35 Burst results for "Three Four Years"

Biden wins White House, vowing new direction for divided US

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden wins White House, vowing new direction for divided US

"Joe Biden will be the forty six president of the United States defeating Donald Trump biting cross two hundred seventy electoral votes with the wind in his native Pennsylvania capping a sweep of the so called Democrats blue wall retaking Michigan and Wisconsin after trump flipped all three four years ago in a statement Biden says it's now time for America to unite and heal he made no mention of the president who was at his Virginia golf club when the race was called not long after falsely claiming on Twitter I won this election by a lot he's the first incumbent presidents since George HW bush to lose the White House Sager made ani Washington

Joe Biden Donald Trump America Virginia Golf Club Pennsylvania Biden Wisconsin Michigan George Hw Bush Twitter Sager White House Ani Washington
Do The Last Thing on Your To Do List by Bradley Charbonneau

Optimal Living Daily

04:29 min | Last month

Do The Last Thing on Your To Do List by Bradley Charbonneau

"Do the last thing on your to do list by Bradley Charbonneau of the SOUR CREAM DOT com. Mathematically it's an easy equation the joy you get from getting to do task off. Your list is huge. Even more mind boggling for the greatest Nobel Prize winning minds. It often doesn't take much to get it done. So why does one equal to? Why do we let those tasks? Linger unfinished are unsorted. Even they might bug us every single day. Maybe even a few times per day but yet we do nothing. Nothing more than wonder why we don't do them or worse. Get FRUSTRATED WITH OURSELVES. That were non doing them. The solution seems no mid is so simple just to the task. Be Done with it but we still don't do it. What is the mental block? Accountability part of it is often the lack of accountability. If no one knows what we're supposed to be doing then probabilities are high. That no one will know. We haven't done them the more people who know the harder it is void. That is if those who know are people whose opinions respect I suppose if you told the bank teller that you're going to quit smoking and then you see the same bank teller in a month and you hadn't quit smoking. You could number one go to a different teller number two stock her hours go another time. One number three till the teller. You didn't quit. Is People. Tell their friends are going on a diet or quitting smoking. Or it's why they don't tell their friends but should we be strong enough to not need accountability from someone else but should be enough to be accountable for ourselves. I guess that's where it comes down a character and inner strength in who you are. Those empty window frames downstairs the worst and simultaneously. Best part of all this is when you do finally do the task. The roared is almost incomprehensible. Two days ago I ordered greeting cards for the upcoming holiday. I'm not sure what him. E But have an inkling our D- poster-size prince photos. It took me fifteen minutes to find photos that were high enough resolution. In of course nine shots that I want on my wall the next day I picked them up the next morning. My wife and I said let's do this thing. We spent maybe forty five minutes measuring glass cleaning cutting and then taping in hanging man. We were done maybe two hours for the whole Shebang. These were windows. That used to be the windows of my kids room. I didn't know what to do with them for a few years. Then someone suggested I hang them on the wall and make photo frames. Outta them. Wonderful idea. three four years ago now he measured. The wall drilled holes installed strong hanging screws even painting quality wire hanging system to make sure we could adjust to tilt the window. Frames have been waiting for photos for years. Now stun now I walk by and stop and look at them and admire our work. Actually stop and look and admire even just for a second. We did it. Do we need to be challenged to get anything done? So what happened in the past few days? I was different from the past few years. I was challenged. I realized that seems to be my answer for everything lately but it also happens to be true. I've just been experimenting. I've been going strong on my right every day. Challenge for the past thirty plus days. I've been drinking some form of Jews for the past three hundred plus days. Are these now habits. Will I now do everything on my to do list? Only because I think that I can do them because I've done the math. Do the math as a math major in university. I like math and science. I liked it. There are definite answers as partly what I've been learning through experiments also because I can't seem to get anything done otherwise quite simple actually number one do the thing you want to do but in bite sized chunks number to keep doing it for a while say month number three see what happens. The math is quite elementary. My six year old can figure it out one plus one plus one plus one over and over again. Thirty Times equals thirty if I do one task per day for thirty days is possible. I finished thirty tasks. It doesn't get much simpler. What's holding us back? Here's what it is. Is that big number? It's the thirty. Were scared of thirty a whole lot. More Than One. So take one at a time. Just one want an added bonus for pure entertainment and much delayed gratification. Take the oldest. Dust covered really annoying item from your to do and do that. Just do that one. Then when you're done stand back and admire it

Bradley Charbonneau Nobel Prize
Drug Addiction In America

Mentally Yours

04:32 min | 2 months ago

Drug Addiction In America

"Woken to Mentally Yours Metro could ikaes weekly podcast about all things mental health. Today we're talking to Dave. Marlon, he was the CEO of crossroads of Southern Nevada, which was the largest addiction and Rehab Center in the area, the psychotherapist drug and alcohol counselor, and he basically knows everything about addiction and mental health issues in the US and beyond. Making me talking tim today about how the pandemic has been affected addiction issues to get help if you're struggling and how to recognize if you might have a problem with drugs or alcohol. Bruce Dave. Thanks so much for joining us on mental yours and welcome from across the pond. My first question was basically because obviously as I mentioned, we're in London. You're in the US, it such different situation in terms of addiction, mental health, and obviously the pandemic to get started. Could you give kind of a brief overview of the reality of addiction in the US? How serious the problem is that how widespread is a? The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation calls addiction the number one health problem in the US. If we look at the the number of prescription opiates that are consumed in the entire world The United States consumes more than eighty percent of them. We. have. You know we've always had an alcohol problem for a percentage of our population. we we developed enough and phetamine mean and a cocaine problem over the last. Twenty years, and in the last five, six years Oh actually even a little longer. An opiate problem has has become. Our most serious addiction challenge. Kind of the most common addiction issue that you see people coming into your center with. It it's interesting. I've run Iran the largest treatment center in Las. Vegas of. Gene. Years. And now as a private center and they're absolutely opiates or over my last three, four years, they're opiates was the number one drug of choice that clients had presented to solutions recovery without the opiate use disorder their primary. Primary substance. Now I work at an indigent facility in in downtown. Las Vegas where. More than half of our clients are homeless. And what's interesting is with this demographic, there's a much higher methamphetamine use. Would say my number one. Substance of for clients is nothin vitamin with opiates and alcohol running for a close second place. That's really interesting I. Think What was interesting that you said kind of opiates have been coming up over the lost six years because for me, it's felt like the coverage has been really recent like only in the last couple of years, we taught it to the opioid crisis this being a sudden kind of unexpected issue but you're saying it's been building for a long time. It has. Interestingly, fourteen years ago I was running the largest health insurance company in the state. And I remember in my last. My last year or two I remember looking at pharmacy reports and we were all scratching our heads saying what is this Oxycontin and why did it not show up two years ago and now I remember when across the ten million dollar mark at the Insurance Company for monthly use so it really begins began spiking. Thirteen fourteen years ago. It became. Newsworthy in fashionable. Six seven years ago, and now we're a were still squarely in an opiate epidemic.

United States Las Vegas Bruce Dave Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Rehab Center Marlon TIM CEO Southern Nevada LAS Cocaine London Methamphetamine Iran
Jetpack over LA: Fact or Fiction?

Uncontrolled Airspace: General Aviation Podcast

07:25 min | 2 months ago

Jetpack over LA: Fact or Fiction?

"Saw reference to this on twitter yesterday too. And so people I don't know what we're David. You know we're talking about here. Breath. So there are reports from airline pilots apparently, there are reports line pilots are saying this. I don't know if I've actually heard an airline airline pilot reporting but that that while on on the approach to lax, I think yesterday. They saw quote unquote a guy in a jet pack at altitude. And it's like. It's twenty twenty innings possible. I mean just right but. What have you heard anything that makes you think this could be real. It's twenty twenty anything anything can happen. Ain't that the truth well back that they seem to have gotten. Audio from. The aircraft in. The Tower. Off. Of a presumed Pasco site. that. Would lend a little credence to the to the story. If you know from a live ATC. I didn't bother to click on the links here to to you know I'm just doing the local TV stations. This is from. The war zone actually from the drive DOT COM, they're they're section called the warzone airline pilots landing at LAX report quote a guy in a jet pack unquote flying alongside them It's like, okay This was some guy in a Moonie. Okay. Yeah. Maybe not but according to this news report there's three different airliners. We just passed a guy. No jetpack. And this was. According to according to the tower tower transmission made on the frequency. To jet, blue twenty-three use caution a person in jetpack reported three hundred yards south of the La final at about three thousand feet ten mile final. That's a little segment audio. Save so suddenly. That's so now is this a do we? I don't know what kind of jetpack. Yeah. That's my question is it a? Is it a sort of a James Bond type of jet pack or is it these more recent guys who were jet? Wing? And fought. Because that's the pictures that they've. Looked down lower in the story as an example, they're not saying this is the incident. But there showing other showing. Images, they have of. Of this is the jet man the. Jet called free also but yeah. Rossi's jet man that's that's yeah. emerets did a thing a stunt I don't WANNA call. It was a promotion. That's true. Three four years ago. Where they had this guy, the jet man fly in formation with I. Don't know if it was a three eighty or trip seven but. The image. Here is a four engine I'd say it's a three eighty. Three. Right. He's He's got about half flaps. Put Slow flight in your book right over the top of Dubai and with two of these these jetpack guys. It's hard to tell from the image. But. It looks like they're a good five well, good couple of hundred feet. Above to the left of this three eighty. Is the Radio Tower American nine, hundred and ninety seven. We just passed a guy in a jet pack and our says, American. Nine, hundred seven. Okay. Thank you. Okay well, this is like off to talk to one seventy, two Andrew. This is he he flies overhead lax more or less daily going to and from work. And I'll have to see what he knows about this sky with must have been. Like A shorts three, sixty or something he's like because he says, we just saw the guy passing bias in the jetpack. So I don't know if he could be going the other way but. The JAMPAKHAO, ran this guy whistling. That's embarrassing. Yeah. That's I mean it's gotTa. Be a turtle prop. No RJ captain in there and self respecting RJ captain would fly that slump. Well he's on he's on vinyl. Still doing. You Know Buck Forty Bucks Sixty. Okay well. But I'm sure jetpack guys go faster than one, hundred and forty. Meter not at least. Once. All right well. You know we're we're obviously interested in more evidence. Yes. Yes. We want to hear more accounts of this and I will check in with one seventy two drew just because he's plugged into that community in Long Beach a lot. So where the he may have some some behind the scenes information about what happened over the. Thing that jumps out at me here. Is that. If he's on final. For La. At three thousand feet and ten miles out. It has to be something like Rossi's jetpack because none of the other stuff go ten miles. Right, I wouldn't think that the James Bond if there is even a flying James Bond jetpack these days I, don't know and that was the only good for. Thirty seconds. And that's when I first heard and the first the first report of this I saw on twitter was accompanied by a picture of that jet pack in the Air Right and I thought I sort of thought it was an actual picture which I don't think you now in retrospect that it was but. anyways. So all right. Well I don't know whether we'll learn more about this or not. But when I first heard about this, if saw this whatever was I, thought it was one of those. Fan like a fan driven. Jet. Packs Ah. Some some people have taken to putting just like you do a drone use a lot of motors. They, they've created some some contraptions that that have motors and turn small productive propellers basically -ducted fans. And get off the ground and get off. But basically, it's like a helicopter. So it's Ok off the ground but I don't think they have the altitude duration or speed to do this well. We know that they did it very long. So it did it. They did it for three or four minutes? Three or four different arrivals. So yeah. Yeah. Three or four three different arrivals and figure they're spaced about a minute apart Hey. Okay.

JET Twitter James Bond Rossi LA LAX David Moonie Dubai The Tower Pasco Jampakhao Long Beach Andrew
The Lifequake Survival Guide With Bruce Feiler

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:01 min | 2 months ago

The Lifequake Survival Guide With Bruce Feiler

"All right well, nice to see you. Thanks for doing this my pleasure. Thank you for having. What how would you describe the the thesis of this book? Debating whether I should start right with a thesis or tell you how I came to the pieces. So. I think I'll do the second way because. I didn't go into this project with pieces, but a big linking pieces showed up halfway through. So what happened what led me into this? Somebody's what this book is. About is how we deal with these big wrenching changes in our lives back hallway light quake. And like what we're in now. And I got interested in these because I went through a life quake some years ago as you know, I I got cancer as a new TAB. About was that same year as the great recession and my family was hit very hard. And then my dad who has Parkinson's Lost Control of his mind. This was a man who was never a depressed admitted his life. And he tried to take his life. Times in twelve weeks. And this was kind of a big crisis. In every way, you can have a crisis, the conversations that we had to have. unhabitable eye like difficult conversations and these were difficult conversations that were impossible to have. But I'm the story guy and I'm the meaning guy in one morning on Monday morning I woke up and I said, well, your idea like what if I send my data question because my dad was always a bit of a storyteller. And I sent question like what toys did you play with a kid? Couldn't move his fingers at this point Dan. But he thought about it all week he dictated his answer to Syria who spit it out he began to edit it in at work and so I. Also another one like dummy balance you grumpy. And This went on essentially every Monday morning for what became years. Up. The. Hatch Become Eagle Scout. How'd you join the Navy how you meet mom and this man who had never written anything longer than three sentence memo in his life back into writing a fifty thousand word. And I got very interested in times of crisis in our lives like it. It's a narrative event in some way and it turns out there's a whole field narrative gerontology. There's all field of narrative adolescence, narrative medicine and kind of storytelling becoming kind of thing that people talked about at that time and so what happened and you know this makes me think of your own life and how you ended up in this conversation is when I began to tell the story to people everybody had a similar story. My wife had a headache and went to the hospital and died my daughter tried to kill herself. I. had nervous breakdown on my television in your case and and I thought well, no one else to tell their story anymore and. Let me see what I can figure out because people were saying like the life I'm living is not the life I expect like I'm living life out of order in some way. And I call my wife one night and I said. I got to figure out how to help. And I don't know I'm going GonNa find and I don't know how to do it but I feel compelled to do this and so I set out on this journey. What became Three four years crisscrossing the country collecting what became hundreds of life stories of Americans all ages all walks of life all fifty states and you name it damn. People lost homes, lost limbs, changed careers, genders, Religions got. Sober got a bad marriages. And at the end of it, I had it was powerful, but it was too much. I had six thousand pages of. Transcripts a thousand hours of interviews and I ended up doing something. I've never done thirty years of writing books. I got a whole team of people and we spent a year coating these. Combing through them debating I'm kind of beating one against the head trying to figure out. What was the big message? What was the big theme coming out of it?

DAN Parkinson Headache Syria
In Washington, DC, 'Dad Gang' works to break negative stereotypes about Black fatherhood

WBZ Afternoon News

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

In Washington, DC, 'Dad Gang' works to break negative stereotypes about Black fatherhood

"A father's day March today in the nation's capital it's organized by a new online group is called the dad game which looks to defy stereo types and redefined what it is to be a modern block dad here's more from ABC's Janai Norman meet Sean Williams a devoted father of three four years ago a woman approached him at the grocery store and commended him for sticking around you know we're not in a non believer not unicorns Williams realized his friend shared similar experiences

ABC Janai Norman Sean Williams
How Stress Has Affected My Business

The $100 MBA Show

06:54 min | 8 months ago

How Stress Has Affected My Business

"Do you ever go to bed feeling a sense of worry a sense of not sure if things are gonna work how a sense of anxiety and you basically just get knocked out because you're so tired from all the work you've done but then you wake up the next morning and you feel just the same. You don't feel any relief. You feel the same way the same anxiety that same weird butterfly feeling in your stomach while I have. And it's been very common in the last twelve months for me. I wake up with a sense of I need to get things done. A sense of warriors sense of anxiety and feeling of a mountain of stress on my shoulders feeling of every single thing that I had to do was critical like life or death and I built it up in my head that way regardless. If it's true or not that's how I felt the past. I have fallen ill more than I ever had in the past decade and a pretty healthy guy healthy. I exercise four to five times a week. I try to get as much sleep as possible. Eight hours a night health priority for me but stress does not care about what you do. It will still affect you no matter what you do whether you exercise or eat right. Get enough sleep. It will penetrate through all that and it will affect your immune system. What happens is basically your body's on overdrive constantly. It's like your flooring. The gas pedal on your car always every time you hit accelerator your flooring at. You're really pushing your car to the limits. Every single time the longevity of that car is just not going to be. They're going to be in the shop constantly and that's what happens. Your body just gets sick and I'm talking about just fallen. Ill getting the flu or getting a cold. Having headaches migraines really and it's kind of hard for me to admit this is kind of hard for me to share this because I think I'm pretty mindful guy but I really didn't realize how much stress was affecting me. I didn't even make the connection that the reason why I was feeling that way is because I was so stressed out. Just thought hey. I'm an entrepreneur. This is the last solvent entrepeneurship. Work hard you gotTa Hustle. You got to Do a billion things to make a billion things change in your business to improve right but I realize I have to ask the question at what cost. What am I paying to do that? Right and I'm paying with my health and paying with my Enjoyment of life. My sense of feeling that everything's GonNa be okay and that has a lot to do with the expectations. I put myself because of the goals I put out there for the business now. I'm not saying not to be ambitious or to lower your standards. I'm saying understand that everything has a price so you don't have to pay a price you don't want to you. Make up the rules a book that I read recently. That helped me realign my expectations. Real Line my understanding of what it means to run a business is. It doesn't have to be crazy at work by Jason freed and David Hammer Hanson. These are the guys that are behind the company base camp and they've been running their company for almost twenty years and they have a different philosophy about work and they're in the tech industry which is hyper competitive and it's all about hustle and working hard and you know stress levels were through the roof and they say nope doesn't have to be that what you make up the rules. You can work forty hours a week. You could work thirty hours a week. In fact base camp has four day weeks Four Day workweeks on during the summer months and yet they're a highly successful company they attract the best talent. They produce great work. That made me scratch my head. Maybe I'm doing this wrong cry. It's kind of hard because you're in the midst of it all in your trying everything you can to grow your business and for me. I felt like I could do more. I could do more. I could do more not understanding that everything has a cost. I started to realize that I was spending. You know close to fifteen hours a day on my computer. I was spending very little time. Recreationally like going for a walk or very little time Maybe going to a movie or a concert. We're having fun on the weekends. I was working through the weekends even even though I would advise against that but you know I had a few projects I wanted to get done at a few things in play a few hours here and few ours becomes you know ten hours what I realized is what's going on here. Is I had my priorities upside down. I built a business and I'm trying to fit my life into the business instead of saying. Hey how do I wanna live kind of life? Do I WANNA HAVE? And what kind of business will help me live that life? That's why I got into entrepreneurship in the first place. That was the intention and I was like that for a good three four years but things changed and my life wasn't a priority anymore My ambitions to grow my business and to build new things started to grow and I lost sight of y started this all and because of this is starting to really get stressed out a really started to feel unhappy physically mentally emotionally week after week month after month and I didn't even realize it. That's the thing about stress. You don't even realize it when it's happening you just think it's normal and that's why I call stress silent killer. I also started to evaluate. You know how much time do I have? You know? I turned forty this year and you know forties super but for the most part if I took a look at the average lifespan Entering the second half of my life meaning from this point on I've lived more than I'm to live you know we don't know when we're GONNA pass away. We don't know when it's going to be the end for us. But if I just take you know trips of life expectancy your statistics time is more precious than ever right my free time. My time with my loved ones time with my friends. My overall a feeling of happiness and satisfaction means more. Now it means a lot more every single day moving forward in that stock rises. And if I don't make some changes where I can let gold little pin and realize. Hey this is serious. I'm getting tired. It's affecting my life. Things will not change. Now it's really affected my business because I was making some really poor decisions at times because I was so stressed because of SOS tired because I was under a lot of pressure. You make bad decisions it cascades. That decision domino effects and causes a lot of issues in. Your Business. Your job as a leader of your business is to make the right decision to make the right decisions as much as possible and if your number one job is to make decisions and that Ability is compromised because of stress. You're in trouble and often when I look back the reason why I was stressed I created the that environment I created the environment to allow that stress to enter When it didn't have

FLU Ta Hustle Jason Freed David Hammer Hanson
Being a Women of Color in the Workplace

$6.99 Per Pound

07:25 min | 8 months ago

Being a Women of Color in the Workplace

"Going to talk about what we usually talk about outsider podcasts reporting which is our workplace and being a person of color of a female of women of Color in the workplace. And how we navigate microaggressions unconscious bias. Balancing all of that with professionalism and has been saying and we just wanted to open it up to the floor and made them can go around and talk about what our individual workplace flake and looks like literally like you know what what does that look like and maybe like the industry that we're ends. Do you WANNA start. Let's see yeah. Sure I currently work at a sales agency and a fashion multi line. Show Room so Pretty much do is just Where in wholesale and the wholesale industry so I work with European designers and After fashion week happens we kind of just like get the collections and we prep it and we see buyers from like Nordstrom burke door of two in the independent Boutiques so our job is pretty much just saw the designers collection during a certain amount of time But I've been in the industry for a while for maybe like three four years professionally before that I was like freelancing and doing other things to buy. The wholesale industry is interesting because in the fashion side. It's not very diverse. It's I been through a lot of trade shows and doing you know market week in Paris but often times. The women selling the clothing are always wait. Do and it's so interesting because the men's industry is buried divers. Wow that's surprising Why do you think that is? I just think men like to work together. True true true. Yes I think so I think women I think naturally were just very Kind of I don't want to say like cliquey but we just kind of you know ten to a little sore already. Yeah I think so and you know when you have a show room with a lot of white women. It's usually. They got to tend to only hire white women green. Yeah what about you Angie? You're in fashion too. So I work for Steve Madden. I do marketing and social media so like comments. Dmz on working with influencers doing behind the scenes now for like our photo shoots and our campaigns and things like that. It's it's different. I've been doing this for since April and before that I was still st man. But I was doing the wholesale side but I've been in the fashion and I've only ever worked in fast. Yeah Higher Being St Man and I've only ever worked retail and like briefly out of showroom. Yeah and with that workplace look like and what does it look like now? Okay so when it comes to retail retail can be very diverse by. Yeah when you start looking at the people that are being promoted Israeli. Never the people like you. It's usually like white women. Yeah Or is usually like white women are one is our want to say like women are people that are like white passing and honestly the same thing for corporate. Yeah I'm in my personal opinion That's really like all you see. They're the ones that make the decisions whether you can relate to them or not And that's it's tough. Yeah no I think I and I'm in a similar boat as well so I work at Cnn's great story and it is a media company kind of like a startup be summation before that out that MTV and it's interesting when I was an MTV it was. I didn't appreciate did. They versity as much because it was actually very diverse. But as Andy said it gets less diverse as you go further up to the top. It's usually like the hustling coordinators or laying. Junior managers are like people of Color. And they're actually doing the creative work and executing and but then sometimes like the people who are getting the credit or approving budgets or have making the thought leadership decisions. Aren't the people who are on the ground and it? It was diverse but as you said it was not ever so the top. I'm in a situation now where I think it's even less diverse and especially in the creative editorial side. Yeah there's only one black producer no one now. We have one Asian producer. And it's interesting too because I think being Asian American. There's like spaces where it might be diverse but it's still underrepresented in terms of like the Asian perspective whereas like in finance or accounting. Maybe there's an overrepresentation of Asian Americans and like less reputation. Everywhere else I think in media it can kind of toss up depending on where you work And Yeah it's pretty dismal. There's can be such big improvement and I don't know if you guys experienced this but especially when you're making content bat is for a diverse community or your featuring a character or even a models or like maybe they wanna work with an influence or who's like not white then it's all for the purpose of of like selling something or trying to use diversity as a coin like a badge on their shoulder to be like. Hey like we'll call diverse. We are like our workplaces multiverse right so that is kind of like the the liberal daily things that I struggle with of. Sometimes they're like. Oh we know we have a long way to go in terms of diversity but the stories we tell her David or some just like is not problematic. Right Right Yeah. I think even for me just from what I've noticed is like I think it it truly bothers me even when I look at like certain photo shoots or campaigns not even from like necessarily where I work but just from like other companies and it's like they have like that one token blogger or like that one token Spanish girl. Ah just to exactly just to say that you had them in there like Oh Nolan. Little more diverse. It's like it's kind of like that. Like white person in caterer but I have a black Friday morning God. No that's not totally like this is so different and I think it's like this is what I say Especially when it comes to companies. It's like you have the most diverse. Like when you look at the demographics of who is buying your product More often than not they are people of Color. Yeah but your campaigns never show that And that is the biggest thing that I struggle with. And then for me. It's also like well. Why am I gonNA WANNA follow you? Social Media Yeah because like now. I'm in that social media realm so like now like I I really like pay its engines and things like that so I I you know. I love this brand. Their campaigns don't really represent me. Yeah I don't really know how I feel about this because then now I'm looking at it like okay. Well who are the top executives that are in? You know that are a part of your company like who's making these decisions. Why do they think that this that? I'm supposed to really to this person that you're showing you know for

Producer Nordstrom Burke Paris MTV Steve Madden Angie CNN Andy David
Trump rallies supporters in Charlotte, North Carolina

America's First News

01:00 min | 9 months ago

Trump rallies supporters in Charlotte, North Carolina

"President trump also weighing in on the democratic field he rallied supporters ahead of super Tuesday he went to a rally in Charlotte North Carolina ahead of that trip though we spoke to reporters but maybe three four years ago when I pulled it I think it's rigged against Bernie but charges I heard just some something happened there and yeah well he just a swat out and probably they'll say Hey look if I win I'll put all right they probably said Hey listen would you take ministration nothing like that has ever happened right but that's the way it seems to go there's no question about it sounds like it's a little bit unfair two

Bernie President Trump Charlotte North Carolina
Michel Rauchs - Benchmarking Bitcoin

Crypto Voices

06:54 min | 10 months ago

Michel Rauchs - Benchmarking Bitcoin

"So very happy to have Michelle on one of the first shows here to start the year in twenty twenty Michelle. Thanks for joining the welcome much batting. Yeah really appreciate you coming on. I've been wanting to have you on for a while. Actually just done You guys over there at Cambridge And curious to learn more about doing a pair of dignity and you've done Just wonderful wonderful work past few years in in Bitcoin and Crypto blockchain. Just a lot of fantastic nick research that certainly will linked to our users haven't already heard Of the work that you're doing but I guess just to just to start for those that don't no. Can you provide a little bit of background for us on sort of how you got into Crypto and Bitcoin and everything at Cambridge. Yeah sure so interested in Financial in systems and especially monetary systems so the different types of the exist how they achieve over time and then in house and cheating you once come up of slowly successions sessions and so yeah. It's been quite a bit of time researching and then I stumbled upon bitcoin into fourteen which interests Pretty much right away. I have had no idea what exactly was what it meant. And how he worked so is essentially took the form university. I need teams Just to research basic so getting benching computer science but also Economics Game Theory and even the politics of it and so as a result of this Masa `this is only kind business ecosystem so collected data of thing was around five hundred different even companies on projects in the space and visualize evolution of the system structure Over the first five years of its existence is that that's how we got into both cryptocurrency space and just off the wedge trading. I didn't we know what to do. Call the professor anew anew worst sees what it didn't know as he actually moved to Cambridge on to join the central ten defines these and pick a benchmarking studies and so I never wego almost study which was reason. I don't take the time you've got a job instead. So that was pretty good Any associate India There as assistant so we CO author team benchmarking studies where we reached out to companies in space but surveys and Indian off the yellow took over as the program and lost two years. They're doing quite a bit of studies and other things any indication Asian material in in that kind of stuff well presentations and just recently. Six months ago moved back to Mike. Country CI launched a consulting firm. You were essentially help. Individuals and situations to navigate. This complex landscape which is in most cases means convincing companies. Why light they shouldn't start to own the press? blockchain shamed him if you were think about alternate s. both internal technical as little so upon business perspective. It's very interesting. I think to describe it So that his DIG MMA your company. There you're referencing. What sort of Things than would would you direct companies to. What sort of sort of advice would you give them? If it is not to start their own enterprise blockchain in many cases. There is absolutely city. No need to do that so we came. She opened in one of the study. Said I offered said Cambridge with a term the cold the blockchain mean where it's pretty bad idea that blockchain this concept is one. We in abstract thing has become an abstract thing that can use as a political tool to either Detroit organizational change actually overcome organization in show. I'm so when we talk T- Stuff it's Eddie engine. Eighteen innovate bank. They if they sold the IT project which is essentially nothing else than Upgrade alone over to Um to infrastructure to essentially portrayal frame it as has a blockchain project. Then they will get executive buying and the budget to that. Although of course they knew they would use anything. That's remove close to what we would consider boxing. A which is waiting in because the guy gets better infrastructure The management has something to sell his public in terms of like. Look how over to your. Your engineering team is happy because finding the budget so in the end. It's kind of like a win win. Situation the only problem is that it just creates edition confusion. I guess at the Public Nick Timber. Wolves isn't what it can achieve so that creates a lease a very unrealistic expectations and so a rule. There is first and foremost almost Telling them what action actually is. Winning the project looks more like a blockchain move and then actually showing some alternatives so essentially focusing on specific civic elements log digital signatures like a public infrastructure cryptographic hashing algorithms in order to essentially a team that business case without atten overheads and disadvantages said in a real blockchain would actually cover okay. Is there a view. Then that you're taking specifically now regarding eighty enterprise consulting and blockchain's whether it's smart contracts on a theory or Peter. Todd's open timestamps on Bitcoin. Essentially many cases it's exactly that and so most companies would actually be better off by just Um Breglio occasionally Thompson thing system states in blockchain because that would just be a little more cost efficient and secure repudiation then building their own to know blockchain that's controlled by them but just in many tatum vans jazzy. Both thing the hype at least in the and the press blockchain industry or community of the hype is stated away and has given room to actually Syria's series initiatives now. Most of these initiatives have numb that much in common with these multi-party consensus systems. But it's we need more bads. It's a lot less about about multi-party consensus systems. But by creating shed infrastructure it's not controlled by one single entity more three consortium or joint ventures and and it's just taking a long time actually get to that point and that was mostly because of corporate governance talking about it's ten different things that our competitors and that we want to build a shed infrastructure that they use but nobody owns while that's quite complex and complicated Actually kickoff so now after we three four years of development of intensity station so we we see the first networks actually deploy and think it's actually really exciting developments. It has not that much to do. With willow would consider blockchain's more about its cryptographic shared infrastructure which deafening those benefits. Everyone involved including the end customer Indians. Well

Blockchain Cambridge Michelle Boxing Public Nick Timber Mike Professor Um Breglio Syria Executive Todd Detroit Peter
U.S. immigration courts overwhelmed by migrants awaiting hearings

Nick Digilio

01:29 min | 11 months ago

U.S. immigration courts overwhelmed by migrants awaiting hearings

"Reports that immigration courts in the US are overwhelmed with migrants waiting on hearings Washington correspondent and a warranty right now the backlog exceeds one million cases Texas democratic congressman Henry player says the U. S. immigration courts are overwhelmed by migrants waiting for hearing there are times where they have to wait two three four years before they go in front of a judge Congress set aside funding to hire one hundred additional immigration judges in the leaders spending bill bringing the number of authorized immigration judges to five hundred and thirty four but Claire says there is still a big problem the court rooms have not match the number of judges right now there are only four hundred and twenty six court rooms which means more than one hundred judges are having a hard time doing their jobs so there are what we call floating judges and and what they do is they wait for court room to open up the problem is that every judges busy so the court rooms are hard to find Congress has set aside more than five billion dollars in this year for the upkeep and construction of federal buildings where says he wants to use some of that money to rent and construct a federal court rooms New Mexico Democrat Dave Holland says this will speed up the asylum process and decrease the backlog Keith it's due every bit of good to make sure that we are processing all those cases it in in a legal way in a fair way clear says the added speeds can be used for judges to hear immigrants in person or by video conference

United States Henry Player Congress Claire Dave Holland Washington Texas Congressman Mexico
McDonald's fires CEO over relationship with employee

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

McDonald's fires CEO over relationship with employee

"McDonald's Starfire's their C. E. O. her relationship with an employee McDonald said that they fired the chief executive officer I see these rock is only been there I think four years three years three four years because of it is consensual relationship with an employee this is the latest challenge for the company this company is going through a lot of challenges trying to keep up with changes reverberating through the fast food industry and they're struggling to do so so this is going to

Mcdonald Chief Executive Officer Three Four Years Three Years Four Years
STEMinists: Elizabeth Blackwell

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:23 min | 1 year ago

STEMinists: Elizabeth Blackwell

"Today we're talking about the first woman mentor earn a medical degree in the united states. She went on to become a champion for women in medicine and an important social reformer. Let's meet our stem in the day. Hey dr elizabeth well. Elizabeth was born in eighteen twenty one in bristol england. She was the third of nine children born to samuel blackwell and his wife hannah who were both well known quakers and anti-slavery activists. This was not your average family. Many of elizabeth's close relatives tibbs became well known in their own right including her brother henry who is a famous abolitionist and women's rights activist and was married to fellow activists lucy stone elizabeth sister. Emily followed elizabeth into medicine and their sister-in-law antoinette brown blackwell was the first ordained female minister of a major protestant artist denomination. When elizabeth was eleven years old her family moved to the united states and eventually settled in cincinnati ohio just six years later in eighteen thirty eight elizabeth's father died and left the family practically destitute in the middle of a major national financial crisis in order order to support the family elizabeth her two older sisters and their mother worked as teachers to make ends meet but elizabeth had other career ambitions. She was inspired to go into medicine. While taking care of a dying friend the friend noted that she would have had a less onerous and likely less embarrassing experience cheap intrigued treated by a female doctor at the time there were few medical schools in america and the ones that existed didn't accept women in order to move towards torturing with going into medicine. Elizabeth took private teaching positions with the families of two different southern physicians who mentored her in their profession then elizabeth moved to philadelphia in eighteen forty seven hoping that she could use her quaker connections to gain entrance into any medical school that would have her. She applied to as many schools so she could but was rejected from all except for one geneva college in upstate. New york apparently sent her an acceptance letter meant to be a practical joke but elizabeth is it didn't find it particularly funny and went ahead and accepted her joke. Acceptance was just the beginning of elizabeth's difficulties in medical school not only when she forced by her professors to sit separately from the men during lectures she was often left out of the labs component altogether that menchu is getting significantly less hands hands on practice than her male peers but elizabeth was a genius she won over her professors and classmates time went on with the sheer force her skill and intellect act. She ended up graduating first in her class. In eighteen forty nine making her the first woman to graduate from medical school in the united states and the first modern day woman woman doctor of medicine after graduation she moved to europe to further train under doctors in london and paris elizabeth was subjected to plenty of prejudice she does from european doctors who would often make her play second fiddle to them as nurse or midwife but even then her brain was churning she noticed that male doctors often caused caused disease transmission and sometimes even epidemics because they didn't wash their hands between patients. Elizabeth began emphasizing the importance of personal hygiene in hospitals tolls and pioneered preventative care in eighteen fifty. One elizabeth moved to new york city there. It was even harder to be a woman doctor than it was in europe. She was refused all posts in the city's hospitals and dispensaries and was even unable to rent offices for her own private practice as a result her. The practice was very slow to develop in the interim she wrote a series of lectures called the laws of life with special reference to the physical education of if girls thanks to the assistance of quaker friends and the quaker community elizabeth opened a small dispensary in a very poor under served neighborhood in eighteen fifty three four years later. She was joined by her younger sister dr emily blackwell as well as another woman doctor. The greatly enlarged dispensary was unified as the new york infirmary for women and children. One of its major missions was in providing positions for women doctors. The block while sisters even trained nurses there during the civil. If a war for union hospitals in eighteen sixty eight after perfecting a plan she created in consultation with florence nightingale. Elizabeth open the women's medical college at the infirmary. The medical college operated for thirty one years and was well known for its very high academic and training standards. Elizabeth served as the chair of hygiene for the school until she moved back to england for good in eighteen sixty nine back in england. Elizabeth established a successful private practice. She also helped to create the national health society an eighteen seventy five she was appointed to a professorship at the london school of medicine for women which she held until nineteen o seven when she was forced to retire due to injury while on vacation in scotland elizabeth took a terrible fall down a flight of stairs and was was left mentally and physically disabled in nineteen ten doctor elizabeth blackwell up died at her home in hastings sussex after suffering a stroke that paralyzed realized half her body

Elizabeth Blackwell Dr Elizabeth Paris Elizabeth United States Dr Emily Blackwell Private Practice Antoinette Brown Blackwell Europe London School Of Medicine Samuel Blackwell New York New York Infirmary England Bristol England Ohio Philadelphia Cincinnati Geneva
Can Aerospace Shrug Off Trade Wars and the MAX?

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

15:10 min | 1 year ago

Can Aerospace Shrug Off Trade Wars and the MAX?

"The boeing seven three seven max fiasco has dominated headlines as aircraft grounding has affected airlines and production slowdown repsonses supply chain president trump continues to escalate a trade war with china putting u._s. Aerospace exports particularly civil aircraft at potential risk the u._s. government's budget deficit has hit a trillion dollars this year and there are words about a global economic slowdown and yet the aerospace and defense industries so far it has remained surprisingly resilient hitter discuss that are michael bruno aviation week senior business editor and in the moscow our executive editor for defense and space ace michael. Let's start with you because you just wrote an article at painted a radi bullish outlook for the centers for you want to explain yeah <hes> joe and jen good to talk about this. It's it's a very interesting picture to me. Because it seems counter intuitive. There were all of these issues that are iraqi pie in our daily brains the ones you've listed joe everything from the max to trade wars and if you just kind of did a sentiment poll you'd think everyone everyone was thinking the end of the world was near but i read about two analyst reports <hes> over the past several weeks and the analyst reports aren't just this their own musings. They're based on their own interviews with ceos and others from across the industry and it's pretty unanimous. Everybody's still expects growth for this year and next year and his mind boggling that is they've got some really good reason to buy jenn. It's it's hard to argue that the trump administration has not been good for defense spending. What's the environment like now. There's been a budget agreement that takes us to the election in two thousand twenty or are we out of the woods all-clear well. We're better than we might have been a few months ago but we're. I don't think we're out of the woods yet. The there's still a poisonous atmosphere. That's very pervasive in washington. What we have right now is an agreement over the the amount of money that the federal government can spend in twenty twenty an in twenty twenty one. That's a big milestone because it gets us past. Ask the twenty eleven budget control act caps it kind of somewhat settles that issue but still we don't have have any appropriations bills that have been passed yet into law so until that happens. There's always the dark potential attention cloud of a government shutdown of a continuing resolution of more fights to come but in the meantime time until any of those doomsday scenarios actually emerged defense is one of the leading reasons why people are expecting growth for not just this year it next year the budget agreement what it's done is it's provided certainty in what the business sector wants more than anything else is certainty the direction of where business going then they can plan and they can make their investments and changes and cuts or whatever they need to do in order to keep rewarding shareholders percents fake holders and the budget agreement provides the certainty not just for two years. It's a two year budget agreement yes but federal outlays which is the money that actually <unk> gets written by the treasury department that goes to contractors and other people federal outlays tend to lag budget authority by in two years so if you've got a budget agreement that sees you through fiscal twenty twenty one that means you pretty much with the federal outlays are going to be going all the way through twenty twenty three four years from now and i mean you think we're going to have a presidential election. You very well could have a u._s. Recession as well as a world recession recession between now and then and yet the defense sector has got really good clarity into what looks like italy's a modicum of growth over the next two to four years pointing out lawmakers have have agreed on how much money to spend basically. They said we'll just borrow it. All grandkids is pay for it someday but they haven't agreed exactly how to spend it right. I mean the president's already shifted some money from defense to pay for the wall aw that he wants to build a mexico so are are the do you see any potential fights brewing or even none of the government shutdown over how to spend all this money yes i do. That's the short answer. I need. You mentioned the border wall. There is an lingering disagreement with with the trump administration's tactics and making that happen <hes> their their propensity to what is called called reprogram money or transferred between accounts without consulting with congress. Were asking for congress after they've decided to do something lawmakers. I really don't like that so at the same time there's pressure for politicians to come to an agreement because we are getting into an election year so so there is some pressure for them to make a deal to make this so it can go either way and then looking to next year a lot does depend on the <music> outcome of the election and that is really a wild card we don't know but the presidency may be in play the control of the senate and house a lot of that will determine the future puts and takes underneath that top line which programs get funded in which don't although you know within the defense budget you can pretty much say that there will be support for certain areas like hypersonic hypersonic missile defense those kinds of programs. I'd say probably have a strong cancer getting funded regardless of the changing political winds. There's one big dad. Jensen jen and i are both a former congressional reporter recovering congressional reporters and there's an old saying tale about how nothing's agreed to until everything it is agreed to so whether it's a wall or some other unrelated topic something could emerge that pops up and holds up defense in at the end and everybody in washington knows that's a reality. It's a fact of life that won't change. Speaking of something. Emerging blew the commercial side the industry large large jets commercial jets has not seen a downturn since two thousand three. It's even led some people to predict. The industry is now recession proof <hes> what what could come out of the blue that could sort of handicap commercial aerospace or even send a new downturn. Oh wow well. How much time do we have on his podcast. Because the you know the the mind wanders with possibilities and the thing about you know we could list several roll things and one of them is the trade war goes south overnight between china and the u._s. I think that's on the top list arrive on most people's tops of their lists and the reason is is because the chinese market represents about a quarter of the commercial aircraft craft backlog at the two major o._e._m. Owing an airbus and if suddenly that is used as a weapon in an economic war that you don't just replace a quarter in fact there's no one else you gotta start finding martians or somebody on another planet. Who's going to buy some of these aircraft because there's nobody else in the world. Who's who's going to step in and buy the equivalent of what china is expected to buy and so that's a big one. You've got other things however there used to me this rule before we got into this endless cycle that you referred to you know this greatest expansion since two thousand three the old rule in commercial aircraft or craft used to be g._d._p. Was a precursor to air traffic to air passenger traffic volume and when g._d._p. He's fell around the world. You would see within about six to eighteen months lag in air passenger traffic and air passenger traffic is what what would drive orders and so there was a natural succession and if one started falling it was just a matter of time until the next point. A lot of people say things are different now. Look for for all kinds of reasons. They look at other indicators beyond just national g._d._p. Around the world but we haven't tested this yet <hes> <hes> it remains to be seen whether we get another recession whether smaller great whether that's actually true and then there's all kinds of small things that could pop up you could see a major cyber security flaw emerge overnight that could perhaps down the supply chain. Maybe not take it down and whole all but if everybody's getting more and more digital in their operations and suddenly you find there's a flaw. You're not just going to develop new plants overnight and bring in thousands of workers who are going to make things the old fashioned way without computers. That just isn't going to happen so i mean there's all kinds of scenarios that could doom things but i'd say at at the end of the day people are worried about china yeah yeah when you talk about things coming out of the blue i mean the the max grounding certainly came on the bill what he saw that the the only thing that's limited is not that many max have been delivered yet right right and had this happened in three years airlines like southwest might all of a sudden have to avid aircraft it could be disastrous for the industry also it's a max remains a hit. It remains a bit of a theory and hear me out for a moment. It's it's a bit of a theory based on an unproven assumption and what i mean by that is the max is all about meeting the growth in air passenger traffic. That's that's expected over the next several years that is based on middle classes continuing to grow well that theory about middle classes growing and continuing to use discretionary spending to buy commercial airline tickets to travel around the world has yet to be tested by. I am major recession so we are thinking that maxwell continue to go on next year and the year after that boeing and airbus are going to sell major numbers of venero bodies and even a few wi- bodies and everybody's still gonna make a lot of money in the end but this is all the first time any of this has been tested jeb. We're gonna wake you up. Stop talking a model. It's commercials what about defense and you talked about. It depends on the election but hasn't defense spending it also always been driven by the threat yes and no i mean it is driven by the threat but what we've seen really since two thousand thousand one since the nine one one terrorist attacks is is generally record high levels of defense spending so even when you had a downturn in the the obama years and they reigned in defense spending a little bit it wasn't <hes> wasn't pure downturn and so so that's been kinda turned on its head mainly because the threat level has been high regardless of where you go in the world if you're fighting terrorism in the middle east now now you know the national defense strategy is more geared toward near peer competitors like china and russia so <hes> so yes that is true but in a in an era where there are threats everywhere you have to be able to adjust the budget otherwise <hes> someday hey you deficits and debt might catch up with you as a nation okay. It is is pretty scary world out there. I mean your team writes. All the time about china's and russia's carr's efforts in hyper sonics about the vulnerability do a space pearl harbor u._s. Space assets are attacked wiped out a lot of a lot of meat certainly defense a lot of neat yeah i. I think there's one other thing and that's interesting about this gentleman. It could be worth explaining for a moment about how despite despite whatever growth the defense budget is gonna have they still clamor for more and they say they need it because they've got growth needs that petr beyond just inflationary adjustments so they need what three percent a year over inflation just to stay to maintain their operations as they are so one reason. They're always screaming as they're never getting real growth. They're only getting inflationary growth so that's right i. I still think we're on course for a reckoning. I mean if you look at the national debt. It's it's a short matter of time before. We're spending more money on interest interest on the national debt than we are in defense. If interest rates tick up. That's a huge problem. Too is in your spending a lot more so you're either going to raise taxes which congress hasn't done in years or or you've got to find the money somewhere and if you have a u._s. Recession you wound up. You wind up in almost every the u._s. Recession having the government increased benefits to the population to support them through the recession and so that's more money going out the door yet another pressure on the budget the trade war with china are they gonna help out there. You go so michael with you or the question. Things are feeling. I'm pretty good right now. But is it nineteen twenty eight for this industry rian nine hundred twenty eight where everything was roaring before the stock market collapsed in the great depression. Ah yeah you know if i can answer that question. I wouldn't be here. I'd be on wall street playing some big numbers and making even bigger numbers <hes> and that's the problem. Is you know not too fancy too much philosophy talk here but there's there's always been this this known unknown. We know that the good times can't go on forever and you know that things happen and changes come and can the question is when does it happen and nobody right. Now says they really think they see it happening in the next six to eighteen months but just about all of these same people say kind of happen so now the now the best guesses are sometime in the early twenty twenty s. You're going to see a real significant hip dip in commercial aircraft orders and you may even see a rise in the cancellation of commercial aircraft orders so that that would be the testing ground but for the next eighteen months things are looking at were end on that positive upbeat prediction hold you to it. Michael comeback fared in a few

China Michael Bruno Boeing President Trump Jensen Jen Washington Airbus Federal Government JOE Analyst Jenn Congress Donald Trump Business Editor Executive Editor Moscow
The design legacy of Apples Jony Ive is iconic, but eco-problematic

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:19 min | 1 year ago

The design legacy of Apples Jony Ive is iconic, but eco-problematic

"Apple is known for beautiful expensive products that get replaced pretty often either for status or because the battery is dying when longtime designer Gianni. I've left apple last month to form his own design company. Lots of people looked back at his time at apple and his influence on creating. Waiting products that were hard to repair prioritized thinness and beauty over sometimes reliability and whether as apple gears up to announce new iphones this fall that might actually change now that I've is Gone Kyle Wiens is the founder of the electronics repair site. I fix it. He wrote a blog post about ives mixed legacy at apple especially when it comes to the environment and he said sometimes simple isn't better. It's this idea that it should be so simple to use the you shouldn't have to worry about how it works. What's under the hood? They decided intentionally that they were going to hide the complexity of the battery from us but what that did is a side effect was it limited the lifespan it made these last shorter and and so then when the new you know a sexy renew features comes out next year like Ammiel one doesn't work as well. I'm going to get a new one. How much did these design choices influence? The rest of the tech world like phones used to have walkable batteries until the iphone came along and Apple Paul really you could argue drove the rest of the industry into this sort of more throw away tack. Absolutely they drove the rest of the industry this idea that it was acceptable that you could get away with say integrating the hard hard drive onto the main motherboard. If you want to separate the computer from the data. There's no way to do it. That's the kind of thing that that most other companies would have said No. That's a red line. We won't Cross Apple crosses that line and then everyone else follows you've also. Written recently about how Johnny is designs based on the style of German industrial designer deter roms and a principal like a really important principle of deter ROMs design was sustainability environmental sustainability and you talk about how Johnny lives is leaving apple without having reconciled really a big gap there. Why do you think that that shift happened and really hasn't been addressed right out of design? Principles Design Zayn is is sustainable and design long lasting and I think those things get coupled together when you do something like like doing in a battery that artificially limits the life of the entire device to the life of its shortest component. You're getting on this consumer a treadmill treadmill where we just have to go out and buy more things and the the environmental impact of manufacturing these things is significant. It's it's over two hundred pounds of raw material to make an iphone but the fundamental product architecture of saying as thin as possible and damn the consequences it really is a challenge. What we've seen is apple's environmental team who is very good have done everything they can to make? The products is sustainable except change the design that has been driven by Johnny Ivan his team and there have been A. A number of very specific decisions that they've made that of limited lifespan of these devices I think probably to the Chagrin of apples embarrasment team who then has to support it in the best possible late how much of it is on us the consumer I I mean we have certainly bought them all the time. We've complained about them. You know you've got rid of the headphone Jack. Oh I can't slot my battery out. This is so annoying and yet we we do keep buying them absolutely and this is a challenge that we have is a culture. Is it when you when you have something where there's multiple variables that you have to choose from you want the best audio player but you also would like something that will last a long time <hes> because it doesn't have stamped on the box. Hey this thing last eighteen months. I think we tend to forget we put out of our minds. Were not very good. <hes> psychologically it making long term decisions and then then later we tend to justify say oh well you know it's not running as as long as it used to but <hes> you know there's a new one that came out so I think I think that is <hes> they've been able to take advantage of psychology <hes> that yes we bear some responsibility but I think the lack of disclosure if they said hey if a single key on this computer breaks it's going be over a thousand dollar repair that might change people's mind when they're purchasing things up front but people don't have that information and how do you think that that mentality that psychology is starting to change sort of like as you get to the point where you're feeling like <hes>. I'm about to buy my fifth iphone. Phone this one seems fine except the battery for example and then of course there was the scandal about it. Do you think that as these devices get longer in the tooth. There's more awareness that they don't last as long as maybe they should or could I think so we're starting to see people wanting to push their devices longer part of that is the improvement in smartphones is not as great every year as it used to be so as that's potatoing. We don't need to get new phones <hes> all that frequently but the batteries don't last any longer than they used to so all of a sudden. We're GONNA keep our phones twice as long as did three four years ago <hes> we're going to have to be replacing the battery and at that point making those batteries available <hes> is going to be an important competitive differentiator and that's where you have companies like Motorola that have come out and said we're going to sell service parts for our funds. We're going to make them available both to repair shops into consumers <hes> there's a there's a crack that apple has left in the market that perhaps mother all will exploit so we could start circling back around to the beginning where we have phones with <hes> swap -able batteries and maybe S._d.. I D cards lots and so this is something really funny people as as because we take these things apart I take apart every iphone. There is room inside the Iphone S._d.. Card Slot. There's room for some cards. There's room for Nestea card. They put that in there the only reason that you can't upgrade. Upgrade the memory on the iphone is is because they want to charge you an extra hundred or two hundred dollars for the extra storage Kyle Wayans the founder of the electronics repair site. I fix it and now for some related links lots of words have been written about apple and whether it still has its legendary Mojo and what will happen now that Johnny Ive is gone but I fought Jonathan Troy Aikman in the New York Post put a really well a week or so ago you said apple needs to figure out how to keep creating things that we didn't even know we needed. We of course also have linked to Kyle wiens piece on our website Marketplace Tech Dot Org and obviously it isn't only design. That's made apple products especially the iphone more likely to get replaced then repair. It's also the fact that a new device gifts introduced every year always at least in theory with some must have set of features that means the old one is now useless or at best unwanted and then new features in its operating system. Them Aren't always available for older phones like in the upcoming thirteen. There's a software fix to keep your battery from overcharging which should prevent your battery from getting old and not holding a tarred so quickly after you buy a new phone except that I._S.. Thirteen will only be available on newer iphone models but it does seem like consumers increasingly want off the hamster wheel research firm Gartner forecast last week that smartphone shipments will have their quote worst ever decline in two thousand.

Apple Kyle Wiens Founder Ives New York Post Johnny Ivan Gianni Design Zayn Johnny Ammiel Jonathan Troy Aikman Motorola Gartner Johnny Ive Kyle Wayans Nestea
"three four years" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"three four years" Discussed on WEEI

"Been on that above anything that I feel like we can we end up just some positive stuff can we rip the next can we talk about that flat drums a bonus tweet that that you had just something to end on something positive that you know because you sound like a great guy like a lot of fun entertaining dot guy and I feel like we've spent ten minutes so just this thing that weighs down is there anything for are you watching stranger things just watch the first season of that I don't know anything going on that's positive in your life that we can end on about whatever you want to talk about I am pretty sure that RJ Baird is probably having a nice eight for twenty five night at least you know how he gets down I just started to be watching the sopranos and I kind of just forgot how great of a show it was I watched it for the first time probably three four years ago and just acted kind of fall in love with the characters again it's been really enjoyable that's pretty much what I've been doing a five probe minutes high resale thing it would separate with such a process to get it on the radio but now that it's kind of reached a conclusion it's just been kind of it's been people the college of get into something else all right so I'm curious on that because we talk a lot of TV on the show a ton of TV on the show what's the first thing or the biggest observation you have on a re watch right because when you have it a second time over there's usually it's a thing or two maybe it's you missed something about a character development maybe it's just Hey I realize that Paulie walnuts what was so it was such a great character early out I mean there must be something right that jumps out of character that you maybe not miss but didn't appreciate as much the first time around certainly I mean I I think it's certainly definitely a different because you go into it with one of her characters that you maybe didn't have in the beginning like Christopher was super annoying to me the first time that I watched it crystal ball are a lot different now I mean I've I've watched the wire through and through probably four times I have a I have a favorite different character every time I watch the wire that kind of the beauty of going back and you know seeing kind of hits you differently and you're in a different place in your life so maybe the humor hits you a little bit or you're going through something that kind of what the show was trying to convey is that if if our trade the different methods when you watch it again keep trying to tell these young kids man okay it starts and ends with the wire you won't find a letter showed like that you just you just can't it's amazing the sense of realism right no absolutely I mean the wire I I told people in it if you want to get into any kind of business or garlic there is legal or illegal you can watch the wire for about three feet I love it thank you so much at C. dot Harrison character Harrison the drive six ten OKC see we got a lot we got some what we got some down I appreciate it man anything I use the related you know we're coming back to you about me on bye bye all right a real react next at C. dot Harrison again how you follow character on Twitter a.

three four years ten minutes three feet
Pence blames Dems for migrant child detention center conditions

Right on Retirement With Kelly Campbell

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Pence blames Dems for migrant child detention center conditions

"Vice President Mike Pence ask today on CNN state of the union about reports that a legal immigrant kids are being kept in unsanitary conditions detention centers. No American should approve of this mass influx of people coming across our border. It is overwhelming, our system how weird treating these children. Look I as I said, you, I was at the detention center in just a few short months ago it is a heartbreaking scene Boyer. Warren Binford was part of a team of lawyers who inspected detention center in Texas. She says conditions were dangerous because kids didn't have the basics like water and soap they were sick there were, they were journey that were. Are two three four year olds. Who did it have anyone to care for them? There is an infant, who is taken from child mother who has gotten terribly sick and handed off to another child who was totally unrelated to this infants. Meanwhile, a day after is postponed planned raids to round up illegal immigrants for two weeks. The president's blaming Democrats for the problem with illegal immigration. If the Democrats would change the asylum laws and the loopholes, which I refuse to do, because they think it's good politics. Everything would be solved immediately. But they refused to do on Twitter this morning, the president pledged to send illegal immigrants packing. If Democrats, don't negotiate what he calls simple changes to asylum and loopholes in the next weeks. He tweets this morning probably won't happen. But worth a try two weeks and big deportation

Vice President President Trump Boyer Mike Pence Warren Binford CNN Twitter Texas Two Weeks Two Three Four Year
"three four years" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"three four years" Discussed on WTVN

"So the first episode I decided we'll lean on the old podcast form that never ceases to fail. Yes. That of the true crime podcast. They're incredibly popular. Wouldn't you say Carolina? Probably the most popular podcasts have to do with true crime investigations. There's no question. I mean. Yeah, there's other popularity genres. But but it's white-hot the true crime podcast for forum is white hot. Sure. I mean, it's not just hitting. It's been a trend for probably at least three four years, but it's molten white-hot. It's good. It's good. It's like a bucket full of lava. It's a it's an okay thing to choose for an episode. Everyone wants to know about the sickos out there. That's the bottom line what they've done and what they'll do next. I know you listeners out there sitting in your car's right now eating some cold HAMAs wrapped from hold. Foods waiting for the blood splatter analysis. And I've got it, and it's bloody. And it's everywhere. Boy, is it disgusting. And with that welcome to true crime. We're going to take a look at a few cases, some of these will shock you disturb you and most of all perplex you, but we'll get to the bottom of them. All. I up Q scary music. Thank you. This one is a murder case in Arizona. A woman named but Kinsey rough camp was accused of murdering her husband herald Roth camp to knife jabs in the chest. Police found with Kinsey fingerprints on the knife. That was later identified as the murder weapon. After rest, they interrogated her for a cool twenty minutes. In the interrogation room MacKenzie. Confessed that preceding jealous row she did indeed kill him. The jury sentenced her to twenty to life and that was that. So.

Kinsey murder Carolina MacKenzie herald Roth Foods Arizona three four years twenty minutes
Jeff Bezos vs. National Enquirer could be a watershed

Bill Cunningham

09:49 min | 1 year ago

Jeff Bezos vs. National Enquirer could be a watershed

"The big news of yesterday is that Jeff Bezos went to war went to war with the National Enquirer now to be perfectly accurate the National Enquirer. I went to war with Jeff Bezos. Now, you'll recall the Jeff Bezos is the owner of both Amazon and the Washington Post, and he has been running gun battle with President Trump fort legitimately three four years now over President Trump's politics president from belief that the Washington Post is a smear machine against him. And so president from his revelled in all of the allegations about Jeff Bezos. And all of the new information that pizzas was cheating on his wife with his next door neighbor. And now they're gonna get a divorce and his wife is going to walk away with one hundred and seventy billion dollars or something. Well, now it turns out that the National Enquirer was trying to blackmail visas. They head of pain photos and text messages. Of Bezos, his crotch, basically. And then they went to be and they said we'd like for you to stop using the Washington Post to investigate us or these photos might unfortunately. Well, beezus then just basically said all right. Well, if you wanna play this game here, we go, and he just unzipped and put everything under the table. So yesterday in a very long post from medium dot com. He wrote. No, thank you, Mr. Packer it. There is something unbelievable about the fact that the owner of the National Enquirer is named Packer which led to the headline in the New York Post as well as the Huffington Post today. Beeson exposes Packer, which is a fantastic fantastic. Headline here is what Jeff Bezos posted. He said first of all just word to the wise. Don't blackmail a die worth one hundred and seventy billion dollars who also has the capacity to create two delivery for anything. Right and has drones like squads of drones that worked for him. It just to go very poorly, by the way, it turns out the main distributor for the national inquirer owned by Amazon dot com. Okay. So here's what here's what he says. Something unusual happened to me yesterday. Actually for me. It wasn't just unusual. It was I I was made an offer I couldn't refuse or at least. That's what the top people at the National Enquirer thought. They thought that because in of them to put it all in writing rather than capitulate to extortion and blackmail. I've decided to publish exactly what they sent me despite the personal cost and embarrassment they threaten AM, I the owner of the National Enquirer led by David pecker recently entered into an immunity deal with the department of Justice related to their role in the so-called catch and kill process on behalf of President Trump and his election campaign, Mr. Packer and his company have also been investigated for various actions, they've taken on behalf of the Saudi government and sometimes mister pecker mixes it altogether after Mr. Trump became president. He rewarded Mr. Packers loyalty with the White House Jenner switch the media executive. Brought a with important ties to the royals in Saudi Arabia at the time, Mr. pecker was pursuing business. There will also hunting for financing, for physicians that is from an article from I believe, the Washington Post federal investigators legitimate media have of course, suspected improved that Mr. pecker has used the Enquirer, and I for political reasons and yet AM I keeps claiming otherwise American media emphatically rejects any assertion that it's reporting was instigated dictated. Or influenced in any manner by external forces political or otherwise. Of course, legitimate media have been challenging this assertion for a long time. And then he has a list and sources he says I didn't know much about most of that a few weeks ago when intimate text messages from me were published in the National Enquirer, I engaged. Investigators to learn how those texts were obtain and to determine the motives for the many unusual actions taken by the inquirer, as it turns out there are now several independent investigations looking into this matter so lead my investigation, Gavin tobacco. I've known Mr. tobacco for twenty years. His expertise in this arena is excellent. And he's one of the smartest and most capable leaders. I know I asked him to prioritize protecting my time since I have other things I prefer to work on to proceed with whatever budget. He needed to pursue the facts in this matter perks of being billionaire. Here's a piece of context by ownership of the Washington Post is a complex afire for me. It's unavoidable that certain powerful people who experience Washington Post, news coverage or wrongly conclude. I am their enemy President Trump is one of those people obvious by many tweets also the post is essential and relents unrelenting coverage of the murder of its columnist Jamal shaggy is undoubtedly on. Popular in certain circles back to the story several days ago, and I leader advised us that Mr. Packer is apoplexy about our investigation for reasons. Still to be better. Understood the Saudi angles seems to hit a particularly sensitive nerve a few days after hearing about Mr. Packers apoplexy we were approached verbally at first with an offer. They said they had more of my text messages and photos that they would publish if we didn't stop our investigation. My lawyers argued that has no right to publish photos since any person holds the copyright to their own photos and since the photos in themselves don't add anything newsworthy. That is the case, by the way, the Peter Thiel and hulk HOGAN made against Gawker, and basically bankrupted Gawker AM is claim of newsworthiness that the photos are necessary to show Amazon shareholders that my business. Judgment is terrible. I founded Amazon in my garage twenty four years ago and drove all the packages to the post office myself today. Amazon employs more than six hundred thousand people. I went those results speak for themselves. Okay. Back to that threats publish intimate photos of me. I guess we me my lawyers and Gavin de Becker didn't react to the generalized start with enough. You're so they sent this. And then. Chief content officer he he pays an Email from the chief content officer of to the litigation counsel for tobacco about Jeff Bezos. And it says Marty I leaving the office for the night, however in the interest in expiating, the situation, and what the Washington Post poised to publish unsubstantiated. Rumors of the Washington inquirers initial report I wanted to describe to you the photos obtained during your news gathering in addition to the below the belt selfie. Otherwise, colloquially known as a bleep pack, the Enquirer obtained a further nine images, and then they described the images including including images from visas to his lover whose name is Sanchez and pictures of his crotch and all the rest visa says attention, but not in the way, they likely hoped any personal embarrassment AM, I could cause me takes a back seat because there's much more important matter involved here if in my position, I can't stand up to this kind of extortion. How many people can on that point numerous people have contacted our investigation team about their similar experiences with I and how they needed to capitulate because for example, their livelihoods were at stake? In the letters. I'm making public. You will see the precise. Details of their extortionate proposal. They will publish the personal photos unless Gavin to Becker. And I make these specific false public statements in the press that we have no knowledge or basis for suggesting that AMA's coverage was politically motivated or influenced by political forces. If we do not agree to affirmatively publicized that specific why they'll say, they'll publish the photos and quickly and there's an associated threat, they'll keep the photos on hand, and publish them in the future. If we ever deviate from the short, no real journalist ever proposed anything like what is happening here. I will not report embarrassing information about you. If you do X for me, and if you don't do X quickly our report, the embarrassing information, nothing, I'm at right here could tell the National Enquirer story is eloquently as their own words below and then he just dumps out all of their emails. So here is why this is relevant number one AM. I was being used to go between by President Trump during the campaign to pay off various women, and that obviously has been reported on the dot that has yet to be connected, and the one the media are jumping on here is this. Suggestion that President Trump both hates the Washington Post and used AM is the go between. So maybe the reason that AM I was going after Beeson is because visas was going after Trump. So basically, am I was frayed that Beeson was going to discover some sort of corrupt relationship between the Saudi government, and am I on the one hand in Saudi government and the Trump administration on the other and his corrupt triangle colluded together to go after Jeff Bezos? And then I tried to blackmail visas to that notion apparently Becker has now been telling reporters that he thinks that these text message, we're actually obtained maybe by a government source meaning that the phone wasn't hacked instead government. Data gathering allowed the Trump administration to grab the text messages. And then hand them off to AM. I obviously if that's true. Trump gets impeach right me. If that's true, then at the end of the road for the Trump administration using government resources in order to grab the text messages of your political opposition in the reports four you'll feel and then blackmail that would be the end of the line for president forget about impeachment. He'd go to jail. I mean that that's an actual crime for a variety of reasons. But beyond that they're trying to now connect that have not yet been connected. Nobody really understands why am I was going after visas? It doesn't make a lot of sense from going after visas makes sense in the sense that Trump doesn't like visas, but the idea that AM I was blackmailing Bezos to stop reporting about their connection with the Saudi government where they do that on their own if they're doing it on their own. It just demonstrates what we've already known, which is the AM. I is basically just a payoff organization and is used by various rich people in order to shutdown stories. They don't like also they blackmail people. Right. This is this is pretty well known all of this is going to come out. We're gonna find all of this. Because remember that David Packard AM. I are currently in a plea arrangement with the southern district of New York in the US district attorney for the southern district of New York. They're in a plea arrangement by which they are obligated to cooperate with the southern district of New York's if you think that all of this is going to stay secret. It is not I will say this all credit to beat us really like. I, you know, I'm a fan of Amazon, I think it's a great company. I was one of the first subscribers to Amazon prime I've been a member of Amazon says like nine thousand ninety eight but putting aside my own business interests in this journalist blackmailing people people blackmailing people, generally, he's really disgusting and trying to suggest that you're going to reveal personal information about someone unless they do what you want is not only a violation of law. It is a breach of basic human decency. So good for us. I mean the man can't afford to do it. And honestly, what does he have to lose at this point? Like people are going to see his his junk. What does he care? He's the richest man on planet earth. So what I did. He has the same junk everybody else does. And he's feeling the same way. So honestly good for be so good for visas should personal issues be used by journalistic purportedly journalistic organizations to blackmail. You the answer, of course, is no so good for for

Jeff Bezos President Trump National Enquirer Washington Post Amazon Saudi Government Mr. Packer Gavin De Becker David Pecker Beeson Extortion Donald Trump Mr. Packers New York Post Saudi Arabia Washington Huffington Post New York
"three four years" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

15:19 min | 1 year ago

"three four years" Discussed on WTVN

"Of course, Davids website linked up at coast to coast, AM dot com. His book alcohol can be a gas. What year? Did you come out with that book? David, I guess that was two thousand and eight I think is when it actually came out started selling like hotcakes, didn't it. Well, because of you, George well, but you wrote it. Yeah. But but we put by phone number on your show and shutdown. Not just our server burnt that. But our whole phone system in Santa Cruz, California shut down because people trying to call us overwhelm the lines. And no one else you get a phone call. It was your fault, George how many people took advantage of building their own little fuel distilleries. Well, hundreds and hundreds I, you know, it's not like they all call me and say, thank you for the buck. But we keep hearing stories from around the world people who've used book to do different alcohol projects and other projects too. Because one of the biggest uses have alcohol turns out to be cooking food house the world that's half of everyone in the world cooks food that each would just been cooked older would indoors. Can you imagine having a campfire in your house and all that smoke? Not good. Well, kill four million. Women ear. We just came back from working with people in Chile, which is a very large indigenous group and every house we went into there was just lots of smoke and carbon on the walls and everybody was cooking with wood. And they are totally wanting to go to alcohol because you know, what's smoke will kill you. If you breathe very long. Well. Chocolat? You know, and and some of them are not so necessarily so obvious like we talk about alcohol for the Kennedy industry being able to extract this stuff healthily is one thing. But most places that we see in California that are growing Kinna have no electricity. If you get on our farm land somewhere, you know, there's a little electricity come into your arm, but these Kanta farms might need mega mega watch power to run all the lights and all that other stuff mpg nieces. Well, maybe we'll get two three four years. So all these Kanter farms are using giant diesel generators. We're talking like eight hundred horsepower generators right to him trysofi run. And now in California diesel was be made illegal because it's so toxic. I mean, we just talked about the ship's a minute ago with diesel. So we're starting to go around to these. Farms in converting their diesel gigantic diesel generators to run on alcohol and have no real emissions. The only comes out the tailpipe is carbon dioxide and water. But as we've just talked about well plant need carbon dioxide, so we can actually put that carbon dioxide into the greenhouse and get double duty out of the alcohol fuel where we get the electricity generator makes and then the exhaust is clean enough to be able to put into the greenhouse helped the plants grow. How did you start in this field? David. We've all done things from where young that we don't talk about it anymore. Really? Well. Back in my youth. When I had an alcohol powered firetruck that I bought some the city of San Francisco. And put a tank on the back and a pump and up in Mendocino. I I had a business where I would pull up to the south road where there was a hose and hook onto it and pump all the water out of my tank, and we'd go somewhere, I don't know where and then I drive off to the next place. You know? So my new business and alcohol working with the Kennedy industry is the same kind of business. I'm not involved in rowing any kind of plants for any kind of use. But what I'm supplying like I did with my fire truck. I've supplying water to guys up the hill. Well, you know, that's hands off kind of vendor. Supplied the business with alcohol. We're doing the same thing alcohol is generators fuel and also carbon dioxide from our firm intention process to be sold to greenhouses, and it can be any greenhouse doesn't have to be candidate can be, you know, a flower greenhouse like I inherited when I bought this land. And you know, the whole thing is complying with you know, the laws of the land, which you know, just now being kinda formulated for Canada. So, you know, everything we do is is about helping those guys not get in trouble. And you know, so I've been at this for a long time, and you know, I've been doing organic farming off and on for thirty years, and you know, that's nothing but regulations and compliance. So you know, we we understand why that's important. We don't complain about it. Because if you do a good job, and you can prove it, which is what compliance is. Then you've got the best customers in the best market. And so we're really happy to see that, you know, this is kind of counterintuitive the FDA and all these places are coming into regulates account of business because it's gonna make it a business that isn't going to cause health problems and bad PR. I mean right early on in the game. They're trying to do the right thing. And so I don't mind supporting that. It's about time to let's go to the phones. Now, let's go to Mike in Cleveland, Ohio to get us started. Hi, mike. Good morning. Good morning. Dave either day, right? A few questions for you. If you could explain to the audience navy about the economics of alcoholics still, I mean for say fifty dollars worth of gasoline. You could still up maybe eight dollars ten dollars per sack sugar explained the benefits an economics of it. Well, sure, what the hell. Awesome. You feel about the FDA station. They after the farmville was signed with the CB being a drug, or is that pretty much settled that you can also you see beneath the nutritional supplement. Okay. Well, I can to. You know, when it comes to the economics of making alcohol in my book, we go over that in detail where you can see exactly how we figure that out. And you know, Georgia's mentioned the books alcohol can be a guess, it's probably at your library. She can look at it. There. And what we show is that if you're using a waste product like well, for instance, I'm using apple pulp from a local, apple juice company. You know, they squeeze it somewhat to get the juice. I take the pulp leftover and I make alcohol from the sugar in that. When I do that. I don't have a price I'm paying for for that actually get paid a little bit to take it away. Now when I make the alcohol from that, my costs are only thirty four cents a gallon. That's all in labor, the cost of my equipment supplies, that's cheaper than the big oil companies. Oh, I'm waiting for them. Big oil. You know, that's that's the thing about alcohol. It's like you can do the right thing and not pay more to do it. You know, when you put it in your car, so thirty four cents a gallon. Well, that means for fuel. I make a pretty nice return on investment without the tax credits, which are also in their which can actually make. Could even cheaper. But you can't count on those every government changes them, and you know, you don't really need tax credits. But the oil companies sure get them, they get five dollars gallon tax credits for gasoline. Now the other question about drugs or supplements. Yeah. You know, it's tricky because the industry really wants to be respected that I'm talking about the Canada industry, and they're happy that is being called a respected drug because it's well-studied, and it is a really good drug, you know, for all kinds of medical problems. Now, of course, that means they're going to get more highly regulated. But I think I've just explained why being regulated it's not a bad thing. I mean, you know, you've got a good product, and you have to charge more for it. Because if your overhead. Nutritional supplements, you know, that's that's a clever way around some of the regulations. And I think there might be conditions under which those claims are gonna work. And I think we have to be open is at a stretch. It's not really a stretch. But it's like, what would it be like, it would be like saying, it would be like saying with if I make alcohol from turmeric, I as, you know, George, I grow a lot of turmeric, I'm the biggest as you know, we are supporters of turmeric, I think it's an amazing anti inflammatory. And I got some talking about my supplying you with our turmeric. But so so if we make whisky out of our turmeric, which is actually going to happen here in two weeks. You know that I can say Martha. I'm only drinking permit disannul purposes. Yes. Right. So it's a it's a stretch. But it would be would have to kernel of truth in it. Next up. We've got Charles and elegant, Texas. Welcome to the program, Charles. Go ahead. Yes, sir. David. I've got a question about the what would the company do help people with set up? Like, I what would be the smallest kind of refineries set up that you could help out with and how much would that you know, kind of sort of a mid range price. All right in that. Yes. He does. He gives plans and everything. Go ahead. David. Yeah. And we actually build equipment now. So since the last time I talked with George where now you're not. You're not supplying that. Now supplying distilleries working put our first one in locally here. And that one is just waiting final investors to release the four million dollar loan from the Bank. We've got the banks all saying, yes, this is a product that we want to loan money on. So the people can go into the business making alcohol and selling it for not just. Fuel. But for instance, the cannabis where we charge seventy five dollars a gallon for pharmaceutical grade, alcohol or the beverage market selling wholesale vodka. You might say with which they flavor and put under their own label for fifty dollars again few. Of course, there's a lot less, but all of it makes money and our equipment is designed to help communities have these additional products, which generate lots of additional jobs and more of a market for local farm production instead of well instead of getting paid for almost nothing for animals. Well, what is the smaller of refineries cost? Our smallest one that we're building is a two hundred and fifty thousand gallons per year which. That's a lot. It's not a lot George. You. Don't think that's a lot for a house tutor and fifty thousand dollars gallons two hundred fifty thousand gallons. Well, think about it George if you use three thousand gallons of fuel year in your life for commuting to work. And maybe let's say I fill up fifteen gallons a week with my car. Well, that's that's seven hundred and fifty plus gallons a year that's not two hundred fifty thousand. No, you're correct. Or is this is a small business size plant. Our biggest one is five million gallons. That's still considered micro by the alcohol industry. The point is if you're making two hundred and fifty thousand gallons a year. You can actually be taking home several million dollars in income. If you're selling it to local bottled spirits, if you're selling it to, you know, pharmaceutical grade companies that need that enter if you're selling fuel if your son all three of those together five million dollars to put into a plant like that would generate eight million dollars a year in profit that's profit. But the smallest one how much does that cost? Somebody know I've million dollars for Leno when we talked earlier David years ago. Yes, we were talking about building little one to create, you know, twenty gallons a week or something like one hundred hundred counts week. Yeah. Little that one is in the book, and you can take the book to your local Welby shopping. They can build you one of that small size. That's something that Charles, for example, would not a problem. But if Charles has, you know, uncle Bob who owns a. Thousand acres, and he can't sell his corn for any kind of real money. And he wants to go ahead and make alcohol and his community to sell at the local gas station. You know? Well, Charles needs a little bigger still. This is what we're talking about. I'm opposed to GMO's to eat. But what do you think of GMO's corn for alcohol purposes? Well, I I'm opposed to GMO's any you are in any funny platform. Well, that's because what it's about our corporations trying to own life. And you know, I don't I'm not, you know, a strongly religious person. But something really offends me about corporations, I think they can patent life. So my only Pat is my one I called the patents to destroy Monsanto. And I the details of that are in my book. But basically, I've made it so that farmers don't need rounded up at all. If they use the byproducts of alcohol fuel, so if you use, but if you use GMO's to make alcohol because the stuff is boiled all the proteins that are in the corn, which is what the GMO. Changes are proteins. They, you know, they're all destroyed. And so there's no problem with using even conventional corn to make alcohol. So it's not really an issue. But there's a lot of other things to make alcohol from, you know, in terms of food processing waste, and you know, and and we're not we're not big fans of corn. Except as thinking of Cornell is basically animal feed and getting the start you out to make alcohol like the alcohol industry does. But really they're better crops. We've been working with sugar beet growers up in the north and they have to sugar in America. Comes from sugar beets sugar cane, you know, so that's half the sugar in the United States is made in America product. Which is a good thing..

David George Charles California Canada Chile FDA Santa Cruz San Francisco Mike America apple rowing Kanter Chocolat Bank
"three four years" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"But we presented the blank contract to Dallas green who was general manager at the time. And we told him to lettuce affecting the team evaluated and give me what you think I'm worth and I'll sign on the dotted line. And he he kind of gave us this this. He he gave. Gave us the speech about he had young players. You had to watch and giving up to an play. And I see that's that's all well and good. But at the time they were about three four years removed from postseason play with pretty much the same team intake. And I just said, you know, I'm going to go to West Palm Beach and do the same thing with the Braves tomorrow, and they actually gay offered me five hundred thousand less than what Montreal was offering in. I understood at the time the offer was for me to refuse. And when I when he called me, and he said, we can do best we can do as five hundred thousand dollars. I said, well, thank you very much. I'll accept it. He got quiet, and I didn't hear anything for about fifteen seconds. And he said can I call you back? I said sure and he called me back. She'll surely about about two hours later, and he said welcome aboard. He said, we're glad to have you. And I knew what it had to do. Of course. They had to clear it with the commission because he wasn't really supposed to make me an awful and what happened after that. And this is so Andre Dawson Stu gods because he just told that story, but he left out kind of the best part my favorite part Andre. I know you're humble, man. You bet on a humble, man. All your what happened was. I actually I went to spring fan. Went back out. There is on it. The next day. They will plan games. Jean Jean-Michel was a manager at the time. He said where are you conditioning wise? I said I'm ready to go. And he said, oh, you need insurance me as a pinch hitter. In the game. I got a base hit to right center field. And he started me the next day. And we get we get through spring training. I get off to a slow start. But that was the year that hit a grand slam home run off. Todd more rail in Saint Louis to win a ball game. And from that point it just you know, started to click day in and day out. And I wanna hit I wanted him VP award. Story. Lebron flop still hopeful about it. But you won the MVP giving the cubs a blank contract. Andre loud to take the whole untried. You know, what I finished runner up twice in Montreal wants to Dale Murphy and wants to Mike Schmidt, and I didn't really think that that's that would be an accolade that I could achieve playing across the border. And I still felt my better years were head of me. And it just so happened at the best year of my career happen to be in Asia. So happened so happened the right hawk always good talking to you the hall of Famer Andre Dawson. Thank you for making time for a, sir. Oh, it's not pledge. You guys. This show aim free time.

Andre Dawson Braves Jean Jean-Michel Montreal general manager Mike Schmidt Dallas Asia West Palm Beach Todd Lebron cubs MVP VP Saint Louis Dale Murphy five hundred thousand dollars three four years fifteen seconds
"three four years" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

"Thought. I remember that match vividly. I was actually home on on TV. And I remember seeing I was like holy shit. He up it's going to be strange always want to ask you this question. I know you were not happy about you pissed off. And of course, later the situation with on that happened the accident and living life. Kan city. We're your here. What were you thinking the nights they had tribute? And you went out and coast. Got up on the term Bucko any kind of strange like victim, motions or anything like that. I know strange question. Awesome thought. You know, wasn't good. Got it. On his head. He ain't in what was going through your head at that point. Do there was a what three four years removed? Yeah. I was I was angry initially got dropped on my head. You know, fuck I'm sitting in the house and. Into your delta just on fire on fire just because the nerves and finally that kind of subsided into hitch finally hired, hyper still hyper sensitive from waist down, hyper reflexive, I should say as I still get your logical. Thanks for that. But by going up to enter question going out that night now that was a strange night because at Saint Louis crown the accident happened and kipper engages city, and then we're gonna kill center and Saint Louis for Monday night role. And it was weird. The thing that was weird about it. Because there were some people that were going to wrestle Semaj goes completely voluntary. Do nobody wanted to work because of what just happened Owen? When sale I was in at a back part of the dresser. Because I was working with undertaker that night. We were sitting there talking about the match comes. Here comes the word, dude. He just fell and someone's at Amen a witch dead. What the the boy say you ribbon? You know that? That's that's that. Wouldn't you? Sure. Enough, man. He was gone. So do would this pay per view. So vents, you know, he's man he makes to call the show must go on. So we didn't show. I remember what undertaker and identity at match if it was a good mother add match, whatever I don't remember the match going to an end you go home, you're processing while we're on a road. But you go back to your hotel room you process and everything regardless of weather. You dropped me on the head or not to be still like the guy. I didn't think he was funny as it used to be but shit. I did I did he was Owen. You couldn't hate on. It. And everybody loved it because we be walking through the day of airport. You know, and he would say something or do something at Landes just to pop everybody. We're rated lettering. Oh, yeah. So in like, you said non drinker, no pills. No, nothing. Just use the absolute Saint of a husband on the road. So going back to Saint Louis, and they said, hey, Steve, here's what we like to do go out and do a toast, and I'm like. Y'all do it. But the thing, but they go back to might. I keep hesitating the thing that was so discombobulating about that night. Duke was the crowd reaction. They were obviously, many of very very sad that someone had been killed the night before but many of them there wanted to see a wrestling show full of all the bells whistles in stuff like that. So there was kind of some mixed reactions out there. Sure, everybody was Ellen had died, but also had anticipated or expected to get razzle dazzle Monday night, raw raw is war show, and it so it was kind of a weird deal going on with that with the vibe. That crown I'm not saying they were eighteen thousand people who were inconsiderate or and sensitive. It was a mixed feeling. So like when I went up there did think it was just like. About as much respect as I do when out there and. And said whenever I said to myself. It wasn't no, Mike. I just went up there. The beers for him should've went out to water because you know, what never drank a beer. There was no animals to do. It was just a weird. Erie feeling because you know, you just lost one your brothers, and when you're into business or like Hilliker have been a bunch of guys working on a highway patrol when you're in your inner circle when he when you butts goes down like that, you never went that nobody..

Owen Saint Louis Mike Ellen Semaj Erie Duke Landes Steve three four years
Sacha Baron Cohen announces new show, "Who is America?"

Mark Levin

04:21 min | 2 years ago

Sacha Baron Cohen announces new show, "Who is America?"

"Knows that she does that yeah now she doesn't know there's no self awareness in that family whatsoever maybe chelsea will run i mean she is not yet thrown her hat in the ring that would be awesome it'd be so great ladies says you know i hate the bushes rob everything about them hang me you like not one everything about them right not even like barbara barbara at all the national debt i kind of feel like she was a nice lady yeah run on illegal immigration all right what's your point the biggest reason perhaps though dick cheney and once again we'd like to keeney watch yourself because 'cause daisy would give him a lap dance yeah i like to i like him and she said on numerous occasions numerous there may have been alcohol involved but i really like dick cheney is you could literally kill that man as weak as his heart is how do you know that picnic be just a jolt he needs a little bit of adrenaline once again dick cheney is not let me down from vulture in case you were wondering if sasha baron cohen still got it the comedians new trump skewering showtime series for crying just all we need another trump's skewering series which appears to be titled who is america just dropped a new promo in which is still yet to be unseen journalists character asked former vice president dick cheney decide a waterboarding kit which cheney does with a smile take a listen is it possible to sign my water bowl that's i i i'm ever assigned a waterbird what a jerk wait wait wait wait what what did he even size got this joe they used to water board people and shady signs it on camera okay we'll so don't understand why why are you so upset about this rob people hate this country because of waterboarding and whether you're not you don't mock it while they're still a war on terror zero problem with their problem with that either i don't know why you're sad sad about hilarious yeah i think it's kind of funny to such a jerk offers so much crap are you feeling sorry for terrorists right but i'm saying the bushes or so bad and so many people died needlessly because of the bush's feel sorry for terrorists waterboarded right the city here you're upset because terrorists get waterboarded we're about ready to like get your getting upset about that right now on the show i don't have to explain right show do something good better move on long dad was super tweedy over the weekend for tweety counselor record pace will that include the failing new york times robert in the machine amazon the washington post quoted anonymously sources that in my opinion dopey out of business seven years about that that was so specific seven business and seven years six point three four years.

Chelsea Barbara Barbara Dick Cheney Sasha Baron Cohen JOE Bush Washington Post Keeney Showtime America Vice President York Amazon Seven Years Three Four Years
"three four years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"On six eight yep we're good sports the giants in denver mile high i two three four years that fourth of july game by the way daytime till to what announce evening tilts or thought you had to have a rule stupid fireworks see fireworks on the fourth of july not when you live in san francisco you just hear this the fog turns various shades of light blue and light red yeah yeah in short season ball i you're pro ball we're in eugene oregon and they played like a five or six o'clock game on fourth of july and it's like the stupidest thing because the northwest yeah right so daytime show we had a one nothing game in the seventh inning and it was an hour and ten minutes in say let's have dinnertime fireworks bright blue sky that the lights that were on you know because they just you know put them on just early went out trysofi went out of the stadium for two and a half hours and then we waited we got her ass kicked after that in the marketing bay state miners i it was there i sell out of the year that's awesome but yeah for people love the brother brazil just peppering the goal but if yet to find the net and if you wonder why why cuckoo is a non were yet to hook up with him we will momentarily anderson verragio we have no the goalie for mexican us definitely look how an aid for anderson berisha copes you wanna help me out here but we're just waiting for him to check in with us we got back a little early thirty five usually when we get him so it's one of those light holiday week holiday weeks right by the way speaking of holiday week paulie mac back thursday and you know it was in kate scott looking forward having kayden what a fun fun filling that'll be not that any more fun you know me with kate she's the best so yeah you guys you guys have a good thing going yeah and you have a good thing always that's your guy of course but you know what i don't you ever feel for though because they cover the team and look they tell a great story no matter what but you go off last year and how dismal the season was but the energy and excitement that kyp in k both had right but it kind of war on them and it's like seeing this success not only is good for the fans for the broadcasters let's put it this way the first winning month into damn good wendy month because it wasn't like it was just face when eighteen and ten some sloppy there they are right now better record winning percentage of five twenty nine better record than both the cardinals and the washington nationals now i will say this course field they've lost eleven hundred thirteen there so it's been a house of horrors you going bumgarner tonight against kyle freeland and that'll be fun to watch and then on wednesday you're going with very very iffy chris stratton barbie tuesday and then wednesday on fourth of july it's andy suarez is this the first time that we've seen in a long time though a legit defensive outfield for them with mccutchen gore keys and slater covering that ground in chorus field i hope so you like the way mckesson playing right i mean it's a lot better than hunter i mean i might to take any slights against hunter on that whole thing what are the what are the advanced metrics tell you about my coaches defense hey coves i would big metric guy because the metrics have the metrics don't really favor brandon crawford well they don't do anyway listen we got the hook has been made with my crew on the guest line so mike it is great.

giants denver two three four years ten minutes
"three four years" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"The company's both big and small to pull from so they bring the people here originally there looking around the world to recruit employee's they bring them to seattle they might work here for two at amazon for two three four years and then over time they get poached by the startups or go start their own business or in a lot of cases go work for facebook or google or microsoft or twitter or salesforce or you know all of the more than one hundred other companies that are here and that's where i think a little bit of this falls apart is that yes there is a trickle down impact on the startup community and it might make it easier somewhat for them to hire but you've seen such an explosion of everything else here that i think frankly facebook and google might benefit more than your average startup for amazon not growing fast way more depth now than there was in the boeing days if that's what you're saying right no signs about turning out the lights when amazon leaves brace there's a lot more your and what's fascinating all this is cities around the country would kill kill for this the problem and this is like the depth of the economy the all these dynamic innovative companies being here you know this is what they would kill for but what was interesting to keep going back to glenn kelman's post i learned so much from it his he's his point was that the real issue here is not these high paying jobs with the head tax two hundred seventy five a year that makes companies question the entry level jobs the service jobs you know the things that are actually going to get people out of homelessness or help them afford houses on the lower end of the economic spectrum it's such a complex issue yeah that's an argument that's been made not just by kelman but the idea is that two hundred seventy five a year per employee is very small fraction of the salary of software engineer which might be a hundred thirty thousand of the year but it's a much higher percentage of the salary of somebody who works in the mail room but at the end of the day it's corporations responsibility to make those decisions it's the city government's responsibility to set a regulatory endure.

amazon facebook software engineer seattle google microsoft twitter boeing glenn kelman two three four years
"three four years" Discussed on The New Media Show (Audio)

The New Media Show (Audio)

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on The New Media Show (Audio)

"How long did they last maybe three or four years three four years right before they burn through the their money so it's just a lot of people with money that are coming up with you know it's okay i'm it's fun fun to watch as well it's it's it's going to keep pushing the medium forward i you know at the end of the day we're all still trying to address the core issue and that's scaling this medium on android right and i know i mean you've been trying to do that for a while now and the recent you know kind of news that came out a little bit about google was was interesting and that's that's a good good development but certainly not the solution and some of it was in new some of was rehashing stuff was already in place yeah and we probably don't have to rehash it again we we asked it already yeah so so anyway i think it's good in i know you probably keep hearing from people kicking tires out there looking to invest in stuff but that's that's what i'm hearing too is that there's definitely renewed interest in and you know venture capitalists or whoever out there looking for investments looking for high equity stakes for relatively low dollars i would imagine maybe that was the case somewhat with some of these new companies that we're seeing in the scene right now too i know that there's a lot of people talking a lot of people wanna sign in the as but i'm going to be frank there's well there there's a lot of money floating around the space right now and people looking to do some land grabs so you know in going through that hole in this in that that that something and the podcasting business side we don't talk too much it's expensive to do these just to have a talk with the company about money acquisition opening your books the just the lawyer up of all the stuff that has to happen to you know to make sure data remain secure if if something doesn't progress it's it's a it's a major pain in it and it can be a distraction too so you know because you have to you know it's.

google three four years four years
"three four years" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"Yeah absolutely so it's complete access i mean to be honest and and by the way there's someone outside the doors using like a soft so i i cut off that's why but no i you know i went to to college political science and and sort of went into the corporate world after that but it just you know creatively wasn't there for me it was torture to to get off and do the big thing and be there every day and i want to be more creative with what i was doing so i started this believe bill this video and start writing songs and that's what my thoughts do i started to write songs and play shows around boston and as you can imagine the money it's different right when you're starting to write songs versus you know a job in the financial in the first video put out was kind of like excellent it was a promise to myself like eddie yeah this sucks man but don't back to that you know sit with it in what's the worst that can happen i believe i wouldn't let myself in three four years down the road here we go that's a very cool so were you we your music career will you were you try to what we're trying to do with your music where you're trying to do anything specific or was kind of more for fun sort of exploring really so i did a lot of like singersongwriter stuff with an acoustic it's hard but hinted you know the first two years of this channel you will then i mean i composed most background music myself calm in it allow me to kind of take what i loved to do just do different way you know and that's what it was it was about a year of blogging writing music just putting it all out there seeing what stop are you editing some of the stuff yourself.

boston eddie three four years two years
"three four years" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"And it's something everybody should read so when you hear these people out there telling you that a bulwark is an annuity shop you know the truth or not we use them as a fixed into income alternative bond alternative and when you hear them tell you how bad they are and i can't tell you go talk to the all the advisory firms including the ones that currently manage your money bring them up they're going to tell you their high fees or this they don't know what they're talking about and so what i'd like to tell you as rather than taking it from me just a voice on the radio who do you think knows more about this roger edison who studied with milton friedman and runs a billion dollar hedge fund and founded the zebra index and blah professor of economics and finance yale or the local edward jones guy and no knock on average owns or any firm but i'm just saying these guys who were telling you these are horrible when you're bond portfolio's leaking oil two three four years from now they're going to bring them up sheepishly right that's when they're going to tell you this change is going to happen we just happened to be ahead of the curve for the grace of god and i know it's not a popular word the the gentleman the people that i said yesterday great people but they said you know you're pretty brave talked about that on the radio i said why is that and they go it's toxic every go they tell you how bad they are and i said you know what honestly i believe that's our job right just like it was to unveil the whole volatility issue and expose that.

roger edison milton friedman professor of economics edward jones two three four years billion dollar milton
"three four years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You'll be searching for in the next two three four years of our trilliondollar budgets for a third narrow this the such fiscal stimulus this late in the economic cycle i'm like everybody has been has been discussing i mean not only did we see of course the big tax bill that was passed and signed into law on december but you know what you just saw was this very significant two spending deal that's going to add you know twenty to thirty basis points to two real real gdp growth on an over that over the next few years so a lot of fiscal stimulus it a lot of fiscal impulse coming out of washington i think the the big question of course is this just a sugar high is this just going to add in short term to nominal growth or does this really contribute to productivity and and what have you and lead to more sustainable real brooklyn i think that's the big that's the big march the question for my own part john was in the american analysis i go to the plugins what's the gdp plugin that we just heard from michael too how do you plug that into this analysis i want to understand what ladies token to the pm's at pin come about right now because we kotto a mock hazel yesterday libya of course someone you know while he heads credit global credit overcame can your taping him for the real we we know this has already happened and he's basically saying we're not on the white treasuries anymore we put onto white for wanna wish shifted so it makes me wanda the policy that we hear about on the worries that a lot of people have on the street at the moment lippi as the deficit getting out a truck control and the government the struggles to finance itself i sent from you guys that that's not a worry for you or or other than just exactly right right i think we.

washington john libya lippi michael two three four years trilliondollar
"three four years" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on WEEI

"He has transcended his position um and i think it really chalked up to three different things um one we know we talented he trains very well he's very disciplined he is also in a great opportunity and a great situation they've got a great system great coaching everybody's proven that and because of that opportunity he's able to take advantage of what he does best he doesn't have to be physically better and all of the quarterbacks that have come before him that have not made it is oldest m in my eyes he's working smart or not harder he's learning more and doing better you can see a leader in games later in his career that stops him from having to be as physical or repetitive he's he's making his way through and learning more and i don't know why any of the writers or or any of the uh of the folks that are that are analysing him haven't come up with this theory which is the fact is that nobody done what he's done because nobody as good as the ion or okay i would agree with that but i also think we're we're dealing with the changing society i the drew brees if you watched in this past year easily when you younger than some brady drew brees plane in the three four years yeah absolutely slice so the the training is different houses training i don't know but you know a lot of what do you think british we don't be shy to fail gumbo what do you think reforms training for no i know i know residents so so he played late in his career is pretty good late is career i think the difference is whether you still want to do we've talked about this last couple of days got all the money and we hit a will you don't really need you want to do you know one word and i think the you and i'm sure drew brees the same way discipline in on i think that that comes down nothing drew brees is not therapies do an avocado ice cream or t b twelve or greens and everything else and stay away from they but i can guarantee that up there killing himself either what are.

brees brady three four years
"three four years" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"Deacon what's up man extra joining me will show today pay ryan the glad to be here thanks for having me i've been following you since the early days of my podcasting journey which was a lot of guys think it's two and a half years it's not it's more like three and a half years because i actually had a financial advisory podcast which is where igf millier with your work about three four years ago that's awesome yeah remember you had i think it was wealth anatomy that's what it is yes absolutely a glad that we can connect on here it's been a long time coming yeah and i think we met at fim con if i remember correctly too so pretty cool to be having this conversation yeah i love income in i definitely think we met there was that community has changed my life so and i'm sure just like order men exchange a lot of these guys lies will i'm amazed it how open the financial advisory community is when you're talking about do stuff online and writing books in podcasting everything like that because in the traditional financial advisory practice that i own than i still own it's a little bit more guarded and i've noticed it's a lot more open with what you guys are doing so i appreciate that of you in the movement for sure yeah and i think that's what it's pounced about transparency right it's like we don't want to hide things i want to help people understand how they can get to where they want to be in life right so i think you're right though it's definitely transition over the years we'll let's get into this conversation retirement is kind of a while to buzzword and we hear it and i think it has so many definitions i've heard guys say you know i retired when i was twenty that doesn't relate to mean retirement just means they stepped away from their job and did something that they wanted to do so i think there's a lot of definitions of retirement so help me understand the context in the framework for the rest of the discussion today when i talk about retirement what i'm talking about is being able to have the financial resources to do what you want when you want to the ideas like you said for these people are in our 20s it's.

ryan three four years
"three four years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"I want to play for you the full interview with samuel cohen the inventor of the neutron bomb i gave me a twominute three minutes snippet of it it's amazing to listen to it i'm bubbling oval with desire to tell you more about this that i can at the moment because my heart is actually pounding in my in my throat ever since i've been a little boy remember to the age of five i feel a nuclear war and i remember when it happened it's was driven me most of my life i don't know if you notice i may have said this once and twenty somewhat years i was a little kid in the streets of the bronx and our member picking up a rag a newspaper blowing in the wind and the headline in the newspaper showed how was i got only would hold i was a kid i guess it showed a mushroom cloud and japan or something like that i must have been a really little kid and i wrote remember picking it up and running through the streets screaming the world is coming to an end i ran up and down 'longfellow avenue 'longfellow the poet little cannot was a couple of years or how kirby i was with three four years old i saw the nuke the the mushroom cloud iran with the newspaper that was blown in the street screaming the world is coming to an end the world is so they thought i was crazy all of the poor people in they bowed my mother must have been very embarrassed for me little did she noted the bible had said that your children will prophesized or something that expect your old men will dream dreams and your children will prophesized she didn't know that piece of the bible but i saw it and i feared any drove me most of my life drove me to the furthest corners of the earth you don't know this one of the things that drove me to the fiji islands to samoa tonga denmark as us looking for healing plants was i was always looking for a refuge from what i thought was the coming the clear war i know this is crazy to most of you it's not real you'll live in a different bubble different world a different a different atrium a reality i.

samuel cohen iran denmark japan longfellow avenue 'longfellow kirby tonga three four years three minutes twominute
"three four years" Discussed on The Basketball Analogy

The Basketball Analogy

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on The Basketball Analogy

"When uninterrupted and that to me is what i'm enjoying it is thereby once in a while like i don't want to watch dominance basketball for three four years in a row maybe we have to but to watch this one team on this one exhibition like idol like the fact of the trapeze artist isn't gonna fall off into the grand canyon to me dozen like doesn't negate what they're doing and i'm actually thoroughly enjoying it i mean i do miss the sus the absolute suspense that comes with these are really two good teams and we don't know who's going to win but as sheer basketball exhibition i can deal with this every couple of years i really can it's it's fantastic to watch it's just the game at its purest form it sort of the platonic ideal of pro basketball and like i'm going to complain about this this is the sport we love and they still the best it's ever been played lightning how can i as it relates right but they're they're greatness has created stakes at a value what would mix things important you know wh what were elevates would duran did last night is the stakes and in this case you know the theory than hang in the balance a guy like it was to to the winner game five you know what have the edge at a late in the series of you know at this didn't drastically alter maybe the course of this series but again it it it put them in a position prehistory so that was a sticks of so so everything that they had accomplished up to this point made last night more significant and that's what the lawyers have done and i applaud them for four.

basketball duran three four years
"three four years" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on WEEI

"Of the best quarterbacks in out there were gone over this chapter he say the tell you where you for quarterback so you could draft a quarterback have under control of the rookie contract four years have them play behind a brady four three four years if it's sam donald so am donald he comes here he is much more touted the garoppolo every was an all these experts the same already nfl's mahedco check thinks he's better than garoppolo nikolai i asked for this month ago if you put garage if you put bocek in a room and he watch they'll much somebody had like of rosen of a of a darnell lamar jackson i mean you throw in these four or five cubans by supposed to go in the first round and said do you think any of them can do what you need done and play quarterback for you and takeover tom brady told it's a no no i don't know if it's a noone up and say this guy might not be is good for what we do as garoppolo is now regarded are supposed to be like a superstar in his foreign taught so let me ask you a question why would cleveland trade donald because they need a quarterback now they knew might because of you jackson job security as as work because just the opposite they're the bride's maker bill trade because of their head coach jobs they need to it they wanted us the bears did buy undressed i do trading the mitch trubisky because they wanted win donald's not ready they tried to get mature bisky to win this year is this year yes to win this year yet having a really good yes yes it's better again yes yes you'll be happy to go to and fourteen if he's good they don't care about it but here's the thing a jail there now trey here's why trade.

sam donald nfl rosen mitch trubisky tom brady cleveland four three four years four years
"three four years" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"three four years" Discussed on The Renegade Republican with Dan Bongino

"We're there's there's no way and this is going to make a punished sense i promise you but i discuss this way on msnbc in regards to the sochi russia olympics what was at three four years i don't even remember i discuss this problem how this secure zones are going to get bummed out now now now now the terrorists are going to take advantages so i got a bunch of get let's get right to today's show brought to you by our friends at purge gold group love these guys because i'm in this ability in my retirement folks stock markets hitting new highs daily that's great but the question a lot of people are wondering how do i protect my hardearned savings when the market negatively dips unfortunately it always does what happens when china calls in the debt folks what happens when inflation starts to explode and get out of control something of warned about on the show frequently you know you can make two three four percent stock market five percent but of inflations six and seven percent i got news for you you're losing money easy monetary policy by the federal reserve big problem right now the company i trust with precious metal purchases i have some silver right in front of me actually is birch go group they self physical precious metal euro possession in the ship it right to your front door we ask them to and right now thanks to a little known ir eight sheasby irs tax law you could move your ira or eligible for when caved when ira backed by physical gold and silver that's the real deal perfect for those you wanna mature your hardearned retirement savings are protected from the ravages of inflation here's regime by the way this company is a plus rated by the better business bureau look it up among the among messing with your go look it up on google yourself and has countless fivestar views these guys are the real deal.

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