand years of Proto early Homo, sapiens arising and Africa, and then we find more of these sort. Of Early Homo Sapiens in Greece dating possibly back to as early as two hundred and ten thousand. So we know that they got out right now we're just trying to find evidence. Is there something that going on in the Arabian Peninsula that either people didn't want to hang out there for very long or that erased a lot of evidence. Reagan. Peninsula, has covered with desert's it's very dry today the food desert where they found these fossils is parched arid but there were periods in the past where the planet was cooler and wetter, and during those times hundred, twenty, five, thousand years ago it was. One of them, it was green radio was covered with tens of thousands of lakes. They were grasslands between them. If you think about these early human ancestors, it's not a separate continent or a separate place for them to go to its Afro Arabia, right? Yeah. So it's an extension of Africa if the client is good and they're following large game, how were they able to find these footprints? This is a very large area and it's a few remnants of human passing through. Yes. So this team will have by Michael, Leah and it's an international team of Saudi Arabians in a number of people on. Has Been doing a search of scouring the deserts of. Arabia. For the last decade, they start with satellite imagery which helps them see parched ancient lake beds which have sort of characteristic white halio souls often these ancient sediments that stand out in the satellites and then go down to ground truth what they see on the satellites, an airplane shots they go in on foot in jeeps, and in this case they saw this ancient. Lake better rolling out as white sediment. It had just been recently exposed by Rosen and they found the footprints of the animals which was amazing and as I looked closer to one hundreds of footprints, it was four hundred mostly animals but they did identify a small number. It was seven that seemed to be human footprints. So they knew right away they were very excited about that that this was something that was important how Can you tell that they're human footprints and not some other upright walking relative? There's not a whole science of studying human footprints ever since the first ones are found in la totally in Tanzania and Kenya there've been a number of footprints that have been studied people use three D morphometric dimensional analysis with computational imaging or can really look at the depth and they could model how much weight would have been needed to make. That footprint, the length of the foot, the stride between the steps, and then they've done studies living people in their footprints in Africa to sort of test out those ideas and Lo, and behold when they do that to these footprints, they seem to come up with somebody kind of humor that was taller and maybe a little lighter weight more like a modern human of Homo sapiens and say an Andrew Tall so based on that. They say, Oh, these probably were made by Homo sapiens although we cannot rule out that nanotubes might have been there to is there anything else can tell about these people by looking at these marks I think if they get more, they can start to tell about their social structure footprint studies in Africa. I've got quite complicated where you could see the direction that they're going in the payson different members of social groups you can. To see what they are the packs of humans look like you know, what size are they how many are in these groups? What are they doing a lot of the way in this case, they're not spending a lotta time. They're just sort of walking through. This is a bantering group. What is really really cool. Though is that footprint site these are a snapshot of a single moment in time a single day most of the. Time when you have an archaeological site in a layer soil that you get the fossils of the tools and the dates, all that took place. This fan is usually hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands of years. So if you find an animal bone near a prominent human early Human Boehner tool, you don't necessarily know fear there at the same time as parch with footprints like these these were lay down in the same day maybe. A couple of days and they dried out and then got caught up in preserved. So we know they were all there at the same time. So you get this really cool day in the life look at the and of the animals they were with, which is really cool in this case and lots of animals. Yes. Almost four hundred footprints of animals including very interesting. A wild asses which I don't think we're carrying burdens but. That's kind of neat and they were elephants and the thing that's interesting about the elephants as their popular disappeared for the Middle East, just in Africa. Thanks for three hundred years ago and here they are in hundred twenty, thousand in Arabia and the camps they also Campbell's it's kind of interesting that such large animals with Aaron. It begs the question were these humans following them where they attracted them. Going back to the, we talked about it being about one, hundred, twenty, thousand years old. There's some question about the date but if that were cracked, is there anything particularly Gordon about this time human history about what we know about migrations that we could link these prince two? Yes. So what is really interesting is that genetic evidence says that everybody outside of Africa. Came from migrations that happened in the last fifty to eighty thousand years. So this state predates that we happen to know that early Homo Sapiens were in the Middle East pretty quickly after this or at the same time they're fossils in caves. At school and cough so that our early sort of product Homo sapiens. So we know humans are at sorta suggests that because we don't have DNA that dates back this early these were failed migrations. These were members of the human family that went out they weren't shelled migrations for them they lived, but they did not contribute to the gene pool of letting people today that's one hypothesis but it also shows that there's more complex story of groups of humans migrating out of Africa constantly whenever the weather excitement is right that it's three to nothing that they can get water follow animals to meet and trek. Africa. They can cross the desert. It looks like humans were doing that whenever they could and so how do they contribute tour ancestry today a really interesting question and how many different kinds of hominids out there. Thank you so much an thank you. Sir,

Africa Arabian Peninsula Arabia Middle East Afro Arabia Gibbons Asia Cough Rabia Sarah Eurasia Saudi Arabians Reagan Georgia Tanzania
How Have Hispanic Americans Helped Shape the U.S.?

BrainStuff

04:57 min | 5 months ago

How Have Hispanic Americans Helped Shape the U.S.?

"Brain Steph Lauryn Boban here. Here in the United States, it's Hispanic heritage month, which officially began as Hispanic Heritage Week in nineteen, sixty eight. Unlike many other campaigns that observe and honor the contributions of a particular group of Americans Hispanic heritage bump run throughout. September. But rather starts on September fifteenth and continues through mid. October. So, why does it start in the middle of the month? Well, a Costa Rica El Salvador Guatemala Honduras. Nicaragua. All celebrate their Independence Day on September fifteenth. Mexico's is on September Sixteenth Chili's is September eighteenth and believes independence. Day Is September twenty first. By, stretching into October, the holiday also includes de la Raza on October twelve, which is a kind of rejection of Columbus Day because of Christopher, Columbus's many crimes against humanity and see our episode on Columbus Day for more about that. De la Rosa instead celebrates the melding of Hispanic races or Raza, and cultures. In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, let's talk about three times at Hispanic Americans have changed the course of history. Some three hundred years after Spanish, conquerors became the first non native Americans to view the Mississippi River and later the Grand Canyon one host. Jeff Marianne Hernandez helps smooth transfer of the territory of Florida into US rule Florida was still part of Spain when Hernandez was born in Saint Augustine in seventeen eighty four. But that changed when he was selected to serve in the House of Representatives and was sworn into duty in eighteen, twenty three as the first Hispanic person to serve in. Congress. In historical context Hernandez being a slave owner is a controversial figure. Still. He remains the first one, hundred twenty eight Hispanic people to serve in the. US Congress. Maybe of more relevance today is the first Hispanic senator elected to a full term in Congress. New Mexico's Dennis Shabas in nineteen thirty five. We spoke with Paul Orbits Historian at the University of Florida. He said in addition to being the first American born Hispanic senator. He's critical for the time we live in because he fought on behalf of all working class. Equally, he fought for higher wages legislation he fought for people to have the right to organize a union he fought for more progress and you as foreign policy for Latin America he organized N. Double ACP leaders against Jim Crow Segregation. Then, a Chevette as one of those people we can use Hispanic heritage month to talk about our connection other people's democratic struggles. Today's Congress. The one hundred sixteenth has forty seven members of Hispanic heritage. Hispanic Americans also helped turn the tide of the civil war. Some twenty thousand were involved in the conflict. While some in the southeast sided with the confederacy especially those who came from wealthy families with plantations or other businesses in Louisiana Alabama more supported the union. or it said a lot of Mexican American soldiers fought on the side of the Union army in the southwest and actually helped defeat the confederacy in the southwest. Hispanic people in the West back the Mexican government to and celebrated the country's defeat of the French at the battle of Puebla on May fifth of sixty two single Demayo in a victory that may have helped prevent the French from siding with the confederacy and thus ultimately helping the Union win. A bit more modern only about eight years before the US Supreme Court ruled in Brown versus the Board of Education, that segregation in public schools is unconstitutional as Spanish schoolgirl showed the way. Sylvia Mendez a Puerto Rican and Mexican heritage was just eight years old when she and her brothers were denied enrollment into the white only Westminster School district in Orange County in nineteen, forty three. At the time about eighty percent of California, school districts were segregated. Her Parents Gonzalo. Felicitas Mendez enlisted other parents to fight the decision and they took the school board to court. After appeals that were abandoned short of the US Supreme Court Mendez Versus Westminster became the first successful federal school desegregation case in the nation that was in nineteen, forty seven. The case was important arguing that segregation itself even if schools were separate but equal was harmful unconstitutional under the fourteenth amendment specifically, the clause, the calls for protection of the laws for all citizens. In appeals Sylvia's case was argued by Thurgood Marshall who went on to argue for the

Hispanic Heritage Month Jeff Marianne Hernandez Congress Senator Us Supreme Court Mendez Us Supreme Court Felicitas Mendez United States Steph Lauryn Boban Costa Rica El Salvador Guatema Nicaragua Mexico Columbus Raza De La Rosa Dennis Shabas Union Florida
Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:57 min | 6 months ago

Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

"From Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny. Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Very. Excited to present our. September. This month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up and fought against injustice and for a better world today, we're talking about a woman who doesn't often receive the recognition she deserves for her behind the scenes activism. As a prolific activist, she had a hand in society changing work major civil rights leaders turned to her for her organizational skills. Let's talk about Ella Josephine Baker. Sisters in the struggle for human dignity and freedom. I am here to represent. The struggle that has gone on for three hundred years. Ella Baker was born on December thirteenth nineteen o three in Norfolk Virginia. She grew up in North Carolina on the very same land where her grandparents were enslaved a few decades earlier. Ella's mother was part of the Local Missionary Association. She helped feed their hungry neighbors and encouraged women to be a force for positive change this activism and kindness stuck with Allah. Ellis studied at Shaw University in Raleigh North Carolina and graduated as Class Valedictorian nineteen twenty seven shortly after she moved to New York City in Nineteen thirty ELA joined several women's organizations and served as national director of the Young Negroes Cooperative League that organization focused on supporting the economic development of the black community in nineteen forty Ella started working as a field secretary for the N. Double A. C., p. she moved up to work as director of branches after just three years. She later also served as the president of the New York. City branch. Then in Nineteen fifty-six, Ella Co created the organization in French. Which bought the oppressive Jim Crow laws in the south. The following year a move to Atlanta to help with Martin Luther King Junior's Organization the southern Christian Leadership Conference. At that time, the SC L. C. was a brand new venture. It was created after successes like the Montgomery bus boycott black leaders including Martin Luther. King Junior created the organization to assemble more boycotts and. Throughout the south. But for the venture to be successful, it would take a masterful organizer while Martin Luther King Junior took the reins as the SEC's public figurehead Ella worked behind the scenes setting the organization's agenda and framing the issues. She organized the crusade for citizenship a campaign to support voting rights. For African Americans, she also helped Rodney Atlanta s ELC headquarters and even served as a temporary director for several months after the resignation of the previous office holder, Ellis desire to focus on the issues and to have influence over the. Direction often clashed with the group's main. Right, as ellos considering resigning in nineteen sixty radical act of civil disobedience inspired her to take a new direction on February first black college students in Greensboro. North Carolina where I'm from refused to leave a lunch counter. Worth's where they'd been denied service for Joseph McNeil Franklin McCain and their to college dorm mates that time was February first one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty. The day they walked into a Greensboro. Woolworth's and sat down at the segregated lunch counter. Ella wrote a letter that encourage students across the south to join forces and take similar acts of protest. She also organized a meeting at Shaw University for the students who spearheaded the citizens from those meetings, the student nonviolent coordinating committee or Snick was created. snick would have a profound impact on the civil rights movement. Ella encourage snack to focus on practicing group centered activism rather than leader centered activism in contrast to the SE L. C.'s leadership style with Mlk at the forefront. Under, this method, of Leadership Snick ran many successful initiatives including the nineteen sixty one freedom rides and the nineteen sixty, four freedom summer and Mississippi L. continued her activism through the sixties. She was also a consultant for the Southern Conference Education Fund and organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic. Party she later returned to New York City and continued her work until she passed away on. December thirteenth nineteen eighty six. She was eighty three years old. Ella Baker was an incredible driving force behind much of the public civil rights work. We learn about in school while she never sought the spotlight she was committed to improving life for future generations

Ella Ella Josephine Baker Ella Co Consultant North Carolina New York City Greensboro Martin Luther King Shaw University Ellis Martin Luther Kaplan L. C. Southern Christian Leadership Raleigh North Carolina Woolworth Joseph Mcneil Franklin Mccain Atlanta Montgomery
Misplaced Science

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:35 min | 7 months ago

Misplaced Science

"Night Welcome to kids Miss Mystery Cyber your host kit chrome today. I'm going to talk about how some Mistakes made it into text books and I'm going to start with the woolly mammoth arose about five point one million years ago in Africa according to the curator of the American Museum of Natural History in New York from Africa the mammoth migrated through Eurasia North America their evolution continued over millions of years eventually producing what we know now as the wooly mammoth beginning roughly two, hundred, fifty, thousand years ago. mammoths were extinct about ten thousand years ago. OOPS more like three, thousand, five, hundred years ago scientists now believe an isolated population of mammoth persisted on Wrangel Island off the northeastern coast of Siberia. And deep in Canada's Northwest Territories, World Heritage site in hunt, valley until about three thousand, seven, hundred years ago. Unfortunately, the ten thousand year mark of extinction is in most textbooks. But let's take a closer look at that date the prominent theory that made it into most textbooks. Encyclopedia's remember those was ten thousand years ago because it was believed for decades at the mammoth migrated from the African continent through. Eurasian North America, driven by the last ice age, they were following the food supply. If that's the case, then it makes sense that some moms ended up into Hani because it was never touched by. The last ice age and yes bone. So the mammoth have been found in that region but this isn't the first theory published in Texbook. As fact that there's some founded expend believed and yes, made it into text books that the continent of Antarctica has been covered by ice for millions of years again hoops the Perry reese map drawn in fifteen thirteen shows the northern coast of Arctic as ice-free. The most puzzling aspect of the map isn't how it managed to be. So accurate three hundred years before Antarctica was discovered but that the map shows the real Coche line under the ice geological evidence. has confirmed that the latest date and Artika could have been charted in an ice free ages. Four thousand BC officials sciences been saying all along the ice cap, which covers yet arctic is millions of years old the Perry reese at Arctic map shows, but the northern part of that continent has been mapped before the ice covered it. That could make us think it has been mapped a million years ago but that's impossible since mankind did not exist at that time further and more accurate studies have proven that the last period of ice free condition and already got ended about six thousand years ago. The question is who map Queen Maud land at Arctic six thousand years ago which unknown civilization, how the technology or the need to do that I wanNA touch on just one more scientific nestled in the ancient city of Komo. Polka Bolivia are stone blocks that were used to make up a series of Pyramids Wayne from two hundred to four hundred tons each block nothing unusual there the city dates back to five, thirty, six AD. Yet. The blocks are riddled with carved indentations and in the surrounding grasses were found. Staple shaped clamps that fit in place were used to hold the blocks together. How could the indigenous people? No knowledge of urgency have created these clamps and where did the metal they use come from? This isn't the only case of metal clamps being used to hold giants don't together in Cambodia's anchor watt giant sandstone blocks way nearly two tonnes were brought to the site of the temple from nearby mountain via series of waterways. Close inspection of stones that are scattered around the site have revealed carved indentation receptacles for metal clamps perhaps. How about an eerie coincidence just outside the magnificent ruins of anger what stands an ancient pyramid temple known as backseat clump core now from Cambodia. Travel over eight thousand miles to Guatemala in the ancient Mayan city of Tacoma all among the long forgotten structures at the call is the Temple of the Great Jaguar although the Cambodian pyramid is much smaller than the pyramid in Guatemala the similarities between the specific design features are uncanny both. These pyramids both these ancient structures have an unusually steep slope angle that didn't exist in many other pyramids or temples however, and perhaps most importantly they both feature a stepped formation. There's a massive stairwell going up the middle of both temples and there's a domed area located on the top of both once there you can see there's a small door that goes inside the pyramid on both and there's another internal structure that looks the same. Basically what you have here is an ancient civilization. Cambodia. Another one in Mesoamerica despite the fact that they are separated by more than nine thousand miles, they feature incredible similarities that no one not even science has been able to explain

Cambodia Arctic Antarctica Africa Wrangel Island Guatemala Canada American Museum Of Natural His Polka Bolivia North America New York Perry Reese Hani World Heritage Texbook Pyramids Wayne Mesoamerica Artika BC
A Look Into Stronger and Harvest Spice

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

04:52 min | 7 months ago

A Look Into Stronger and Harvest Spice

"I we want to take a deep dive into the stronger protective blend. The bright uplifting sent of stronger helps to evoke feelings of wellness and vitality whenever you need it the most. Powerful combination of rose. Let's. Cedar Wood and Frankencense essential oils bring a strength and a utility to this blend that we know you'll love. The rose. A symbol. Of. Beauty. Love. Purity. and Faith for centuries. There are over one hundred species of roses and the world each with their own history and legacy. The rose that we will be focusing on is the Rosa Damascene. Ah. More commonly known as the d-mass grows or sometimes as the rows of Casteel. It's a rose that has been written about throughout literature. With the fame Syrian poet knees are couponing writing. I come to you from the tales of the Damascene rose that depicts the history of all fragrance. Shakespeare reference, the flower and his play twelfth night as well as his sonnet one thirty. And the English poet Thomas Rivers wrote a whole owed to the Damascus grows. Now. Oldest known tangible historic evidence for the existence and possible use of roses. Comes to us from the Minoan civilization. The evidence is in the form of. Of a fresco from the palace at. In Thirty, seven, hundred BC. The Damascus froze gets its name from Damascus the capital of Syria were the rose originates. The French Crusader Robert Debris who took part in the siege of Damascus in eleven forty eight at the second crusade. Is sometimes credited for bringing the mask rose from Syria to Europe? However other accounts state that the ancient Romans brought it to their colonies in England. And a third account is that the physician of King Henry the eighth. Gifted him one in fifteen forty. Whatever way it made its not Europe, it has made a large impact. On not only the culture but also the economy. For instance in Bulgaria. In Bulgaria's Rose Valley, the Damascus rose has been grown an picked for more than three hundred years. and. It's the center of the modern rose industry. The rose has been utilized in everything from cooking to perfumes and rose waters to even some traditional medicinal practices. And now it brings a beautiful floral note and years of tradition to this blend. Lithium might be the oil and this blend that you might be the most unfamiliar with. It belongs to the Lorraine J. Family, which includes the true. And it's relatives although it's a very broad family that includes things from the bay leaf to the Avocado. Lychee Cuba commonly known as May. Be Chinese pepper or Mountain. Pepper is a small tree native to southern China and Tropical Southeast Asia. The tree bears Pale, lemon scented flowers and small fruits that looked like peppers. Which is where the nicknames come from. Although, it is native to southern China and other parts of Tropical Southeast Asia it is most widely cultivated in Japan. Taiwan and China.

Damascus Rose Valley Rosa Damascene Syria Europe Taiwan Bulgaria King Henry Thomas Rivers Casteel Lorraine J. Family England Robert Debris Shakespeare Japan Cuba
LIVE from the Esselstyn Farm

Plant Strong

04:45 min | 7 months ago

LIVE from the Esselstyn Farm

"Right. I am here. With my dad, this is this is fantastic and I want you to know that. You, think will now be the. The most prolific person on a plan strong podcast I think this will be your fourth episode episode that we've done together and the reason why I wanted to pull you aside and do something right now is because obviously we're at the farm. In upstate new. York. And we've got our big plants Doc, two thousand and twenty event coming up it'll be our ninth annual plants dock and I thought this would be an appropriate time for us to reflect on your childhood. Growing up here on the farm and how it impacted you as A. As a as a man growing up, and just you know what kind of let it flow and and see what happens but. Just for for starters. How long has this farm bending the S Allston family. Actually, was. My stepmother and you. In the nineteen, eighty, five or six. went to Albany. Police tricentennial. which is a farm that had been the same family for over three hundred years. So some some were of the order of sixteen seventy five. So the farmers got quite a tradition to it. To put it mildly I mean that's that's three hundred from my math is correct. That's. Three hundred and forty five years. Yeah we're moving on. And I think I've also heard that it's it's one of two. Two farms in the whole state of new. York, that had been owned and operated by the same family over three hundred years. which I mean. Incredible. Now, I want people to know. Before we dive into this that we're probably going to have some distractions, we've got like six six or seven grandchildren running around. And we're doing our best to kind of maintain order but. Of course of route twenty, three although it's Many yards from here often we'll have some heavy trucks and motorcycles give their little echo. Yeah. So bear with us. So when exactly did you and your your brothers and your sister and your parents moved the farm? Well, actually my dad although he spent a fair amount of time at the farm here growing up as well. His parents who lived at the farm also his father was a lawyer. Working in new. York, city so That Grew up in New York City when he went to He went to Yale and he went to. Medical School. Two years at Yale in the last two years at. Columbia. And then he began his practice of surgery in new. York. City we lived in Riverdale, which is suburb of. Of of New York City. Until I was seven years old and it it always been my father's dream. To come back in practice medicine up here. Using the farm as a home base. and. So it was in nineteen forty one in September that we moved from. New York City. To the farm. So nine, hundred, forty, one you were born in thirty three. So that makes you about eight years old I was seven because. I. Was about three avas eight three months after we moved up here. Okay. All right. and. What I mean so can you remember back? Coming from the city to the farm at. That's a pretty big adjustment. I would imagine. Yeah it was. It was. You know just seem to flow though I. Mean there was just. Nothing that was really difficult about it with a we were in sort of. A little. Local School Clark School. easy to make friends. And A state. School onto the eighth. Grade. And then Then attract began to get a little hotter my. Parents. Sent me to difficult academy. I was there for all four years. Thought deerfield was terrific. I really enjoyed. The friendships there? I love the athletics there. And fortunately, the academics there and they go to jail.

New York City York Yale School Clark School. Medical School S Allston Family Columbia Albany Deerfield Riverdale
A Genocide of Black Brazilians

Latino Rebels Radio

04:23 min | 8 months ago

A Genocide of Black Brazilians

"I know. We're GONNA talk about police violence over the next forty five minutes, but before kind of delve into specifics I like to get everybody on the same page. Brazil in breakdown, some basic facts history that you have to know to understand. What we're GonNA talk about today. So I, some promos Brazil a country of two hundred million people in which fifty five percent identify as black or Brown, which corresponds to a lighter skinned. Race Person. and I know you're wondering why. How is it possible that Brazil can be fifty? Five percent black, well Brazil was actually the largest importer of enslaved Africans over the course of more than three hundred years. More than four million enslaved Africans from West Central, Africa arrived on its shores, and it was also the last country in the West who abolish slavery. It did so in eighteen eighty eight. And one in abolish slavery, and subsequently became a republic. There was no government to attempt to actually include blacks in society whether it be through education through housing through Employment Black Brazilians were simply left to fend for themselves. And around this time this is when we see for Bellas sprout around major cities for villas. Swab communities. That are created by people who are building their own houses and on communities without government support. and. A lot of the stuff that. I'm going to talk about as it relates to police. Violence in Brazil can be tied to those facts that I just listed about Brazil. So can you tell us a little about the state of police violence in Brazil? Can you characterize for our audience? While I'll I'll try to be brief, but there's a lot to say about it so. Police violence police harassment isn't to Brazil. It's brutal goes unpunished. It's getting worse and worse, and it's inherently anti-black. The Pool. People who suffer from police violence are almost always. Black Impor-. Black impoverished. Let me just give you some basic numbers and stats because I think it's best to start there, and then we can go from there. So in the first five months of twenty twenty realization Eto has already broken the record for murders by police within a five month period they've been seven hundred and forty four murders, and this is the most in twenty two years. Now Mind you. This is happening during a pen Dimic. Last year. There were almost six thousand murders compete committed by police throughout the entire country. in two thousand fifteen, there were three thousand and three hundred forty five, so obviously the shows that police violence is increasing. And at least eighty percent of these people are black. So for Brazilians and especially Brazilians. Who are activists? Many people call this genocide against black people, because so many people are dying every gear. that. Just to. To emphasize how horrible it is. They people call genocide. There are two things that I wanted to talk about that kind of really get to the heart of this violence. Since Brazil is A. Very mixed country, mixed race country, the lines between black and white are often very fuzzy like. Sometimes, you just don't know sometimes. It's possible that a person could be black in one part of the country and white in another part of their country, but in Brazil. There's common saying that the police always knows who is black. Mainly because the police targets black people, and in the second, saying that is, that is almost always repeated by government officials police, and even you know regular people in the street is. Monje, it'll mortal Ed Bongino bone that means a dead bug is a good book. So, we combine these two. Sayings and thoughts that means that black people in Brazil are suffering. At the hands of police. Police,

Brazil Black Impor Brown Monje Harassment West Central ETO Africa Ed Bongino
Pelosi pushes for removal of Confederate statues

Mark Levin

03:12 min | 9 months ago

Pelosi pushes for removal of Confederate statues

"House speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday demanded the removal of Confederate statues occupying the U. S. capitol has remained silent on her father's role in overseeing the dedication of the Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee monuments while serving as Baltimore's mayor in nineteen forty eight now face a true Stalin's revolution Nancy Pelosi would be called to account because her blood was involved in promoting the confederacy doesn't matter she was or not that's your blood that's one generation ago she hasn't even been confronted by the media on this hasn't even been confronted except by Breitbart posted this week formally requested the removal of Confederate statues occupying the U. S. capitol dismissing them as monuments to men who advocated cruelty and barbarism to achieve such a plainly racist and the demand comes as angry protesters across the nation take matters into their own hands vandalizing in some cases beheading statues and monuments memorializing the civil war era and beyond I'm surprised they don't have a guillotine as I've said before the halls of Congress or the very heart of our democracy the statues in the capitol should embody our highest ideals as Americans expressing who we are and who we aspire to be as a nation Pelosi said in her letter to committee chair Roy blunt and vice chairs Alaska monuments to men who advocated cruelty and barbarism to achieve such a plainly races center grotesque affronts to the ideals she said our ideals their statues pay homage to hate not heritage they must be removed well then her father's a real SOB he's a real **** he's a real racist and a hater Thomas Dallesandro that's her maiden name oversaw the dedication of such a statue in Baltimore's Wyman park the Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee monument is mayor of the city in nineteen forty eight mark that's way back in nineteen for who cares we're going way back to three hundred years now at the time the speaker's father said people can look to Jackson Lee's lives as inspiration and urged Americans to emulate Jackson's example and stand like a stone wall against aggression in any form that would seek to destroy the liberty of the world he said what was wanted to found the north and south fighting for a common cause the general ship in military science displayed by these two great men in the war between the states lived on and were applied in the military's plans of our nation in Europe and the Pacific areas he's right about that Alexander said of the dedication the Baltimore sun continued today with our nation beset he said by subversive groups of propaganda which seeks to destroy our national unity we look for inspiration to the lives of Leah Jackson to remind us to be resolute determined in preserving our sacred institutions and goes on city crews remove the statue in August twenty seventeen on the direction of the city council close his office did not respond to Breitbart's request for comment on the

Nancy Pelosi
A Manhunt on the 17th Centurys High Seas

The Book Review

08:44 min | 10 months ago

A Manhunt on the 17th Centurys High Seas

"Steven. Johnson joins US now. He is the author of many books many bestselling books including farsighted. And how we got to now but he joins us to talk about. His latest book is called enemy of all mankind. A true story of piracy power and Histories. First Global Manhunt Steven. Thanks for being here but much having me. There are lots of exciting terms just in your title and subtitle alone. I WANNA start with those even though and we'll talk about this. There's a larger story that you want to tell with this book but let's begin with piracy because that's a fun word. What happened on September Eleventh? Sixteen Ninety Five. There's a kind of interesting bleak poetry to the fact that this happened on September eleventh. Basically the events that are at the center of the book is a clash at sea in the Indian Ocean between pilot. Ship led by a very mysterious figure who would become the most notorious criminal in the world. A guy named Henry Avery and a much larger Indian treasure ship whose name was anglicized as the gun sway and the translation of that into English is excessive treasurer or exceeding treasure. So they were being pretty conspicuous with maiming. This vessel in terms of the of treasurer on board and effectively. These two ships confront each other on September eleven sixty ninety five by all rights. The pirate ship should have been easily overpowered but to incredibly unlikely things happen a cannon onboard board that Indian ship explodes because of some kind of malfunctioning design which basically turns cannon into a bomb when it explodes in so instantly. There's this you know. Many people on Indian ship killed the deck catches on fire. And at the same time. The first cannon fire from the pirate ship manages to have this incredibly lucky shot where they split the main mast of the Indian chip in two which effectively disables at in in the water and so the pirates are able to board the ship they pull off this heist that in today's currency we be would be worth as much as one hundred million dollars so it makes one of the most lucrative crime some in the history of crime and triggers a global crisis that reverberates around the world. Okay before we get to that crisis because you would wonder why one active piracy would do that. Just general picture of the piracy problem at that time. I'm always taken aback by the way that pirates are these cute Nara dwells in children's picture books or like Johnny Depp for many people. But that's not what piracy was back. Then what did it looked like? And was this unusual. Well actually one of the origin points to this project for me was years and years ago. I mean something like fifteen years ago. When my kids were very young we went to Disneyworld and we went on the pirates of the Caribbean ride and it was right after nine eleven and I had this on. I was floating down this little canals. That ride songs are being song and everything. That's very Kelly. The that the pirates were the terrorists of the seventeen hundreds and sixteen hundreds right. They were these terrifying figures would show up out of nowhere and burn your village down and attack. The women and people lived in fear of them. Here was three hundred years later. And it's just a kind of a children's story so they'll link between pirates and terrorism. Which is something that runs kind of subtly through enemy of all mankind actually began on that. Disneyworld ride in some ways. But what's historically really important about pirates at this point in history and one of the reasons why this particular story has so much significance. I think is up until this point. There was a very blurry line in terms of the legitimacy of piracy so there was this other class of occupation. That was called being a a private here. And if you were a privateer from all outside appearances you're a pirate attacking other ships and stealing their treasure and doing all these atrocious things that seat. But as long as you weren't attacking if you were a British privateer as long as you weren't attacking British ships. You're within the zone of and people like Francis. Drake a couple of generations before Henry Avery. When often basically we live the life of piracy but then came back to England and was knighted and bought a giant estate and lived a completely legitimate lifestyle. And so in a sense what happens to this period because of crime for reasons we can get into. It's a turning point where the British crown finally has to take a stand against piracy. They have to basically announced to the world that they're not a nation of pirates the way they've been accused to be. Let's talk about what made this pirate attack so noteworthy. Obviously there was the hall but were there other things that made this a big deal at the time. There are a couple of big ones. I is the other element of the crime. This ship that they attacked was a ship that had been doing business and ports of call like Mocha in the red seat but it was also filled with religious pilgrims coming back from Mecca on a whole other level was kind of a Muslim like religious transport vessel as well and among those pilgrims were a significant number of women women in the Royal Court of Aranda. Who was the great grand mogul of India? The last of the moguls and this was an unusual thing. At the time right you would not see a lot of big vessels in sixteen ninety five. That had a significant number of women on board but there are all these female pilgrims on board and so when the pirates attack the guns way they find these women there and number of the pirates rape the women on board. Some of the women commit suicide jumping overboard to avoid being attacked. And so there's this kind of outbreak of the atrocious sexual violence that happens as part of the crime and of course WORD GETS BACK TO WRONGS. Zab that not only has a hundred million dollars of his assets been stolen but members of his extended royal family have been sexually attacked and violated and this all is crucial in terms of geopolitics. Because it's right at a moment in a time where there's a major economic transition happening in the world. There's a chapter in the book called two kinds of treasure and is basically. There are two different ways of making a fortune that are in conflict with each other here. There's a very old way which is represented by Aurangzeb which is have an autocratic dynasty tax year citizens. Sit On that wealth and pass it onto your descendants. That's what every most of the rich people in the world at this point where people who were members of some kind of royal family that had some kind of dynastic wealth. But there's this new way of making money that has just appearing in it comes in the form of this interesting embryonic. New Organization called the multinational publicly traded corporation and that was the east India company. The east India Company was the first company that actually had publicly traded shares. So that people could. Outsiders could invest in the company in those shares could go up or down in value and for the first time people were making money not just through the prophets of the business but through the increase in value of these publicly traded shares and that turned out to be the future. Right dot is how if you look at the one hundred richest people in the world today. The vast majority of them were people who made money because they had traded shares in a company. They found that their parents found it. So in a sense clash between these two massive economic forces and Henry. Avery in his little pirate ship gets right in the middle of it because once. Iran's UB here's that his money has been stolen in women have been raped he threatened to eject the east India company from India which is the main source of their income. They've been trading CALICO and chinse fabrics and so on and if that had happened if they've been thrown out of India the whole course of the British Empire would have been transformed. It's entirely likely that the British Empire would not have formed in in India in the subsequent decades. If the east India company had been injected. So why wasn't it? Attracted rings up puts a number of the employees of the east India Company under house arrest and threatens to execute them and they began a furious letter writing campaign back to London. Saying we have to find the pirate we have to bring him to justice and we have to announce to the world that we are not going to tolerate piracy anymore or else this whole incredibly lucrative business that the country is increasingly dependent on is just going to disappear and so. That's what triggers this global manhunt really the first one in

East India Company Henry Avery India Indian Ocean Treasurer United States Johnny Depp Caribbean Steven. Johnson Aurangzeb Rape London Mecca Francis Drake Iran England Royal Court Of Aranda Mocha
Cucuy

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:02 min | 10 months ago

Cucuy

"Welcome to kiss Miss Mystery. Your host kid crumb today the spirit of Kuku. You might have heard of the wall city in Mexico Corner. Baca asked twenty residents of this wall city. Why the walls and you'll get twenty different answers. Mostly it seems. A consensus is that they keep out bandits and drug lords in the community surrounding the walled city. Crime was running rampant. Children were safe ninety. Were killed by drive by shootings other simply vanished off the streets. Local law enforcement was in the pocket of the local drug dealers. Some residents sudden Asir to the church but most simply locked their doors and kept children indoors than does were afraid to venture out and soon it was appeared. The local economy was collapsing. Many of the elders of the community built helpless. Spoke out about the Kukui. A spirit that arrived with the Spanish censors before but unlike the Spanish that killed and pillage the cocoon came to do good. It was a priest that arrived with. Cortez and fifteen nineteen. I mentioned a false God like spirit called Kukui. There was plaguing the various Spanish camps. For three hundred years of Spanish rule over the central regions of MESOAMERICA kacoos present ravaged the caps with fever and dysentery. It was in the early nineteenth century after the Spanish. American wars and the secession of most Spanish territories details of a strange spirit cuckoo that has so affected early Spanish conquistadors that they were often defeated at least temporarily by the indigenous tribes they encountered but does the elders passed away generation after generation. The story of Kukui became a folk tale often told the children to scare them into be good otherwise the Kukui take them away but by nineteen fifty. The community around the walled city was confronted by so much random crime and violence that only older families those that have made their home against the wall had lived there for generations remained at local gatherings. The elders talked about Kukudji that? Maybe it was time to call up the spirit but they were always laughed at their folktales dismiss. When the aging mayor realized at the end of his beloved community was in sight he called a special gathering of the elders and together they prayed and sang songs calling on the spirit of cocoon. Within days of the meeting of the elders crime left the community and also left a lot of bodies now flash forward to the hundreds of refugees being held at the US Mexican border several reporters from ABC NBC. Cbs visited the cage paraded families. It was a famous. Cbs reporter Luke made her way to the heart of the refugees and spoke to a mother who expressed a sense of calm explaining in broken English. That could Kui had been summoned. Not sure what she had heard. What was that aspect of? Her conversation was removed from the interview. It was leaked to the press just ten days after that interview that many of the guards come down with a virus of course it was attributed to illness. Popeye refugees or was it

CBS Miss Mystery Kuku Baca Mexico Corner Asir Cortez Mesoamerica KUI Fever United States Reporter Luke ABC NBC
reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

How I Built This

07:01 min | 10 months ago

reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

"Think about the small moments or decisions in your life that actually had a huge impact on how your life turned out. Maybe it was a conversation. You struck up with the person next to you on an airplane. Maybe it was a party. You reluctantly went to only to meet the person you'd eventually marry or maybe it was a decision to stay on vacation an extra day that sparked a new idea for Kevin System. It was a random remark from his girlfriend that made him decide to use filters on instagram for Blake. Majkowski was a chance meeting with a group of young Argentinian who took him to the countryside where he saw kids with no shoes. That one day inspired him to create. Tom's and for Louis Fun on it was a free lecture at Carnegie Mellon University in two thousand. We'll get deeper into the story in a few minutes but that single lecture would lead him to invent to ingenious new tools the I was capture. Yes captures those annoying twisted and blurred letters. You have to type into a website to prove your human and the second one was duo lingo now. The biggest language learning APP in the world which is now getting even more popular because people are looking for new things to do now that they're stuck at home but was captured and duo. Lingo were designed to harness the power of crowdsourcing to solve problems. And I'M GONNA blow your mind here if you have ever typed in a capture or reused dueling go. There's a good chance you've taken part in a massive online collaboration that you probably weren't even aware of and it's amazing. How Louis came up with all this but let's start at the beginning. Lewis was born in Guatemala in late. Nineteen Seventy S. Both as parents were doctors and though he was surrounded by poverty violence in Guatemala City. Louis screw up in comparative privilege and as a kid. He spent a lot of time hanging out at the family business. My Mother's family actually had a candy. Factory everybody is always a Mesa. The fact that I grew up with a candy factory they think it was like Willy. Wonka or something. I was not all that much into the candidate. Self I was into the machines because basically the candies made by these gigantic machines. That bump out I don't know how many thousands of pieces of candy per hour and basically all my weekends. I spent playing at the Candy Factory and I would They the machines apart and put them back together they would be some extra pieces after. I put him back together on that. That would be a problem but what? What kind of student were you were? You were school pretty easy for you. Yeah I was pretty nerdy basically. That was really good at math. Math was just easy to me. I what I would do during the summers is basically get either next year or you know. Couple YEARS LATER. Math books on all the sizes. Wow it kind of came easy but the way I really got good ideas by doing hundreds and hundreds exercises. That's what you do in. The summertime was bored. I mean I was an only child I is. I didn't have that much to do. This is remember this is also pre Internet pre everything. So what was I going to do? Man That's what I did was putting playing cards in the spokes of my bicycle and by jolly ranchers seven. Eleven should math books. So you were. Did you just love math? I mean it sounds like kids. Don't think about their future. They're not like I'm going to study math so I can be in tech one day like unless I've really enjoyed it. I I enjoyed it was it was like a puzzle for me by the way this is not the only thing I did. I mean I I also played a lot of video games Pirated Video Games in my commodore sixty four like floppy disks. Floppy Disk loppy discs. That's right I wanted a Nintendo. When I was eight my mother would not get many intendo. She instead got me computer. Commodore Sixty Four. And I couldn't figure out how to use it but eventually I read like the manual stuff and I figured out how to use it more than I figured out. I could buy other people's video games. And so I became a little hub in my in my little neighbourhood but these were not other kids adults or kind of basically young adults who had a computer and they would come to my house and I would take their games and give them my games exchange so then. I collected a pretty large number of video games but sh- mentioned right that I mean because your childhood sounds pretty nice but but like as a kid I guess or even as a teenager there was a civil war in Guatemala right. I mean we know that today. There's a a lot of violence there. Obviously violence in the US and other countries to but Guatemala's has been particularly hard hit. I mean did it feel dangerous when you're a kid yes it did. There was a civil war pretty much since I was born in seventy nine to nineteen ninety-six. There was a civil war going on the whole time. It always felt dangerous when I was fifteen or so. My aunt was kidnapped for ransom. I mean she was gone for seven or eight days. Wow People's cars would be stolen. I don't every couple of months. Somebody's car would be stolen in my family. Going past seven thirty PM was rare games. You needed to go out in a large group. If you're going to go up at seven thirty PM and I did my house had walls and barbed wire yeah. It felt dangerous. I mean this is one of just one of the reasons I came to the US. Actually I mean I was. After my aunt was kidnapped I thought to myself. I don't WanNa live here. Yeah and I guess you did end up leaving Guatemala for college because you went to Duke in North Carolina and you describe yourself as a like a math nerd in school and and is that what you intended to do like to do something in math. That's what I wanted to become an economic math professor. I was pretty certain. I wanted to become a math professor at the time. I thought the best thing that I can do is really learn a lot of math and I really it and I thought it was futile to learn how to deal with other people. It is interesting because my job. These days is one hundred percent just dealing with other people's problems. I'm just trying to understand the so so by becoming math professor. You thought. Hey I wouldn't have to deal with people I would just deal with facts. Data and numbers. Yes yes and you know I. I'll do math research all day long. And every now and then after class of but whatever that's like a tax That's that's what I thought so all right so you are She gets your degree and you this path to go into academia and you go into a PhD program at Carnegie Mellon Correct and I guess you go into computer science right yes. I changed from math computer science because I visited a math Grad school and what people were saying the professor was saying. Oh I'm working on this open problem that nobody's been able to solve for the last three hundred years and I thought I don't think I'm smart enough if you haven't done it and nobody's done it in three hundred years that's Kinda not for me whereas when you visit in computer science I mean this is crazy thing before like. Oh Yeah I still have an open program yesterday. Well it's a much younger field yet so that I thought that was much more exciting for me. At

Guatemala Professor Louis Fun Math Grad School Candy Factory United States Guatemala City Carnegie Mellon University Instagram Majkowski Kevin System Carnegie Mellon Blake Nintendo TOM Wonka Mesa
Medical Astrology in Practice with Kira Sutherland

The Plant Path

08:54 min | 10 months ago

Medical Astrology in Practice with Kira Sutherland

"Hey there everybody Ceja Popham here founder of the School of Evolutionary herbalism in your host. Here on the plant pass and I know it's been quite some time since I've published a new piece of material here on the podcast and I'm really excited about what we've got in store for you here in this episode. I've got curious Sutherland. On the line here with me and in this episode we are going to be discussing with you. Some of the ways in which medical astrology can be incorporated into your healing practice whether you're an herbalist or a natural path or any form of holistic practitioner cure is just an incredible wealth of knowledge and understanding in clinical experience in. How medical astrology works Shira is natural path. A homeopath an herbalist a nutritionist. And we we met actually a number of years ago at the Renaissance Medicine. Conference put on by My medical astrology teacher Judith Hill and it was just myself and Kira and Judith and Matthew would there in Portland Oregon Teaching about these old old approaches to to healing grew using astrology and natural medicine. So I'm super stoked to have you on the podcast here cure. Thanks so much for joining US excited to be here. Thanks for having me. Yeah so let's start off by just sharing a little bit about Your coach to healing how you work with people. I mean you've got a really unique. Lots of different areas coming together in your approach from the herbs and the naturopathy. He end the medical astrology. And I'm just curious if you could share a little bit about your story and how and especially how the medical astrology piece came into play in your approach to holistic healing awesome. I'm I oh my gosh where do I start? I'm actually American borne in San Francisco but I my whole adult life has been in Australia. If you're my accent go in and out So I grew up in the seventies San Francisco so I was around a lot of alternatives. things thinking one of my mom's my mom's a scientist but her one of her best friends was an astrologer who comes to feed me stocks. That was always kind of in my in my cells or in my awareness but when I studied naturopathy in my early twenties in Australia so just to clarify to naturopathy in. Australia is an Undergrad Bachelor's degree. And then you go on a new upper stop some different style of naturopathy to North American one. But as I was studying naturopathy I got really frustrated that you know they have all these beautiful things know you talk about a lot in your book about the vital force and all the energetics but I got really frustrated. There was no system to put things through because my brain works really systematically and everyone was finishing off studying ir Veda or traditional Chinese medicine and I was like this isn't this doesn't make sense to me. That were natural. Medicine has been so long. Where's our system because we must have one and I was. Yeah and I was. I started looking for a system to things through and then if you go into the history of medicine as well as I luckily started studying astrology formerly at the same time I finally came across medical astrology with all the elements and the humor's and I was like. Oh here's our system. We just threw it out three hundred years ago in medicine and nobody knows about it anymore so for me. Medical astrology really was like. It's like icing on a cupcake of what I was doing as a clinician because it it gave me that whole system put things drouin understand people better and so I didn't. I mean I have studied a bit of. Tci A year of Ir Beta now as well. But it's for me. Medical Astrology was just as beautiful system to overlay on the herbs the nutrition. Yeah that's really how it came about for me Nice. Yeah I love how you said that in the way that and this is the thing that I discovered and founded my own experience to being best year was you know there's all this you know clinical evidence and studies in science and then and then it's like. Oh but if you want kind of more energetic perspective or everyone looks to the east you know to Chinese medicine or Veda or the other systems and it was like. Where's our Western traditional model? You know and I always felt that too. Like how heaters all these little pieces in bits and bobs. But where did they all fit together? And I think it's interesting how you know. He is always seen as like. Oh Lake pop astrology. Look it up in your Sunday Pierre. And it's Kinda hot hot funny funny but I think people really realize how central it was to to the practice of Medicine Right. It was. It was completely there too. Wet Three Hundred Renard. Two years ago an and it makes so much sense especially the energetics of the elements and I mean I know you go into that law in what you teach as well but yeah because the West we had it just as well as the eastern for me It just yeah. It really was that last little piece to really put it all together and it's by no means we call it whether hop astrologer you know. All the alternative stuff gets called wou-wou down here in Australia. Had Yeah it's just it for me. It's such a core part of when I look at a client even if a client. No-one using medical astrology gives me so much inside even if I just have their birthday around what systems I really need to look at for being the underlying cause of what's happening with them. It's just for me. It's that blueprints or road map with much. Better directions to the person. So for for maybe. Maybe there's some listeners. Out there that like the concept of medical astrology is like wait wet. Maybe just give a brief lake snapshot of like like how. How exactly does astrology apply to our body and our health and healing like how? How does that work? I guess in a in a kind of big picture overview Sherbourne here so you know if we go back in history Which I'm not a great history teacher but anyway all the way back to kind of Egyptian Times or even earlier. We have a hieroglyphics and drawings of what they called. Astro Manner Zodiac Nan. And it was. It was an overlay of the astrological signs. The twelve signs over the human body so in astrology we start with aries and we finished with Pisces. And so if you take those trump signs in overlapping on the Human Body. Aries is the head. Tourists is the neck and it works. Its way down to high-seas feature good each of the signs and the planet associated with each of the sides has rulership of a bunch of different body parts organs and functions. So we look at. Somebody's you know. Even if you only know your sunshine because of your birthday we look to that sign for your if you use it a loss and maybe overuse it so there could be a bit of a depletion or a lack of vitality going on in that area of the body or if if we know a whole astrology chart every planet with sitting somewhere when you were born and so if we can actually pull up the circle wheel of a of an astrology charts you can look where all your planets were gives you an even bigger or blueprints as to what's going on with your body physically

Australia Renaissance Medicine San Francisco Human Body Ceja Popham Judith Hill Shira Sutherland United States School Of Evolutionary Founder Three Hundred Renard TCI Scientist Portland Oregon Teaching Sherbourne Kira Egyptian Times
Islamic Folklore The Ant Prays For Rain

Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

05:34 min | 11 months ago

Islamic Folklore The Ant Prays For Rain

"Once there was a big famine in Palestine it was during the time of the Prophet Prophet. Sulaiman King Solomon. He came out with his people and proceeded to an open place in the desert to pray for the rains to come. Suddenly he saw an and standing on. Its two legs raising. Its hands up towards the sky and saying oh Allah we are but very small among all the creatures we cannot survive without die. Grace please bestow upon US sustenance and do not punish us because of the sins of human beings please send down the reins so that trees can grow farms become green in grains become available and we have our food to eat prophet. Sulaiman knew the language of all animals. He told his people let us go home. The prayer of this end is enough. It then rain too heavily in all the land became green and productive. The end is an intelligent creature. Warm days it collects and stores grain inside the hulls. It knows that during wet and cold months it would not be able to go out to search for food for fear that grain may start growing because of wetness it splits it into two or more pieces at times during Moonlit nights it brings the split grains out of the stores for drying and preservation against decay. The holes under the ground are made very carefully and covered with shelter to prevent the rain water from getting inside the holes the end unlike the other animals can lift a burden twice. Its own weight. It is not a selfish creature. When aunt finds some store of food grains it runs up to its group takes its fellow ants to that place. It shows everyone of them. Its own find of this door. The always behave in this manner. They work in live in cooperation with each other. This shows how the aunt works for the group and how each of them fulfills the needs in livelihood of its fellow beings how shameful it is for a man who has no regard for another man who has no concern for his fellow human beings who could be starving because of want of food. Once while Prophet Sulaiman was traveling together with hosts of men. Gin and birds. They reached valley events. When the chief of these ants witnessed the pomp and the glory with which Prophet Sulaiman and his companions were approaching toward it. He warned all the answers to get into their holes lest they got trampled and crushed unknowingly by the approaching men and Jinn Prophet. Sulaiman smiled at. This warning sounded by the ants chief and ordered his companions to wait till the aunts went inside their holes. None of us should hurt any aunt while passing over their land. He said it said that Prophet Sulaiman addressed the chief of the aunts. And Said How could my people hurt you or your fellow ants when they are floating through air? Don't you know that I am a messenger of God and would never act unfairly? The chief of the ants replied o Messenger of God my cautioning. The ants was not for any hurt that they would suffer but to prevent them getting stray and forgetting the glory of God after seeing year pomp. And show there is a deep meaning. In this event it shows that even the most humble and smallest of creatures has been endowed with the necessary wisdom to live safely and avoid being hurt as far as possible. It also shows how even a small end does have the natural understanding of the true position of Allah. It imparts a lesson. That one should not forget the true might and glory of Allah when one experiences a great power and dignity of any creature in this world thus an aunt is one of the most wonderful small creatures in this World Surinam L. The end in the holy current is a chapter named after this creature over one thousand three hundred years ago. Imam Ali was giving a sermon in Kufa. In which he was describing the beauties of creation in various forms of life he was referring to small creatures in asking men to study. How God made them so small yet so sturdy strong he described the end in these words. Look at an end. How tiny is its body? And how delicate features it is such a small creature that it often escapes the eye and few people care to attach any importance to it. Among the living beings found on this earth. Look at it and study its ways of life how it crawls how it attacks its food how it lifts a grain so many times heavier than its body carries it to its whole how it stores grains and how in summer it gathers in stocks food for

Prophet Sulaiman Sulaiman King Solomon Imam Ali Palestine United States Surinam Grace Kufa
"three hundred year" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

The Brain Candy Podcast

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

"I just don't know anyone one like you okay so i was thinking though when i read the headline three hundred year old note found inside of jesus statue bet as but but yes that seems like a colloquialism that the i forget the outlet i think it was like the lease daily beast <hes> daily mail. That's i think what it probably okay but anyway. I was picturing like a note in the ball. That's what i'm picturing and then yet get fuzzy same but the picture indicated a crack in the but as many photos of bums do that's why you don't think that it's going to happen. I could see the the sentence like four four mind your mind and then like it's like you don't think it's good as it sounds like what it does. It comes out and sure enough. It does sound exactly like that. She's by crack. A priest. Put a note claiming that it's the oldest time capsule oh home like because it was intentional so funny in the note was the details about the time period who the celebrities were politics. Oh i think that priests had intended on being raised yeah. I mean why liked butts. Oh my oh my god sarah he knew about the entertainment of the time he was in on pop. Culture shows that i didn't say a word. I'm just saying where there's smoke. There's fire smoke. There's fire shows a profession in which that that would be no probably kind of oh my god. That's just the therapist to me wants to know who. I don't think you're wrong 'cause why the but it was like on the top at the top of his mind what's on mentality my mind <hes> and how if you want something right now like let's say you want more champagne. Yes then you could call not call. That's hey come on. That's crazy could use post meets the.

sarah three hundred year
"three hundred year" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Yes, sir. I have an exclusive for you. I get on the mountain how. Aspirin. I should wait for her next report before I give you the dollar. Why? Wait, you can't wait. You wanna open your Christmas present before was. Okay. Okay. The creature that we refer to as big foot. He has other names all around the world. I have solved the mystery while I will first of all Christmas has come and gone. So I'm a little late getting my present from you. Yeah. Okay. That is it may. About six thousand years ago extraterrestrials team to this planet. They brought with them. And which we now refer to as the big foot creature after by two or three hundred years. Bigfoot creature rebelled. The workloads like the you. And they they rebel the extraterrestrials in charge of them. Coach to kill them. So from here. Banishment if you will how many did they bring in? What do you think the populations now on several? Several ships. They brought about maybe forty or fifty of them, and they became they couldn't contain them. So they left them here. And they. Co-created and moved around the world. Has. Now is this a prediction or is this an observation from you? This is after rigorous research tireless analysis. And. I'd come up with this conclusion. Now, it's not bizarre. And all I have a prediction for you. All right. You aware of these October surprises that the media presents every year. Yeah. This year is Melania. Trump wife of. Donald John Trump. We'll engaging divorce proceeding. She will walk out the door of the White House on October first. Two thousand nineteen. All right. We're gonna put you down this. Selling? It's young women and she will go back to Slovenia writing. We'll be an all time bestseller. That's the prediction. We'll put a town. That's a pretty dramatic prediction to Frank. Thanks. But you discussion about dick foot. Look a lot of people have talked about the possibility that Bigfoot could be an extraterrestrial. That's very possible. In your thoughts that it was dropped down on us from. Could be could be more open lines and more predictions next on coast to coast AM. Don't forget to watch our TV show beyond belief with George Noory, just log onto beyond belief dot com. This hour on ninety three WIBC is powered by the home loan expert. At Walgreens, we know it's cold and flu season. Again, a time. When all you wanna do is to your kids game. But instead you're coughing aching the entire time. That's why Walgreens is minutes away to help you find everything you need to feel better like Vicks dayquil Nyquil combo packs along with expert care that goes beyond the pharmacy. Stop in today for personalized advice and find the right really right here. Walgreens, trusted since nineteen o one now with guard base dayquil Nyquil severe twenty nine ninety nine through January fifth uses directed. Millennials be entitled dreamy technology reliant eighteen to thirty four year olds are about to move into their purchasing power. Are you ready contrary to what you may think millennials are very observant.

Walgreens Melania Donald John Trump Aspirin Slovenia flu George Noory White House WIBC Frank three hundred years six thousand years thirty four year
"three hundred year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"So she stayed longer as she started to try. She's like loans getting the way we manage my other projects. But now that is being like how two years since then whatever she's like, I want to have more projects than I had. But I want to do that. And I don't want to do this. You know, so see us moving on. But that's the gig. They be drinking wine and getting drunk at ten thirty AM. Right. So I don't know who they're gonna get to be her spot deliver chemistry though. An Irish woman who married a ghost of a three hundred year old pirate says they have split up. Now, do you have to actually file divorce papers when you made up the whole thing? You know what I'm saying? Like the ghost already goes to us. It was the problem. I mean, that's true. He was a pirate. I guess he moved on some other booty come on. Yeah. Ours woman who married the ghost with three hundred year old pirate claims a couple of house would up. Amanda, Teague forty six of drug header cold Luth, married county. I'm married. The Haitian power named Jack early. Also, a black man Hobie a pregnant. Oh, I'm sorry guys. I know that's the best here the wedding. Strongest goes, burn the wedding to her soul mates it plays on Boorda boat in international waters off the Irish coast. Could you imagine? Then people looking around all crazy going just mile just dismount. Yeah. She should have. No, he was probably transparent throughout the whole thing was, however, the Irish MIR reports a couple of Qatar today at the less than a year couldn't even last year when a month Huckabee alive three hundred years and can't take one year of your ass. You terrible..

Teague Luth Hobie Huckabee Qatar Jack early Boorda Amanda three hundred year three hundred years two years one year
"three hundred year" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Welcome to the show board. Gary McNamara and Eric Harley meteorologist, Tom. This is Red Eye Radio. And I am here tonight along with meteorologist Steve Lenore. Steve Lenore is out of north of Dallas and south Oklahoma City. That's a lot of territory to cover, and there's a lot of stormy weather there. But all the storm chasers from that neck of the woods down in the Carolinas taking pictures documenting hurricane Florence now. Tropical storm was sixty mile an hour winds. Steve one of the things that we would love to hear. I think from people calling into the station, and and telling us what they're experiencing right now in that area, Tom, you're absolutely right. One of the best ways to really put the human face on this. The thing is to get I witnessed reports. It doesn't matter. If you're actually in an area, that's flooded. Or maybe you evacuated and you had a story to tell about that. Because these things are always a learning experience for folks, just like we are hearing from new Bern North Carolina. Some folks are saying. It's the worst flooding in three hundred years, which is unbelievable of historians. In town would know that. Vice been around that laundry report it, but what I'm trying to say is that we would love to have some people call in with either I witness reports a question is great or if you're an evacuee as one eight six six ninety redeye one eight six six ninety redeye this is Red Eye Radio. Of course and bring it on. We love asking questions a real quick update. Here a tornado warning in effect for portions of southeastern North Carolina, and this is associated with a spiral rain band. And we're gonna talk more about that. With our next guest that you believe read Hunkin chess. Read Hawkins with the Wilmington, North Carolina weather service office, a read tell me, how are you tonight? I'm doing great, buddy. And thank you for your help yesterday. Really, really appreciate the advice. And we've had some nice comments about folks who were indicating that they felt comforted by the fact that at least somebody was given a very straight story about what was happening in their neck of the woods. And right now, you've got a coupla it out there. Oh, that's actually our sister office morehead city there. Yeah. Looks like it's up in near Oslo Jeff just Jacksonville area. And it's a nice standing there. There's another bandits closer to Wilmington. Any rotations on that speak. Okay. What's what's it's rain production on the one closer to you? Probably one to two inches an hour. So far as one o'clock this morning. We were a little over eleven inches of rain. Wow. Let's namely with the the Senator they came over last this morning. And now that centers, you know, down into South Carolina. Now, we're getting that big stretch south, so rain, imagine, we're gonna probably double double rainfall in the next twelve hours or so. Wow. Taking it up to twenty two out of this free. This is stealing Oregon and again predate use the burning the midnight oil with us here. So to speak. Yeah. We fill badge it a little while ago out of the Raleigh office. And I was asking him a witch waterways. He was the most concerned with in his area of responsibility. And I would ask you the same question. I know that a lot of that stuff up. Streams I come running right down the river through Wilmington. There is is that your biggest waterway of concern. Well. Which runs from North Carolina down into Wilmington. That is one. Also, we have the lumber river that flows just west of Fayetteville down to a. Overton North Carolina. And it turns into I believe the little TD river and that flows between Myrtle Beach and Florence. And I mean, they're they're all of great concern. And I think as I was saying this is our third major major flood and in or years in our area, and sir how bad do you project it to get based on the current rainfall and future forecast? Rainfall how bad you projected to get in William Wilmington, which we know was a pretty good sized city, but one hundred twenty thousand people the pets twenty downtown one thing when you get the river downtown it opens up more of a B estuary. And so you don't it will slow, but you don't see the impact could it spread each and spread out so far? So. There's a geological feature which kind of a rise and Wilmington as close as we were. We have a lot of lot of areas that are over twenty in elevators and most of the Costa. My a tweet tweet twenty to thirty feet elevation is almost like your ears. Pop. Yeah. So. Trains. Bring them back bringing that back again, we had a little break up on your cell phone there, you you guys are now working on cellphones and my crank. Yeah. We've lost. We've lost IRA are here in the office landlines. We still have still have our our system to indications. We have the internet that we can. At software and things like that. But voice over IP line to have gone out. Okay. Yeah. Apologize for the cellphone tonight of a landline. But that's that's the only choice. Well, no. That's that's okay. We still have not been able to make a connection with the folks up in Moorhead. So when we when when before you drop off, I want to get you the touch base with Brian to see if there's a a number we can use to try and get into into morehead. I'm assuming. They're saying, but we are here. Okay. Yeah. I figured I figured that. And so in any case at this point. Would you say that you are on the improving side or really status quo with fingers crossed that you don't get more rainbow? Where we're and we're gonna get more rain..

Wilmington North Carolina Steve Lenore Florence morehead Tom Bern North Carolina Steve one South Carolina Carolinas William Wilmington Gary McNamara Dallas Oklahoma City Raleigh Eric Harley Fayetteville Senator TD river Costa
"three hundred year" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Welcome to the show board. Gary McNamara and Eric Harley meteorologist, Tom HALE. This is Red Eye Radio. And I am here tonight along with musicologists Steve Lenore speed Lenore is out of north of Dallas and south Oklahoma City. That's a lot of territory to cover, and there's a lot of stormy weather there, but all the storm chasers from that neck of the woods. They're down in the Carolinas taking pictures documenting hurricane Florence now. Tropical storm was sixty mile an hour winds. Steve one of the things that we would love to hear. I think is from people calling into the station, and and telling us what they're experiencing right now in that area, Tom, you're absolutely right. One of the best ways to really put a human face on this fan of a thing is to get this reports. It doesn't matter if you're actually in an area, that's flooded. Or maybe you evacuated and you have a story to tell about that. Because these things are always a learning experience for folks, just like we are hearing from new Bern or Carolina. Some folks are saying it's the worst. Flooding and three hundred years, which is unbelievable. You know, historians in town would know that. Vice been around that laundry report it, but what I'm trying to say is that we would love to have some people call in with either eyewitness reports a question is great or if you're an evacuee as one eight six six ninety redeye one eight six six ninety redeye this is Red Eye Radio. Of course and bring it on. We'd love to ask questions that are real quick update. Here a tornado warning in effect for portions of southeastern North Carolina. And this is a sociology with a spiral rain band. And we're gonna talk more about that. With our next guest. I do believe read Hawkins chess. Read Hawkins with the Wilmington, North Carolina weather service office, a read tell me, how are you tonight? I'm doing great, buddy. And thank you for your help yesterday. Really, really appreciate the advice. And we've had some nice comments about folks who were indicating that they they felt comforted by the fact that at least somebody was given a very straight story about what was happening in their neck of the woods right now. You've got a couplet out there. Oh, that's actually our sister office morehead city looks like it's up in near Onslow just Jacksonville area. Nice standing there. There's another band. It's closer to Wilmington. Any rotations on that speech? Okay. What's what's it's rain production on the one closer to you? Probably one to two inches an hour. So far as of one o'clock this morning. We were a little over eleven inches of rain. And we yeah, we mainly with the the Senator they came over last. This morning. And now that that center down into South Carolina. Now, we're getting that big stretch south so. Fetch rain, imagine, we're gonna probably double double rainfall in the next twelve hours or so. Wow. Taking it up to twenty two out of this read this stealing Oregon, and again you burning the midnight oil with us here. So to speak. Yeah. We fill badge it a little while ago out of the Raleigh office. And I was asking him which waterways, he was the most concerned with in his area of responsibility. And I would ask you the same question. I know that a lot of that stuff up. Streams come running right down the river through Wilmington. There is at your biggest waterway of concern. Well. Which friends from North Carolina down into Wilmington. That is one. Also, we have the lumber river that flows just west of Fayette Bill down through Overton, North Carolina. And I turned into I believe the little PD river that flows some between neural beach and Florence. And I mean, they're they're all a grave concern. I was saying this is our third major major flood and or years in our area, and sir how bad do you project it to get based on the current rainfall and future forecast? Rainfall how bad you projected to get in willing Wilmington, which we know was a pretty good sized city about one hundred twenty thousand people the flooding downtown one thing when you get the river downtown it opens up and sets more of a B estuary. And so it you don't. It will slow, but you don't see the impact. Could it spread? It can spread out so far. So there's a geological feature which kind of a rise and Wilmington coast. We have a lot of lot of areas that are over twenty in elevation and most of the coach tweet twenty twenty to thirty. It's almost like your ears. Pop. Yeah. So. Trains. Bring back bring that back. Again, we had a little break up on your cell phone. There you go. You guys are now working on cellphones and my crank. Yeah. We've lost. We've lost IRA are here in the office landlines. We still have to enter still have our our system chain occasions. We have the internet that we community at software and things like that. But voice over IP lines have gone out. Yeah. So I apologize for the cell phones. Instead of a landline. But that's that's the only choice. Well, no, that's that's okay. We still have not been able to make a connection with the folks up in Moorhead. So when we when when before you drop off, I want to get you the touch base with Brian to see if there's a a number we can use to try and get into into morehead. I'm assuming. In the same boat. We are here. Okay. Yeah. I figured I figured that. And so in any case at this point. Would you say that you are on the improving side or really status quo with fingers crossed that you don't get more rain? We're going to get more rain. Yeah. And.

Wilmington North Carolina Florence morehead Tom HALE Steve Lenore South Carolina Steve one Wilmington coast Hawkins Carolinas Bern Gary McNamara Dallas Oklahoma City Raleigh Eric Harley Senator Onslow
"three hundred year" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Welcome to the show board. Gary McNamara and Eric Harley meteorologist, Tom. This is Red Eye Radio. And I am here tonight along with meteorologist Steve Lenore speed Lenore is out of north of Dallas and south Oklahoma City that a lot of territory to cover, and there's a lot of stormy weather there, but all the storm chasers from that neck of the woods down in the Carolinas taking pictures documenting hurricane Florence now. Tropical storm was sixty mile an hour winds. Steve one of the things that we would love to hear. I think is from people calling into the station and telling us what they're experiencing right now in that area. Tari absolutely, right. One of the best ways to really put the human face on. This kind of thing is to get eyewitness reports. It doesn't matter if you're actually in an area, that's flooded. Or maybe you evacuated and you have a story to tell about that. Because these things always a learning experience for folks, just like we are hearing from new Bern, North Carolina. Some folks are saying. The worst flooding in three hundred years, which is unbelievable. You know, historians in town would know that. He's been around that laundry report it, but what I'm trying to say is that we would love to have some people call in with either I witness reports a question is great or if you're an evacuee one eight six six ninety redeye one eight six six ninety redeye this is Red Eye Radio. Of course and bring it on. We love to ask him questions that Thomas real quick update here a tornado warning in effect for portions of southeastern North Carolina, and this is associated with a spiral rain band. And we're gonna talk more about that. With our next guest. I do believe read Hawkins. Yes. Read Hawkins with the Wilmington, North Carolina weather service office, a read tell me, how are you tonight? I'm doing great, buddy. And thank you for your help yesterday. Really, really appreciate the advice. And we've had some nice comments about folks who were indicating that they felt comforted by the fact that at least somebody was giving a very straight story about what was happening in their neck of the woods. And right now, you've got a couple it out there. Oh, that's actually our our sister office morehead area. Looks like it's up in near Onslow Jacksonville Jacksonville area. And it's nice standing there. There's another bandits closer to Wilmington. Any rotations on that is a speech. Okay. What's what's it's rain production on the one closer to you? Probably one to two inches an hour. So far as of one o'clock this morning, we were little over seven inches of rain. Wow. And let's mainly with the the Senator they came over last. This morning. And now that centers, you know, down into South Carolina. Now, we're getting that big stretch south so. Fetch rain, imagine, we're gonna probably double double rainfall in the next twelve hours or so. Wow. Taking it up to twenty two out of this free. Louis Oregon and again, earning midnight oil with us here so to speak. We spoke awhile ago out of the Raleigh office. And I was asking him which waterways, he was the most concerned with in his area of responsibility. And I would ask you the same question. I know that a lot of that stuff up. Strange. I come running right down the river through Wilmington. There is is that your biggest waterway of concern. Well. Which friends from North Carolina down into Wilmington. That is one. Also, we have the lumber river that flows. Just west of say Bill down through. North Carolina, and I turned into I believe the little TD river that flows through some between, Myrtle Beach and Florence. And I mean, they're they're all of great concern. And. I think I was saying this is our third major major flood and four years in our area, and sir how bad do you project it to get based on the current rainfall and future forecast? Rainfall how bad you projected to get in William Wilmington, which we know was a a pretty good sized city one hundred twenty thousand people, you know, pets. Pets simplicity downtown one thing when you get the river downtown it opened up and sets more of a. Estuary? And so it you don't you will flood, but you don't see the impact could spread it can spread out. So far. So there's a geological feature which kind of a rise and Wilmington. Coast to coast. We have a lot of a lot of areas that are over twenty. And most of the coast in my past twenty twenty twenty to thirty feet elevation. It's almost like your ears. Pop. Yeah. So. Trains. Bring them back bringing that back again, we had a little break up on your cell phone there. You guys are now working on cellphones and my crank. Yeah. We've lost. We've lost IRA are here in the office of landlines. We still have we still have our our system chain occasions. We have the internet that we can. At software and things like that. But voice over IP line to have gone out. Okay. Yeah. Apologize for the cellphone tonight. You have a landline? But that's that's the only choice say. Well, no, that's that's okay. We still have not been able to make a connection with the folks up in Moorhead. So when we when when before you drop off, I want to get you to touch base with Brian to see if there's a number week use to try and get into into morehead, I'm assuming they're saying, but we are near okay. Yeah. I figured I figured that. And so in any case at this point. Would you say that you are on the improving side or really status quo with.

Wilmington North Carolina Florence Steve Lenore South Carolina Steve one Hawkins William Wilmington Tari Onslow Jacksonville Jacksonvil Gary McNamara Carolinas Dallas Raleigh Eric Harley Oklahoma City Senator Moorhead Thomas
"three hundred year" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on KNSS

"Cook and is an immersive vacation where you get hands on cooking instruction and then that begs the question what happens if mama loves to cook and dad just wants to watch any we have plenty of those and sometimes it's the other way around we have lots of just eaters well that's so cool and not a problem i'm thumbing through the website and looking at some of the pictures and let's talk about where you stay at three hundred year old olive mill yes our home base yes lock usa go lucky you set the beautiful tuscan bed and breakfast for lack of a better term with beautiful lodging debut is outstanding it's probably one of the most beautiful views in tuscany we're overlooking multiple tian oh oh man a week wouldn't be long enough for me i can tell you that i one of my fondest memories of living in spain for years was these paradores a national hotels that are put in old monasteries and castles and things like that and as i thumbed through this is a very old building but boy somebody who spent a lot of money to make the interior quite guests friendly and comfortable yes they are they all have you know everyone has a separate there's a separate restroom each each villa your each room there it's one single story most of the rooms are single story they've all been retrofitted for there's air conditioning it's quite comfortable oh man i'm looking at the dinner kuskinka countryside so it's sort of a rustic you know if you're expecting you know a big high and five star hotels you're not going to get that you're just gonna get tuscan countryside it's a three hundred year old converted olive mill with a lovely restaurant on the ground a beautiful meadow behind it and as clean said there's gorgeous views from all around it's just quiet and beautiful tackler the restaurant at luck houston is also internationally known people come from all over the world there are are chef there is a michelin star chess donya and she's just fantastic and we cook with her as well on mondays we cook with donna and we make an everyday we cook about we learned to make about five to seven thinks per day that was almost every day that was my next question is the cooking kitchen where participants learn and study and watch is that inside the same location or is it a separate location we traveled to different locations in the village every day we have a transportation so we do a different restaurant kitchen every day except for one day wednesdays we take a tour of cnn with the private guide who has her phd in history pack it in for you people say it's just you know we do something every day and in our kitchens the nolan's that teach most of them are speaking english so we have an interpreter every day so the instruction is is really a hands on most of its hands on and quite detailed so you can we give you a recipe books that you follow along and you get a lot of instruction and really really good food is there but let's talk about the food from that region and and what might we expect to prepare during the week yeah i was just gonna talk about that guy you're gonna learn how to make handled pasta the pasta of their region is called p she it's kind of like a fat spaghetti but you make it from scratch you make an old school the way the known as make it with the well of flour and the eggs in the middle and then you mix it together and roll it out we make the food of that region is about vegetables and meat it's a very you know we're deep into tuscany so we're not near any water no fish it's basically chain golly and be they have the canon of beef which is a big white steer that specific to this region and it is the.

Cook three hundred year mill one day
"three hundred year" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"That's that's sort of the beginning of the beginning but but this whole thing of attacking the media and attacking everybody yeah tom dislike i was listening to your monologue and i got into car and listening to marty i think we entirely missed the point about any comparisons of fascist germany and the united states it was not about hitler fitness the most evil man and when we think of world war two chilling and everything the first thing we think about is that but really it was the process bronx with a power anytime you mentioned adolf hitler and nazi germany people are gonna immediately think of adolf hitler and you're not going to compare trump with that hitler nor should he be compared without off here hiller came to power he only had the support of about a third of the german people you know he he he was he did not get a he did not he was not elected by majority he was not elected of course but but but he didn't even have majority support when he first came to power but by nineteen thirty four thirty five i think it was thirty five or thirty six he was on the cover of time magazine as literally the most popular politician in the world because he was bringing germany out of the great depression by by building the audubon by starting by designing and building the volkswagen by a huge massive military buildup and by blaming all the other countries for the woes of world war one and for all you know everything had happened and and if hitler had never guessed the jews and we look back at the history of world war two i think that we would still see those same parallels between the way that hitler took over germany and the way that the trump has successfully taken over the republican party and is and is preparing to take over the entire united states it seems but what we still focusing on the man and not the process the system the system that rocket with a pilot didn't invent anti semitism right with an anchor of about striking he's taking over just yeah and if you want to think that that the idea of sending people off to camps where they would be murdered their children will be separated from them families would be torn apart people would be subject to insane brutality generation after generation you don't need to look to nazi germany you just look to the united states before the before the civil war and and for that matter all the way back to the founding of this nation when white people i came to this country and started a systemic and systematic genocide of native americans that killed something somewhere between twenty and one hundred million human beings over the course of a two three hundred year period you know both the genocide of native americans in the genocide of african americans you know we are capable of this but it's not going to help if we continue to draw parallels between nazi germany it's not really going to help because people just aren't going to see that well i think i think it might help considerably if we can help people to see that because this this as you said michael this is an old playbook and and this playbook has been picked up by these guys and they are running with full tilt boogie as you know as if they had just watched the movie and said okay cool we'll do that michael thank you for the call you know including the military expansionism and and and the threats against neighbors and breaking alliances i mean all of this stuff is going on you're listening to tom hartman visit thom hartmann.

two three hundred year
"three hundred year" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on WWL

"The one hundred two hundred three hundred year event level etc can we go back and have maybe flood protection or levies one oh one and explain when some of these terms mean sure absolutely and we'll look at it from only new orleans district the greater protection system and what we did is we built this system to defend against a storm surge of a one hundred year event and that means any storm that has a one percent chance of rain in in any given year so it doesn't mean it's the storm of the century or you only have a chance of reaching this once in a hundred years it means that there's a one percent chance of occurring in any given year can i interrupt for one second ricky in terms of each time you flip a coin right even if it comes up heads nine times in a row it's still a fifty fifty chance at it's gonna come up heads or tails so how does that rank with this one percent occurring in one hundred years that doesn't mean that you're only going to have one in one hundred years right at explain all of that the e you're very right in and when you're looking at it as every time you flip the coin you're looking at a fifty percent chance in this case every time you flip the coin you're looking at a one percent chance we were discussing it earlier and it's like rolling dice in that you know if you're if you're playing the game and you roll a seven it doesn't mean that you're going to roll all the other numbers before you get a seven again you had the exact same chance of getting a seven again the next time you roll so in this space right so extended into this one percent which means that every year what.

new orleans ricky one percent one hundred years one hundred two hundred three one hundred year fifty percent hundred years one second
"three hundred year" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on WWL

"In the city's three hundred year history she's facing a number of big challenges right out of the gate the need to be addressed the swearing in ceremony shot to begin right around ten am this morning from the halio jackson theater will be carrying that live for you here on wwl along with continual coverage on wwl dot com the regular session of the legislature must and in a month but now there's a belief that the capital it'll end sooner in mid may so that lawmakers can address tax bills and address the six hundred forty eight million dollar shortfall and russian president vladimir putin is has been sworn in to begin his fourth term as russia's leader there were protests and clashes with police more than fifteen hundred arrested checking wall street right now the dow is up one hundred ninety five nasdaq up sixty three and oil up another sixty six cents now over seventy a barrel wwl sports lsu baseball's nc double a tournament chances elma bubble tigers fought hard over the weekend and picked up a huge series victory over fourth ranked arkansas the bayou bengals closed out the series with a seven five win yesterday much to the delight of coach pulmonary ready to fight to the end like we always do so we've laid the groundwork now to make these next eight games means something five of lsu's next eight will be played at home though hosts mcneese state on wednesday steve geller wwl sports.

halio jackson theater russia bayou bengals lsu president vladimir putin arkansas mcneese steve geller six hundred forty eight millio three hundred year
"three hundred year" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Might dilute that kind of tradition i think that's what the daphne people might be worried about what's wrong with that things change i i think basically communication figure when he sick me when you bedridden if the nurses a foreign at foreigners you have to communicate is very difficult innocent people might think that's vina phobic that people don't want to deal with pointless but that's not really what it's about and people don't want to be burden anybody they don't want to depend on anybody i don't want to top say bothering if you say this is mr suge he's a demographic researcher you just don't want to be burden hill this feeling that you shouldn't be a burden it runs very deep physically psychologically ball stopped him i just prefer i will be health not by any other people why is that just feeding it might cause problems them with other people so you'd be more comfortable knowing that you're not putting anyone else causing the trouble it it it so if i we need some help from other people i might want to kill myself that's how extreme it gets this is a young man whose thirty he said i would rather commits suicide then be taken care of by somebody who doesn't want to take care of me who who i'd be a a burden on will uh there is the karcher like two three hundred years ago in japan if the or two months a life unto you like six separate thieves or dan hammadi take these these old mothers to amounting and stay there make the modern state care is a very long tradition in japan of the call it an old boss that whole us the elbe statement obama grandma and steaming his two to throw throw away your syria had to have real hellhole movies about in japan this one cold the ballad of narayama second a very poor rural village about one hundred years ago tells the story of a son and his mother up the mountain on the way up they pass by another son literally flowing his father off of a cliff.

researcher japan syria mr suge dan hammadi obama two three hundred years one hundred years two months
"three hundred year" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Have this island concept having moin national workers in our neighbourhood might i do that kind of tradition i think that's what the japanese people might be worried about what's wrong with that things change i think basically communication plinking when his sick gimme when you bid ridden if the nurses a foreign how foreigners this you have to communicate in his very difficult in a some people might think that's xenophobic that people don't want to deal with this but that's not really what it's about and people don't want to be a burden to anybody they don't want to depend on anybody angle one two same thing if you say this is mr suge he's a demographic researcher you just don't wanna be burden this feeling that you shouldn't be a burden it runs very deep physically psychologically ball stopped him i just prefer i will be helped not by any other people why is that just sir feeding it might cause plaza then with other people so you'd be more comfortable knowing that you're not putting anyone else causing them trouble get it so if i we need some help from other people i might want to kill myself that's how extreme it gets this is a young man whose duty he said i would rather commit suicide then be taken care of by somebody who doesn't want to take care of me who who i'd be a a burden on it all there is the karcher like two three hundred years at all in japan if the old woman's alight unto you like six separate thieves or then of hamady take his these old mothers to amounting asleep there make mother's day gift he was a very long tradition in japan of they call it an old boss that will boost the bus day nato bombings that graham on steaming means two to throw throw away your cereal they have the hellhole movies about this in japan his one cold the ballad of narayama set in a very poor rural village about one hundred years ago tells the story of the sun in his mother of the mountain yuji off fellow on the runup they pass by another son literally slowing his father off of a cliff correct.

researcher japan mr suge nato graham two three hundred years one hundred years
"three hundred year" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Make a stand out but the bottom line is it's a very simple business with a level playing field i think it's actually even more advantageous than ah i'll tell you why say that it's just a site thought in that is i've owned properties in the middle of groups of properties that were owned by big companies and i find that in when you deal with big companies they're like giant ships at sea if you need to turn it's going to take you a long time to turn that ship the round the other direction weir's were nimble we can come in and we can make changes very rapidly and very cost efficiently um that they can't do i want examples the deal drought and i did and that we bought this three hundred year department complex on a street that with nothing but apartment complexes and there was like eleven apart the cop lectures there in these role owned by big institutional owners and this one just happened to fail and got foreclose on we bought it out of foreclosure and we were able because we were so nimble and so light uh as far as overhead we were able to cut the rents lower than the other people on the street to the point where they literally sued us because we took our rent so low to try to stop us from doing it and we actually put three of those guys out of business three big time businesspeople out of business because we're more nimble they are we see this happen all the time our lifestyles members with the training the you provide into we providing the classes in the training the mentoring that you provide they're able to go out there and go into a neighborhood in beat the other people how how are they doing this cardis 'cause they.

weir three hundred year
"three hundred year" Discussed on Dumb People Town

Dumb People Town

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on Dumb People Town

"Store areas senate by steve chris or risky oh as well zones puncher i love this duty tweets at us all the time and he gave the gray guys we have another romance and dumb people town the worst one i think was with our beloved nikki glaser who is here when we found out about this now here's another one laser also in the film glaring stole woman fed up with searching for the perfect man a boy has married the ghost of a three hundred year old higher it instead and she says he's her soul mate let's call that would be left right so you couldn't be a made on any other level i love the she puts the search on herself i got a search for another guy i a found him gang foul i will get into a but i want you to ice their wedding photo i love the made it he would leave that's law is cute she's a looker while gesture you wrote a book of i area wrote a book called went to kill us an unfiltered guide to being a bright and i really wish that i had this image of ahead i think it would have informed the whole book guys had over a period of journalists on this also evans says a long time because people have asked if you wanna send a story hashtag dumb people town and daniel van kirk on twitter yes and that's how a litigator them as that is a great picture theology she doing this so she can tell the world that her vaginas haunted like what is that none online lonrho it's flag i would rather mary a three hundred year old ghosts than base angle is that.

steve chris nikki glaser daniel van kirk twitter evans three hundred year
"three hundred year" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on WLOB

"Almost three hundred years mark brann annual was making his story city councilwoman towns rule defeating fellow democrat former judge does reach shore monet and i said to her congratulations on standing me on making history because i have three with two women home gene um to be proud of that and i are both saying but it's about moving forward can terrell inherit some big problems in new orleans including crime an issue with the city's drainage and drinking water president trump and hillary clinton taking digs at each other in now i'm gonna keep speaking out apparently you know my former opponent is obsessed with my speaking out perry there was another somebody told me tweet today honestly between tweeting a golfing how does he get anything done i don't understand the former secretary of state clinton speaking to a crowd in little rock arkansas after the president tweeted today that quote crooked hillary clinton as the worst and biggest loser of all time she just can't stop which is good for the republican party a disturbing video surfaced says it's a hidden video from 2014 the show's nurses last seen as a world war two veteran repeatedly called for help and died while in their care the family of eighty nine year old james dempsey of woodstock's georgia hid the camera they filed a lawsuit and later settled these with northeast atlanta health and rehab center fox news.

mark brann new orleans trump hillary clinton perry golfing arkansas president republican party world war james dempsey woodstock georgia terrell secretary of state atlanta three hundred years eighty nine year
"three hundred year" Discussed on Popcorn with Mitchell Davis and Jack Ferry

Popcorn with Mitchell Davis and Jack Ferry

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on Popcorn with Mitchell Davis and Jack Ferry

"It was just go hang out with your sister and get out a year i felt like when i was very rarely ensure where i was i was watching it thinking okay there clearly going for like an eta thing here because like et is got that very famous seen at the end were elliott as crying and it's like it's like devastating immersing seeing that as a kid got it knows like clearly they're going for that but this is such a camp weird silly movie that i look this is really totally notions after this movie are so can once he's not a cat you think he would have been like well hey you know i'm a human now and i'm like an adult can and i'm dead show i've been a life for three hundred year me light come on he's like just a little over age like these old bye you know and then he got run over by a bus in ran a you know a nazi he played it so weird he was just was like i hate when that happens on a mike this little girl is loosely her mind perhaps some man's a out here pat die multiple times that is why do you think he like tried to groundhog day himself realise forever i'm going to go get run over by a truck and it's like well that's an aura came back to life oh maybe i have nine lives lives later he's like how can i also hacking like if you're a live forever.

elliott three hundred year
"three hundred year" Discussed on Giants of History

Giants of History

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred year" Discussed on Giants of History

"From what we can tell they all spoke greek never bothering to learn the language of the people that they ruled over and this might not be the best analogy but it will get the point across here that would be like the united states having a president that didn't speak english but clear patrick changed all that she was the first farrow and ferro is just another word for king or queen essentially but she was the first to pharaoh in three hundred years to learn egyptian and this of course played a large role in her endearment to the people of egypt who had for centuries resented being ruled by foreigners who didn't even bother to learn their language cleopatra didn't stop there though as it is said that cleopatra could speak nine languages some say more all of which she learned out of strategic ambition she was a cunning linguist as the old joke goes and if you don't get that one look it up and speaking of the pharaohs of ancient egypt there were approximately a hundred and seventy feroz total that ruled ancient egypt throughout its long and storied history that's the number one hundred and seventy think about all the times you heard the word ferro and all that you associate with the word ferro will love the approximate 100 in seventy that ruled over egypt cleopatra was the last pharaoh now some historians and scholars might argue this point and this could be posed as a trick question at a dinner party or something but some historians will say there was one pharaoh after cleopatra and the reason they would say this is because famously cleopatra had a son with julius caesar whose name was to syrian or son of cesar now unclear patrick died on august twelfth in thirty b c e her son says syrian inherited her thrown as the sole ruler of egypt.

united states president patrick farrow ferro egypt cleopatra julius caesar cesar three hundred years