35 Burst results for "Three Hundred Sixty Degree"

Monica Lewinsky's New Documentary Will Explore Cancel Culture & Public Shaming

KILF Morning New Podcast

01:43 min | Last week

Monica Lewinsky's New Documentary Will Explore Cancel Culture & Public Shaming

"Monica lewinsky is opening up about cancelled culture and public shaming while discussing her upcoming documentary. Fifteen minutes of shame. Yes she should. She's a absolute. She's the top expert mma world as far as public shaming is concerned and have her reputation just dragged through the mud for years. And there's that other documentary that's out. Fx is impeachment american story. I guess which will dramatic cise the events and she was produced. That i guess. Dramatize what i say. Tremendous dramatize association. Sorry yeah she said we're living in a culture and world now where we're drowning in shame. We're taking a three hundred sixty degree. Look at this culture of shaming public human public humiliation and trying to question where are we going. it's great. it's a great thing because she's right. We're drowning in shame. And we're we're pointing our fingers and and shouting down. Everybody who says or does anything. We don't like personally and and try and trying to take it to the degree where it's not just me. That disagrees with you the whole world. We think you're a horrible person. You should lose your job. You should lose your family. You should lose everything you've ever had. Well she just about did because she told nbc when she was on there promoting this fx series she told savannah guthrie that she couldn't get work had ptsd and was financially dependent on our parents as a result. Well

Monica Lewinsky Savannah Guthrie NBC
Optimize Your Brain: Fighting Cognitive Decline With Nutrition & Lifestyle

The Rich Roll Podcast

08:17 min | 6 months ago

Optimize Your Brain: Fighting Cognitive Decline With Nutrition & Lifestyle

"What is it about age or maybe neurology that makes people set in their ways as they get older. It is a weird thing right. It really is more difficult to entertain new ideas. I think it varies from person to person but in my experience just comfort you know when once you set a path in. You're comfortable with it. Your brain doesn't really allow you to change that math. It's like walking on a snow track. It's so deeply set in the walls or sol-solid that it's difficult for you to actually make a new pathogens and it requires a lot of reflection and judgment and being okay to make mistakes and the discomfort in being uncomfortable the comfort in being uncomfortable. They can help you set noise but it does seem like that becomes much more of a challenge. It does it does We the whole idea of change is not normal. I'm talking about chronic change acute chain. We're good at it because an acute change we had to for millions of years. There's a tree there's a lion you know. Better make change in my decision making. I'm not going to go down. This stop long-term change were not designed for that were not our brains are not designed for long term change. That's a completely different mechanism. And and if we and if we don't address that i mean to be honest i know that it's not be recalled. Our political stances. Everything is around this concept of being with change. I always say about. Five percent of population is future seekers. Another ninety five percent is passed protectors And you have to be pass protector in many ways because protection has worked. Whatever has gotten you here as you depending on the past patterns right but all the change in society in the world around us is by those five percent. Whatever i'm using arbitrary number that are comfortable. This is weird. People comfortable with change with the unknown. The three hundred sixty degrees of are known. You're willing to go there and yet this house. that's comfortable you're willing to leave it to go to the next place. That's an unusual concept Were which comes with the frontal lobe but but That's why as we get older. We become more set on all the strings that connects us to the past. You want us. To sever sever sever suffers to go to a new path. That is unknown at a time. Where i'm already vulnerable. Yeah that's too much risk. Yeah yeah is there a genetic piece to that when you look at that five percent can you isolate out what it is that distinguishes them neurologically from very early. You can tell there. There's a genetic component environmental component that genetic anxiety is at the core of all this stuff or term that is like anxiety we using anxiety as a just as a word. That's as filler. But it's a little more than that. Our ability to deal with the world around us for the most part for at the beginning is genetically you can see children. We have two children both trust me. We're gonna talk about them. But they're very precocious. Yeah incredibly but the understatement of the century go ahead make very different very different. Alex is what you could see when you when you I'm not putting him down. Because this is not a weakness this is just our proclivities. We can change you when you put him on the sand when he was six months. Old us som- do this. He hated sand. Sofi would crawl to the ocean. Having right away. I mean that's a threat. Why are you not threatened. By very thing you're supposed to be threatened by north right so that threat aversion versus not the river part of it is intrinsically ingrained in us part of it is actually data shows part of. It's actually program how your mother reacts to anxiety provoking moments mother because the is there all the time wherever you're around the most and how they react know how they promote challenging situations and anxiety provok- situation how they react with it and how they deal with it is the forget about leadership masters. I got a phd. Forget about that ends and starts there. Yeah you create situations that are a little bit anxiety provoking. You fail nothing. My parents didn't react badly. You succeed great how you react. And how does micro environments of threat version threat response. Threat creation and response is the foundation of all leadership. Yeah i would think from an environmental perspective or i mean an evolutionary perspective that You know maintaining your membership in good standing with your community is paramount right. So if that community is welcoming to people who pushed the boundaries and try new things. That's one thing but if that sort of thinking outside the box is gonna alienate you than You there's gonna be some pushback right there's a disincentive. That's that's butting up against somebody's willingness to entertain new ideas or try new things always an and the culture that's been set in place that creates an aversion to change the language the micro languages that anything that somebody brings that his little threatening to the status quo. You have things out. This is a this is arrogant. The word arrogant to push away. People who have new ideas is universe. It's it's such a ubiquitous silencing technique and When you look at when you look at the main reason why people are not willing to change his the fear of being ostracized like you said. Nobody wants to get out of that comfortable zone. Because it's really difficult to be alone in your way of life in your new methodology in your new habits and that's that's the first step that people have to challenge themselves to take over right given that though it's interesting that most environments are not really that permissive when it comes to free thinking and creative expression and most are pretty regimented around. What's okay and what's not but it would. It would seem like we should be more encouraging to that permissive environments. And why is that. Why are we not able to make that more. The case as opposed to you know the slim five percent or whatever it is. Yeah well we have ghanistan and with taliban around us yet. That same mentality exists here in the medical community and by the way this is me not bashing dramatic medical community like part of the only the medical community here to know about just their mentality. that's all know. But but the stagnant comfort with the status quo. Right is the same thing. I mean the hallways of your limbic system are the same You might have put it better clothes and better beards and you know my beard was a little better here than that but if the mentality is i must maintain it's not always over. I must maintain the status. And i don't know even why because it makes me uncomfortable. It's a satan. yeah. I mean to In two thousand two before we met two months earlier. I'm an experimental therapeutics branch. That's as wonky as as experimental as it gets speaking with nobel prize winners two months later. I'm in afghanistan. Speaking with taliban leaders. Both places trying to bring change. And i can promise you. The the the language was much more sophisticated But the blockades same protection of the status quo. That's why i mean when we talk about. Dementia we talk about stroke. We talk about mental health. Even now that repetition of the same patterns over and over again. I'm now some other. Studies are starting with clinical trial with hundred people. Fifty people six. We're done. We know what works.

Foundation Of All Leadership Sofi Alex Paramount Taliban Afghanistan Dementia Stroke
Rewiring and Resiliency for Better Health with Nicole Waters

Outcomes Rocket

05:43 min | 7 months ago

Rewiring and Resiliency for Better Health with Nicole Waters

"Today i have the privilege of hosting nicole waters on the podcast. She is a natural health practitioner who utilizes integrative techniques for mind body spirit integration. She created her own stress management program utilizing mind body relaxation neuro harmonizing breath work and neuro linguistic programming to guide our clients to overcome stress patterns and rewire into powerful states of living. Nicole also provides consultations utilizing food medicine as well as emotional wellness consultations. She believes everyone has the opportunity to thrive in their life and through education and support. She has seen people turn their lives around. Three hundred. sixty degrees. Nicole has been in the area of wellness for over twenty years. It was her own struggles with stress anxiety and health imbalances that allowed her to search out and find new ways to live healthy and well. Nicole enjoys working with clients to teach self healing tools and techniques needed for clients to transform their lives into ones. They enjoy living. She has experienced in both conventional as well as medicine before starting her own business. She was in corporate america within the healthcare market for over twenty. Nine years she's a natural health practitioner Licensed professional coach a certified rakia professional and a registered yoga teacher. So she's got a lot to offer us today around the subject of wellness nicole. Such a privilege to have you with us today. Oh it's my privileges thank you for having me saul absolutely so before we get into the nuts and bolts and You know what you guys do. Tell us a little bit about you. And what exactly inspires your work in healthcare while i think you know when miraculous things come about for a for each of us when we know what our life's work is it kind of happens interesting way and sometimes we're like what are we doing here. What's how is this happening. But you know for me it was. You know my own health journey. That started some ways of looking at medicine differently health differently wellbeing what that means and just taking a kind of a different path. You know i was somebody who i was. Now it's been over. Twenty years was diagnosed with a health condition. Ulcer at an early age. That was when i was thirty and just some of the things that had come up about. That was just something that i wasn't willing to do and i just started to dig in look at some other ways of going about it and i think that this happens with different people you now. You're just like that doesn't seem to vibe too well. And what are some of the other routes to go and You know. I think that's really were coming into a time. As far as inspiration with healthcare so much has changed within healthcare and people are really on looking at getting to the root of what's going on and maybe not so much of going for a quick fix on one eight to really know why they're feeling the feelings. They are why their body is feeling such a way why they have these sort of annul. Host of imbalances are things that are showing up. Maybe not going that quick fix route anymore. Because it hasn't really you know maybe it's been more like a band aid instead of just really finding out what's going deeper and deeper and that's really. What kind of inspires me. I inspire people to help them understand a variety of things that i want struggled with for example like fighter flight or adrenaline. And cortisol know. We're in a situation where people are very highly stressed and i was one of those as well. I think i came out of the womb stressed. I was in that situation and we don't a lot of times go into You know when when you see Practitioner that they really talk about. They say oh eat better or exercise more or something like that but but why is that. Why is there this constant strive cycle that happens and then how do we really get out from underneath it so that was a piece of it and then also i'm really inspired by talking to people about their thoughts. You know how their thoughts play a tremendous role in one house. You know i'm sure you know this. You know. I mean it's anyone who's doing anything and business. The sometimes you just gotta be pumping yourself up right on on how to move through things and so thoughts play a big role. And how often is that. Maybe talked about you know in traditional healthcare and then getting back to the way our ancestors ate and the way that we used to eat and how food impacts our body and how it you know creates such a bigger connection to our inner world in ourselves and loving ourselves knots to give ourselves fuel instead of just picking up a box you know of something that's been fortified and then also i'd say like emotions. Emotions are really part. I think most people have learned in their life to not address the motions that it's a old conditioning. Like oh just kind of stuff it in there unless you've gone down a different paradigm but that's really getting broken into now. I mean i think we can look at our world and say that you know. It's very important to be a dresser emotions in a healthy way so that it's not you know going out in projecting on other people and so these are all like very important pieces of like a whole picture which i say well being being well which is more than just the body. It's about the whole person. And so i love that i love that. Were going into different areas within the whole you know the whole person emotion the mind the feelings a you know the body things like that so very very important to inspires.

Nicole Saul Ulcer America
SolarWinds - The Gift That Keeps On Giving - DTNS 3943 - burst 04

Daily Tech News Show

33:27 min | 9 months ago

SolarWinds - The Gift That Keeps On Giving - DTNS 3943 - burst 04

"You're unique and so are your taxes. Turbo tax live has experienced tax experts. Who listen to you. Learn about your unique tax situations and answer your questions and on top of all that they can do your taxes from start to finish. Maybe you started investing and want some reassurance from an expert that you're doing things right maybe you're now self employed and needs some expert advice on what qualifies as a home office deduction or maybe it rather have an expert file your taxes for you so you can focus on what matters most no matter what. Your situation is turbo. tax live tax. Experts can answer your questions. Give tax advice review your return before you file or even do it all for you. Turbo tax live. Gives you confidence that you're uniquely you. Taxes are done right into a turbo tax. Live file with the help of an expert or let an expert file for you coming up on how to clone someone security key roku by some qube and we'll make the apple cars. This is the daily tech news for friday january. Eighth twenty twenty. One in los angeles on tom. Merit and from studio redwood on sarah lane from studio colorado. I'm shannon morris drawn the top tech stories in cleveland. I'm lynn per nine. The show's producer. Roger j we were just talking about a cas product that makes you ice cream and ninety seconds whenever you wanted and why roger never cries wider conversation join our expanded show. Good day internet at patriotair dot com slash dpd s. Let's start with a few things you should know. Amazon has discontinued its prime pantry. Grocery and household item service products previously available in pantry will now be available like any other products on amazon. So it's not going away to gather but the service itself prime pantry launched in twenty fourteen offering reduced shipping on up to forty five pounds of household goods for a monthly fee. Amazon node vied prime pant pantry subscribers about the closure in december and then issued refunds the. Uk's competition and markets authority launched an investigation into google's privacy sandbox. That would block third party. Cookies in chrome regulator received complaints from the marketers for an open web coalition saying the plan would abuse google's dominant position in online advertising. So the investigations going to evaluate. If the privacy sandbox changes would concentrate advertising spending market share with google samsung launched the galaxy chromebook to a cheaper version of the galaxy chromebook at launched last year so instead of four k it has a ten eighty p lcd screen with less storage fewer cameras less ram. It's also heavier and thicker overall but it also now starts at five hundred forty nine dollars instead of one thousand dollars. That has a thirteen point. Three inch nineteen twenty by ten eight hundred sixteen nine. Lcd touchscreen with the dual core intel seller on five twenty five you upgradable to an intel core. I three ten ten eleven ten one. one zero. You eight gigs. Ram and one hundred twenty five gigs of storage for six hundred ninety nine dollars a shortage of semiconductors affecting automakers. Volkswagen said last month that they needed to adjust first-quarter manufacturing plans around the globe because of the shortage. Now honda says it will cut domestic output by about four thousand cars this month at one of its factories in japan nissan is adjusting production numbers for its note hatchback model and ford has moved up previously planned downtime at a kentucky plant for its sport utility vehicle factory to the jin chips all right. Well we're talking about cars. Let's talk about the the apple car. Yeah a lot of rumors as of late will really over the last few years. But but but the rumors had resurfaced recently and hyundais. Now talking to apple about kerr's so says the company hyundai representative told cnbc quotes. We understand that apple isn't discussion with a variety of global automakers including hyundai motor as the discussion is at its early stage. Nothing has been decided. Korean economic daily said that apple suggested the arrangements and hundred was reviewing the terms that involved e production and also battery development hyundai has had his own battery platform called e. g. m. p. going into production later this year. So might be saying what you're doing. Reuters sources say that apple would like to produce a passenger vehicle by twenty twenty four however might not be that date bloomberg's mark gurman reports in thomas e. v. from apple is five to seven years away and michio recently said he wouldn't be surprised if it takes until twenty twenty eight. Yes what's probably going on. Here is apple and i think this significant part has decided to start investigating how they would build. Whatever it is. They're going to build whether it's a whole car or an integrated platform and they're going to different manufacturers and parts suppliers and folks like magna including hyundai. And saying what are you got. How can you help us with this. And is a great company for this because they make parts they make systems. They make full cars. There's all kinds of services in the conday company that could play a part with apple so it may not be. That apple knows what they want from hyundai. It may just be that they're going and saying hey let's talk. You do a lot of the kinds of things that we think we're going to need. I'm pretty excited about this. I just got my first hyundai ever this year and my perception of this story was weight but hyundai currently uses android auto and a lot of their their cars. So i would love to see. How apple would integrate Hyundai's current technologies into something that is very useful for that apple ecosystem not just looking at e itself but also the The the systems inside of it the controls in how they would manage that four a driver and a passenger in the car. Yeah i mean. I think that's one of the big questions that i have is okay. Let's say let's say it's hyundai that that applet ended up working with with clearly not set in stone at least from what we know at this point. But let's say it's the companies for kicks. Let's imagine that that's what it is. Yeah it is. It is an apple car that hyundai produces a lot of parts for the way that works with lots of other companies to produce other hardware for apple. I mean that that's the loftiest kind of goal that we're looking at and maybe that would take till twenty twenty eight at you know if if apple was lucky. I think it probably has more to do with like you said shannon not that you know android auto wouldn't still be prevalent in a lot of passenger vehicles but maybe at some sort of it's a special relationship. It's it's a special kind of os inside a car that is supposed to you. Know i don't know move some merch because What apple is providing on the software side is is. Is that much more interesting. I really don't know if you look at that. Bloomberg article mark gurman sources are saying that Tesla people that apple has hired are working on things like interior exterior. Drive train stereo. Desist the kinds of things. You need when you're building a car not carting a software platform so then the question becomes is it the apple car period. Maybe hendaye makes it. Maybe somebody else makes it. And you know they'll figure out how to distribute it or is it the apple car by sunday and you go to hyundai dealership to buy it the way you went to an. At and t. store to an apple iphone but it's really apples car in cooperation with sunday. Are there multiple partners. I mean that's all the kind of stuff we're waiting to see but it really does feel like we have gotten to the point where this is no longer just yeah. They're working on project titan. They don't know what they're gonna do to. They have an idea. It's more than just software and they're working out the details. Maybe they don't even know that yet. Well i'm interested to see what happens but we also have some other news. Security among the systems impacted by the solar winds attack is the electron filing system. Used by the us federal courts at investigation is underway to determine if confidentiality of documents filed with the courts was breached and as a result starting wednesday confidential documents filed with the courts will be stored on standalone systems. Not uploaded big difference so these are documents sealed from public access because they contain sensitive information like investigative techniques identities of informants and a lot more other. Us federal agencies affected included the justice department the state treasury and energy departments as well solar winds has engaged. The krebs stay most security consulting group to help deal with this attack. That firm was formed by alex. Stamos the former chief security officer at yahoo and facebook and chris krebs the former director of the us cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency or sisa. So krebs was fired last month. By the president after finding no evidence of with voting systems in the twenty twenty election. Yeah stamos first of all brilliant for those two to team up and smart for solar winds to engage them for what they say is Helping with transparency with companies that are affected But this we we are not done finding out how bad this is. There are reports that there may have been other ways that this whoever is behind this intruded beyond just solar winds. They're finding evidence of that. They have not been able to root out the people that got into this vulnerability from all systems yet. They're still in there in a lot of cases. And you know this. This kind of confidential information is exactly the kind of thing you fear that someone would get intruding into a government system informants investigative techniques that you can now learn from to evade being prosecuted or caught yourself. That's that's crown jewel type stuff it's it's very interesting. In fact krebs spoke on record saying that it could potentially take years to figure out how deep the solar winds attack actually went and how many different kinds of infrastructure. You know brands and everything that it might have affected so this is not something. That's going to die anytime soon. I'm glad that they are reaching out. Craig's and stay most though because that i agree with you tom. It's excellent. excellent team roku made a few interesting announcements roku says. Npd data shows that the roku s was the top selling smarter operating system in the us and canada in two thousand twenty thirty one percent market share in canada. Thirty eight percent in the united states That's pushed the samsung's tizen number two. At least we don't actually know samsung's ties and was number. One in two thousand nineteen also announced a wireless soundbar reference design that uses wifi for its roku. Tv ready program remember. Last year roku announced the program which had a designed for wired. Sound bars. The program includes tcl. Pokemon on an element has just announced. They'll join as well with two point. Two point one ready sound bars roku tv ready to expand internationally later this year as well. But here's the big roku news roku has agreed to acquire exclusive global distribution rights to more than seventy five Shows documentaries some of which had not been released before qube shutdown. So there'll be some new stuff that nobody's ever seen after their exclusivity deal expires. That'll happen in a bit more than a year. Depending on the show roku will still have the rights to show the content just not exclusively until thousand twenty seven the content will have to be presented in original increments of ten minutes or less. The deal doesn't let them stitch it altogether. The content will be added to the more than forty thousand movies and tv shows already available. In the roku channel shows include from Be anyway punked. Murder house. Flip and dummy which stars anna kendrick. I never watched the new punk. I heard had its moments. The whole qube thing. It's really interesting to me because it was sort of like. It crashed and burned so quickly. And there's a lotta shot and friday around folks in the industry about it. And i think that's not because qube was doing things wrong. It was because the company had raised so much money time. Because you know. They had meg whitman. Jeffrey katzenberg who are you know. Heavy hitters and there was a little bit of like you are being to embassies and therefore you shall fail. The company did fail and the idea that some creators will have a new life on another platform shows. That just don't even saw but people still worked on. And maybe you're really good. I think this this makes a lotta sense and good for roku to get exclusivity for at least a few years so does roku have to wait at all in order to start showing this content or can happen immediately. I don't know when the start date. Whenever the deal is you know goes into effect. Then they'll immediately be able to to show it so you know within a month or so it would be my guess anyway but no they. They don't have once. The deal is actually in effect. They don't have to wait. What's going on here. is that the baby. Production companies own the rights to their own stuff but they have a two year exclusive for each one of their shows with qube and those two year exclusives are now being transferred to roku so roka will be able to have the exclusive for the remainder of whatever. The period was with quick. That's why it's more a year. Exclusively goes away then they still have the right to show it until twenty twenty seven but the production companies that made it can now start shopping at around to other places as well so the production companies do hold the content and remember this is just the content. Qube is still in a over. Its turnstile technology which is holding it up from selling its technology and i would expect once it resolves that lawsuit should resolve it in a way that they still hold their technology. They'll sell that to so this isn't the last you're going to hear could be selling off a part of it. I would imagine. Gotcha yeah that whole. The whole technology part of qube was again was an ambitious thing that was released at a very inopportune time in twenty twenty when everyone was like. We're just sitting at home like we don't need this like mobile phone technology. It's like cool that you can shifted around but you can't even cast thing. I mean the company did fix that pretty soon after allow about she was just. I mean it's just did. The timing couldn't be worse but that technology when you think of it in a variety of other form factors such as monitors that swivel talked about some of those yesterday. I don't know that qube or tiktok or snapchat or all of the stuff where we're like. Oh yeah that's the. That's the portrait view. Rather than landscape view. That works for certain apps is is is all that this is four. I think there's more to it So we'll see what happens and there's patents and things that are always valuable because you can use those to extract some concessions and money and stuff. So yeah expect that all to come join the conversation in our discord which you can join by linking to a patriotic. Can't get in there and talk about your favourite qube shows with all the other discord folks. Just lincoln to your patriotic out at patriotair dot com slash. Dpd s all right shannon. How do you clone a security key. Well i i will say please do not stop using your security keys because of this story i will explain it. Researchers from ninja lab published a paper on thursday showing how you could clone a google tightened security gate this is a two factor authentication key which is very similar to a you. Be key that you have to plug in or tap in order to access an account after putting in your username or your password credentials. Were both so in order to pull off the clone. You would need physical access to the key for about ten hours. Sometimes a minimum of ten hours just kind of depends on how good you are at this. About twelve thousand dollars worth of equipment physical equipment and custom software and some advanced skills in electrical engineering and cryptography as well. So you have to remove the chip and then take measurements of it at a being registered on each account that you went to attack the measurements observe electro magnetic radiation as the chip generates digital signatures that let the attacker slowly deduced the private key so measurements take about six hours per account. That's not including taking apart. The original tighten security key putting it back together. Then you need to seal the chip back into its case. You also need the targets password in order for this to work. So the reason it works is because of vulnerability in the security hardware chip residing within the google titan key and that is called an eighty seven hundred x by this company called. Xp if it's exploited in attacker could grab the elliptic curve cryptographic private key for the account and the same chip is actually found in other two factor. Authentication physical tokens as well like There's a ubiquity that it's found in but chances of attack or very very minimal given the scope of the attack so if you do all of this without the target ever noticing then they would never duplicated key but again given the scope given how much it costs and everything behind the scenes probably when it happened to normal user. The point of these security keys being the best way to use For two factor. Is that you can't even get at your private key right you. Nobody has to be able to get in there like the chip. Just doesn't make it available so the fact that they were able to get in there and get it is huge. You know the fact that they were able to do this is significant. But i mean if you're not a target of an advanced persistent threat. You don't need to worry about this. No one's going to go to the trouble to do this. And even if you're a target. I would guess shannon that most of them probably would be able to notice if someone took their key for ten hours or more you. You likely likely would especially since a lot of people with hardware tokens like google titan will stick them on a on their keychain for example like with their house keys or whatever wherever they keep all those personal physical devices that they don't want lost or stolen they keep them all on engaging so if somebody was to take one of these out of your purse out of your gym locker wherever it might be and remove it for like ten hour street minimum. You would likely know that this would have happened. the neat thing about these chips inside of these. Google tightened security keys. And any other cryptographic hardware tokens like these is that. Even the manufacturer doesn't know the private key so the fact that they were able to find vulnerability on these specific chipsets is really interesting. And i think that's the important bit of that. Is is even though the google titan like the end all be all of really excellent. Two factor authentication. There's always. The potential that vulnerabilities can be found. So i'm happy that this research came out. It's so fascinating and it's so interesting in this means that an x. p. and other security chipset manufacturers that sell these teeny tiny chips to google or whoever the company might be They can build on this. They can research and figure out what the next version of their chipset needs to entail in order to not be vulnerable to this again in the future. Yeah i mean this is really a good security story right. We finally figured out because there's always a way right. We finally figured out the way you get the private key out of a security key and guess what it's really hard takes a long time and now that we know it we can make it even harder and hopefully you know push that barrier out even further and even if somebody did have time to do this and you didn't notice i was reading the paper because i'm a huge nerd and they go as far as using fuming fuming nitric acid in order to get like melt the epoxy off of the original google titan. How are you going to put that back together. In order for somebody to not notice like there's a lot of intricacies with this attack in order for it to actually be pulled off so chances are very very slim that somebody would be able to pull off so again as i said at the very beginning. Don't stop using your google tightened security key if you have one keep using it because chances are you would never be attacked with this. Just just know if you haven't seen it in ten hours look together strange. This is going to be in a movie though. I'm calling that shot right now. We're gonna we're gonna see this movie. Where like i hope so. Somebody goes into surgery and they take his key and they go out and do all this and they slip it back in because ten hours later. He wakes up from anesthesia on something like that. I just hope they talked to the researchers so they actually show it off right. Yeah Sony tv and audio announcements Starting with details for its own tv lineup. Sticking with lead ravi x four k and k. Tv's will support four k at one hundred twenty hertz variable refresh rate vr as well as a l l m low latency mode and e arc. These are all things that are important. If you've got a ps five now you've got sony. Tv they can go. That sony also has an improved a chip that is going to improve the picture and sound positioning. So it aligns with what you see on the screen. Sony's master series. Tv's will come with a sensor that adjusts white balanced immense. Your ambiente color temp. You don't have to do anything they'll just do it. Also an aluminum heat shield. That will make for brighter. All the sets will support. Hdmi two point one. Another big one for ps five dolby vision hdr angle tv. Sony also announced. It's three hundred sixty reality audio platform if you're not familiar with three hundred sixty degree audio places instruments and vocals in a virtual sound field around your head but using just the one speaker so you can do this in an amazon echo or google. Home sony will start streaming video with three sixty audio later this year. Starting with concert from zara larsson on january eleventh. And somebody's gonna make speakers that support this. It'll be may supported by other speakers as well. But sony is going to put out the are five thousand and three thousand They've got that dark cloth. Surface that all these speakers seem to have these days with either bronze or silver accents. Work with google and amazon assistance and can connect to select sony abroad via. Tv's as well as supporting wi fi bluetooth. Spotify connect in google cast. The speakers do automated calibration to the room. They're in donut. The press a button for that. Either and we'll simulate three hundred sixty degree audio for stereo tracks as well. The five thousand cost five hundred pounds or five hundred ninety nine euros no. Us price yet on the three thousand two hundred eighty pounds. Three hundred fifty nine euros. This seems this. Seems like it's shaping up to be one of the trends. Is this the sort of three hundred sixty degree audio while you're listening to your black bank and it's just one speaker or potentially a couple of speakers ativan. Maybe yeah yeah already supported. Yeah there's less of kind of like What do i have to do. Five point one surround or at least get a couple of speakers and make them a stereo pair type thing. I really haven't heard this in. I don't know. I used to hang out at magnolia at best. Buy all the time. And just like geek out on stuff like this. of course. this technology wasn't around at the time. But it's really come on. Let's turn on some stuff and see the speakers. Do it works well. Then that's awesome my first reaction because i got rid of my kind of pants speakers some years ago because friend of mine needed them more than i did and i didn't have room in my apartment but i miss that i'm also an a. A permanent now that's smaller and kind of has a lot of weird angles and i find audio bounces off walls in wiz. That wouldn't if it was more of a square box broom So i'm not sure that i'm the perfect target market for this. You're the you're the one puts this through its paces and sees if it really works. Yeah if i could actually work as advertised again with some funny angles in a big old frame. Then i'm i'm really into this and i've always been. I don't have a sony. Tv currently sorry zony. But i was abroad. Bravi a person for years. Nears i think what the new bravi line is coming out with. Looks really nice. And i mean not totally in the market for a new tv. But i like the fact that i might get a new sony again paired up with a sony speaker. You got three six. Yeah already got all this stuff. It's going to be a messed anyway. You slice it. But i like. I like this to be sixty reality audio platform. What would you have set up in your house. I was straight up going to mention sonos because if if it doesn't have the connectability to be able to work with all of my other platforms that currently have invested in. Then chances are i wouldn't buy it. So i do have sono says in my house and i do have some issues connecting those with other speakers in the household to like like my google hub for example so the fact that this works with google and amazon assistant the speaker specifically The audio speakers. I think that's pretty cool. I like that. They are bringing that in and i am interested because i do live in a household. That has very high ceilings. How this would work in that kind of environment. So yeah. I'm very interested in the audio aspect. Well you might also be interested in what colour has come out. Oh yes the folks who make things like toilets and and sinks and lots of appliances however. Been a real. Cas mainstay for the last few years for some cool innovations and this year is no different. Even though we're not in vegas koehler has a new smart bathtub called the stillness bath. That lets you use an app or use your voice using google or amazon's assistance to fill up the water or perhaps set the mood by changing the color of the lights around the tab or even add some fog. You know you wanna kind of pretend like you're in the then present routines also turn on features in a certain orders if you wanna get kind of creative. that's cool. Yeah the certain amount of limitations with the base model and the base model is not cheap so temperature and depth control models alone will cost around eight thousand six hundred ninety eight dollars. That's right it's almost nine thousand dollar bathtub. If you want the experience tower that lets you activate fog and aromatherapy. That will run you just over ten thousand dollars. Both models are available in july. There are real things and if you want the version with lights and floor grades for overflow fifteen thousand nine hundred ninety eight dollars available. This october signed me off. I won't be buying those. Nope not even a little bit but we could have taken a bath at s in the new in the pre show roger was like. Why would you want fog. It's like this. Why does anyone want to be on. Yeah racist luxury suites in hotels for sure as well as apple's houses sure yeah something well. Yeah it's it's that like hey look at what my bath can do people go. Wow very fancy and then you know ten years from now will be like remember when we thought it was fancied to talk to your bathtub so that it would start filling up without touching it but Yeah it's it's somewhat silly because of the price. But i'm not really much of a bath person but they do look very nice all right. Let's check out the mail bag but ads do it. Nick wrote in with a pronunciation. Ramps own neck. You are not alone he says. Ac's rog is an initial list. Because it's our og like fbi or cia. People say ron yet. They're lower end gaming brand tough not initially them. It's an acronym like scuba or produce you f but pronounced off. It's like ace's can't make up their name minds. Then there's strict which is our subbrand strikes as a word it's a completely nonsensical made up word. But it's a word and you pronounce it as such nick as honestly as somebody. That buys a lot of hardware. Because i've rarely had a bad experience with them over the past twenty years. I am baffled by some branding decisions. The one the bugs me. The most is the strict subbrand. Sometimes acis makes the tricks products. The high end product in the product stock yet other times. It's a mid range product. Would it be too much to ask for consistency and product. Branding twenty twenty one. Yes apparently apparently we feel your pain. Nick i love the dichter's just like i just need to vent you guys. Let me let me let me get this up. Just we appreciate that. Yeah i mean i. i'm with you nick. Everyday is a fresh new hell when it comes to reading out some model numbers but what is not is shouting out our patrons at our master and grandmaster levels. Today they include christmas merton james and digression daniels and of course landon peralta back and illustrating the show. What have you drawn for us today. Len well you know. I'm really excited. Say that we've have the first image of the ample car the car. Which i'm that's what i'm calling it. I'm sure they're gonna take my advice. Coming around twenty twenty seven ish or so maybe You know you may. If you're a fan of richard scary busy world a you may be very familiar with the look of of the apple. Ii car I think it'll be a big hit with with fans of people who have kids So check it out. this is called meet. I car And this is available right now. My patriot on which by the way has to new levels. If lets me be your Let me be your teacher. Your mentor with your artwork. I can give you some help that way. And patriots dot com forward slash. Len plus i also just launched a new product called flip face max which is over at lend store dot com. And i i want to show you what that looks like. I did something special. for For our friend shannon for snubs. This is a this is what the flipping flipped. Face masks. looks like This is It's a little bit higher Higher end than the normal flip sister used to But those are on the front page story on pro dot com. But this is for you shannon. If people wanna see that because most people are just listening to this what should they do. Go to well right now. It's going to be on twitter instagram later. But just go to lend dot com. You'll see all the ones i've done over the past couple of weeks and including including shannon's so it's really lovely. Let it's yeah. That's adorable shannon morris First show of twenty twenty one certainly not the last. I know you're a busy lady at. Where can people keep up with your work. Oh my gosh. I have been busy. Youtube dot com slash shannon morse. Just like name. I just did at tech predictions video and it was so cool. I got like eighteen up and coming tech youtubers to their twenty twenty one tech predictions for the year. And there's some names in there that you that you definitely know. Aunt pruitt Miriam take rene ritchie. So i had a whole bunch of people joining and kinda give me their thoughts and It was very very optimistic. And i was really happy to see that. So if you want to see that video and the rest of mine check out my youtube channel. Hey folks if you need. Just the headlines. It's okay to skip eighteen s. Know you get busy. Check out our related show daily tech headlines all the essential tech news in about five minutes daily tech headlines dot com. We're live on this show. Monday through friday at four thirty. Pm eastern twenty one. Thirty e. c. And you can find out more at daily tech news show dot com slash lives. We back monday with chris. Ashley have a gray weekend. All this show is part of the broadband network. Get more at frog pants. Dot com club who've enjoyed this broader.

Tech Technology Apple Hyundai Hyundai Motor Mark Gurman Nissan Honda Cnbc Kerr Kentucky Ford Japan Michio Reuters Bloomberg Thomas Magna Google Roku Krebs Shannon Morris Sarah Lane Roger J Competition And Markets Author Samsung Shannon Sony Chris Krebs
How a 22 Year-Old Company Pivoted During COVID

The Small Business Radio Show

06:40 min | 11 months ago

How a 22 Year-Old Company Pivoted During COVID

"Meredith. Welcome to the show. Great lakes wrap very. So how are you doing during covid six months and i can't believe we're six months in. I was saying just six months ago. Oh probably over next month right right. Now we're doing good have left the house really We did mu so. That was a little bit stressful. But all good so tell us about. The salesforce is small and medium business trends report. Why do you do this. And what can we learn from it. Sure we'll be. We just have published our fourth edition of the smb transport where we surveyed twenty three hundred global smb leaders and we actually got a really unique experience this time around because we published one back in march and the pandemic hat. And we're like we got we got. We gotta redo this. We want to get before and after so we just did another survey in august so we have a really interesting perspective of kind of before. And after i wouldn't say after i say now we're not quite after yet right. I guess that's wishful thinking right But during i think you know we're we didn't publish it on salesforce dot com slash. Fm be trends but he wants to see the details but you touches on things like how the pandemic racial injustice have affected motivation. What challenges and gold are happening with. Smb leaders how demographics shape the entrepreneurial experience in the outlook You know the role of digital transformation and driving resiliency in small businesses and really how small business leaders are planning to recover and to grow from that. They're really seven insights that stood out to me the first and not surprising we asked what are the top areas of focus during co bit in back in august sixty. Four percent of our smb leaders said safety and sanitation policies. Like i'm thankful for that to too as consumer next was fifty. Nine percent of leader said local public health mandates contact with service a out of physical space. That's top of mind You know second because we have the before an effort after that. Continue to be challenges. That didn't really change Keeping up with demand Forty seven percent ranked it very high in march forty six said the same in in august providing quality products still challenge on still one of their top challenges. Smb leaders but what was new and what really became more difficult for these three things which was bringing innovative products to market. You see a lot of companies have done so much to the word pivot now is being overused. But you see you know that the stock company now making ppe Howard folks getting innovative in delivering services to homes right versus navy in person You've seen i've seen in san francisco restaurants pairing up with the wine shop and delivering date. Night meals But really getting creative on the market but another area that was personalized customer engagement. I think it's become more important To engage with your customers and that's it became more difficult. You know something. Many small business owners had it really thought about the personalization and then third was the connected experienced How do i stay connected during these times. The thirteen that came out to me. Was you know we we ask. Vod survey respondents. Are you a growing business or you. Can you know Growing meaning our or your revenues growing Those are are growing. Were actually much more likely to offer flexibility to things like payment policies return policy maybe giving extended payment terms instead of paying. You know in thirty days you can pay forty five days but this really highlighted the importance of prioritizing developing a relationship versus a one time transaction about all the time and i think even more so in the last six months has been loyalty right. Returning customers You know the more flexible you are with these customers. Warned loyalty recreate. You create an honest. That's your recurring revenue. Are you wanna find your recurring revenue. The fourth thing. That really came out before you go on. I just want to discuss a couple of elements. Because i don't wanna lose them very important threads. You talked about the personalization of the customer gauge being so important. And we've seen that for a long time. Ever since burger king said you know you can have it your way people want a personalized one on one experience but it really is becoming much more difficult because on one hand you have the personalized experience on the other hand. You have contactless delivery right. So what do you think. Some of the best ways are for small business owners to actually keep that personalized connection with their customers at time. When they're not supposed to be contact lists right. You know i get about knowing who your customer is. And this is where i think. Technology actually can play a huge part. It's a huge advantage to small businesses. There's technology out there. Of course we've got some. But i think there's lots of great companies it's not affordable and it's easy to use but a great crm tool which is customer relationship and a lot of opposites. Don't go searching for a crm. They're like how do i talk to my customers. How do i connect. This is about putting the customer in the center of everything you do. And you want to get off spreadsheet or off the piece of paper and you know you as the owner of the business may know mrs smith very well. She has two dogs. she likes to be. She likes the color red She lied roses but you may not know her as well. When that person carl's intimate make an order. Wouldn't it be great if all your employees knew everything about that. Customer data is about personalization when fact that together and share that data with your company right so we call it just force. We call it the three hundred sixty degree view of the customer. We wanna know their likes their preferences their orders. What business have they done with us. What have they done the past. So you really have that personalized Interaction no matter who they're talking to when they call you or when they email you. Or when nate tweet you get. We're seeing growing channels is also about the personalization and it sounds like channel so many channels out there now. We don't just walk into a store. We can't really walk into a store. So you gotta be listening everywhere and meeting your customer where they're out

Meredith Great Lakes Navy San Francisco Burger King Mrs Smith Carl Nate
Antares rocket launch at Wallops Flight Centre set for Sept. 29

Innovation Now

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Antares rocket launch at Wallops Flight Centre set for Sept. 29

"The Northrop Grumman Antares rocket with cygnus resupply spacecraft on board will head to space. Later this month launching from the mid Atlantic regional spaceport at NASA Wallops flight facility. The Antares launch is the company's Fourteenth Commercial Resupply Services Mission. Cygnus will deliver NASA science investigations, supplies, and equipment to the International Space Station highlights of space station research facilitated by this launch include a plant habitat for radishes the test of a biologic drug that could be used for the. Treatment of leukemia and the Universal Waste Management System. A new compact toilet that astronauts can use on deep space exploration missions a new three, hundred sixty degree virtual reality camera from a Montreal based film. Studio will also be transported to the station. So astronauts can capture a future spacewalk in cinematic virtual reality cargo resupply from US companies insurers a national capability to deliver critical science research to the space station and significantly increases masses ability to conduct new investigations at the only laboratory in space innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley

International Space Station Nasa Wallops Antares Cygnus Jennifer Pulley United States Nasa Atlantic Montreal
Breaking the Esports Audio Sponsorship Mold w/ 100 Thieves VP of Esports and JBL's Global Director of Marketing Comms

Esportz Network Podcast

05:31 min | 1 year ago

Breaking the Esports Audio Sponsorship Mold w/ 100 Thieves VP of Esports and JBL's Global Director of Marketing Comms

"While the podcast. So we're going to be breaking down this deal for both perspectives. It see how the cookie crumbles really what it comes down to how these deals habit. You see all the headlights you see the products being worn by the players Orga dive into really the steps that lead up to the creation of a brand deal like this one. So starting out from the early stages which side reach out I was JBL. Making the step over to one hundred thieves or one hundred thieves reaching out to jbl. Do you guys remember? I'm pretty sure we were the ones that initiated the contact. Through an agency that we're working with at the time to help us to grab craft our approach to to exports into gaming in general. So I i. think we were the first ones to to to. To Extend the hand. Absolutely, Jacob, do you remember when those conversations started and the energy was like a as you reached out? This is a space that's really filled with a lot of partners jbl. Here's a legacy audio brad reaching out to you remember what those early conversations through like. Yeah. A excitement is always Key in figuring out these partnerships and really looking at all brandon and who reposition ourselves with. We need partnerships that we that we truly get behind an ice either about So with JBL obviously premium quality products something we feel like we represented in displays of east bolts. So while I, can't remember the. The. Stop Time. All who initiates I remember you know sort of the. The sense of feeling in the room once we came over the initial hurdle of introductions and you know that was one of excitement. Absolutely. I can only imagine the seems like a trend that's happened this year of these really log running brands enter eastward seeing that with Herman. Miller. For example, in the complexity partnership, you've got a brand that well out dates video games, much less e sports getting into the space promising. Hey, we've got this great product that's been used by all these other industries, and now we want to be involved in East Sports Michael From your perspective. Why was J B L A natural fit for East? Sports. So I I think to to answer that it was. We were looking at this more as a great fit for gaming and where we think gaming is is going in the future if you take a look at how the graphics within the game have evolved over the last fifteen or twenty years like. It has grown in leaps and bounds, and so the realism that's now. Prevalent in President Gains. Really helps to create the super immersive experience for Gamers and we felt like sound was a piece that was that was lagging in that equation. And so our whole idea was we want the gamers actually be able to hear the game in the same way that they see it. and. When we identified that as a need in space, that's when we knew it was time for us to actually enter. We didn't want to be just another brand that said, hey, gaming. It looks cool. Let's do that. We wanted to make sure that we're actually bringing something new table and and actually you know solving a need that we thought consumers gaming space might have. And that was really the whole impetus for US designed to get into gaming. Absolutely in every game knows how important audio is you mentioned how graphics approving well, sow does it prove it as well especially in the battle royale? Sowed is so important you've three hundred, sixty degree view. There's always people either above below at identified where they are and reacting to it is becoming an increasingly important part of being successful in eastport. Jacob you of a background is professional player. Could you talk about how audio matters especially at the highest levels of water video game? Yeah. Absolutely like you mentioned the. But I think The. The shooter Genre in general audio is one of the most primary importance of of of performance ride. So when we first started this conversation, it aligned sort of when we. Just picked up our counter strike team as well. both counterstrike fortnight now valor and call of duty call everything right sound. So very pivotal to to play performance. So as one of the the first conversations that I remember having was making sure that whoever we partnered with on the audio category, it would be a product that we were excited to use them that all of our. Players get behind and use on a daily basis because of how how big of an importance it has on the products on performance site So it was very reassuring. I remember Maddie from from team coming into the conversation saying listen it's got it's going to be jpl I'm really excited about this what are your concerns here because mostly on the performance side without teams and so Speaking on behalf of all of our players and going into the competitions it's important that we have You know state of the OPS. Hardware. When when we playing whether that's mountain. audio. Absolutely, you're only as good as your equipment. Well, that's a lie could be better than your equipment plenty of types, but at the highest level, those little those little differences really make a big deal. Michael

JBL Jacob United States Maddie Brandon Eastport President Trump Herman Miller Michael
Loving Your Skin and Niaouli Essential Oil

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

06:07 min | 1 year ago

Loving Your Skin and Niaouli Essential Oil

"Today. We're excited to sit down with Susan Cravat to talk about the. Doe Tara SPA hydrating botanist. And we'll also take a look at a special new oil. Susan. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you for having me. I am so thrilled to be able to talk about this product. I think it's one that is so popular with people. So can you tell us about why Tara chose to create the dough? Tariffs by hydrating body missed. Sure so a few years ago, we released the beautiful tach, and it was so well received. We wanted the consumers to have it in enjoy an another way, and so that what happened and we created the hydrating body messed with the beautiful blend in it. And it does smell amazing beautiful blend? Is I mean a word beautiful? Can you tell us a little bit about the oils that are in that blend? Yeah, the essential oils in this are lying Bergamo and frankencense which primarily gives the hydrated vitamins. The amazing sent the smell. We have lime that comes from the south of Brazil are Burgum. Oh is sourced from southern Italy and Frankencense is made up of four different species of a few different regions, and so that together makes this beautiful amazing sent that you're smelling. So in addition to those incredible essential oils, what are some of the other ingredients in the hydrating? Miss that helped to soften and hydrate the. Absolutely, so the wonderful botanical moisturizers are coconut, oil, passion, fruit, seed, oil, sunflower, seed, oil, avocado, oil, and the combination of these oils really helps to promote mounts and smooth skin, so those are kind of the most important things in the hydration of the skin, and it just makes a beautiful combination. And absolutely feels so luxurious. It doesn't feel heavy or like. It's going to fill up. Your pores or anything like that is wonderful. It is so Susan. How do you incorporate the hydrating mist into your daily routine? Okay this product is probably one of my very very favorites, and so this at convention last year I, was excited because I got to have hands on with the consumers and having them experience it the way that I use it on the daily basis, and so what I like to do is I. Take the hand of body lotion I put about a nickel sized into my palm, and then I put about two to three sprays into the palm of my hand and cocktail that together with my hands. I just read my hands together. So you're getting a more luxurious and rich and hydrating experience, so if you live in dry drier, climates or You just need a little extra boost in hydration for your skin. It's a great way to combine those two wonderful. Not Sounds amazing and like you said luxurious I think that self care and taking the time to care for your body is so important it is. So. Is there anything else that you would like people to know about the hydrating mist? Yeah one of the things in this goes more into function is that it has a three hundred sixty degrees sprayer, so it is an airless tube so when you have the sprayer upside down in most bottles, you wouldn't be able to spit out onto your body. Maybe one or two in it would stop so this airless tube makes it so that you can spray it upside down and hard to reach places, which that in itself is really handy, because you can get all the places on your body for hydrogen experience absolutely and I think that is wonderful and definitely makes it unique. Thank you so much for talking with us today for. Your insights about the doe tariffs SPA. hydrating body missed your so welcome. Thanks for having me. We're now going to switch to talk about very special new oil Kniola. Picture a land in drought. Dust blowing through the air and the sun beating down. It's an inhospitable environment and in your mind's eye. You might not picture much growing there. But there is a plant that you would not expect to see. And that's the only tree. This endurable tree can survive severe droughts or extreme rainy seasons. Even forest fires cannot destroy it. In, an Australian, Soils are nutrient deficient and flooded or wet for most of the year. In summer the rainfall dominates, and a light frost occurs in most years in the south. The spring associated with brief to acute water, stress and fire and water table. Fluctuations are major factors governing plant distribution. Yet, the Kniola tree thrives and continues on. Naively commonly known as the broad leaf, paperbark or paperbark tea tree is a small to medium sized tree of the myrtle family morte by. Other notable members of the. Family are Eucalyptus and clove. The scientific name for Kniola is Melaleuca Quinquina via. Melaleuca from the Greek words for black and white refers to the dark trunk and white branches. And Quinquina Servia comes from Latin and means five nerve which refers to the common number of Longitudinal veins present in the leaves.

Susan Cravat Doe Tara Spa Melaleuca Quinquina Kniola Frankencense Tara Quinquina Servia Melaleuca Bergamo Italy Burgum Brazil
Has ON1 Figured Out the Connected Experience?

The Digital Story

08:15 min | 1 year ago

Has ON1 Figured Out the Connected Experience?

"So starting this June you can subscribe to a complete photo capture management editing sharing system that works on Mac. Os Windows IOS and android devices. It's called on one three hundred sixty degrees and there's quite a bit to unpack with it before you even get into the new stuff you know on one has been building a block by block a pretty good argument for being your photo management and editing solution. They've been working hard. The latest release of the one that it wasn't too long ago was photo raw and it's it's very nice and it rolls up a bunch of stuff. They have been working on before but now I really feel like they're pulling the whole thing together by adding this connected services cloud service and very importantly launching a mobile APP. Okay so you have the mobile apps for both I less than android. You have the desktop software for both Mac and windows and then you design a clever cloud based system to sort of help. You connect it all together with some pretty neat features. I'm GonNa talk about and then you do so at a competitive price. That's really what they're after here. That's argument and I have to say there's a lot to it really is okay. This service automatically keeps track of photos that you choose to access from any of your devices so that includes the Meta data and where you want to store them. The desktop and the mobile APPs share the same processing engine and I think that's important. Gazeta enables non destructive editing settings to remain in sync as well. So we've experienced this before right. I mean this isn't brand new with white room creative cloud. We can work on an image on her IPAD and you know get saved back to light room on our desktop computer in photos for Mac. Os allows us to do the same thing so it really isn't like this hasn't happened before I think the real appeal for those that are going to love. This will be in the details on how they do it and how much they charge you to do it right and you know sooner or later you know. We have to have the price discussion right and we're going to have it today as well. So let's start with some of the features so you have all the powerful editing features of photo raw and Federov. Their image. Editing application has been evolving very nicely over the last number of months. So you have that okay and those of you that that already have photo raw. What will happen in June is? They'll be an update available to it that will allow it to connect to the cloud. Service the on one three sixty degrees. Now you get to choose which photos to sync between devices and this is somewhat similar to light room desktop that allows you to choose a folder album a collection a collection. You have to remember. Which APP am I talking about collection? allows you to choose a collection that you can share of the creative cloud and then access it via your tablet or your phone on one takes us approach to so they don't take the all or nothing that you know everything that you're working on has to go into the cloud or anything like that. They want to give you as much flexibility as possible. Your original files. Wherever they happen to to be they stay there. Okay they stay in that location so if your original files are on your desktop computer and you decide to share you know the say album of images you know through the cloud service to your mobile devices into other computers. Your originals don't travel up to the cloud they stay on your computer all right so and and I think that's a pretty important feature what what on one does is that. It creates sort of a compressed raw file version of it. And those that you choose to share. And that's what they upload to the cloud service. Now they're compression. Option is four times smaller. They say than than the raw file itself but a very high quality so in a sense is probably fair to say that it is a compressed raw file. And we're seeing cannon do this we're seeing other folks do this so you know. This is something that that we know works and that can be quite good. Here's a feature that is going to be competitive with the service for one license. You get five desktop computers and five mobile devices. That's pretty strong. One of the the walls that I slam into a lot with my Adobe creative cloud subscription my photographer subscription it gives me light room mobile and so on and so forth is that is only for two machines. I regularly work with three machines and so I find myself always having to disabled one in order to enable the other and you know do all that kind of stuff so so this five machines. I liked that five. Machines is a nice uneven number. That's perfect for probably most folks. Five machines will work for me quite nicely and then they give you a flexible pricing plan. What THEY WANNA do is if you want to own the application itself photo raw you can do that you can buy it or you can rent it and roll it into the cloud subscription. Which is you know. Three hundred sixty degrees. What they're calling. So you have an option so you can either. You know. Say Hey I want to own the software and then you know all subscribe to the cloud service as I needed or as they don't need it or you know however you WanNa do that you have a couple options within the cloud service or you can say hey I just WanNa rent the whole kit and caboodle and You know just have them take care of everything and the pricing depends on what you're going to do and we're actually going to cover pricing in this segment. Now I want to read you a little something from their site. That explains what they're doing here. Is I thought that the copy was pretty good and I thought it made a lot of sense. At least I understood. Okay on one pulls off this magic by creating a temporary version of the photo under the hood similar to a compressed raw file and storing it in the cloud. The photo maintains the tone in color of the original photo while using only about twenty five percent of the cloud. Storage Space Atypical. Raw file uses for those who demand the full raw file at all times and don't care about the storage space uploading and editing. The raw photo itself is also an option. So you can go either way however I think to save money. Most people will at least give this a try. This compressed Rafal approach. Now as I mentioned before your original photo files stay. Put right where you keep them. Your original photos can live on any of your devices including external hard drives and file servers again. I think that's that's a pretty important point. You can choose to upload copies of your original photos to on one three hundred sixty degrees as well if you need to access the full original file remotely.

Cloud MAC Adobe Cannon
How I Built Resilience

How I Built This

06:34 min | 1 year ago

How I Built Resilience

"Okay onto today's bonus episode. So as some of you know we've started this new series of online video conversations. Where every week? I talked to a founder or an entrepreneur or just a wise person about how they are building resilience into their businesses. Right now and in case you missed these conversations. When they happen live. We are posting an excerpt. Right here every Thursday in your podcast feed and you can see all of them on our facebook page facebook dot com slash. I built this. Just click on videos anyway. Last week I spoke with six chefs about the impact of cove in nineteen on the food industry. And today we're bringing you conversation with. Jose Andress the founder of world's central kitchen. Jose as many of you know is a Michelin starred chef known for as many restaurants around the country including minibar in Washington. Dc AND BAZAAR IN L. A. Jose is no stranger to giving back in two thousand ten after the earthquake in Haiti he founded ruled Central Kitchen which is a nonprofit that provides meals during times of crisis specifically natural disasters and in the wake of the Corona Virus. Pandemic ruled central. Kitchen has been on the ground serving hundreds of thousands of meals daily to people all over the world. I spoke with Jose at his home in Maryland. Where he's cooking with his family delivering meals and feeding the masses by borrowing some bigger kitchen's like the kitchens at the stadium where the Washington nationals play baseball in Washington DC. I've seen some videos. You outside the stadium then literally delivering food How are you doing are you? How are you staying safe? When when when you're doing that work well listen People as being from the beginning why we do what we do. I mean frankly was Chan is doing close to two hundred thousand meals a day so they will reach three million meals way. The today on this is reality. But we don't do it the long way our organization that we've proven over and over that we can go from is more organization to sometimes the main organization in a in an emergency in Bama's we were the first one on the ground Fed for the NYLAND's eighty thousand today. We were the first one Sundays before anybody else show up here. Obviously America's own is what we belong on to be able to put the know. How of wasn't Kitchen the surveys of federal Americans is the best Moment in that in the way of we wish we were out of business and we had to do it but we Feeding save thousands many of them American people In the British cruise ship we help the government than we went cutting four to help the Governor. Newsom to look the same in Oakland. We knew that this was about to happen. We call it from the beginning. This is going to become a health prices. Obviously everybody's GonNa talk about the economic crisis but above all these may become a big humanitarian crisis not only America but the run the world humanitarian crisis because Latvia foot. So how we do it. We are trying to build restaurants to join. We have more than five hundred restaurants across America. We are adding new restaurants almost everyday. Well why we do it. Because who better than defeat Americans than the same chefs do it in the good times is not like restaurants that are gonna be retiring from what we are able to contribute by. The restaurants are barbed distribution. Their leaders shops. The owners of the restaurants are in their communities. They know their communities better than anybody with partner with local organizations that know the neighborhoods very well so we may be feeding into bronze in Harlem only housing fellows that need our breasts because nobody else is there or all of the southern many angios receiving funding May NGOs. Don't have any more the same luxury of volunteers on the systems that we took for granted are shutting down with forget the NGOs are the third biggest employer in America on. When does India are not up and running this system breaks? We should be super thankful for them. Because they do an amazing opening surveys. So what we're doing is covering the blind spots. We are in more than hundred cities as we speak in multiple estates. I'm always do it. Will we partner ownerships achieves something very simple at three hundred sixty degree response What we see here is how together we can show Congress and the White House what legislation what bills. They have to pass to make sure that we're no wasted fought by farmers no being able to sell it and throwing in the fills or the production. When this time we have many cities across America? Where families are hungry. We're trying to rein smart solutions.

America Jose Andress Washington Dc Founder Partner Facebook DC Michelin L. A. Jose Maryland Haiti Chan Bama Oakland Newsom Harlem Washington
New UK podcast consumption data shows record listening

podnews

02:31 min | 1 year ago

New UK podcast consumption data shows record listening

"The latest from our newsletter pod News Net in the UK eighteen percent of British adults over ten point one million people. Now listen to podcasts. Every week according to new data from Audience Measurement Company radar podcasts. Now more popular than CDs all People's own MP three music collections. According to study the full data is on Raytheon's website. Fieldwork was carried out in February before the Corona Virus Pandemic Australia and Audio Equipment Company road published a Free Amazon Sound Library and Plug in and Sonics. They say is a three hundred sixty degrees surround. Sound format very clever and could be manipulated in postproduction company also produces a suitable microphone. Megaphone is apparently moving offices in Reston in Virginia in the US to building a looks frankly something like a sand. Crawler from Star Wars fell joined the folks from Google. There who are the anchor tenant now on news. Four new products called pod something. Paul Garner his adjust launched service that promises to turn your podcast into a multi media content gala with transcriptions blog posts. Video highlights and email lists podgy. Rama is a new cross podcast player with data sink available on Web Windows Mac. Os and IOS and apparently coming soon to android. Pado is a new open source podcast player for the web. It uses the apple podcasts. Api We've linked to the GUITAR REPO as well as to it online and Paul Jobs. Well it isn't new but it is a fine and free place to post jobs in the PODCAST INDUSTRY. Current jobs include some from spotify. Gimblett apple and NPR. You'll find it at Paul job. Start Net. Podcast NEWS AUSTRALIA ANZAC Day. Twenty twenty is tomorrow. Social distancing rules in the country mean. Australians are unable to join ceremonies across the country to pay their respects Queen. Podcast THE IRON FIST. In a velvet glove have produced a secular service to listen to including the odes last post her most importantly a minute's silence and previously driving from San Diego to Seattle via independent coffee shops. The Cross country coffee roadshow is now focusing on the effects that the corona virus is having on this formerly thriving industry owners and guests.

Paul Jobs Sonics Apple Audience Measurement Company Pado Paul Garner Raytheon Twenty Twenty UK Megaphone Audio Equipment Company Amazon Paul Spotify Google Star Wars Virginia Queen United States
Self-driving cars from Tesla, Google, and others are still not here

The Vergecast

09:58 min | 1 year ago

Self-driving cars from Tesla, Google, and others are still not here

"We will we do. We make the software. The sensors computers that go onto a car that allow it to be self driving and We're partnered with a couple auto companies that Do the physical part so I ask Every self-driving Executive Outcomes on our show. This question are self. Driving car is going to happen. Yes when it's ready when it's ready That's actually the best answer. It's the best non answer answer every unless we were like it. Will I promise hazy defined answer went? No I mean I mean look. I've been doing this for you. Know well over fifteen years now and it moved probably. I don't know maybe five or six years ago. It moved from an if to a win thing right. We spent a lot of our time. Doing assistive technology. How can we aid the driver? Can we augment the driver and a number of different projects back in the day? But when came to driverless cars I think the IT moved from if to win for me about five years ago so you were previously. Google left to do this one. Yeah what was the thing that made you think I need? This seems to be a different company. Well I left to. I always been on my list to start a company someday. I just didn't know when the time might be right but the funding environment was right I felt like there was a way to build a company that was Strategically aligned with an automaker in order to scale without prior to ARGO. I've worked most of my career working on things that are in numbers of hundreds and I want to get to. I want to build technology that will be out in the millions someday in order to do that. You know. Making building manufacturing vehicle at scales is not is not easy for any start up. There are companies doing it. That have been That have found some success. Don't get me wrong but I wanted to stick to what we know. Which is the robotics part and then partner with the car companies to do the car part Argos introduction into sort of the the public cautiousness was really interesting because very few people had heard about you guys until Ford made this announcement that they would be investing always. It was always the guy behind the scenes right but I think the industry knew who I was. I I'd like to think that I mean I'd banked a number of years at that point for sure But you know it Google. There were very few people sort of at the front line. In frankly while I was there I was quite happy to be the guy behind the scenes. It was a great place to work. But what was that? Like sort of Having that sort of be sort of your broader public introduction was the D. announcement of this very major investment from Obviously a storied car company like Ford And having that sort of like that sort of thing that Kinda hung over the announcement to I you know. I think it was helpful at least from a recruiting standpoint because it helps our employees a little bit about the mission and what we were how we how we were intending to go to market and how that we were intending to partner. It certainly showed other car. Companies that There was a willingness for us to kind of work with their processes to do things again at scale and doom safely. It's been really helpful to us that we have been able to be Heads Down with some stable funding to just go make progress and build the product It's really hard to build a company when you're simultaneously fundraising selling and sort of building something from scratch and I have seen that part as well and other things that I've invested in the past and it's like it's it is hard So that that funding was very helpful to us to be able to make progress very very quickly. What's different about Argos tack than things that people are familiar with like Waymo or crews or something like that? Well I think our approach is. I usually leave the comparisons to you guys. But our our approach is to Focus on the urban cores So tends to be a little bit lower speed but very high dimension of complexity so We operate in South Beach. In fact I was just there and and you know the car operates super well even with the total influx of just pedestrians everywhere. Forget forget crosswalks. Crosswalks don't matter everybody's going to the beach and they don't care if their cars in the way right and so look. We want to go. Where the people are we wanna go where people wanna be because we know there's lots of trips there's lots of demand and there's a there's a good business case to wrap around that So we we've traded off to. We focused we're focusing on those really high Complex areas lots of interactions per mile per hour. Wanted to mention it. Is that a computer problem. Or a sensor I think we tend to just diverged. We tend to focus on the hardware. What's bolted the AD car? So you can see the world but are you more focused on the what am I seeing. How do I get around it or you have to detect? Everything I you know is a funny thing. It's it's week we call it a tightly coupled system meaning that everything has to work for you to have a good end result If anyone piece of the picture anyone piece of the system is performing sub optimally. The thing doesn't work that. That's that's the thing about robotic so it's all important we need Certainly a lot of compute. We certainly need sensors that. Give us three hundred. Sixty degrees of awareness around the car. Were a believer that You should use multiple modes because different sensor types fail when compared to others so the strengths of one complement the weaknesses and others. So we use camera radar and lighter and when you're when you're working in a very complex scene it's not good enough to just say when I say complex. I mean lots of cyclists. Lots of pedestrians lots of cars that are everywhere not following. Necessarily the rules load in order to interpret that in it you really have to have a very very acute in precise sense of what is what is the scene. It's not good enough to say that. Blob of like points from a lighter die. We think that's a pedestrian though. You have to know that that's actually a pedestrian climbing out of the vehicle. And they're most likely going to go around in particular path in the you want to give them plenty of margin and room when you if it's safe to pass so the the technical term might be seen understanding That is super super important. We hear about some of the scenarios that Self driving cars have figured out Whether it's traffic signals certain intersections What are some of the scenarios that are still proving to be a challenge? Would you say for cars to figure out does sort of go into the area of edge cases or they're still just sort of very basic things that still need a lot of work done to it so the broad strokes answer is? It's things like really bad weather so if you have and by the way if there's snow on the ground that's not so much a problem. It's more the falling precipitation so thor's falling rain falling snow fog. Those are difficult problems and it before you even get to the software part of the problem you have to get past the fact that the sensors see the world fundamentally differently and so we have to build just new models and new ways of tackling that maybe there are new sensor types. We look at But it's GonNa take invention. I believe it will take invention both at the hardware level in the software level to tackle that problem. You mentioned edge cases you know cases are funny thing as human driver you put on however many miles a week or maybe don't drive but a typical person. Their commute will put on so many miles a week and They might see one or two anomalous things. If you have a fleet of cars every day putting thousands of of miles on all of a sudden the what you thought was infrequent actually turns out. It's really frequent right. And so that is the other challenge and yeah absolutely. We have to build a system. That's Resilient enough to handle all of these pretty frequent things that occur that are You know that that to use may seem abnormal. That actually were were learning was pretty normal. Actually so let's take a step back and talk about why you guys are doing this. You know why do we need self driving cars? And what sort of like the business case that you see for Technology guys are working on so I think the answer that you probably hear a lot is about around safety. And that's super important. We believe the same. We believe the same. A human drivers are not great at driving distracted. Many of them There are good drivers out there. But there's also they're also large distribution of drivers who I would prefer not to be driving So so we want to not remove driving. We want to augmented and give people a new another choice. Okay in a lot of people. Don't use rideshare services today. Because they want they want a more personal experience. They want to listen to the music. They want to listen to. Maybe they have to carry things around with them. Maybe they have Whatever it is they want a more private experience and more tailored experience or maybe. They're afraid of their driver. They're you know they're in a situation. Well you know for a lot of people especially for for women for Women Writers. It can be a you know a a crapshoot in terms of kind of driver and I am having a really bad run of rideshare driver right like I just am. It's not good We could talk about that later. Probably that the safety is number one. I and I and that is absolutely a mission that drives the company our employees. It's why I'm involved in it. I think what doesn't get talked about enough though is also the problem that cities experience and how this can be a solution to at least a dimension of the problems that that cities have. Today sees have unprecedented congestion. There's more cars on the road than ever. The system is in gridlock. People's ETA be ability to get to where they want to go quickly is is It's increasing average commuter increasing in time And so how do we? How do we solve that? The good news is that the more autonomous vehicles are on the road that are deployed in a shared context in other words. You don't own it. You just use it when you need it. It means that the vehicles can pre-position themselves at night. When there's less congestion on the grid for where the demand will be in the morning. It means that we'll be able to After it drops you off can go on to serve the next person. It won't be hunting for parking or consuming real estate in the city rand ditherer a great report that showed up to a third of the real estate. In a city core is devoted to parking which is a shocking statistic. Imagine if you repurpose that for other things that people want whether it be parks or affordable housing whatever it might be but that's GonNa take a long time. It's going to take a long time and I'll get to that part of the last thing. I the third thing I want to get into. That's that I think is important. Is that Is the addition to changing the landscape of cities. We can also tell. Vehicles

Google Partner Ford Executive South Beach Waymo Argo Women Writers
23rd International Meeting of National Mine Action

UN News

13:21 min | 1 year ago

23rd International Meeting of National Mine Action

"So here we are at the urine stool in Geneva and we are speaking about the twenty thousand International Meeting of Mine Action National Directors and United Nations advisors so basically basically unmastered say the United Nations Mine Action Service in addition to Sarah Jerry. He's a researcher. From King's College in London has been looking at research approach into on the link between climate change and vulnerable populations affected by unexploded ordinance stuck in the ground and elsewhere. Welcome everybody body. I'm going to just dive in quickly. Going to Richard Baltimore's Program Manager for South Sudan with unmasks wretched. Tell me the main thrust of the meeting being here at the United Nations in Geneva what you can to achieve this week well simply putting the importance of mine action back on the map. Reminding people there's a problem exists exists around the world that is being addressed but it needs constant support to keep his going a mine-free world is achievable. We simply need to keep doing what we're doing. Just talk me through what the process. Who says you go into a community in south Sudan? Can you give me a particular example of an area is cleared recently. How you've held community? We're helping hundreds of communities Aziz every single day we're going into villages where mines were laid possibly thirty or forty years ago wet forests have grown up around them. People wonder into those forests in search of natural resources to cut wood together the forest vegetables and plan selves up working to render the ground safe and the the the reality is the poorest of the poor go into minefields knowing they all taking a risk. Studying Cambodia showed eighty five percent of mine victims victims. New they're in a minefield at the time. They had their accident but they also knew they were going to be hungry at night. So they take the wrist to go and get it and not not. de-mining is not an option. People will still take the risk and go into the minefields. We need clear those minds to make the land safe. Just start with a level playing field being out to grow awesome food. It is astonishing it comes down to having to live from day to day and Edwin fake money. If I can come to you know you were in Cambodia. Do you share richards. Experience experience. There is that what you were finding radio program officer unless now but you were working for a long time with U. N. D. P. The UN Development Program. Yes you actually see that people take risks risks. When they're hungry they will try to the forest to find food if they have piece of land contaminated? They will try to farm it so that they can grow the rice. It's basically subsistence isn't farming for everything there. And if they contact us the land and they will take measures to go in and see if they can actually get food. What's your message to the conference? Is this week. There is a need for us to address this theory's hope for example specifically for Kamalia. Two hundred twenty five is a goal for them. It can be achieved there to clear. All of known remaining landmines by twenty twenty-five how many we talking about. It's there still about nine hundred square kilometers of land mines but it was like a lot. I mean look look and you say twenty. twenty-five it is a lot but the government has actually committed themselves. You know Wait I left Komodo last year. They committed themselves that they will give ten percents counterpart funding to any international funds. Subtle coming for Mine Action and you be assumed that in the sense that last year we got ten percent of those about about two hundred thousand dollars last year from the Komo government which is a first big step for them taking responsibility for the problem that they have so there is progress and hopefully by two thousand twenty five and quickly back to Richard. You said that South Sudan continues to be contaminated by mines laid out decades ago but their goal is twenty twenty. He's seven four title Clearance Twenty Twenty Six if the current peace can hold if we can get access to all areas then. It's reasonable with current levels of funding as long as that maintained that we we will complete clearance by Twenty Twenty Six but ordinance will continue to appear for decades. There is still ordinance turning up across Western Europe that was fought over a hundred two years ago. Being ploughed up in the fields of Belgium reality of any conflict affected country but in the short term you need sustained funding to help South Sudan Dan. As many other countries need to decontaminate. You cannot come quickly to use Aruna Jerry from King's College London research only be looking at the link between climate the change and unexploded ordinance or nine months contamination. Can you tell me a bit about what you felt. I've been looking specifically at the conflict context. I've been looking at mine. Action in how they interrelate from post conflict peacebuilding framework and the climate. He's something that I've come into recently looking at how that is adding the levels. Abelson wonder ability because I was in Angola in September doing some work where they went national saint for Humanitarian De Mining on a research project. Nick and what we saw there was that once fields are cleared that the farmers there are grateful because clear and provide quite a lot of land. And what they're doing is resorting to the cotton slash methods of cultivation now. What that does the environment is? Just at the the time the fires in the Amazon on but in Angola there was second highest fires when the satellite team. It is dance so while we can clear and and the farmers were saying yes but the drought has impacted so yes. The farm has been returned to the farmers. But there are other you know beyond the mine in action and my take into that is can we incorporate as a sector. Can we bringing other lessons for these people when we out there with them saying once we've cleared the farm may be a certain sense of responsibility in the ways. We cultivate and all so integrating being innovative in our practice to dealing with communities to reduce their ability interesting. So what you're calling for really is for broader approach to helping communities once the areas made safe. So I don't know maybe I could turn to you. Seddon Threat Mitigation Officer with the Mine Action Service so he didn't a lot of work into be at the moment. I don't know how house access you have there. Because we've had talks recently here in Geneva for ongoing between opposing parties fighting outside Tripoli to the South how are you UH helping communities get safer and be free of this sort of scourge that must induce mentality among populations yes. There are two real issues to addressed. ICED firstly is that Libya has the world's largest uncontrolled ammunition stop palm. It is estimated that there were between one hundred fifty thousand two hundred thousand tonnes of uncontrolled control munitions across Libya. Also what we've seen recently in the fighting which broke out in southern Tripoli in April of last year is the expenditure ordinance and the threat posed by explosive remnants of war as increased and sadly many of the areas that were previously cleared of you exit have now been reconsolidated as a result. The current fighting some specific concerns that we've got amendment relates to some of the more complex munitions that The Libyan's require assistance to dispose off. And the previous Qaddafi regime for example bolts some quite complex missile systems that use talks ick propellants and these toxic propellants pose a very considerable threat to the environment went and also to the Libyan people which live close proximity to their storage depots so one of the projects that are mass. Lear initiated with support from the German government his to safely dispose of some of these very hazardous liquid propellants in Libya. Thank you Bob for that. Now I'm going to turn to leave because you're the Global Communications Honcho Four. Unless you could tell me how many countries on Mrs Operating in I'm what stays sort of information sharing between those officers who are involved in making community safe and and maybe what are the new ways that we using computers not officially intelligence to help us improve decontamination. Everywhere yeah the United Nations by action service we of nineteen programs in countries and territories around the world the UN as a whole is a little bit over thirty so the UN is. We're mine action. United Nations mine. Action has the Inter Agency Coordination Group for Mine Action which we helped to service and facilitate and that's really is an information exchange so and this meeting that we're at this week in Geneva Leyva where we have the national directors from all over the world from every mine affected country. I'm comes in. That's a big part of it is to share lessons learned best practices and the technology which is very important specifically with with improvised explosive devices. I mean we've been working for years in Afghanistan. We've seen a lot of devices that were used in Afghanistan that show up in other conflict zones specifically today's in Somalia we've seen stuff in Iraq. There's an innovation there. There's obviously on the dark web. People have access to figure out WHO's building. What and how are they building yet? What type of charges etc.? So you have to stay alert and you have to be following that. Obviously that's not something terribly new military out there in the world The United Nations. We don't don't particularly do intelligence service things but we are starting a database now in order to try to bring in academics and the governments that want to share that information in order that we make our people on the ground safer so that people would have some type of place to go to look at the type of devices I see they can do photos of directly and put it up in this database and then people can look at it from other parts of the world and say immediately. I've seen that. Don't touch that wire. I mean if you WanNa get it simple or this is probably how it is or the or the charter is going to be. You know. Two hundred meters. There's away or is that kind of thing and somebody mentioned earlier today when we were speaking about infrared Is that you know the technologies that exist out there. They are extremely deadly. It's a little bit different than a landmine. I'm where you're just using a metal detector and you're going along and something beeps and you're saying okay is that you know a pop top or is that something more dangerous when you deal with. ID's there three hundred sixty degrees so you don't know where they are And I mean there was just an attack recently in Afghanistan for example where somebody stuck a charge on the top of the roof of a car which killed the UN employees it was UNDP and that's an example of something which smit this new database that's going to be soft launch today at this is meeting with look into. So what specs do you need for your car roofs when the UN by vehicles because that's obviously a weakness right when a car sitting in traffic and somebody puts a bomb on the roof of of it and nobody thought about that but there are ways to know if there's devices on a car magnetic sensors that tell you. Something's been added this car and that's the kind of stuff that we need to know. The the United Nations need in order to keep all personnel. And all NGOs safe. It is frightening. You could be totally paranoid radio studio. They want to step foot outside. Because it's you know I've read the English patient I've read the some of the mindset of somebody who's laying mines encounters and things. I think my goodness this is just extraordinarily frightening writing and terrifying. And I'm Bob you're saying earlier the the threat of mines is not going away. Sadly the very effective asymmetric form of Attack Jack and the effectiveness of the ID as technology level is now very much understood by. The extremists are employing days. I mean sadly that knowledge is now the Leah's mentioned the information is disseminated now across the Internet. It is relatively easy now for people with no previous experience or training to acquire The knowledge from the web to make homemade explosives and to build quite sophisticated audience systems from scratch. You know with any external intervention. So so you're suggesting earlier Bob that it's not just a question of getting the minds out of the ground. It's a broader approach. Can you maybe explain what that means. Yes certainly insufficient really just to deal with the the explosive threat itself itself when one considers the threat posed by ideas. You really look at the the. ID system so it requires an effective whole of government approach. And that's very much based on not just the entity that's dealing with the explosive straight itself. But you got to look at the forensic organization that recovers evidence the analysis of that of the good police squirt this required to identify locate arrest and then process the perpetrators through the judicial system and Libya. This is happening. It is happening. Actually the The Mass Libya team has worked quite closely with Libyan authorities. And we've been trying to develop the forensic skills of the Criminal Investigation Department such that the Libyan police. I can do this themselves. Thank you very much. I think we've pretty much come to the end of this discussion very brief Look at what your and Mine Action Service is doing. It's been a delight to have you here but I'd love often any final messages or thoughts that you have before you plunge back into the dark recesses of the UN Pele here in Geneva and share information which is obviously why you're here simply that clearing clearing the wolves. Lamont problem is achievable. It's very very achievable. I started de-mining in nineteen ninety-three when the world talked about it being a thousand year problem problem now it down to single digits of years with realistic assessments. Credible Clarence methods. We're winning this fight. Unfortunately the fighters moved on on the problem is not being replaced by problem. The crux of this issue is ending grievances. If people want to find a way to kill each other's they will do so but in those countries where the wounds have healed such as Cambodia. We can go on and complete the Job Sarah Jerry Richard. Bulte Bob Seddon ugly really would yeah. Many things

The United Nations Geneva Bob Seddon Libya South Sudan Cambodia Clearance Twenty Twenty Six Twenty Twenty Six Afghanistan United Nations Un Development Program Tripoli Mine Action Service Sarah Jerry Richard Angola Richard Baltimore King Researcher Aziz
Residency pairs aspiring restaurateurs with temporary sites

Monocle 24: The Menu

08:05 min | 1 year ago

Residency pairs aspiring restaurateurs with temporary sites

"Today we meet the team behind residency. A new initiative assistive to pay or vacant restaurant spaces with emerging culinary talents launched in London. The new enterprise already looking to go into national with the mission to support young talent and budding entrepreneurs can me. Let's opium of restaurants consultancy districts and sip fork of restaurant experts. Montana Montana fog are co founder of residency. And I met them here at Majoria. Oh studio one to find out. More residents say is an initiative which we have creates it which pass up and coming chef superclubs new concept's any sort of emerging thing and food and beverage or hospitality with vacant spaces basis at the moment across the capital but our ultimate jets viz and beyond and through our combined expertise so it's a residency is a collaboration between between district. which is a property restaurant? consultantcy Montana fog which is a restaurant. Consultancy and through combined expertise we can create pop-ups ups and empty spaces very easily. We have contacts with landlords because district says a property business. A Montana can support the operators on the ground and enable the space for operators to go in and start trading. So how did you find each other. What kind of discussions did you have when this idea was born? Well we've nine furlongs. I have yeah we have. I think we first met when my partner and I were looking to open a restaurant or committed was advising us and thankfully we didn't do the deal not through any issue with Camilla ritual. It was the wrong space the wrong concept at the wrong time which is a restaurant consultant but then we work together on a project for the crown estate and had assault on Heddon street which was ironically the property like you offer done or any love it and synergy edge we and then we came together and they had a site where that essentially the keys are being put through the letterbox in the previous tendency unfortunate made it and they had a site that was fitted the Dow and ready to go and they didn't know what to do with it really they'd been thinking for a long time about how they could launch some finish itself which is something we are seeing from landlords now because if you were wind a few years back when a new site came up with an estate in central London landlords always wanted the latest new concept concept the newest operator and since then has been a few burnt fingers so in terms of pushing brand new concept landlords our little bit more cautious about that mom so they are thinking of ways that they can do that without perhaps taking on a long term risk without of committing so when ten had in st came back to the landlord new I think one of the stories I think sub told me was that they only bought some new carafe when St when and everything else was was there and it's provided a great opportunity to trial the poop concept and so the crown at hired Montana fog and district separately and district in terms of helping helping with some sort of strategic direction but also in terms of doing the licensing making sure that all the documentation and Montana fog to find the operators and support them on the ground from day one so basically what you're doing now you're looking for these spaces and he also looking forward to preneurs budding restos operators. I would like to take over the spaces for some time. What kind of conditions are we talking about? How long would this pop ups for example? And what kind of operators are you looking game for. Exactly it depends side-by-side how long the pop-up lost with Tennessee. I think we are moving into month. Eight seven and Republican another three or four months. We'll see so it depends on the landlord. I mean typically day-old Adage from restaurateurs is once you found this all you want twelve months later you'll open the door was that's how long it takes to sometimes raise the money to get your lease. Signed your heads of terms obviously to fit it out so adama landlord or have an empty site. It could be there for a year before I'm actually GonNa say that open again so we can activate that site pretty much within a week to week turnaround. Make sure it's fit for purpose and get an operator in there. And they could trade their quite happily for four to five months whilst unseen the new incoming operator who takes a full lease is doing doing the negotiations with the landlord. Millennials have let so I activated is very flexible model rarely because some operators will want to go in for four to six months and north of gang of presence in makes him return perhaps but others will perhaps wants to do a supper club or decently much shorter term or might be happy. Just go in somewhere for a week to Derby PR and some of the landlords that we're actually talking about our existing operators already have to activate spaces particularly helium pumps and they could be much shorter. Say It's bespoke and it's flexible. An in terms of your other question of what sort of entrepreneurs are we looking for. The Sky's is the limit. We've had interest from a large very well. Funded American Vegan concept. which is very edgy? We've had interest from people who've superclubs in Hackney these people some of well funded and well back to existing. Operators is the ones that aren't who would have a great concept on great passion Russian but to get in front of a landlord to get a lease for ten to fifteen years. No way you ever going to be up to do that. Unless you've got some very very well funded ended backers of which most people don't because the banks unfortunately won't be lending anyone any money for quite a while for the smaller operations and this gives us the opportunity he to educate the operator in terms of how a landlord works. We should very much district comes and for us the Montana folks of of residency to work with them and help them and with the figures look concept introducing to suppliers etc etc.. Actually so there is a lot of support available when you choose. The operator so veto need to be worried about north knowing everything takes yeah. I think that's our biggest point of difference is it's three hundred. Sixty degree support system. Why there will be people who the first people we've introduced a ten Heddon street with David Carter from smoke stack and Chris Leach who worked at Bratton cooked lots of different places? How much support do they need? Not a great deal to be honest with you because they're incredibly experience but moving forward when we take someone from WHO's done of a food stall pop pop somewhere. They will need to understand how the western works because the West End Actually David. Chris did put their hands up and admit that the learning experience of coming from east blondel shortage into what is basically mayfair. Soho borders different world. Because lunch is a big thing. Lunch makes the difference. It doesn't make you a millionaire China but without lunch you really suffer if you're in the west end but you cost this much higher You've been following London restaurant scene for years. How has it changed changed? And what are your predictions. What is going to be happening in the future and always the landscape changing thing? We've seen this of past. Few years is a huge increase in the number of restaurants in London and this was sort of lead from consumer trend to solve. Eat out more and with the sort of casual dining lining crunch the so called and they changing political landscape confidence decreased and the oversupply of restaurants. Met not this wasn't in any way sustainable stable anymore. So that's when we started to see like restaurants going back to landlords and whilst the market is still very vibrant. There's loads of new. You operators out there that wants to take on site and central London. There's nowhere near as many as there was before and what it's done is created a survival of the fittest backdrop so the good restaurants still still trading while and a very very good and another thing. That's sort of is in between nether is is suffering. We've also seen rents go very very high because of the lack of supply of restaurant

Montana London David Carter Opium Chris Leach Majoria Co Founder Hackney Partner Tennessee Assault DOW Camilla Consultant China Bratton
NASA clears Axiom Space to put commercial habitat on space station

Rick and Bubba Show

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

NASA clears Axiom Space to put commercial habitat on space station

"NASA has contracted with Texas based axioms space to build a habitat module for the international space station that would serve as a hotel for space tourist concept images of the axiom segment include plush crew quarters in a three hundred sixty degree earth observation window the largest ever constructed for space but before you book your rates are going to be about thirty five thousand dollars

Nasa Texas
How to Deal with Mean People Who Suck at Work

The Small Business Radio Show

08:21 min | 1 year ago

How to Deal with Mean People Who Suck at Work

"You'RE GONNA meet a lot of great people out there that are really going to help you out but you're gonNA meet a lot of people that are really going to suck here to help us how to deal with those people that suck is Michael. Brennan has been recognized as Forbes. Top Cima influence influencer a top business keynote speaker by the Huffington Post and the top motivational speaker by Entre magazine. He's got a new book out. Called mean people suck how empathy leads leads to bigger profits and better life Michael. Welcome to the show me well. I'm so glad that someone wrote a book about this. Because I mean people do suck and I and keep thinking that to folks who are really great. Innovators leading great companies like Elon. Musk and Steve Jobs. Do they have to be mean people know they don't and that's really the You know one of the things that led me to write. This book is is. There's some surprising counterintuitive research out there actually almost the weight of all the research found shows that organizations and you leaders and cultures that are focused more on on empathy more on on carrying a and less about creating an environment of fear are actually more successful and you know we think I think sometimes it you look at jobs you look at other influential inspiring leaders and we saw they they ruled with a heavy hand and actually if you dive into it what we find is a lot of those leaders. There's a myth of of kind of culture personality about those folks. The actually created cultures where they showed some concern care whether it's for their customers for their employees as or whatever but they actually weren't the mean people thought they were and you know so sometimes I think we have to dig a little bit deeper into some of those but the fact is that cultures organizations positions that are built around empathy and concern for other people are more effective and successful overtime. And I always say just because I do believe because I know enough people have worked for Steve Jobs. One of my friend says you know I. I left apple for the second time when he flew when he threw a coffee pot in my head. I think Steve Jobs was mean right. But as you said just because Steve Steve Jobs was able to create a sessile organization dime being mean or Elon Musk by being you know he's just very compulsive it doesn't mean that you can do it in your organization but the thing is that in more to get people to do stuff you gotta be mean you know you gotta scream you gotta yell but what you're saying your book is that's just not true. It's a myth and that's twice as we hear these stories and you know I'll give you a steve jobs. As an example Steve Actually owned two companies. They'll to companies in life. We we all know apple but we forget about Pixar right and Pixar th-they're founder cofounder wrote a amazing book. One of my favorites called Creativity Inc where they talk about. The secret of their success was a culture of openness finesse and where they had these you know these meetings where they were talking about the movies that they were they were trying to produce in anybody's from the CEO. Down to the janitor could provide an opinion so you know even in those mis of personality around Steve Jobs yet sure but he threw coffee should people but the fact is that he built a company that had an entire sort of culture of empathy empathy built right into it and it was the reason for their success. So you know that's that's one simple thing another another step that I love to use as A good friend of mine. Jim STANGL. who was the former? CMO At doc proctor and gamble wrote a book called grow where he looked at companies that were built on some sort of purpose or values where they weren't just putting profits over people they were putting people over profits fits those companies were four hundred percent more successful based on their stock price. And so yeah we hear these anecdotal stories about me leaders but the simple fact is that companies that we're built on cultures of acceptance and diversity and inclusion and and concern for other people or the environment or whatever it is concern for others and not just you know leadership worship There are more successful so if you want to build a successful company have a little bit of concern for the people around. You know. It's interesting because now that I think back on of course we'll never know is maybe Steve. Jobs was like like that because I didn't want there to be leadership worship right because certainly apple is a company built on concern for other people in diversity inclusion and those kinds of things. Well that's exactly right. I mean you look at you. Look at their headed resigned. I mean he's he's he's a famous person in in his own right. And their whole company was built on obsession over customer you know utilization and amazing customer experiences. So Yeah Steve Maybe was obsessed with an you know sort of forceful in making that an important point. But that's what apple was it was a company built around providing an amazing technical customer experience. So you talk about on your bother. You've had fifty three jobs in your life. See you must have seen your fair share of mean people absolutely. Yeah Yeah I mean you know the story is I I was. Somebody sat down with me for an interview and they were like. Hey you've been a successful executive and you know for the first time I actually never had considered third myself as accessible. I I still feel like I have a lot to accomplish. And she asked me why and You know I give her an answer but afterwards thinking about it and then I started thinking well how many how many jobs have I actually had. And I counted them up and and I thought you know a lot of the reason I've had so many and a lot of them were within one company. I spent nine years at at one company. Seven years of another. I mean I've had some long stints but many jobs within and what I found was that in most cases I liked the company or I like the work but I just hated my boss and and You know I think a lot of the reason for the fifty jobs is I left my boss and and in some cases gave up too soon. I think I think slowly over the course of my career. Learn how to deal with What I look back at and considered some mean people One great example. I had a boss who I really didn't like and We're not friends and what happened was I learned how to deal with him. I learned we were both fathers. We were both parents of a couple of kids and and once I got to know him as a person once I got to understand what he really wanted to accomplish and once I took the I think the courage to stick up for myself and let him know like you know. Hey if you want something accomplished hired me to do that job and I'm good at doing that job so let we do it. We became we had a great working environment refreshing. Today it's interesting. You said that you left your boss when I left IBM and in Nineteen Ninety I actually. He did leave my boss and I always tell a joke when I'm speaking that this guy used to have sales contests where first prize was lunch with him. And I always said what second price to lunches with you and I realize is it. I didn't just leave IBM. I really left him. So based on your experience Michael How do you deal with mean people that suck at work instead of just getting out of the situation but that's not always the solution. That's not always the right thing to do. That's that's right and and and it's true and in fact. The data shows that most people do leave. I think it's something like sixty plus percent and people that leave a job or leaving the boss. It's not the company of the work which is sad you know? It means that we have a crisis of leadership in our in our culture. The simple as that I've kind Touch upon this but the first thing is find out what your boss really wants If you find out in that conversation that your boss just wants to feed his ego he he or she is a narcissist. Then you need to leave. That's that's step number five but but the first thing is find out what they really want. you know. Make sure that's clear between the two of you. The second thing and this is something I I I did it almost every job I had is. I would interview a neat with the people that were appears of my boss. I would meet with the stakeholders that my boss was supposed to be serving customers which choose a lot of fun but really try to kind of get a three hundred sixty degree view of what. What your leader really is looking for what they're trying to accomplish? Then the third is what I what I what I mentioned. You have to have that courageous conversation. I call it the cake. Baking conversation you WANNA sit down and have this conversation with your boss where you say. Listen I know you want me to you WANNA cake. You want it to be chocolate chocolate chips with chocolate icing and guess what. I'm a good chef. I know how to make a really great cake. So let me go big that you can't ask me for a cake and tell me how to bake it and so that's the conversation that too few of us. Have we get into this kind of victim mentality where we think our bosses yell at us and tell us what to do and we get mad and miserable and then we leave. So that's the third step is making sure you have that conversation. The fourth I mentioned as well get to know them as a person you know try to just subtly find out you know are they mean because they're going through a divorce or or they've got you know health issues. They got problems at home like you know. Sometimes we learn these things we find that they're people too and we can understand and a little bit more about why they're acting the way they are and so once you go through those steps if you still find that your boss Jerk Ben step number five is either commit to delivering what they want or leave and and I think at least having a formal systematic profits go through those steps can really help a lot of people.

Steve Steve Jobs Apple Elon Musk Michael Steve Maybe Elon IBM Huffington Post Brennan Entre Magazine Forbes Pixar CEO Creativity Inc Jim Stangl. CMO Executive Founder Doc Proctor Gamble
How Did a Mad King Design Disney's Castle?

BrainStuff

07:02 min | 1 year ago

How Did a Mad King Design Disney's Castle?

"You can thank a mad bavarian king for the opening credits to every Disney movie before Walt Disney built Disneyland. He and his wife Lillian toward Europe including stop at the magnificent noise von Stein Castle in the Bavarian Alps of Germany. Disney was so impressed with the skyscraper turrets and towers of this fo romanesque structure. That he used it as the model for sleeping beauty's castle centerpiece of Disneyland and now the ubiquitous logo of Walt Disney pictures but if Disney known the real story of Nausea von Stein and it's fairy tale king an eccentric opera fan who was declared a madman before dying under mysterious circumstances says he might have chosen a different castle. Nausea von Stein. Castle is one of the most visited tourist destinations in Europe welcoming more than six six thousand visitors on busy days in the summer but the man who dreamed up the fantastic castle never intended for it to be open to the public it began as an architectural sexual love letter to the German composer. Richard Wagner and evolved into a refuge for reclusive king who slowly lost his grip on reality King Ludvig Ludvik. The second never fit the mold of stoic monarch born in eighteen forty five. He was raised in princely elegance in his father. Maximilian the seconds castle who Schwangau Schwangau. Where the young royal quote enjoyed dressing up and took pleasure in play acting? According to his mother Marie of Prussia from an early age Ludvig had a vivid imagination and flair for the dramatic how in Schwangau built in eighteen. Thirty two in the GOTHIC style was decorated with paintings drawn from Medieval Evil German legends and poetry and young Ludvig particularly identified with Luhan Green. A legendary night of the holy grail. who travelled on a boat pulled by spawns when? Maximilian the second died suddenly in eighteen. Sixty four Ludvig then. Eighteen years old was thrust into power unprepared for any serious political leadership. One of the first things Ludwik did as king was to invite his musical idol vagner to come to Munich for an opera festival wagner was also obsessed with German medieval legends and an even written opera version of Balloon Greene story in eighteen fifty wagner who was in dire financial straits eagerly accepted ludvig said vegetation and the young king became one of the composers chief patrons when they met Wagner. Didn't know what to make of the other worldly ludvig Wagner Wagner wrote. Today I was brought to him. He's unfortunately so beautiful. In Wise soulful and lordly that fear his life must fade away like a divine dream in this this base world. You cannot imagine the magic of his regard. If he remains alive it would be a great miracle. Wagner couldn't have predicted it but just two years later in eighteen sixty six Bavaria and Austria suffered a humiliating defeat to Prussia in the seven weeks war and Ludvig was stripped of all real power it was then historians believe that. Ludvig decided to retreat into a fantasy kingdom in the Alps dedicated to Wagner and alternate reality in which he could play out his operatic. Attic daydreams full of Christian Knights Magical. Swans ludvig already. Had the perfect location picked out a rocky promontory near his childhood castle with three hundred sixty degree views of Pristine Alpine Lakes lush valleys and towering peaks. He wrote a letter wagner describing his plans to build a far more ambitious ambitious version of his. Father's Sean Gal. Quote the location is one of the most beautiful to be found holy and unapproachable a worthy temple for for the divine friend who has brought salvation and true blessing to the world to bring his vision to life. ludvig enlisted a theatrical set designer and scene painter from Munich Nick named Christian young to make some appropriately dramatic drawings of the new home Schwangau as Ludwik called it. It was meant to be an idealized version of medieval castle. Missile inspired by visit to the legitimately Medieval Art Board Palace but cranked up to an eleven ludvig. Wanted two hundred well appointed rooms cavernous cavernous singers hall for Opera Performances Ornate Walled Gardens and even a nights bath akin to the ritual baths used by the knights of the Holy Grail. But rather even being a complete throwback the castle was to include the latest technological comforts including electric lighting flush toilets central heating and an electric buzzer system for summoning servants. Since the first stone of Ludvik Dream Castle was laid in eighteen sixty nine he'd written to Wagner that he hoped to move in in three years but construction was still still ongoing when Ludvig finally moved into the first completed section fifteen years later by that point the scale of the castle had been pared down significantly and the the project had taken on a distinctly coach feel looted a deeply pious Christian had begun to identify himself. More and more with the Arthurian Hero. Parsifal another night in the quest of the holy grail. In the castle a space originally planned as an audience room for receiving guests was turned into a high donned throne room without a throne instead. It's guilt walls and murals would serve as a hall of the Holy Grail. ludvig grew increasingly reclusive. He he slept during the day and wandered the castle at night it higher musicians and actors for private concerts and operas and during various snowy winters. Journey out for nighttime sleigh sleigh rides in an elaborate custom-made sleigh sometimes in medieval costume by eighteen. Eighty five the still unfinished castle had gone wildly over over budget and Ludvig had tried the patience of his foreign creditors when he couldn't repay his debts. The foreign banks seized the property and threatened to bankrupt the state of Bavaria. LUDVIG ministers largely to protect state assets accused the King of insanity and removed him from the Throne Ludvig had clearly shown some borderline align delusional behavior and his obsession with building his new Schwangau plus four other lavish personal palaces and homes was all consuming whether or not he. He had any mental disorder. That would be diagnosed by. Today's standards is still debated Ludwig's ultimate fate is also shrouded in mystery days after. Ludvig was deemed insane by the state appointed psychiatrist and locked up in a drab hassle. He was found. Dead apparently drowned in waist. Deep Water Ludwig's death at only only forty years. Old What have been ruled suicide. If not for one gruesome detail. His psychiatrist was floating dead next to him. No one knows exactly what happened. The castle was renamed noise Von Stein German for New Swan Stone. After Ludwig's death as a homage to the tragic and eccentric figure known as as the fairy tale king. Ironically the debt ridden castle opened to the public seven weeks after Ludvig step in eighteen. Eighty six has paid for itself many times over. Thanks to the one point point. Four million tourists who visit every year

Ludvig Richard Wagner King Ludvig Ludvik Throne Ludvig Stein Castle Medieval Castle Ludvik Dream Castle Walt Disney Von Stein Schwangau Disney Maximilian Prussia Europe Ludwig Walt Disney Pictures Munich
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That's he got out of that yes have you no faith I I I I think every maybe I don't know two two point touch back maybe that's what the defense will get a in here is Tom Goldman thanks so much you're listening to weekend edition from NPR news live from KQED news I'm Tiffany cam high groups opposing oil and gas drilling in the arctic National Wildlife Refuge have a pop up exhibit showing in San Francisco they want to put a spotlight on what might be lost here's KQ Edie's Alice will flee well I'm arsenal alive it's warm inside but everything else evokes the vast Alaskan wild a wet earth the aroma rises from the moss covered floor textured fabric lit to resemble the Northern Lights hang above floor to ceiling video shows migrating caribou families meadows of blooming wildflowers and arctic foxes leaping in the snow contrasting footage shows politicians announcing their plans for oil extraction images and voices of the region's gwich'in people complete the program environmental groups that sponsored the installation used techniques from issue advertising to generate an emotional response from visitors the wilderness society's Lulu Gephardt compares the refuge with the abundant life of East Africa Szeryng Getty plane because it has such an amazing diversity of wildlife all come to the refuge to their children and lay there a birds from every state in this country are born in the refuge proponents of oil and gas companies say drilling in the region will generate jobs and help meet the U. S. achieve energy independence in September the trump administration moved closer to leasing parts of the refuge to oil companies I'm Alice will flee KQED news the exhibit ends tomorrow at the capitol art gallery I'm Tiffany can hi KQED news support comes from personal capital offering online money tools to give users a three hundred sixty degree view of all their money personal capital dot com it's time for perspective that's our daily listener commentaries series when in the presence of something truly inspiring is your reaction verbal or awed silence Michael Ellis has his answer I have led about over forty safari to Africa and at the beginning of each trip when I'm orienting people about what to expect and how to behave I always give them a warning that several times during our trip I will require complete and total silence no yanking know where ling video no clicking cameras no commenting on the obvious just silence it seems to be a trait peculiar to western thought that we must constantly process our experiences by commenting on them rather than just having them on my trips I want people to take the world directly into their bones to feel it viscerally in the gut not in their brain these quiet moments can be very powerful and later can be easily accessed when I see a photo of a spotted hyena I can still hear the crunching of a wildebeest leg I can feel the power of those massive jaws as they slowly but forcefully crush the heavy bone and I can smell the smell of recent death and I can still taste the presence of those three ponderous male elephants that slowly walked by my tent the quiet washing of their massive feet to the tall grass the low deep rumbles in early impossible here emanating from their bodies that I could physically feel I could feel the hairs vibrate in my ear and I disappeared for a moment into their world in the Japanese art of flower arranging he combine a negative or empty space is just as important as the plants themselves the key to success is knowing when to quit arranging in my business I have to know when to not talk there is information and then there is wisdom I can give you the facts on she does and how they hot but into you watch when quietly stock exil burst of full throttle turning this way and that and rapid pursuit knocking the legs out from the prey and then watching the gives else last gasp hearing it's a death rattle then you may have gained a little knowledge about the world and you didn't hear a word for me this is Michael Ellis with the perspective Michael Ellis is a naturalist who leads trips throughout the world he lives in Santa Rosa you can share thoughts on his commentary online at KQED dot org slash perspectives and that's also where you can find out.

three hundred sixty degree
Calms Secret to Success? Matthew McConaugheys Bedtime Stories

Business Wars Daily

05:50 min | 2 years ago

Calms Secret to Success? Matthew McConaugheys Bedtime Stories

"Business Wars daily is sponsored by SALESFORCE salesforce customer relationship management solution is committed to helping you deliver the personalized experiences that could customers want so they'll keep coming back again and again salesforce bringing companies and customers together visit salesforce dot com one hundred fifty million times and the company turned a profit last year it's now worth more than a billion dollars the first wellness apt to become a unicorn and it shows the simplest of features bedtime stories read by celebrities like Matthew mcconaughey as observers have noted meditation is nice to have adults suffering from it won easily blame it on political news or climate change concerns stock market volatility over use of technology or the Mash up of skyrocketing love but everybody needs to sleep with once upon a time now at the heart of the business subscriptions quadrupled Com stories have been played more than dollar annual subscriptions according to Tech Crunch last year the company noted an uptick in users tuning in at bedtime and decided to test products for insomniacs I have additional options for managing their mental health founder Michael acton Smith is nothing if not a big dreamer he's considering launching real world products from more companies are jumping into the digital behavioral health game developing APPs intended to bridge the huge gap between suffering and treatment anxiety is highly treatable close a two-thirds of people who have never received treatment according to patient advocates enter the big guns of mental wellness apps head space and calm relaxing way to run billed as a partnership between Nike and the blockbuster meditation APP head space it was a reminder to just how ubiquitous mental wellness APPs have become June loan debt and the pressure to perform do we have anything else we can be anxious about how about a toxic combination of all of the above will listen regardless of the cause more industry is relaxing head space is in you might say head to head competition with Com- A serial entrepreneur from South Wales Michael Acton Smith founded stream to date com has raised one hundred forty million dollars in funding and reached about fifty million users the company says about two million of those users purchase seventy lost ninety six dollars a year it now claims to reach more than forty five million users in one hundred ninety countries the company markets the APP to corporate wellness leaders they reach nearly one hundred million users worldwide albeit with different tones and strategies founded by British former monk. Andy put a comb in twenty ten head space earning the American Medical Association which offers at two burned-out doctors and Temple University which gives it too stressed out student athletes that's not to say that being in the meditation in two thousand twelve but it grew slowly for its first few years Smith credits the two thousand sixteen election with increasing America's anxiety levels and his company's revenues grids of companies eager to calm they're anxious employees down what's up anxiety has become the most common mental illness in America with some forty million they're everywhere and applied to everything from running to serious mental health issues like depression and suicide alley and they're on the benefits men use of hours daily happy Monday friends the other day I pulled up apple's APP store my phone to look for something in steering me there in the face was the APP of the day which promised and I quote here a more one side effect of success and that Ho category mindfulness APPs are taking a bit out of depression drug sales which are declining as people realize clothing and retail stores to publishing hotels and even a private island resort a really really come when we would imagine what would you pay for a peaceful day or from wondering I'm David Brown and this is business even better a peaceful night more and more of us are willing to subscribe to stillness it appears so watch this space calm and head space may be winning now but many scrappy upstarts or aggressively climbing that path to enlightenment and that fight is likely to be anything but peaceful business wars daily is sponsored by salesforce have you ever wondered what salesforce does of salesforce is a customer seamless personalized experiences that customers want and build lasting trusted customer relationships make sense salesforce uh-huh slash learn more nations ship management solution they bring companies and customers together. How do they do it? They give your employees of three hundred sixty degree view of your customers bringing companies and customers together visit salesforce dot com slash learn more that's salesforce dot com slash learn more

Salesforce Michael Acton Smith Matthew Mcconaughey Nike America South Wales Founder American Medical Association David Brown Apple Depression Andy Temple University One Hundred Forty Million Doll Three Hundred Sixty Degree Ninety Six Dollars
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on KTRH

"Also a certified financial planner you know the certainly when it comes to health care long term care to touch on that Troy I mean there are things in there that people probably don't want to think about and maybe they should be thinking about it but then you get to the estate planning part because you certainly help people with that you're not a an estate planning attorney but you can help people come up with plans and may be pointing in the right direction I suppose I you can talk about that but there are certain things we should have financial directives healthcare directives things that we need a place to find that most people are on top of that say at fifty five or they wait till something happens ago who I need to get that done we're working with people primarily who are about to enter retirement and we're helping them to develop an income planted in income strategy and investment plan maybe an insurance plan so by that time a lot of people do have these documents in place maybe not all of them but they'll at least have a will a living will maybe some medical directives when the big ones that a lot of people forget about is the financial power of attorney so the financial power of attorney is important because it allows one spouse to access the other spouse's irate before the death certificates issued a lot of people that we meet with they do have those documents they maybe don't have everything that they need but often times we will you know running to a family that they're already retired and they don't have these documents in place so yeah absolutely it's something we identify in our covers three hundred sixty degree process it's just part of family planning and an asset protection and preservation planning yeah I think you know we were talking earlier about retirement planners comparing them to a broke and a broker is basically all about investments what harvester basically creating five at least five different plans for us right in income plant and investment plan a health plan the tax plan and a state plan that is what is called holistic planning correct yes in been before and even today if you go to the wrong type of adviser if you're working with a broker or you're just working with investment adviser who doesn't do comprehensive planning I guess that's the best way to know who you're working with many people think they're working with a comprehensive retirement planner thank you you're not working with a retirement plan unless you have all those things unless you have a tax planning income plan investment plan a health plan in a in a in a state plan those are the the things that you need in retirement to sleep comfortably at night knowing that all the bases have been covered knowing that your family is taken care of god forbid anything should happen to you so a lot of times just investment advisors even if they're not a broker for their fiduciary there an investment adviser most investment advisers especially at that big firms they really just focus on the investment plan what percentage should we have in the stocks what percentage that we have in the bonds they're not talking to you about your state plan or your long term care plan or in income plan to keep up with inflation and a tax plan that reduces your taxes if you don't have all these things I do encourage you to visit the website reach out to us through there it's carvers financial group dot com come visit us come down here to H. Q. nine twenty memorial city way were right behind hotels outside memorial city we also have seven satellite offices throughout the Houston area so if you're in league city or the woodlands or sugar land or Katie we have satellite offices.

Troy three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on KTRH

"Also a certified financial planner you know the certainly when it comes to health care long term care to touch on that Troy I mean there were things in there that people probably don't want to think about and maybe they should be thinking about it but then you get to the estate planning part because you certainly help people with that you're not a an estate planning attorney but you can help people come up with plans and may be pointing in the right direction I suppose I you can talk about that but there are certain things we should have financial directives healthcare directives things that we need a place to find that most people are on top of that say at fifty five or do they wait till something happens ago who I need to get that done we're working with people primarily who are about to enter retirement and we're helping them to develop an income planted in income strategy and investment plan maybe an insurance plan. so by that time a lot of people do have these documents in place maybe not all of them but they'll at least have a will a living will maybe some medical directives one of the big ones that a lot of people forget about is the financial power of attorney. so the financial power of attorney is important because it allows one spouse to access the other spouse's irate before the death certificates issued a lot of people that we meet with they do have those documents they maybe don't have everything that they need but often times we will you know run into a family that they are already retired and they don't have these documents in place so yeah absolutely it's something we identify in our covers three hundred sixty degree process it's just part of family planning and an asset protection and preservation planning yeah I think you know we were talking earlier about retirement planners comparing them to a broker and a broker is basically all about investments what harvester basically creating five at least five different plans for us right in income plant and investment plan a health plan the tax plan and a state plan that is what is called holistic planning correct yes in been before and even today if you go to the wrong type of adviser if you're working with a broker or you're just working with investment adviser who doesn't do comprehensive planning I guess that's the best way to know who you're working with many people think they're working with a comprehensive retirement planner but you you're not working with the retirement plan unless you have all those things unless you have a tax planning income plan investment plan a health plan in a in a in a state plan those are the things that you need in retirement to sleep comfortably at night knowing that all the bases have been covered knowing that your family is taken care of god forbid anything should happen to you so a lot of times just investment advisors even if they're not a broker for their fiduciary there an investment adviser..

three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on KTRH

"A certified financial planner you know the certainly when it comes to health care long term care to touch on that Troy I mean there are things in there that people probably don't want to think about and maybe they should be thinking about it but then you get to the estate planning part because you certainly help people with that you're not a an estate planning attorney but you can help people come up with plans and may be pointing in the right direction I suppose I you can talk about that but there are certain things we should have financial directives healthcare directives things that we need a place to find that most people are on top of that say at fifty five order they wait till something happens ago who I need to get that done we're working with people primarily who are about to enter retirement and we're helping them to develop an income planted in income strategy and investment plan maybe an insurance plan so by that time a lot of people do have these documents in place maybe not all of them but they'll at least have a will a living will maybe some medical directives when the big ones that a lot of people forget about is the financial power of attorney so the financial power of attorney is important because it allows one spouse to access the other spouse's irate before the death certificates issued lot of people that we meet with they do have those documents they maybe don't have everything that they need but often times we will you know run into a family that they're already retired and they don't have these documents in place so yeah absolutely it's something we identify in our covers three hundred sixty degree process it's just part of family planning and an asset protection and preservation planning yeah I think you know we were talking earlier about retirement planners comparing them to a broke and a broker is basically all about investments what harvest you're basically creating five at least five different plans for us right in income plant and investment plan a health plan the tax plan and a state plan that is what is called holistic planning correct yes in been before and even today if you go to the wrong type of adviser if you're working with a broker or you're just working with investment adviser who doesn't do comprehensive planning I guess that's the best way to know who you're working with many people think they're working with a comprehensive retirement planner thank you you're not working with the retirement plan unless you have all those things unless you have a tax planning income plan investment plan a health plan in a in a in a state plan those are the things that you need in retirement to sleep comfortably at night knowing that all the bases have been covered knowing that your family is taken care of god forbid anything should happen to you so a lot of times just investment advisors even if they're not a broker for their fiduciary there an investment adviser.

three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on KTRH

"Also a certified financial planner you know the certainly when it comes to health care long term care to touch on that Troy I mean there are things in there that people probably don't want to think about and maybe they should be thinking about it but then you get to the estate planning part because you certainly help people with that you're not a an estate planning attorney but you can help people come up with plans and may be pointing in the right direction I suppose I you can talk about that but there are certain things we should have financial directives healthcare directives things that we need a place to find that most people are on top of that say at fifty five order they wait till something happens ago who I need to get that done we're working with people primarily who are about to enter retirement and we're helping them to develop an income planted in income strategy and investment plan maybe an insurance plan so by that time a lot of people do have these documents in place maybe not all of them but they'll at least have a will a living will maybe some medical directives one of the big ones that a lot of people forget about is the financial power of attorney so the financial power of attorney is important because it allows one spouse to access the other spouse's irate before the death certificates issued a lot of people that we meet with they do have those documents they maybe don't have everything that they need but often times we will you know running to a family that they're already retired and they don't have these documents in place so yeah absolutely it's something we identify in our covers three hundred sixty degree process it's just part of family planning and an asset protection and preservation planning yeah I think you know we were talking earlier about retirement planners comparing them to a broke and a broker is basically all about investments what harvester basically creating five at least five different plans for us right in income plant and investment plan a health plan the tax plan and a state plan that is what is called holistic planning correct yes in been before and even today if you go to the wrong type of adviser if you're working with a broker or you're just working with investment adviser who doesn't do comprehensive planning I guess that's the best way to know who you're working with many people think they're working with a comprehensive retirement planner thank you you're not working with the retirement plan unless you have all those things unless you have a tax planning income plan investment plan a health plan in a in a in a state plan those are the things that you need in retirement to sleep comfortably at night knowing that all the bases have been covered knowing that your family is taken care of god forbid anything should happen to you so a lot of times just investment advisors even if they're not a broker for their fiduciary there an investment adviser.

three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

Mindfulness Mode

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

"For whom we did a three hundred sixty degree performance review. And the predominant piece of feedback he got was. He's never satisfied. He can never celebrate success. And I think that the standard operating procedure would be to sort of encourage a gratitude awareness, or to encourage, like, hey, every Friday, let's have a beer party right? I live in the world. That wasn't gonna work with this guy, he'd undermined it at every step of the way, I knew my client while enough, and so we started doing some work together and what we began to unpack was a belief system. He had which was to celebrate was to relax and to relax was dangerous. And as we started to unpack it, he related back to the fact that his grandparents had survived the Nazi programs. Right. And here's the belief system that he grew up with if you celebrate slash relax. The Nazis going to knock on the door. Right. So do not relax. Okay. Okay. And so doesn't matter that he's two generations away from holocaust. His internal system was wired to believe that now by surfacing that, but becoming mindfully aware of that by coming to understand, and being relationship to that, and not treated as something to be beaten up, stop being this way. But in fact, take a pause and love the wish for protection. That's implicit net. He was able to speak about it with loving kindness towards himself. And this was the trick to then be able to go to his inner circle of leaders and say, so this is the problem. I have. And so I'm going to be uncomfortable when you roll out a birthday cake in the team, and that gave them permission to Pat him on the back and gently say to him, you're safe, the company's not gonna fail. Because we took an hour out to celebrate somebody's birthday. Right. And that kind of transformation becomes much more permanent than a simple life hack life trick of. Hey on Fridays. Let's ordering beer, right. Yes. Does that make sense? Does it makes total sense, key was to be able to create the safety for him to look at his life in a meaningful way and to make the connections between the past and the present? That's the key, Jerry. Have you ever been bullied or were you ever ah bully were you ever in a situation where mindfulness would have made a difference? As far as you know, this kind of thing you have a story for us. Yeah. Well at the L tell this story, don't tell the story in the book, I grew up with a lot of violence, as a kid. I remember one time there was a lot of violence put on pawn me as. Eaten up often and I would occasionally lose it, and so it's funny, I'm gonna show you on fortunately, your listeners won't be able to see this, but I'm going to bring up to characters. So this, I'm showing up to the camera is hog right, Marvel's character. And this is Thor. Oh, yeah. There is. Okay. So I grew up. And there's a Thor that there's a halt that lives inside of me. Okay, are raging character? And when I was a kid, there was this one time in Brooklyn, where we lived on the second floor of a two family house. And I looked out the window, and I saw that a neighbor. Boy with throwing rocks at my younger, brother. John. Oh, yeah. And I was an hall came out, and I ran down those stairs in I pull this kid over the fence and I threw him down on the floor, and I founded his face, and I broke his notice, and I was ju do not mess with my. I people, but part of my path into adulthood has been to learn to take the hulk that exists within me and turn him into four right? Because the mythology that marvel so skilled at giving us is that superpowers have dark sides and light side. And the fact that hulk and Thor have a relationship is not an accident hulk and Thor are equal in power, but four is committed to Justice hulk has the capacity to rage out of control..

Thor Pat Marvel Justice hulk John Jerry Brooklyn three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

05:08 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"Supposed to go you know you know radio there's no bumps in the road everything we needed to be smooth appreciate that i had no idea it was among friends right out of the shoot the worst play rica somebody in la play radio then moaning to friday five man i were were work with i don't try cry cry travels you don't notice on music are people are people people got to do is put a drink game my hand for some reason yeah down travis will be listening to this on his way home on the full five freeway so no not so much oh it feels that way heels right do put a drink sentiment right like that i wouldn't have go figured you for a country muruga hurts baby eric jourjour sherry i've into tennessee tennessee right now nashville headed headed south or was for which means the guy just doesn't because he's from detroit and don't think a lot of detroiters in country music for a lot of different things way i felt about it figuring takes up still working on it i guess he's a collective he's so worldly by the way you know i spent fourth of july with my classmate over here to the right it was great great ouray place that he lives on all sides thank you so you felt you wearing a house actually house but you felt like you were in a high rise in downtown la you had a three hundred sixty degree view of los angeles nice fireworks all the way around like you can slit sit at the top of this man's man's lose my number sit at the top of the mansion right in watch fireworks the entire night it was crazy acohol was flowing the whole deal every floor had a bore every single floor had a bar and was a little bit better i had an opportunity travis some of his family in sorry it was a couple of pieces snap place four one me l z to djamil three amina four jemil's free and five so it was five blacks in the entire house is fine i mean it's fine sales good number majority bad number right so i'm having dinner supper doing barbecue time and i had some color greens kagera habur you collingridge raj have you i don't like him have you had them yeah i'm sure you have chris had collieries so i'm eating him they wanna l these family members who happens to be white okay asked me what was i eating i say colleen she's all i wanna try those so i went got some put him on a plate for her to eat them they need nuts in them nut say needs some cashews walnuts cashews all this so i had to go get your brings your mail a hand any day of walnut the cashier this agrees she sheet look she was like who say fit widely l k penalty you find his family member from walnuts cashews and some damn collar greens kale salad so i ran out to the store gives some ice so i'm coming up the stairs you know the bags of is they all gathered around my poor sisterinlaw like she's excise experiment kesha go hey man you know she said what she said put some nut seagal agrees but the ice started to melt this first time she'd ever had them in needed nuts believable it's like sees different palettes the uranium potato giving right with the in laws or yes it's just it's just the your meals drivers you guys away you do them unnecessary nut tone thing stop it why are you guys for all nuts in in anything salad related deal it's just the white folk man i love y'all death with disease wait go go back put raisins poten who does stop potato sound my day i've been white my whole life you're not going on all you don't go to all the festivities dinner's getting around some white people and i have a few have you gone to all the meetings though have you skipped because if you those meetings if you miss them know meetings man raises in a potato salad they'll do that to you that's bad yeah the marshmallows on the sweet potatoes they do all that i've seen that.

three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on Fore Play

Fore Play

04:40 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on Fore Play

"Thousands of articles and honestly your bibliography is longer than i think anything that anyone that is listening to this show has ever written combined so it's very very extensive and i think that that's important now i want to next ask because like i said we we are the personification of tiger fan boys we love tiger we love everything about him we love the his flaws and all of that at all just factors into an are you know in our minds how amazing captivating he is in my first instinct when i heard about the book was you know look i already got this image tiger i love the guy to death i love following them i don't wanna read something that's going to bring him down or whatever's what is your reaction to that because i feel like we're not alone in that i'm sure that is some people's reaction to it is is that he's he's on a pedestal in a lot of people's minds and rightly so he's transcended figure not only in the game of golf but probably the greatest individual athlete in in modern history you know you're naming people like i'll lee or or michael jordan now more currently somebody like lebron but i think tiger transcends all those people except perhaps i'll e because he changed the game you know physically socially culturally and certainly my financially but here's the thing is that we were given certain views of tiger that were propagated or we're we're visible through our television screens or watching your mind in person in also we were getting certain images of time peter woods through the myriad corporations whether it be american express or censure or nike or year or you name it that frankly were were just only half of tiger's life and what jeff and i try to do here and it's not the easiest thing in the world to do because it has you know when you read all those books you read very similar anecdotes time and time and time again and we tried to answer the question is who is tiger woods you know who is the whole person a three hundred sixty degree immersive view into an iconic athletes wife and we we liked them to shakespeare because he's somebody you see once and you may never see again and i think we're we're seeing evidence of that now with with his comeback so we didn't have any we didn't have an agenda we didn't go in trying to tear down tiger woods what we did try to do is help people understand typing and who is e but also i think just as importantly you know what's the price of genius you know when you're a child star of the magnitude of a michael jackson when you're on network television at the age of two you're on the show called that's incredible which was a really variety reality show you know at the age of five you know what's the psychological cost of that and so we were asking big questions and i think that the if we had just knocked this book out in a year and thrown some sexy anecdotes or sexual episodes or incidents into it to just try to tiddly people then i i could see where we would be subject to certain kinds of criticism but we didn't do that and you know what we did was spent thousands of hours tens of thousands of hours really between the two of us trying to understand this guy try to write a book that's going to stand the test time and just to to wrap this up this point is is like i i'm captivated by tiger to it doesn't mean i don't like him in fact there were times when i was in laws his his greatness on the golf course but there are also other times when you when you read some of the things that you read in this book where you're like my god he's he's a machine he doesn't have human emotions he doesn't he doesn't send a message of appreciation or thanks to people when the simplest gestures would have gone the longest of ways in other people's minds so he's a complicated guy in and we wrote i think a very fair in a very revealing book of his life how much do you feel like you've sympathize with tiger because you talked about how.

three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"In your family and things that are helping you thrive i think and i hate to bring 'em exercise but i think exercise aides and the release of endorphins but when you talk about developing who you are you have to look you have to take a three hundred sixty degree look about who you are you are the nucleus of your you literally are the center of your universe and one of the superpowers i talk about my book is being selfish and positively selfish and so in order for you to develop a step by step plan step by step approach to become a better you you have to i understand that is true that the world does revolve around you in such a good way i mean because imagine you go into work and you have a negative attitude that negative attitude is gonna filter through everything and everybody in that job imagine you coming home from work and you have a negative attitude is going to filter through everything and oughta energy in your home and so you have to be very very aware of who you are so that you can develop a plan and be able to attack it as needed so i do go back to is not the thing is to thing if you need us to develop a plan of on being an amazing entrepreneur you have to know what you're passionate about things you love things you don't like and you you have to go back into the entire history of you in c and admit to whatever you can't commit to your shortcomings hand you have to look at things that you're great at and so when you do that and you take that three hundred sixty degree look at who you are you and your open to that again if you're open to it because you have to be open to it and you have to accept the real statue see you will be able to develop a plan and develop goals in chief goals that you want so that you can literally not just achieve the goals that you can thrive in every step that it takes to get to that goal for the discomfort development plan one of the notes that you had in the book also as discomfort is risk and discovery.

three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Now good a dumbbells now you have three hundred sixty degree plane of movement that you have to balance more neuro muscular activity so dumps are better than barbells in that way no muscular activity and you can adjust the weight so you can do things we can only do three reps you can do things you can do twenty reps if you want so great exercise can't really do that hotel room but just saying generally speaking good exercise but now you go the tip top the best exercise for normal must go activity would be ups because same thing you're moving your body through space you're not balancing weight balance brings all doom that i'll get even better now you're going like creative which is good that's like beyond the spectrum which is good totally good but so yeah keep these things in my i think when you when you do thing so if you can add or when do work out so when you if you can add weight that's the challenge if you're going to add weight to these moving your body through space exercises that's when you gonna get well i think now i'm just gonna take this one step further because you don't necessarily have to add weight as you stated earlier if you can adjust how you're moving your body through space and then you can get the you can get additional and i'll tell you what really makes us obviously if you do any gymnastics training if you do a pull up that's hard if you do a talk pull up your knees or pulled up that's even harder if you do a l sit pull up with your knees are up put your feet are pointed straightforward that's even harder each one of those things is a little bit harder and same thing with a dip like just a regular dip if you've got your feet hang it's easier if you bring it up to talk his little harder if you bring it up to an l it's even harder so you can keep doing these things and there's squats that you can do i mean just doing pistols alone that's a lot harder some people can't even do pistols and so you might.

three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Cd adam corolla show like never before in three hundred sixty degree virtual reality visit podcast one dot com slash corolla vr the download the sold out show at east ports arena and santa ana with guest real housewives of orange county heather do bro you women you do a lot of complaining with all the metoo move in all this stuff we yeah yeah you pay less for your auto insurance there's a seven years longer ones at the end win the quad amal and lady kicks the door on your bathroom we can all pretend you're taking a piss plus gino bald bryan and a sold out orange county crowd again visit podcast one dot com slash corolla vr and get it on virtual reality more info at adam corolla dot com so aj here as i recall there were shooting they went some place that wasn't union to save a few bucks so they had like the non union crew they're up on the sort of second floor walkway of the hotel or something he was supposed to be returning with groceries and someone was supposed to shoot him like through the groceries and the gun had a part a partial bullet or squibb or something wasn't a squib i don't think it was a dummy cartridge a little something to make something yeah and the thing just literally fired when of supposed to be a blank and went through the guys at grocery bagging like say order something it just dead just right there unbelievable and he had like one of those weird died at the same age of his dad or one of those weird things.

santa ana east ports arena orange county three hundred sixty degree seven years
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Anyone ever knew in the capital how's that a show koi live from seattle to vail lable on net flicks as we speak in of course podcast the copepod well podcast one apple podcasts we will take ourselves break we'll do good sports cody walker will be paul walker's younger brother code is going to be in here with talk all about his event right after this see the adam corolla show like never before in three hundred sixty degree virtual reality visit podcast one dot com slash corolla vr the download the sole down show at eastport arena in santa ana with guest real housewife of orange county heather dubrow you women you do a lot of complaining with all the metoo movement all the stuff we yeah yeah you pay less for your auto insurance there's a live live seven years longer be ones at the end win the quantum ball and lady kicks the door open on your bathroom we can all pretend you're taking a piss gino bald bryan in a sold out orange county crowd again visit punt cast one dot com slash corolla vr and get it on virtual reality more info at adam corolla dot com.

seattle cody walker paul walker eastport arena santa ana apple orange county three hundred sixty degree seven years
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"You can take kids to virtual museums to to other countries to the surface of mars where video footage captured by the mars rover can be stitch together into three hundred sixty degree three d view so things that we can't do physically as humans we all of a sudden get the ability to do via virtual reality but other than somewhat fringy in entertainment is there a promise here is there something that this is going to transform or is this just something to keep in the closet when your friends come over and your playstation and play well there is one for playstation and so certainly it has that quality now but that's only when you're looking at those very early kind of core uses like gaming and entertainment when you open it up to social applications and you open it up for people to consume mmhmm or experience art together or social experiences together then you have this ability in certainly this potential to influence everything from people social behavior to the relationships that they're forming to increasing the intimacy in a relationship and so these this is really where we're in the infancy and this is really where you have consumers of virtual reality in the creators of these experiences who are just starting to play with these dynamics just starting to see these sort of incredible stories coming out of this so it's it's very easy to look at virtual reality and say oh well this is a clunky looking headset this is expensive i don't have a computer that can run this it takes too much effort ticket into it but these headsets are striking and what it takes to run them on is getting cheaper and easier to obtain so were fast heading towards a world in which these are something you can just slip on hand to someone else and as the size of the form.

three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on The Filmcast

The Filmcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on The Filmcast

"Yeah wall i'm also bothered by just a pure logistics of the tech we we see this on directional treadmill thing but yet in the in a context of the virtual world they're leaping and twisting and diving and then later on the very very end they have these harnesses attached to them which would make a hell of a lot more sense if they were in the whole movie and it felt like this crazy three hundred sixty degree you know we cut back to the real world a few key moments in see them doing things akin to what their characters do but the things are characters do like for example in the senior guys just reference where she has to leap from zombie zombie like itchy physically leaping in her q bothered by when it gets to the end and people are literally fighting vr style in the streets how does that work what are we doing this world is so slapdash realize there's all these details yeah but they don't mean anything it feels so thoughtless like i find it so infuriating because like i love spielberg like jaws is one of my favorite movies of all time and to watch him make this which just seems like he's just like yeah this is fun this is for the kids at south by southwest when he introduced it he said this is not a film this is a movie and guys like what that means is so gross like as if because it's not like the post i guess we're not supposed to regard it with any kind of seriousness or any kind of criticism and that's what i'm saying about the line item called out in my tweet about like you know like a gamer can always smell a hater.

three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"Yes yes you can actually export a i don't know if it's an mp four or if it's navy i or or what the format is maybe proprietary to end the scape but i can actually record it and do the fly around the walk throughs and then send that actually out as a video to my client or upload up site and have them come on take a look so you can you are able to convert it to a standard video sounds like yeah so i'm looking at end scape knowledge base on using a skyboxes a background that sounds like what you wanna do right that's exactly what i wanted bill and it has a couple of links there where you can go to get some free skyboxes but you know it's like any oh oh i i see see i see the way they're doing it is you get somebody else's panos or whatever and they say from that you can use yeah open footage dot net but yeah you'd rather go out there capture the actual clients landscape so that they can see what it would look like in their terrain i understand that well it's so so that sounds to me like open footage probably is using a standard format so i'm just i'm looking at open footage to see if they documented but it's my guess that they're using a standard footage footage format some sort of three hundred sixty degree four footage format and if that's the case i'm sure they are an end scape says here's how you use it as a background it's just a matter of figuring out how to take your existing skyboxes and converted to that format and i take my own pictures and stitch together somehow and that would be the other alternative yeah yeah i mean okay so this is another question then is how do i make three hundred sixty degree image yeah and you can go out and i mean this would probably be more than adequate go go get samsung gear through camera three sixty camera or something similar and just shoot the image with those make it very simple rather than stitching also stitch but stitching is never going to be quite as good these three hundred sixty degree cameras.

samsung three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on Amazing Business Radio with Shep Hyken

Amazing Business Radio with Shep Hyken

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on Amazing Business Radio with Shep Hyken

"Customer time line which give all of our technicians are call center agents uh a full three hundred sixty degree do of the customers journey with us so they can see over two hundred and fifty data elements that are combined into this every interaction and he technology issues any eriko is that they had and digit arms than with all this information so they can get into that really deep customer experience uh with our customers and be able to serve them so there's so many other things that we've done but it's it gives you a flavor for the spirit of innovation that we've had to really be there for our employees that to give them the training the tools that technology the data and everything they need to be there for our customers still have work to do but an incredibly proud of the progress and uh and the work that our teams are dawn way and and i appreciate that you say their work to do because even the best companies recognize it's still a journey and it doesn't and as new ideas to technology comes up you can only make it better so i wanna talk to you about training in a moment but i want to ask you if there's lots of ways artificial intelligence a as being used today and i don't want to turn this into a discussion of a i but one of the cool concepts i've heard about and have seen in action i i attend the ibm think conference every year which is coming up in just a few weeks again and one of the things a jenny romney who is the ceo talked about was flipping the letters a i to become i a which is the intelligent assistant that supports the customer support professional so the machine listens in real time and here's what the customers asking in his giving the professional support rep uh.

jenny romney ceo ibm three hundred sixty degree
"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"three hundred sixty degree" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"On the other hand companies like facebook noah whole lot more about you than neptune on right now is a huge advantage for netflixing but if somebody else has a great i'll i mean arguably amazon with theoretically also had a terrific algorithm going sure google facebook i amazon they have cut above more of a three hundred sixty degree look at who you are last question netflixing where does what happens with netflixing in a year let's say is it acquired in your view i like for netflixing yeah you know i i thought i share a cube with read for few years and read always wanted to run the studio that's essentially what he's doing now but he would have been a great successor to bob idir you know potentially he'd be a great successor to tim cooke you know he he understands how to drive culture both on the content entertainment side as well as technology and i think it would make great sense for both of those companies but logic sometimes doesn't really work out in the real world mitch thanks so much accounting by shortening because of all this breaking news but we hope you'll come back thank you mitch the cofounder of netflixing they give you still think you stand by disney for he makes a pretty good case mitch does apple for netflixing we've seen in the enormous i do think disney and netflixing makes a lot of sense of mr are looking for a successor i think read hastings from what i could tell we've met him a couple of times that's about as good as it gets he's taken maybe two misteps during his tenure netflixing at most otherwise it's been flaw the execution so i think it would make a lot of sense why not just hiram away any more that's not the reason to to buy netflixing in fact what i hear mitch saying is that all to me this is.

facebook disney mitch apple hastings amazon google bob idir tim cooke three hundred sixty degree