24 Burst results for "Three Hundred Thousand Years"

English Is Plain Weird

Lexicon Valley

01:59 min | 6 months ago

English Is Plain Weird

"English is not normal the more you hang around and linguistics to more languages you mess around with the more language histories you learn the more you realize that this language that i'm speaking right now. Although it has many advantages for muendane and often unfair reasons this language is not normal and by that. I don't mean that it's extraordinary. I mean that english is weird as languages go and i actually find this one of the funnest things that i know about language and yet it's very hard to perceive it because it's the language that we speak and it's the language spoken by so very many other people in the world. English can feel so normal. But it's actually a highly abnormal thing. And i want to share with you. How it's abnormal and what i mean specifically is that when we think about language we have to think about the history of homo sapiens and the history of homo sapiens. As far as is known now goes back about three hundred thousand years and we might suppose that language emerged then. It's the way. I tend to think of it now. It's also possible. That homo erectus had language in which case language goes back about one point eight million years that is daniel ever another linguist view and i am pretty convinced of it but let's be conservative for now. Let's say that it's three hundred thousand years. The thing is for most of that time. Humanity was different from what most of humanity is now. The neolithic revolution that large scale architecture and the development of what we call civilizations. That's only ten thousand years ago or so and so what that means is that i say two hundred ninety thousand years what humanity was relatively small groups living on the land language developed there. So anything that happens to language after that is a departure from what language normally was what this evolved to be

Daniel
The earliest human footprints in Arabia

Science Magazine Podcast

07:54 min | 1 year ago

The earliest human footprints in Arabia

"Now, we have contributing correspondent and gibbons. She wrote this week about the likely earliest human footprints on the Arabian Peninsula high an hi Sarah how old or how early are these footprints but that's a good question. They threw a whole package of dating methods at them and came up with in the Ballpark of twenty, one, thousand, two, hundred, and ten, thousand years old. Now the dates are not absolute. There's some questions about them, but that's a pretty good ballpark. How does this age compare to previous hints or clues that humans modern humans early modern humans were on the Arabian Peninsula. Here's the. We know that early hominids members of human family have been migrating out of Africa for two million years because we find fossils of our ancestors in the public of Georgia we find them in. Asia. We find them in Eurasia place, but we don't know how they got out and the most logical route is they had to walk through Rabia because they couldn't fly. They couldn't paddleboats a at that point the one landmass in the way between Africa where humans arose originally, our ancestors arose and Eurasia is through Arabia. So we know they had to go through there, but there's a huge gap there are. No tools older than three hundred to five, hundred, thousand years, and what is there is not definitive. The only fossil have a member of the human family from Arabia is a finger bone that is about eighty eight, thousand years old. So the mystery is, where's the evidence of members of the human family marching through Arabia, and then the second part of that is modern humans specifically, our ancestors Homo sapiens arose probably in Africa, because we see fossils in the ballpark of one, hundred, eight, thousand, three, hundred, thousand years of Proto early Homo, sapiens arising and Africa, and then we find more of these sort. Of Early Homo Sapiens in Greece dating possibly back to as early as two hundred and ten thousand. So we know that they got out right now we're just trying to find evidence. Is there something that going on in the Arabian Peninsula that either people didn't want to hang out there for very long or that erased a lot of evidence. Reagan. Peninsula, has covered with desert's it's very dry today the food desert where they found these fossils is parched arid but there were periods in the past where the planet was cooler and wetter, and during those times hundred, twenty, five, thousand years ago it was. One of them, it was green radio was covered with tens of thousands of lakes. They were grasslands between them. If you think about these early human ancestors, it's not a separate continent or a separate place for them to go to its Afro Arabia, right? Yeah. So it's an extension of Africa if the client is good and they're following large game, how were they able to find these footprints? This is a very large area and it's a few remnants of human passing through. Yes. So this team will have by Michael, Leah and it's an international team of Saudi Arabians in a number of people on. Has Been doing a search of scouring the deserts of. Arabia. For the last decade, they start with satellite imagery which helps them see parched ancient lake beds which have sort of characteristic white halio souls often these ancient sediments that stand out in the satellites and then go down to ground truth what they see on the satellites, an airplane shots they go in on foot in jeeps, and in this case they saw this ancient. Lake better rolling out as white sediment. It had just been recently exposed by Rosen and they found the footprints of the animals which was amazing and as I looked closer to one hundreds of footprints, it was four hundred mostly animals but they did identify a small number. It was seven that seemed to be human footprints. So they knew right away they were very excited about that that this was something that was important how Can you tell that they're human footprints and not some other upright walking relative? There's not a whole science of studying human footprints ever since the first ones are found in la totally in Tanzania and Kenya there've been a number of footprints that have been studied people use three D morphometric dimensional analysis with computational imaging or can really look at the depth and they could model how much weight would have been needed to make. That footprint, the length of the foot, the stride between the steps, and then they've done studies living people in their footprints in Africa to sort of test out those ideas and Lo, and behold when they do that to these footprints, they seem to come up with somebody kind of humor that was taller and maybe a little lighter weight more like a modern human of Homo sapiens and say an Andrew Tall so based on that. They say, Oh, these probably were made by Homo sapiens although we cannot rule out that nanotubes might have been there to is there anything else can tell about these people by looking at these marks I think if they get more, they can start to tell about their social structure footprint studies in Africa. I've got quite complicated where you could see the direction that they're going in the payson different members of social groups you can. To see what they are the packs of humans look like you know, what size are they how many are in these groups? What are they doing a lot of the way in this case, they're not spending a lotta time. They're just sort of walking through. This is a bantering group. What is really really cool. Though is that footprint site these are a snapshot of a single moment in time a single day most of the. Time when you have an archaeological site in a layer soil that you get the fossils of the tools and the dates, all that took place. This fan is usually hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands of years. So if you find an animal bone near a prominent human early Human Boehner tool, you don't necessarily know fear there at the same time as parch with footprints like these these were lay down in the same day maybe. A couple of days and they dried out and then got caught up in preserved. So we know they were all there at the same time. So you get this really cool day in the life look at the and of the animals they were with, which is really cool in this case and lots of animals. Yes. Almost four hundred footprints of animals including very interesting. A wild asses which I don't think we're carrying burdens but. That's kind of neat and they were elephants and the thing that's interesting about the elephants as their popular disappeared for the Middle East, just in Africa. Thanks for three hundred years ago and here they are in hundred twenty, thousand in Arabia and the camps they also Campbell's it's kind of interesting that such large animals with Aaron. It begs the question were these humans following them where they attracted them. Going back to the, we talked about it being about one, hundred, twenty, thousand years old. There's some question about the date but if that were cracked, is there anything particularly Gordon about this time human history about what we know about migrations that we could link these prince two? Yes. So what is really interesting is that genetic evidence says that everybody outside of Africa. Came from migrations that happened in the last fifty to eighty thousand years. So this state predates that we happen to know that early Homo Sapiens were in the Middle East pretty quickly after this or at the same time they're fossils in caves. At school and cough so that our early sort of product Homo sapiens. So we know humans are at sorta suggests that because we don't have DNA that dates back this early these were failed migrations. These were members of the human family that went out they weren't shelled migrations for them they lived, but they did not contribute to the gene pool of letting people today that's one hypothesis but it also shows that there's more complex story of groups of humans migrating out of Africa constantly whenever the weather excitement is right that it's three to nothing that they can get water follow animals to meet and trek. Africa. They can cross the desert. It looks like humans were doing that whenever they could and so how do they contribute tour ancestry today a really interesting question and how many different kinds of hominids out there. Thank you so much an thank you. Sir,

Africa Arabian Peninsula Arabia Middle East Afro Arabia Gibbons Asia Cough Rabia Sarah Eurasia Saudi Arabians Reagan Georgia Tanzania
A journey into the Chicxulub Crater

Part Time Genius

03:31 min | 2 years ago

A journey into the Chicxulub Crater

"The town of trip to Mexico it's a crater about a hundred and twenty miles in diameter it's about a hundred ninety kilometers during the created this crater was about six miles that's ten kilometers wide hit the earth sixty five million years ago in spite of these comments measurements the crater is hard to see even if you're standing right on its rim to get a good map NASA researchers examined it from space ten years before the nineteen ninety discovery of the trip to the crater this is Louise Alvarez a geologist Walter Alvarez a father son team proposed a theory about the impact that we know today created it they noted increased concentrations of the elements radium in sixty five million year old clay medium is rare on earth but it's more common in some objects from space like meteors and asteroids the cover is a massive asteroid hit the earth blanketing the world in a medium showers particles wasn't the only effect of the collision the impact caused fires climate change and widespread extinctions at the same time dinosaurs which until then had managed to survive for a hundred and eighty million years died out Doug Robertson of the university of Colorado at boulder theorizes the impact heated atmosphere dramatically because in most big dinosaurs to die within hours this mass extinction definitely happened also evidence shows that about seventy percent of species living on earth at that time became extinct die off marks the border between the Cretaceous and tertiary periods of earth's history which are also known as the age of reptiles in the age of mammals respectively today scientists call the extinction B. K. T. event after the Germans spellings of Cretaceous and tertiary the KT event had an enormous impact on life on earth but what would happen Astrid had missed would have led to a world where people in dinosaurs would co exist or one in which neither could live in a world where an asteroid whizzed past earth instead of crashing down with the force of a hundred million tons of TNT life could have progressed much differently sixty five million years ago some of the animals and plants that are common today we're just getting started these include placental mammals which are mammals that develop inside a placenta in the womb and angiosperms which are flowering plants insects that rely on flowers such as bees were also relatively new many of these life forms Dr after the KT event and without that mass reptilian extinction to clear the way it may not sound ecological niches to fill in this scenario today's world might be full of reptiles and short on mammals including people but even Astrid hadn't had them source other cases life forms come to think anyway sometimes our species had started to dwindle long before the asteroid impact led many researchers to conclude that the asteroid was just one aspect of a complex story other global catastrophes like massive volcanic eruptions in what is now India most likely played a role also the changing landscape as the supercontinent Pangea broke up into today's continents probably had something to do with it too there's another argument that the check to lab asteroid hit the earth too early to have caused the extinction researchers Greta Keller and markets Harding both concluded the impact took place three hundred thousand years before the end of the Cretaceous period Keller theorizes particular impact was one of at least three massive collisions Harding argues that the regulator didn't come to the church let asteroid from another event such as a series of

Mexico Sixty Five Million Years Three Hundred Thousand Years Hundred Ninety Kilometers Sixty Five Million Year Eighty Million Years Hundred Million Tons Seventy Percent Ten Kilometers Ten Years
What If the Meteor that Helped Wipe out the Dinosaurs Had Missed Earth?

BrainStuff

06:08 min | 2 years ago

What If the Meteor that Helped Wipe out the Dinosaurs Had Missed Earth?

"Today's episode is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like, you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you stay hydrated, feeling refreshed and ready to take on your day. Refresh yourself with smart water. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here on the northern coast of the Yucatan peninsula near the town of chick. Love. Mexico is a crater about one hundred twenty miles in diameter. That's about one hundred ninety kilometers the asteroid that created this crater was about six miles. That's ten kilometers wide and hit the earth sixty five million years ago in spite of these immense, measurements, the craters hard to see even if you're standing right on its rim to get a good map. Nasa. Researchers examined it from space. Ten years before the nineteen ninety discovery of the chick fil crater, physicists, Louise, Alvarez and geologist. Walter Alvarez, a father son team proposed a theory about the impact that we know today created it. They noted increased concentrations of the element iridium in sixty five million year old clay radium is rare on earth, but it's more common in some objects from space like meteors and asteroids, according to the Alvarez theory, a massive asteroid had hit the earth blanketing the world iridium, but shower of particles wasn't the only affect of the collision the impact caused fires climate change and widespread extinctions at the same time dime stores, which until then had managed to survive for a one hundred eighty million years died out, geophysicist Doug Robertson of the university of Colorado at boulder theorizes, the impact heated earth's atmosphere dramatically causing most big dinosaurs to die with an hours this mass extinction. Definitely happened fossil evidence shows that about seventy percent of species living on earth at that time. Became extinct. The massive die off marks the border between the Cretaceous and tertiary periods of earth's history. Which are also known as the age of reptiles and the age of mammals respectively today, scientists call the extinction decay t- event after the German spellings of Cretaceous and tertiary the t- event had an enormous effect on life on earth. But what would have happened if the asteroid hadn't missed would it have led to a world where people in dinosaurs would coexist or one in which neither could live. In a world where an asteroid whizzed past earth instead of crashing down with a force of a hundred million tons of TNT life could have progressed much differently. Sixty five million years ago, some of the animals and plants that are common today. We're just getting started these include placental mammals, which are mammals that develop inside a placenta in the womb and angiosperms, which are flowering plants insects that rely on flowers, such as bees were also relatively new many of these life forms thrived after the t- event, and without that mass reptilian extinction to clear the way they may not have found ecological niches to fill in this scenario. Today's world might be full of reptiles and short on mammals, including people. But even if the asteroid hadn't hit done stores and other Cretaceous life forms might have become extinct. Anyway, some dinosaur species had started to dwindle long before the asteroid's impact. This has led many researchers to conclude that the asteroid was just one aspect of a complex story. Other global catastrophes. Massive volcanic eruptions in what is now. India most likely played a role also the earth's changing landscape as the supercontinent Panja broke up into today's continents. Probably had something to do with it too. Then there's another argument that the chip to love asteroid hit the earth too early to have caused the extinction. Researchers Gerda Keller and Marcus Harding, both conclude that the impact took place three hundred thousand years before the end of the Cretaceous period. Keller theorizes chick fil impact was one of at least three massive collisions Harding argues at the iridium layer didn't come from the web asteroid but from another event such as series of meteors burning up in the atmosphere. He bases. This theory on ROY particles objected during the impact a most of these are in an older layer of the earth than the Katie iridium layer, according to both of these points of view the absence of the club. Asteroid strike may not have had a big affect on the k t extinction earth was a warm planet for most of the time that dinosaurs lived after the end of the Cretaceous period, the world got a lot colder and experienced several ice ages. Whether dinosaurs could have survived such change in climate is debatable. It's hard to come to a definitive conclusion about what the world would look like today without the chicks love impact. But the question of whether people in dinosaurs could have coexisted is a captivating won the ideas, president in everything from the Congo legend of mock lame Obembe to King Kong to the pervading kitsch of the Flintstones. Then of course, there's the prevailing scientific theory about the origin of birds that they are in essence dinosaurs that we are coexisting with today. Today's episode was written by Tracy the Wilson and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production. Iheartradio's how stuff works to hear more from Tracy. Check out the podcast stuff, you missed in history class and for more on this and lots of other historic topics is that our home planet. How stuff works dot com. And for more podcasts from iheart radio is iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Jerry Lewis is dead. Sid vicious incurred. Kobe also did Amy wine-house Johnny cash and more disgrace. Them's rock and roll true crime podcast with stories about musicians getting away with murder and behaving. Very badly is available now hosted by me Jake Brennan, you can listen to disgrace of the iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

Walter Alvarez Gerda Keller Apple Fil Crater Lauren Vogel Marcus Harding Tracy Sid Vicious Mexico Nasa Cretaceous Yucatan Iheartradio Doug Robertson Murder Jerry Lewis Jake Brennan TNT Boulder
Neandertal Spears Were Surprisingly Deadly

60-Second Science

02:50 min | 2 years ago

Neandertal Spears Were Surprisingly Deadly

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata time three hundred thousand years ago the scene a herd of horses struggling in mud a short five meters away, a group of early Nando tall hunters throwing volley of wooden spears towards the animals, and then probably coming into an injured horse, and then perhaps finishing it off with thrusting spear on Emeka milks a paleolithic archaeologist at University College London. But there's something not quite right about that classic scene. She says specifically the Neanderthals spears may have been more sophisticated and more lethal than we've given them credit for which would alter that. Ancient Tableau, we believe that Neanderthals could have thrown them from farther away that that would have allowed them to approach animals that maybe weren't disadvantaged, and they wouldn't have necessarily needed to come right up close to the animal to kill it off. With thrust. Some of these. Shots with throwing spare could be lethal to animal like that. If they hit in the right way this revised assessment of Neanderthal weaponry began with the crafting of spruce timber into replicas of an actual three hundred thousand year old spear. The surface was finished with the same kinds of stone tools used to make the original milks, then recruited six male javelin throwers to Chuck the replica at a hay bale at five meters. They struck the target more than half the time at ten to fifteen meters. A quarter of the time, but from twenty meters just one in six throws hit the hey, I mean, it's still not amazing. Accuracy. I have to say I was hoping for better though, she points out that the javelin throwers aren't trained to hit targets. Something Neanderthals may have been more skilled at and the experiments suggest the weapons were at least capable of sailing much farther than had been thought and high speed video of the throws proved the spears could strike with deadly force. The research is in the journal scientific reports the crafting of these ancient spears also suggest. Just some degree of intelligence, a concept of or intuition about balance mass and design, for example, whoever crafted these ancient spears use the denser, lower part of the tree trunk for the spirit tips intended to strike prey, but we still don't know which Neanderthals use this beers in battle. I want to emphasize that we chose male athletes rather than female athletes. Not because we don't think that women were playing a role in hunting. But because we needed a homogenous sample, but I'd be very curious to know how women did in terms of accuracy, perhaps another round of tests with women throwers can address that. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher dot.

Christopher Dodd Christopher Dot University College London Emeka Chuck Sixty Seconds Five Meters Three Hundred Thousand Years Three Hundred Thousand Year Fifteen Meters Twenty Meters
The Watch (Ep. 303) - Game of Thrones Prequel News

The Watch

03:08 min | 3 years ago

The Watch (Ep. 303) - Game of Thrones Prequel News

"Do we know? We know Naomi watts was just cast as cast as social eight with a dark secret and young handsome, British dude from pulled dart also cast your so you're. Jack was not shutdown the I'm very curious your thoughts on this. But from a complete outsider perspective, not just outside are like we don't actually know what the decision making. It's been behind the scenes on this. But outsider in that. I don't really know what the long night super is. I just have a feeling that they, you know, they cautiously Greenland five pilot scripts the zeroed in on this one is one of the most potential. I think it's very important. Not knowing anything about the script. I think it's very positive important. That woman is at the helm of this franchise is opposed to recycling. The same type of person that did the last story because I think the other game of thrones got some criticism some of deserved for its treatment of women on screen, and I think it's time for different perspective on it. And then this casting is terrific. And so, you know, fingers crossed obviously, we said the same thing about James Mangold, directing Boba fett movie. But so far, it seems like they're doing things, right? Yeah. So the long night is in referee. To the age of heroes, which is basically this this period of time thousands of years before the story of game of thrones. At the television audience knows it, and it essentially covers the sort of rise of the white walkers. I think the white walkers this is from winter's coming net. But the white walkers came for the living writing their pale spiders as big as hounds bringing with them a darkness that lasted for generation. And this was known as the long night, and one thing that I think is pretty interesting is that. That does set it up. Similarly, I think too you've got an age of political intrigue and infighting between humans that are then confronted with this almost supernatural evil at their doorstep. And that is where game of thrones is winding up. So it is it is kind of fascinating to see them. Maybe run back. Some familiar beats if not the actual story. But I think they it's so it's so early it's really hard to like have any make any real assumptions about these things. The fact that Naomi watts cast as a as a quote unquote, socialite suggests that you will still have some of the same chamber whispers that we have in game of thrones. Which I think is something that you, and I are both really into. She has the right coloring to Lancaster. I assume Lancaster's existed in some form there. That's kind of exciting to to imagine. It's sort of hard to imagine any other ending for the series that doesn't exist yet other than what the creation of the wall. And would you know what we now know is a three hundred thousand year. I don't know how much time has passed. But basically a pause. Button until the problem came back again. Right. Yep. So does that rub? This of some of its potentially dramatic stakes. Maybe it does maybe doesn't we don't actually know what the battle over the characters are going to be. But it also offers an opportunity potentially to go deeper in different directions than game of thrones much like better call Saul has used the goodwill of breaking bad to give us really fascinating character. Studies in

Naomi Watts Lancaster Jack James Mangold Greenland Saul Boba Fett Three Hundred Thousand Year
Tampa, Michael Drake and Orlando discussed on Glenn Beck

Glenn Beck

00:36 sec | 3 years ago

Tampa, Michael Drake and Orlando discussed on Glenn Beck

"Scientists are warning a quick flip, of the earth's magnetic field to cost trillions of dollars in damage and international team of scientists has new research shows the earth's magnetic fields can flip much quicker than previously thought rather than taking three hundred thousand, years the group's found evidence a reversal of the magnetic north and south poles can happen. In as little as two hundred years the team including scientists from Australian National University, says if the, magnetic field. Reverses it would increase solar radiation and destroy power and. Communication systems around.

Tampa Michael Drake Orlando Buckhorn Tampa Buckhorn Bob Gaultier Honolulu Pinellas County Michael Drako David Graham Felix Vega Scott Hawaii Australian National University Governor Rick Florida Rica Kevin Allen Miami
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Savage Lovecast

Savage Lovecast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Savage Lovecast

"Don't wanna see your ass walking around naked thought i might be down when you're about to move in said i might be okay with that the reality of you walking around naked not so into it so yeah throw something on would you just to be considerate because we share the space we've to find a way to live with each other where we're being respectful of each other's boundaries and comfort levels and it is a reasonable boundary to sadie roommate i don't wanna see you naked not a reasonable thing to say you roommate i don't ever want to hear you tuck got roommates you're gonna hear him forgotten neighbors probably gonna hear them fuck to we're social animals we humans we clump up we clump up increasingly in urban centers we live cheek by jowl and you will overhear people having sex just as our ancestors two hundred three hundred thousand years ago on the african savannah overheard each other having sex in the cave an ex bush on top of the next tree it just comes with being a human you will be subjected to other people's sex noises don't like it build yourself a soundproof booth that you can sleep at night you know when you're swapping dirty messages without exciting new stranger that you met on some app and they ask you a question that inevitably gets asked what are you wearing you know what you want to be able to say me undies i'm wearing me undies of course i'm wearing me on days because they are fun and they're comfortable and they feel as good as they look and then you can take a picture and send it to them and prove that you're miandi is feel as good as they look so to those you haven't tried them yet or sex it out pictures of yourselves wearing them yet you can get incredible underwear sent here door with me undies meaning no more hunting around for the perfect pair crowded stores and eventually settling for good enough mandy are made with sustainably sourced material from beechwood trees there naturally soft fiber makes.

savannah bush mandy two hundred three hundred thou
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"So our brains actually evolved because of that cavity and the effects of of the atmosphere in that cavity if we leave the planet and go to mars we're no longer in the atmosphere of the earth we can become significantly dysregulates because we had all lager have those kinds of frequencies that are naturally part of eibar our our biology gotcha interesting now this be the same thing as what is referred to as geomagnetic fields when we're talking about the different magnetic fields produced by by the planet this is one of the one of the jio magnetic fields correct okay all right got now what do you think about these earth thing mats are grounding match the people use i think they work very well i think the body is definitely needs stimulation of different kinds i think our biology gang going back millions of years uh or even more recently three hundred thousand years is used to are sleeping on the ground basically so that we're closer to the actual earth itself don't forget the soils themselves are emitting all kinds of frequencies because of all the minerals in them yeah yeah the wall well even the human body from what i understand we have certain amounts of the mineral i i believe is called meghna tight in the human body that also helps to to transmit frequency throughout the body absolutely we have probably a billion magna type particles per gram of brain allow so the the brain itself then is a huge receiver.

three hundred thousand years
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min
"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred thousand years" Discussed on Wow In the World

"And now the dna testing has become so much easier and cheaper than ever before almost anyone who wants to take a test can take one min the i actually did mind with national geographic gina graphic project that's pretty cool but when i'm wondering right now is why homo sapiens are the only homo species at left on planet earth today well from what paleontologists have found there were at least sixteen other homo species so besides homo sapiens there were the homeowner letting hummel how delicious and homo heidelberg insas and others so what happened to that well many of these species lived for millions of years in overtime like other species well they went extinct in i guess we homo sapiens are still pretty young yeah i mean we've only been around for three hundred thousand years many so that kind of makes us like babies in the homonyn family on now hello maimi the lead human dr well we certainly act like baby sometimes at least as a species oh and you haven't seen anything until use nina homo sapiens tantura well woo we are we'll be right back this message is for a year i'm of your eisenberg join me on npr's ask me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy were games music paredes and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts ooh that's kid the shell hey hi thanks for calling wow in the world after the beep get ready to record.

hummel npr three hundred thousand years one min